Collection Title: Merthyr Pioneer

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
13 articles on this page
Advertising

Socialism and the War. W. C. Anderson. IW See Page 3

Advertising

t\6 How Blunders are Made. By Tom Smith. PW See Page 3

Coal Field Dispute 1

Coal Field Dispute. 1 SERIOUS DEADLOCK AT CONCILIA- TION BOARD. MEN'S EXECUTIVE TO MEET THREE CABINET MINISTERS. UNRESTS IN THE DISTRICTS. Board for the ooal trade of South Wales and Monmouthshire met at Car- diff on Wednesday to further consider the new draft agreemen for. the regulation of wages. Prior to the Conciliation Board meeting, the workmen's representatives further discussed the situation, which they considered to be grave, in view of the contention that when the workmen decided to return to work, they did so on the distinct understanding that the new terms agreed upon were to apply to all members of the Federation and who might be- come members of the .Federation," whereas, they contend. Mr. Runciman's final decision deprived many thousan ds of the present mem- bers of the Federation from the benefits ob- tained through the strike of July. The workmen further contended that Mr. Runciman had no right to go back on the pro- mise given them, they said, by himself and the other representatives of the Governemnt, and they decided to inform the coalowners that until the matter was cleared up they were unable to sign the new agreement. In order that our non-mining readers may form some conclusion as to the justice of the men's c&se. we give the following historical sequence" Government Terms, July 1. I Night men to be paid six turns for five I throughout the coalfield. The Agreement, July 20. I The agreement shall apply to all workmen I now employed at the collieries of the own- ers and who may be members of the South I Wales Miners' Federation. Mr Rwncimar.'s Award. I The "bontus turn" should applv to all night men on the afternoon and lllg shifts, but not to engineinen, pumpmen, mechanical staff stokers, banksmen and officials. The Conciliation Board Meeting. I Augmented interest attached to the proceed- ings of the Conciliation Board in view of the deadlock which arose on Tuesday over the non- aoceptance by the Miners' Executive of Mr. Runciman's decision on the bonus turn. Although it was originally expected that the new agreement would be ready for the signa- ture of the parties on Wednesday, Mr. James Winstoue was compelled to inform the owners that the workmen were una ble to finally agree upon the new agreement in consequence of theii desire to see the Cabinef Ministers res- ponsible for the terms of settlement upon the question of the exclusion by Mr. Runciman, in his award, of oertain classes of workmen from the benefits of the 6 turns for 5 provision in the original Government terms. W Appeal For Immediate Advance. I Mr. Winstone asked subject to leaving this matter to be further considered. that the ag- reement be put into operation and that the applioation of the workmen for an immediate advance in wages he taken into consideration; also that any advance awarded should be re- trospective as from the day of return to work of the men after the week's strike, on July.20. Mr. Winstone urged the employers to waive, under the exiting circumstances, the right to have the agfeemect s igned, and to proceed to tbe consideration of the application for an ad- vance in wages. Vie Owners' Reply. Mr. F. L. Davis, for the owners. intormea the workmen that they were prepared to ac- cept the whole of the terms of Mr. Runciman's award, and to sign the document at once. but they could sot accede to the request of the workmen to leave the one clause referred to im abeyance, neither could they consider the application for an increase in wages until after the agreement had Ikhti signed. Rut they were issuing instructions to the members of the Coalowners' Association to pay the advance to the surface workmen and the money due under the 6 turns for 5 provision as and from July 20. MASS MEETINGS' DECISIONS. I The dissatisfaction of the men with the Run- eiman Award, and the way they have been played with by the owners was expressed at mass meetings held throughout the district fliis week. The men, however, acceded to the advice of the lefiders, and decided to continue at work pemding the result of the conference to be held at Cardiff on Tuesday. There were two brief stoppages at two of the Low li-Ilertbvi- Colliery Pits on Wednesday. At the Hafod Pit Trehafod. the men struck work without notice because of their great dissatis- faction at the Award submitted by Mr. Runci- man. but the men decided to return to work pending the next general conference of the coalfield. A resolution was also passed against the suspension of the Eight Hours Act, and an- other disapproving of men working afternoon and nigllt shifts working Saturday afternoon and Sundav night. At the Lady Lewis Pit, Ynyshir, of the same company, the dissatisfaction was aggrava- ted by the announcement that a non-Unionist had descended the pit. There has been great trouble over the non-Unionist question here, and the men decided to suspend work as a protest Late in the day a lodge meeting was held in the Eagle Hotel, and under advice, decided to resume work in the afternoon.

