Collection Title: Merthyr Pioneer

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
6 articles on this page
MISS KIERNAN SACRIFICED

MISS KIERNAN "SACRIFICED." Dowlais School Dispute "Settlement." Local Authority Discuss Report. Caustic Comments by Members. The special meeting of the Mer- thyr Education Authority, held on Tuesday, to receive and consider the report of the negotiations relating to the dispute at the Dowlais R.C. School, was characterised by several breezy interludes," the chairman, Ooun. J. Harpur, having considerable difficulty in preserving the ordinary dignities of debate amongst the mem- bers. Coun. D. Davies explained that be- cause Canon Lucan would not agree to carry out the Act, he would not agree with certain suggested terms of settlement. Coun. Francis said that if the Sub- Committee had known, they would naturally have made some exception. Ooun. D. W. Jones: It means that the majority of the Committee agreed on a certain matter. It does not mean that each member agreed. Ooun. Davies is quite in order in ask- ing that we should place on record in our own minutes that he did not agree with this. » Ald. Dan Thomas: Another lovely instance of Jesuitical manoeuvring (Laughter.) Coun. D. Davies: I am not preju- diced. If he would carry out the Act as he should do, I would have agreed to it. Coun. H. Owen: The Canon is quite prepared to carry out the Act. (Interruption.) I have the right to speak. I am not the mouthpiece of Canon Lucan or anyone else. Ald. Dan Thomas: It looks very much like it. Coun. Owen: I fear no man. not even Ald. Thomas. Chairman: Order. Is it under- stood that we allow this. that Coun. Davies disapproved at the managers' meeting of the suggested terms of settlement be inserted in the minutes ? The suggestion was agreed to. Maintenance of the School. I Aid. Hankey said it seemed to him that it was rather futile to go into the terms of the agreement then, as they had no authority. It was sug- gested in the report that unless the Foundation Managers move in the direction of peace, there is only one course open to it, viz., that of ceasing to maintain the School." He respectfully suggested that they should consider that. His opinion wa.s that they should, after a reason- ble time, give notice that they (the Authority) should refuse to maintain the School. Ooun. H. Owen (representative manager) complained that certain letters were omitted from the report and referred to one received from the Board of Education on the 24 November, 1914. He would like to know why it had not been included in that report, particularly as it dea.lt with the same thing as a letter which appeared on page 6. The re- port should be a fair one, he said, but this was one-sidled. Chairman: It is not one-sided, Ooun. Owen. Mr. Rhys Elias (Director of Educa- tion) Coun. Owen was a member of the sub-committee, and he never brought this forward then. Coun. H. Owen: I told you that I was going to criticise. Now there is another omission on page 4. Parag- raph 49 of the Inquiry report is omit- ted. Director: There are many parag- raphs ommitted. Coun. Owen: There is no reason whatever why this should be a one- sided report. Ald. D. Thomas: I rise to a point of order. Coun. Owen- Coun. Owen: I repeat it, sir. It is a one-sided report. Aid. D. Thomas: 1 have heard you say so. You need not repeat it. Did Coun. Owen make any protest what- ever at thfe sub-committees? It seems to me he has come here with a special He Was at every meet- special brief. He was at every meet- ing. Chairman: The only thing lie ob- jected to was paragraph 11. He ob- jected to nothing else. Director: When draft copies were submitted to the sub-committee Coun. Owen found no fault with the report so far as the narrative is concerned. Whether it is a good or indifferent one, he had the opportunity to criti- cise the report before to-night. I am chiefly responsible for the report. If he had raised these matters at the sub-committee, I should have sub- mitted them to the committee. But in no single instance did he find fault with the narrative, with the excep- tion of Paragraph 11. Aid. Dan Thomas: He had not bern instructed then. Coun. D. W. Jones: In this narra- tive we only started with the letters of this year, Clearly it would not havo been fair to put. any one in without the whoJe of the correspondence. I am extremely grieved to hear it said that is a one-sided and unfair re- port. Coun. Owen did not express that view at any of our meetings. He only objected to Paragraph 11. He deprecated any criticism of the Board, but the Committee thought the Board of Education to blame in the manner in which they had treated the matter. Ald. R. P. Rees: I find another inaccuracy on page 4, where it says that "it is believed that no manag- ers' meetings were held, and the controlling policy was solely in the hands of the Correspondent." There were 18 meetings held durng that time. Coun. D. W. Jones: They are not recorded in the minute book. Ald. Dan Thomas: These records are not shown in your minute book. Perhaps Aid. Rees will say where the meetings were held. Coun. D. W. Jones: The minute book was produced at one of the in- quiries. There was no record of those meetings. Coun. D. Davies: There were no administrative meetings for ten months. "High and Mighty." Coun. H. Owen: I hope you will alter this report before you send it out to the public. This report is not to come here, and we must accept it as it is. I understand that Canon Lucan and the managers at a certain period resolved themselves into a sub-committee, and that Coun. Davies was invited to be a member of that sub-committee. Ald. Dan- Thomas: I should like to know the authority for Coun. Owen's statement when he says" I under- stand." Coun. Owen only came into the matter late in the day, but he seems to have become high and mighty. Coun. Owen: I am not going to be bullied by you or anyone else. Ald. Thomas: Let's have tho truth 'then. Coun. Owen: You won't listen. Ald. D. Thomas: I don't come from Cardigan. Ooun. D. Davies: Let's have the truth, anyhow. Aid. Rees: I moved that Coun. Davies be a member of that sub- committee (of the managers). Coun. D. Davies: I have no recol- lection of that. Coun. F. A Phillips: I take it that the committee have met, and did the best they could to bring out this report. Silent Supporter of the Canon." Ald. R. P. Rees: We want an ac- curate report Cmairman It is a remarkable thing that these things were never referred to before. Ald. Rees is talking of things now which he has never mentioned at our Education Committees. Ald. Rees: There was no occasion. Chairman: It is the truth that we could not get a word from Ald. Rees at our meetings. CoUll. D. W. Jones: No. He has been a silent supporter of Canon Lucan throughout. Ald. R. P. Rees: What I have done is what I have thought right. Mayor: Is it not the best way out to adjourn the meetings and ask members to send in their objections in writing? Pressure on the Government. U,ouii. f,'rane.Is seconded Aid. Han- key's motion that the report be ad- opted. Members of the sub-committee, he said, had spent a considerable am- ount of time and labour to come to a fair finding and report. There had been no personal feeling at all. He was simply astounded at the position taken by Coun. Owen. The report was drafted, then printed, and sent to the members, and with the exception of the paragraph named Coun. Owen made no objection. Since then he seem to have obtained a lot of iu- formation whiQh lie did not have at that time, and which he wants to embody in that report. To be consis- tent with themselves, they should ap- prove of this report unless ample reason was adduced for not doing so. The Information in tho report would give the public some idea as to how the authority had been dealing with this matter. So far as the question of dismissal was concerned, the Board had upheld the authority's right of dismissal. Even the Board of Edu- cation. in order to save the face of the Government, tried everything they possibly could to bring pressure to bear on this young lady to resign. To a very large extent the Irish par- ty and the clerical party brought tre- mendous pressure to bear on the Government, and they came down here and said, in effect, I Somebody has to be sacrified, or we will throw the Government out of power." As an embodiment of the Catholic Church Canon Lucan-- Coun. D. W. Jones: I don't think we should introduce politics or religi- on into the discussion. Sacrificed. Coun. Francis: If the people in London had not done so, I should not have referred to it. Here you have a man who, by virtue of his position, should have protected this young lady, but simply because she was not amenable to his dictates, she has been sacrificed. It is not a credit to him. I attended the School Committees when the parents stated that they would not send their children to the school until s he was dismissed. I say this authority has never gone out of its way to harm a child of any Roman Catholic. We are, and have been prepared to give them the best edu- cation we could, and if we had had the assistance of the managers, and particularly Canon Lucan, we should not have reached the position we have. Ald. Hankey: We do know that pressure exists, and that we have done our best to find a way out. I do suggest that the authority, having done all it possibly can to endeavour to settle it, give notice that it will decline to maintain the school. Chairman: I think we should ap- prove or reject this report first. Ald. Hankey: It seems to me that we shall do it some time or another. I Lamentations." Ooun. Owen: I take exception to the top paragraph on Page 5 (refers to the assault on a scholar by Can- non Lucan.") That pupil Barrett, it is well-known, was only- Town Clerk As that is sub judice. it is before the courts now, I don't think it is a proper tiling to publicly discuss it new. Coun. Owen: I thought it would serve the authority better to bring an indictment against those who Chairman: Order, Coun. Owen. Coun. Owen: This is nothing more or less than a chapter from