Belgian Refugees Fund I

Belgian Refugees' Fund. Dowlais Office Staff and Works' umciais, 16th, €6 2. lid.; Collected by Mrs. Carter, Dowlais 8th, £ 2 15s.; Elizabeth St. Church, Dov» la is, 9th £2: Dowlais Office Staff and Works' Officials, 15th, £ 1 12s.; Hermon' Church, Dowlais, 81st, £ 1 2s. 3d.; Mr. Hogg, Bskdale, 6th. El Is.; Tabernacle Church. 6th 16131-: Salem Church, Heolgerrig 8th. 9/9; Salem Church, Heolgerrig, 7th. 8/9; Palace Staff. Pontmorlais, 7/6; A Friend from U.S.A. 5' Hermon Church, Dowtais, 32nd, g2. 5

Domestic Economy In the Schools

Domestic Economy In the Schools. DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION CALLS AT- TENTION TO SERIOUS DEFICIENCY. TIMES INOPPORTUNE FOR FORWARD MOVE. Following a short discussion on Wednesday the Merthyr Education Committee decided that the time was not opportune for an extension of the present system of teaching domestic sub- jects to the girls in the upper standards of the Public Elementary Schools. The matter arose out of the following report drawn up by Mr Rhys Elias (Director of Education), and was presented to the meeting:- "Convinced that the teaching of domestic subjects is inadequately dealt with at present, I beg to submit the following for your con- sideration Five mistresses are at present engaged in this work, and by their full time occupation 450 girls receive instruction In one week. There are, however. 1,792 girls who are qualified to receive the instruction, from which it follows that 1,312 girls are denied the opportunity. The first step towards meeting this deficiency is the appointment of additional mistresses; the second is the provision of additional domestic centres. The girls of the three schools—Aber- morlais Georgetown, and Merthyr R.C. are now taught at the Abermorlais Centre. The number of qualified girls at these schools is 319, but as the available accommodation of the cen- tre for one week is only 90, 229 girls do not tre foi- one w k is only receive the instruction. If the Georgetown Girls' School were provid- ed with a centre, the situation in this part of the borough would be partly relieved. Heverting to the first point, viz.. the ap- pointment of additional mistresses, the follow- ing is a proposed arrangement based upon the available acoommodation. The Proposed Centres. I New Mistress: Ireharris Centre 3 days, cooker; Pantglas, 2 days, cookery. Miss F. R. Davies: Merthyr Vale, 3 days, cookery; Abercanaid, 2 days. cookery. New Mistress; Troedyrhiw, 2 days laundry; Troedyrhiw, 3 days cookery. Miss Hinds: Pentrebach, 2 days laundry, 1 clas." Abercanaid Girls, 1 class Pentrebach Girls; 2 days cook ery, Pentrebach, Girls. Heol- gerrig. 1 day cookerv. Miss M. Rees Queen's Roact—2 days laun- 1 dry, 1 class Queen's Road Girls, i class Twyn- yrodyn Girls; 3 days cookery. Queen's Road Girls. -N- ew Mistress Twynyrodyn—3 days oookery, Twvnyrodyn Girls. Abermorlais-2 days cook- ery. 1 class Georgetown Girls. 1 class Merthyr R.C. Girls. Miss Cleary Abermorlais-3 days cookery, Abermorlais Girls. Intermediate—2 days cookery. Intermediate Girls. New Mistress: Penydarren—5 days cookery, Penydarren Girls. Miss Gardner: Dowlais Central-2 days laun- dry, 3 days cookery. New Mistress: Gollifaelog 3 days cookery, Gellifaelog Girls; 2 days cookery, Dowlais R.C. Girls. This plan, requiring the appointment of five new mistresses, will provide instruction for 900 girls per week, but will still leave 892 girls without it, and these can only be dealt with by providing additional accommodation." Aid. Thomas thoug-t that considering the na- ture of the times in which we lived, the Com- mittee ought to hold their hands. He was cer- tainly opposed to the consideration of a scriem, for the appointment of additional teachers to the staff. A Serious Question. I The Director: It is a matter I wanted to call your attention to. because I do consider it a serious question that you allow girls in the up- per standards to finish their education, so call- ed, without any facilities being offered them to receive some knowledge of domestic work. He desired to point the Committee's attention to this, and then the responsibility would lay with them. Conn. Phillips asked what standards received this special instruction, and was told by the Director that all girls over the age of 11 years were supposed to receive it. Aid. Thomas admitted the seriousness of the matter, and the responsibility- To his mind to make the teaching of domestic science any- thing like adequate, they wanted, not five ad- ditional teachers, but two or three times that number. But the scheme pledged them to spend hundreds if not thousands of pounds in addi- tional accommodation, and lie said that the present was not the time to involve expenditure on that scale. He wou ld be only too pleased to move in the matter when the position justified movement, but to-day the position was serious, and he appealed to the Committee to hold its hand. Coun. D. W. Jones said the report meant the embarking on a very big thing indeed, and the whole of their elementary girls who went on to Cyfarthfa or the Intermediate got the instruction there. The Director pointed out that his figures were of girls who did not pass on to those schools. Prospective Grant Decrease. Coun. D. W. Jones, continuing, said there was every reason to believe that the grants they received from the Government were going' to he seriously reduoed. He had seen a circular that day in connection with another matter which satisfied him that they were going to he verv seriously curtailed, and he doubted very muoh whethey they should embark on this scheme. They had been able to do without it for all these years, and it was better that for the next few months they shoud let it stand by and then dea.! with it in a more comprehensive way Coun. Lewis (Penyuairen): What would it cost up per teacher? Director: They start at P-70. 1 he Chairman (Coun. Morrell) said it was a bit unfortunate that they had buildings al- ready, and that they were lying idle for want of teachers to occupy them. There was no de- sire to embark on any unnecessary expense, but they had the buildings and they would have to be idle until teachers were provided. Trie lime inopportune. The Director: I should like it understood that I am not pressing it; or urging that it is absolutely necessary. I am simply pointing out that there is a great weakness on the educa- tional side at this moment, and M soon as you are in a position to do so. this should be reme- died. I agree that the present is an inoppor- tune time to launch it, but any time is conveni- ent for the Committee to become acquainted with the needs of the borough. In reply to Coun. Francis, the Director said there was not at the moment any vacancies on the Domestic Science side. The scheme was meant to extend that side and complete it. Coun Francis: Is any provision made for the Penydarren district? Director: The Penydarren girl-, will receive instructions on three days as last year; un- der the scheme, they would have had five. It was decided to defer the consideration of the scheme until a more opportune time.