the Book of Lamentations. The authority has been beaten up and down. I object to that paragraph. Coun. Francis: You have no right as a member of tho sub-committee to do that. Coun. Owen: I told you that I would take an opportunity of criti- cising when the report was presented. Coun. D. Davies: You have been briefed since then. A SCENE. Coun. Owen: I take it, sir, as a sweet narrative, as I told you be- fore. I was not conversant with all the letters then. This is a concocted report. (Uproar.) Mayor: I object to Ooun. Owen saying this is a concocted report. He should withdraw that remark. Coun. Owen: There are omissions. Aid. D. Thomas: Then they cannot be called concoctions. Coun. D. W. Jones: I want to sup- port the Mayor here. I think that any member who charges his fellow-mem- bers with concocting is very unfair. I think he should withdraw it or fully substantiate it. Ald. D. Thomas: Coun. Owen is a very versatile gentleman. I know him before to-day. He is versatile ia con- coctions. Let us have a withdrawal. Coun. Owen: Talk about creden- tials. My credentials are as good as Ald. Thomas'. I am prepared to put them on this table with yours any day. Aid. Thomas: Your concoctions are no good here. Chairman: I must ask you to with- draw the word concocted," Coun. I Owen. Ooun. Owen: I am not going to withdraw it. Chairman: Then sit down, please. Aid. Thomas: You are a tt concoct- ed" gentleman, Coun. Owen. (Laugh- ter.) Coun. Owen: If you are not care- ful with that tongue of yours, you will be concocted before you leave here. Ald. D. Thomas: Another empty threat 1 Ald. C. Griffiths: Call in the police. Coun. F. A. Phillips: If we are going to discuss this, let us do it quietly. I feel that if Ald. Rees, who was a member of the managers, has anything to say against the report, he should say so now. Chairman I shallbe glad to hear. Aid. Griffiths: When I said some- thing regarding Coun. Owen, I was asked to withdraw, and I think he should withdraw that remark. Chairman: I quite agree with that. I have asked him, and he refused. Ald. R. P. Rees then complained that a certain letter was not put in its proper place according to the date of other letters. The Director explained that al- though it may seem "chronologically wrong it w,4s logically right," as the letter was written some time before. Finally the report was adopted with but two dissentients—Aid. R. P. Rees and Coun. Owen. I Coun. Owen Withdraws Concoc- tions." Coun. D. W. Jones again appealed to Coun. Owen to withdraw his re- mark. It may be a biassed report in Ooun. Owen's opinion, but no one knew better than he that "concoct- ed" was an unwarranted description. Coun. Owen: I am quite prepared to. withdraw the remark in accordance with the suggestion of Coun. Jones, and to substitute the word "biassed." Ooun. William Jones expressed the hope that the Press would publish the report fully as it stood. The commit- tee had been condemned by some people who had not fully understood the matter, for doing something which they said was not right. Aid. Hankey: What will happen next? Will this be put in the min- utes and brought up at the next com- mittee ? Chairman: Yes, and there will be a report from the sub-committee re- garding the payment of the teachers' salaries. Coun. Owen: Will the omissions be in the report? Aid. D. Thomas: No. They can bring up a supplementary report at their own expense. I think we should have a few extra hundred copies of this report printed, say 500 or 1,000, and be kept at the Director's Office for the public to obtain. Coun. Owen: As a ratepayer I ob- ject to that. Aid. D. Thomas: I want to circu- late them in the Park Ward. (Laugh- ter.) Coun. Parry: If this report is pub- lished, the public will have access to the truth. Effective Control or- Coun. Morrell: We are in exactly the same position now as we were prior to the negotiations taking place. We have to make our control effect- ive or decline to maintain the school. Coun. D. W. Jones: Ald. Hankey means, I take it, that we should fol- low up the letter of the 6th March. I think we should do so to-day. Chairman If it is the wish of the Committee, I agree. Coun. F. A. Phillips: Is it in order to do that to-day? Ald. D. Thomas: Certainly. We can act upon the report. Coun. D. W. Jones: Can we not pass a resolution instructing the Di- rector to proceed with the policy laid down in the letter of March 6? That would be the proper course. Town Clerk: I think you should take a little time to consider it. If a a notice of motion was given by Ald. Hankey, it would, I think, strengthen the hands of the Committee. Coun. Morrell: Are we not perfect- ly in order this evening to adopt any course we wish. It seems to me that we should know our own minds now. Town Clerk You are in order, but I think we should make the matter stronger if notice of motion is given. This was agreed upon, and Ald. Hankey gave notice that he would move a resolution regarding the maintenance of the school at the next meeting of the Committee. [Sub-Committee's Report on page 7]