MerthyrTroedyrhiw Amalgamation

Merthyr-Troedyrhiw Amalgamation. INFORMAL JOINT COMMITTEE CON- SIDER PROGRESS. PUBLIC CELEBRATION OF COMBINE IN NEAR FUTURE. Tin first Joint Committee of the new Amal- gamated Troedyrhiw and Merthyr Co-operative Societies was held on Saturday last at the Troedyrhiw Committee Room. This meeting was ai. informal gathering, since t',e properly constituted Joint Committee was not formed, but it is hoped that this committee will be in in a position to meet next week. It is pleasant to know that all obstacles have been overcome, and everything with re- gard to the amalgamtaion has been arranged. The amalagamation is now practically in force, and members of the Troedyrhiw and members of 'he Merthfr Sooietieb, are members of the Merthyr, Troedyrhiw and District Co-operative Society A splendid spirit prevailed at the meeting, and the Chairman, Coun. Enoch Morrell. was able tc report admirable progress, and to put forward several schemes for the benefit of the newly-amalgamated society. It is proposed to celebrate the amalgamation by a tea to be held in Merthyr, and probably, a procession in com- memoration of this important event. Greater Confidence Manifested. It is interesting to recall that one of the im- mediate results of this cohesion of the two so- cieti,L.which we trust is but the precursor of a still greater extension of the princijrfe in the immediate f-tirture has been a manifestation of greater confidence in Co-operation. Many peo- ple m the town have recognised the strength I of th:? new position by making offers of premi- ses OL supposed better sits than that at pre- sent occupied in Bothesda Street. However, the Committee, whilst determined to move for- ward with the least delay, is moving with safe- ty, ani we can assume all Co-operators that w' ea the movie is made it will be to a site worthy of the movement. Things are not to be hurrieJ. by jumping at supposed bargains. No.. thing but the bfst will do for the new Amalga- mated Society. Nor is the movement to be sad- dled with fancy prices. Keen business ability will look after the interests of the members, and when the forward move is made, we may rest assured that the Co-operative steam-roller will run forward. True Spirit of Co-operation. 'I 'I, As we hoped, ana believed trom the neaitny spirit that Troodyrhiw Co-operators exhibited, the Merthyr Committee had been met with most generous terms, and when the members will be told-in the ordinary course of affairs at the celebration ceremony—the whole facta, they will, we are sure, be delighted. Now is the time for all workers, aye. and for the mat- ter of that, for everyone who has not hitherto embraced Co-operation. to inquire into the movement, to acquaint themselves with the advantages it offers to them as purchasing con- sumers. to mark its influence as a deterrent to expkitation, or to strike a balailee: a balance which we are sure will result in an influx of new members; an influx that will be the beat celebration of the amalgamation that we eould liave- and an influx that will evidence the growth of the splendid spirit of mutual aid. The individual advantage accruing to purchas- ers from active participation in Co-operation are iltrong enough to constitute the most co- gefit arguments for membership, but we prefer to take a broader view of the movement, and to se< in it an important unit in the machinery that will lift Democracy out of the slough of desponc into which competitive trade has plun- ged it.

Domestic Difference at Aberdare

Domestic Difference at Aberdare, STIPENDIABY'S VIEWS ON MOTHERS- IN-LAW. The Stipendiary (Mr. R. A. Griffith) is "down" on mothers-in-law. Read what he said last week at Abei-dai-e Police Court. "There would be more happy marriages in this world if there were no mothers-in-law. These two young people have the misfortune to get marrie.d when they were much too young, and they have not learnt sense. I am afraid the mother-in-law has been encouraging them to quarrel, and encouraging the girl to run home after every little tiff instead of do- ing her utmost to get her to put up with any little faults of her husband's. I think it would he a sin to separate these two young people. Let them go back and live together peace- fully." The young couple referred to were Stanley Perry (22), a private in the R.F.A., summoned by his wife, Elizabeth Mary Perry (23) for de- sertion. Mr. Reeks Thomas appeared for the de- fendant.- 0 order was made.

Advertising

EVERY PRINTING ORDER given to the Pioneer Pre." means more Ammunition for Party Propaganda. Get into the Line of our MUNITION WORKERS.

Lletty Shenkin Fatality

Lletty Shenkin Fatality. INQUEST AND VERDICT. Mr. R. J. Rhys, Coroner, held an inquest at the Mountain Ash Police Station on Saturdav touching the death of John Thomas (41), over- man at the Lletty Shenkin Colliery of the P.D. who, is reported in last week's is- Company, killed by a journev of trams at the Company, killed by a journev of trams at the colliery on Wednesday last. Mr. McBride. H.M. Inspector Mines, was present at the inquiry. Evidence of identification was given by the deceased's brother, Benjamin Thomas. who said that deceased resided at 7 Greenfield Ter- race, Cefnpennar, and was a married man with three children. Benjamin Evans, collier employed at Lletty Shenkin Colliery, stated that shortly before 3 o'clock in the afternoon the deceased overman shouted out to witness and his mate. who were working in a roadway off the main haulage road, to "mind not to come out until after the full journey had passed up." The deceas- ed man was then going down towards the double-parting." Soon after, witness saw the deceased being dragged underneath the out- going journey. Immediately Knocked Stop." Replying to the Coroner, witness said he immediately jumped to the signal wires and knocked stop." He found deceased lying ac- ross the road underneath the fi tram. He was quite dead. His lamp-stick and cap were found a distance of about 15 yards below, show- ing that he had been dragged along by the journey from the place w here he was knocked down. The roadway in that place was arched and there was a width of about 9ft. At the time of the accident witness was ready t-o go out. Thomas Ford. a roadman at the colliery, said he was working a distance of about 25 to 30 yards away on the "double-parting." It was witness who started the journey on its way out. There was ample width in the place where the accident occurred, chere being over 3ft. from the rails on the one side, and over 2ft. on the other side. There was also a manhole near by. David John Davies, the manager at the co- liery, explained a plan of the workings and said that the journey could only travel at a rate of about It miles an hour. In reviewing the evidence, the Coroner re- marked that whatever happened to the deceas- ed it seemed quite clear that he was knocked down by the journey. It did not app ear to be a ease of being suddenly overtaken with illness. for the overman shouted out to the two men immediately before that, And seemed to be alright. An .<* know Ins way about the colliery better than anybody else. The jury returned a verdict of Accidental death."