1The Palace

The Palace. An exceptionally attractive prog- ramme is provided by the Manager (Mr. Hall-Jones) for his numerous patrons For this week's enjoyment, there is a remarkable drama, The! Price of Discipline." The story of a father's severe treatment and the re- sult, which raises the question of how far discipline may be exercised, with due regard to the future welfare of children. A thrilling and exciting drama is provided in "The Fight to the Death." A Cleek mystery drama is aJso to be shown, The Mystery of the Glass Tubes," by the Edison Co. Another good draana is The Phantom Cracksman." "Kidding the Boss and Her Last Chance will provide considerable amusement. Monday next, being a holiday, spe- cial attractions have been arranged —which include a fine exclusive dra- ma, "A Woman's Martyrdom," in which appear two well-known .French artistes, Messrs. Ravet and Garry, and the greart child actress, Maria Fromet. The story has a military touch, which makes it of special inte- rest. That remarkable comedian, Charles Chaplin, who has become so world-renowned, will be seen in a new comedy. He is so excruciatingly funny that everybody is bound to laugh at his amusing antics. He has just insured his feet for £ 30,000, for he says his feet are his fortune; in fact, it is his feet that have put him on his feet. For a good laugh, which is better than medicine, take Shakes- peare's advice, Throw physic to the dogs." and see Chaplin at the Pal- ace. Monday is also Empire Day, and some special pictures will be shown. On Monday and Tuesday the Palace will be open at 11 a.m., continuing until 10.30. The children will be hav- ing a holiday; take them in the mor- ning and let them Eave a happy time. On Thursday next an exciting and sensational drama. "The Lost Bride," the story of a bride of but a few hours, who, losing her memory, wan- ders forth 'to join the life of spangles and sawdust, to be discovered by her husband after many years of adven- I ture. Ellen Aggerhoime is the star ar- tiste in this great picture. The music at this house is specially selected and is a feature of the entertainment. I The children are specially catered for on Saturday mornings.

Advertising

I WORKERS! SUPPORT YOUR OWN PAPER. j £ 50 REWARD i] 50 REWAR- 1 LOST!! I A Beautiful Grey African Parrot, lovely plumage, grand talker, heard last in Glebe- land Street, explaining-" HOW TO IN- 0 n CREASE YOUR BUSINESS." Only one n way-that is to ADVERTISE ADVER- TISE with the MERTHYR & DISTRICT BILLPOSTING CO., Ltd., Williams' Square, 0 ;¡ Merthyr, and the ?50 Reward will soon no U be in your pocket. y n The Best and Most Commanding Hoardings n y In the District. 0 boo- oooo ttar Mtf- -oOc:)oo ooc:Õ