Danger on the Line

Danger on the Line. RAILWAYMEN DISSATISFIED. I RESOLUTIONS AT SUNDAY'S IONFE- RENCE. A mass meeting of South Wales railwaymen was held at the Cory Hall, Cardiff, on Sunday night, Mr. G. B. Smith, President of the South Wales and Mon. Council, in the chair. The proceedings were conducted in private, and at the close oof over two hours' sitting, the following official report was issued to the press The meeting was addressed at some length by Mr. W. Griffiths, of Newport, and Mr. E. Charles, of Pontypool. who executive com- mittee members of the N. U .R. These gen- tlemen explained very fully to the meeting the steps taken by the executive committee with regard to increasing the war bonuses to raftwaymen and many other matters. The following resolution was submitted to the meeting. and carried practically unani- mously South Wales Determined. That this meeting instructs our execu- tive committee to give the necessary notices to the railway companies to terminate the agreement arrived at at the outbreak of war. seeing that the truce was arrived at on the understanding that the standard conditions of railwavmen in general should not be low- ered. This, in effect, has taken place owing to the Government failing to control the maximum prices of commodities, which have entailed intense suffering to the railwaymen in general through the lowering of the stan- dard of living and at a time when the majo- rity of other workers' standard is increasing. We. therefore, instruct our executive eom- mittee to immediately take steps to enter in- to negotiations with the railway companies to put into operation our national program- me. Failing national action, we ask our exe- cutive committee to give permission for a South Wales movement, as we consider that the cost of living in South Wales is greatly in excess of other parts of the country." There was a general and very keen desire that an effort should be made to improve the position of the railwaymen. There was general dissatisfaction expressed as to the meagre allowances or war bonus which had been arrived at some time ago, and the meeting felt that at the least the war bonus during the review which had taken place be- tween the railway companies and our execu- tive committee some months ago would have resulted in an increase. It was pointed out that the present war bonus paid was 3/- to those earning under 30 and 2/- for men earning over 30/

Advertising

PRINTING SENT TO PRIVATE COMPANIES means Profit for Individual Owners. When WE do your work, the Profit comes in the PROPAGATION OF SOCIALISM AND TRADES UNIONISM. TR Think it Over! I