1Wedi Meddwi

Wedi Meddwi. Wedi meddwi ydyw desgrifiad byr o sefyllfa ein gwlad ar hyn o bryd. Nid o angenrheidrwydd ar ddiodydd meddwol. ond ar ryfel a gwaed, ac o bob meddwi dyma y gwaethaf. Mae llawer o ymosod ar y fasnach feddwol ar hyn o bryd, ac nid heb achos, ond nid yw unrhyw les i ddynoliaeth wrthod y meddwi ar ddiod er mwyn meddwi yn fwy ar ryfel. Nid yw addoli a gwasanaethu Bacchus waeth, nac, yn wir, cyn waethed, ag addoli a gwasanaethu Mars. Mae y naill a'r llall yn hawlio ebryth dynol. Os nad all Cristionogaeth a gwareiddiad ein drychafu uwchben yr aberthu dynion i Mars a Mamon. buasai lawn crystal, os nad gwell, i ni grefydd y Derwyddon. Dylai y goleuni sydd genym ein cadw ni yn yr oes bresenol rhag yr eikin addoliad y cyfeiriwn ato. Ond yr ydym yn gwrthod ein goleuo, a cheisir pardduo y sawl faidd wrthod cymeryd ei feddwi ar y rhy- fel. Pwy mor ddall a'r hwn na fyn weled." Rhybuddiwyd y wlad dro ar ol tro beth fyddai canlyniad y dio- falwch, ond nid oedd gwrandawiad yn cae l ei roddi i'r proffwydi. Pan mae dynion yn ddigon gwrol i wrthod meddwi, diystyrir hwy gan y rhai maent yn caru eu lies. Dirmygir hwy. Dyna wneir a Mr. G. Trevelyan am ei gadarnder a'i wroldeb dros ei egwyddor. Gwneir pobl yn ddeillion drwy y meddwi yma, ac o bob dos- barth o ddeillion meddyliol y dall bleidwyr yw y dosbarth anhawddaf ei oleuo. Gan fod y sefyllfa ofnadwy bresenol wedi ei chyraedd mewn Gweinyddi- aeth Ryddfrydol, ni fynu llu ameu dim yn ei chylch, na meiddio credu y gellid ei hosgoi. Am y Toriaid daliant yn "true to nature." a chwareu teg iddynt. Y Germans oedd eu bwgan a'u tegan ers blynvddau. Ond pe mai Gweinyddiaeth Toriaidd fuasai mewn awdurdod, ni fuasai un- rhyw bechod (yng ngolwg llawer o'n liarweinwyr) ameu y sefyllfa. Dyma arwydd o ddalineb pobl wedi meddwi. Pan yn oofio hyn, nid yw syndod fod gweinidogion, blaenllaw mewn dawn, yn anwybyddu efengyl tangnefedd ac ewyllys da. Nid yn unig ceir llu o'r dosbarth wedi meddwi, ond ceisient eraill hefyd i wneyd yr un modd. Ceir personau yn annog y merched ieuainc i wrthod gwneyd sylw o'r dynion ieuainc nad yjdynt wedi enlistio. Oeisir dangos mai "coward" yw pob mab ieuanc nad yw yn gwas- anaethu fel milwr. Hwyrach fod hyn i raddau yn cyfrif am y sefyllfa foesol y mae ein gwlad wedi syrthio iddi, ao, os felly, mae rhan helaeth iawn o'r cyfrifoldeb yn gorphwys wrth ddrws arweinwyr crefydd. Yn y meddwdod yma nid oes eiriau rhy eithafol i'w dweyd am y Germans ac nis gellir dweyd rhai ddigon eith- afol am y Kaisar. Ni fyddai ddim niwed i ni gofio nad yw y Kaisar yn fwy- o German na George V., yr hwn, gyda'i teulu, sydd yn costio dros 10 mil o bunau bob wythnos. Rhaid i un fod wedi meddwi cyn y gall dybio am foment fod rhyfel yn foddion teg a buddiol i setlo cweryl, llawer llai i weithredu cyfiawnder. Y cryfaf sydd yn enill faes y frwydr, ond ni ellir maetumio mai y cryfaf bob amser sydd yn bleidio ac yn ym- ladd dros gvfiawnder. Siaxedir llawer am w ladgarwch. ond nid dyna yr elfen sydd yn cym- eryd gafael olik milwyr. er yn ddi- ameu fod rhai yn hollol wladgarol, ond eu bod i raddau helaeth yn ddall i ffeithiau gwladwriaethol. Pe buasai y milwyr yn caru eu gwlad, buasent yn caru rhianedd y wlad, ynghyda'u moesau a'u purdeb. Mae ffeithiau yn tystio yn wahanol. Gresyn na fai i ni sobri vchydig. ac ystyried nad yw ond cabledd noeth i weddio Duw am oruwehafiaeth ar ein gelynion (fel eu gelwir). Rhaid i ni gofio nad yw gwerin Germany mwy na gwerin Prydain yn elyniaethus i'w gilydd, ond maent. fel n innau. wedi eu twyllo, a llawer. hefyd. o honynt wedi eu meddwi. ac yn "dools" yn nwylaw y iywodraethwyr. Nid yw hyn ddim ond rheswm dros gydym- deimlad a chariad fodoli rhyngom a I hwy. Wedi'r rliyfel. bydd y gwerin- oedd yn sobri. a gwae i rai a u twyll- I asant ac a'u meddwasant y pryd I hyny. PERCY 0. JONES.

Workers and the War

Workers and the War ———— COST OF LIVING. It is a natural and inevitable re- sult of war that its utter wastefulness should make all produce increase in price, and if the public had not such short memories and shallow minds, there would be less heed paid to the seductive glamour of militarism. The present war has not brought ita worst features home to the English people yet, but the trend of events is plain enough to those who care to see. and the portents indicate that, bad as prices are now for people of moderate means, they will be a great deal worse before the year is out. There is need, therefore, for the people to study the art of spending wisely, although the people with good and steady incomes will be doing the best service to the community by living as usual. The stiff rise in bread will increase the feeling that the Govern- ment has failed to adopt that firmness and foresight which they displayed on behalf of bankers and stock-jobbers-a class usually well able to look after themselves and it is felt that the Consultative Committee on prices which did something at first to fix prices, ought to have had more power to purchase goods that threatened to become monopolies. There has been no debate in the House of Commons on this subject since February, when the Prime Minister adopted another of his disappointing wait and see" atti- tudes. On that occasion Mr. Bonar Law struck a truer note. when he declared that the Government ought to have bought up wheat earlier in the winter. There were 7,500.000 quar- ters available in this country alone, which has gone up more than £ 1 per quarter a nice little haul for some- body. at the nations' expense. And the revelation of the great Cardiff milling firm's balance sheet, showing a profit of t367,865 as against £ 89,352 last year, must clinch Mr. Bonar Law's regret. With all that profit of 300 per cent., with wages only of £ 200,000, it is small wonder that bread is Id. dearer in London than in Paris, but it is a wonder that we should tolerate it when our great fleet is keeping the seas open for us to deal with almost the whole world. There is the same fear of Government oomplicancy in regard to the price of coal, as the Committee's report on that subject was presented weeks ago, and only yesterday was it announced that one of the recommendations was to be acted upon that which sug- gested the prohibition of coal to neut- ral countries. As yet nothing has been done on the assertion of the Commit- tee that the high prices could have no real basis on the facts of the situation Taking the highest figure, the increas- ed oost of getting the coal to the dis- tributor was 3/ but the oost to the consumer has increased by 7/- to 101- a ton. That sort of evidence was plain enough, but the Committee only weakly suggested Government control, and ere another winter some step in that direction must be taken to as- sure the health and well-being of the people. Unless some check is plac- ed on those who take advantage of the country's extremity to make for themselves exorbitant profits, no sur- prise must be felt at the recurring la- bour unrest, and demands for higher wages.

Advertising

FREE OFFER TO LADIES. To prove the superiority of ELLIS' PiLLS FOR FEMALES, I will send a Free Trial Packet Post Paid. Prepared from the original recipe of a celebrated nurse, and never fails in restoring regularity and correcting all disorders. Safe, certain and speedy pill that never disap- points. Thousands of letters of thanks testifying to speedy efficiency after aN other things had been tried in vain. Each purchaser sends back testimonial, as they afford relief in every instance. There is nothing to equal them. 1/3 per box. Special extra strong pills (recommended), 4/6, post paid (in plain wrapper, with full directions and advice). Supplied through the post only by Mrs. ELLIS, 12 Yallance Road, Iff ove, Sussex. An interesting guide. 48 Pages, 50 illustra- trations, sent Free with each box. Mention paper.