THE PIONEER 10000 SHILLINGS FUND

THE PIONEER 10,000 SHILLINGS FUND. AN APPRECIATIVE LETTER, AND THE NEED FOR MORE.. We begin the task of making our usual ap- peal this week with feelings a little less re- pugnant that generally stem our flow of thought, and it is because we have received a letter from a Mountain Ash I.L.Peer. which we are pleased to believe showns promise of the awakening of that vast body of workers we ex- ist to serve. Our comrade, who is too modest to permit us to divulge his identity, says, in the course of his letter — I hope you will be able to keep the paper afloat, as it is vital that the workers should possess a local mouthpiece. If we were not so apathetic and ignorant, you would not have to appeal to us for financial support, and we should put a press of our own on a secure footing, in preference to buying Northcliffe's papers. I believe with the trying times ahead the "Pioneer" will be more valuable than ever, and so wishing you success in your ef- forts etc. Those are our sentiments with one exception; we would not ally ignorance with apathy. Com- rades, can you not realise the urgency of our case you who respond and respond nobly to the calls that are made upon you for a thous- and causes that touch your sympathy; can you not see that yotxr apathy binds us as with chains? We know that you must be awake to the need of informing yourself of your classes activities; that you know that it is only through a press of your own that you can so inform yourself, but the difficulty is to make you see this is a pergonal light, instead of the vague generalisation that contents you to-day. Believe us proud of our class-the working class, too proud of our movements and our ideals, too hateful of mendicity, to beg your aid if we could manage without it. Soon we shall be able to face the ordinary difficulties with composure. We like ordinary difficulties: they give zest to life, and add joy to conquest: but when the difficulties are neck deep from Monday morning to Sunday night, they initiate even our glut- tonous selves. Give us a fighting chance and we will show you what we can do for yon: re- fuse to put up the purse, and the possibility is that when you are most in need of our help we shall not be in a position to offer it. Show that your Trades Unionism, your co-operation and your Socialism have taught you the rudi- ments of mutual aid. by sending along that share capital £1 you can afford, or that odd I/ that you will never miss. ohare Capital. I £ a. d. Already Ac-ki*>wi«&^vu 279 6 0 Received this week 1 100 £ 280 16 0 10,000 Shilling Fund. a. d. Alreadv acknowledged 1,159 9 M R 5 0 1,164 9

Aberdare Women Fined for Stealing

Aberdare Women Fined for Stealing. NO EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES. At the Aberdare Police Court on Wednesday the Stipendiary (Mr. R. A. Griffith) fined Eliza- beth Davies and Margaret Jones, two married women, 40/- each, on two charges for stealing two imitation Bnrbery coats, the property of Mr. J. H. Powell, J.P. There were two sepa- rate charges, the first coat being stolen from London House. Aberdare. and the second from Mr. Powell's Emporium at Cwmaman.—Mr. W. Griffiths was for Mrs. Davies, and Mr. Harris ior Mis. Jones.—Much interest was taken im the proceedings. The first witness was Mr. Dd. Hopkins. ma- nager of the outfitting department of the Aber- dare shop. He said that defendants came to the shop on August 19. He had to leave them alone for a time in order to get what they wan- ted. Next day they came there to exchange a cap they had bought on the previous day. Wit- ness was dressing the window next morning, and missed the coat. which he intended to exhibit. It was valued at 30/ An Aberdare pawnbroker s manager said Da- vies came there with the coat to pawn. She said she bought it at Merthyr. She was a custo- mer of his. and he advanced her 12/6. Sergt Griffiths Abevaman, said he went to look for Mrs. DavieB on August 21. He found her in Mrs. Jones' house. In rqplv to his inquiry Mrs. Davies said she jeceived the coat from Mrs Morgan (IS Morgan Street) to pawn for her Mrs. Jones confirmed her statement. Mrs. Davies further stated that she pledged for a number of people in the district, and they gave her 3d. a time. In eourse of further conversa- tion Mrs. Davies admittted that she pledged the coat. Both women were further charged with steal- ing an imitation Burberry coat from the Empo- rium, Cwmaman, between Ausjust 14 and 17. Evan Thomas, manager of the outfitting de- partment, recognised the coat as the property of J. H. Powell. It. was valued at 30/ A pawnbroker's manager said that on August 17 Mrs. Davies and Mrs. Jones brought the overcoat to be pawned. Mrs. Davies said it WI88 her brother-in-law's coat. Sergt. Griffiths said when he saw Mrs. Davies she said Mi's. Jones had given her the coat. Mrs Jones's husband then came into the house and said he had exchanged the coat for some birds with a man from Altrincham in Cheshire. When charged at the Police Station. Mrs. Davies said, IX> We are giving in to it. Mrs. gones said, "Of course, we did take it. The Stipendiary said they were the worst cases of larceny that had been before him. There wae no redeeming feature. Their hus- bands were colliers earning good money, and they were in no distress. It seemed they had made a business of stealing goods and pawn- ing them. They would have to Day 40/- each on each charge.