Collection Title: Merthyr Pioneer

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
8 articles on this page
THE NEW GElllFAELOG SCHOOLS

THE NEW GElllFAELOG SCHOOLS. CEREMONIAL OPENING BY COUN. J. HARPWR. INTERESTING REVIEW OF EDUCA- TIONAL, PROGRESS. By the opening of the new Gellifaelog Schools en Tuesday night, another long step in the edu- oational history of the Borough was completed; a step which we can look back on with pride. for it is trust that whilst in housing and many ether departments of municipal activity we have lagged behind our sister municipalities m the industrial fields of the nation. in this matter of education we can with Justice claim to have marched in the van. Our Education Committee, our teachers, and our Director of Education have earned the heartfelt gratitude not atone of ourselves, but of posterity also. The schoo ls provided in va- rious parts of the borough are second to none 'in architectural set-out, our cirriculum is calculat- ed to produce capable scholars; and our admin- istration exercises a paternal interest that in conjunction with the activities of the Director and his staff, is calculated to build up the ju- venile mind in happy consonance with the hanci- some buildings which we have built for the in- struction of the young. It is needless to go into this matter of condi- tional progression here, since Ooun. Harpur has so ably touched upon it in the speech with which he celebrated the opening ceremony, re- produced below. The siathering wa.s enthusiastic, and some measure of the pride which the people take in the new school may be taken from the fact that big as is the new school, it was totally lmadequate to accommodate all who sought admittance to the ceremony, over which the Mayor (Coun. John Davies) presided, supported by amongst others. Covin. John Harpur. J.P., t' e opener; Aid. C. J. Griffit's, Dowla*; Mrs. Ket swell, Secondary Schools Committee Coun. D. W. Jones Aid. Ivor Abraham; the Directoi of Education (Mr. Rhys Ehas); Mr. E. Williams, Miss Attwood and Miss Williams (head teachers), and Mi". J- Llewellin Smith (architect), Abeixlare, who handed to Coun. Harpur the customary silver-gilt key in comme- moration of the conclusion of the work. The Mayor, in opening the proceedings, said: "\Ye are opening this new school, and I, for one. thmk we have been too long at the oM school, which was detrimental to the health of the children, and by being detrimental deter- red their chance.s of successfully lighting their battle with the world. We believe in education; we all believe in irae and faithful education, which qualifies the child for this life and for the future. I hope that our culture in this country will never teiach him to be cruel in any way "This building is a veiy excellent testi- monial to the Council, and its construction Is a testimonial to the architect and builder. I hope the teachers will enjoy the place and turn out chi dren who will be a credit to Dowlais. Con- cluding. he hoped that fche teachers of the new schools would get on much better than they did in the old one. Mr Chairman. Ladies and Gentlemen. INTERESTING OPENING ADDRESS. The following is a tail report of Coun. John Harpur's speech 1 esteem it a \'ery great honour to be invi.ted by my colleagues to open this magnificent block of sehoof buildingB. To my mind, no greater konour could fall to any man's lot at any tinx .of life., and, more so, at the eventide of one's life, than to be ac- tively engaged and doing the little bit that lies in one's power—however imperfectly it may be done—in this great and glorious work of education. We are all glad that, at least, in the erection of thifc school we have reached a consun-rmatiom of a project which has been far too long delay- ed, and one which has been sadly needed for many years. The old school buildings were a bye-word and a reproach to us, and it is really marvellous h8W the teachers and children, un- der such unfavourable and depressing surround- ings, have been able to do such very efficient work. It was in 1906 that the Education Committee took in hand the ma tter of providing addition- al sc hool accommodation in the Gellyfaelog dis- trict, and it was thought the needs of the dist- rict could be met by taking down the old school buildings and re-erecting a, new school on the same site. The Board of Education held that the site was neither large enough nor suitable for a school of the size contemplated, and that it would be better to erect new .buildings on a site in North Penydarren. History of Scheme. After considerable discussion iivd correspon- dence on the matter, it was decided, in De- oeciber 1908. to purchase three aeres of land in North Penydarren for the purpose, and in Jan- uary, 1909, the Town Clerk reported that on behalf of the Corporation he had purchased 16t acres of land for £ 2,000. and 3 acres would be reserved for the Education Committee. The plana for the new buildings were entrusted to Mr J. Llewellin Smith, Aberdare. and were anally approved bv the Local Government Board on May 23, 1912. Sanction was then .given to borrow a sum of £ 21,090 for the pur- chase of the land and erection of the schools. Th,- contract was given to Messrs, Enoch Wil- liams & Sons, Dowlais, and amounted to nearly £ 19,000. The buildings should have been ready by the end of July, 1914. but various causes have contributed to the delay of more than twelve months in' the completion of the work. The schools provide accommodation for 1,160 children, and are designed so that all the class rooms and assemblv halls obtain araple cross ventilation, and are well lighted from the south and south-east. The general treatment is on line external walls, except the east, be- ing cemented. The east c-levatlons are faced with a red brick, with forest stone string courses, &C. The floors are of deal wood blocks; cloak rooms and lavatories are suitably tiled. In- ternal quoins and ceiling enjjLes have been rounded, and mouldings which might collect the dust have been avoided. The buildings are treated on the low pressure hot water sys- tem with red radiators, al class-rooms bein2 provided in addition with an open fire-grate for emergencies. m Retrospective Educational Glance. I Now, when I survey rfiis imposing pile of buildings, with all its modern appliances. itA large, airy and well-ventilated rooms, there comes to my mmd a VIvid picture of the littta schoolroom of the days of my youth. BuilcRngs like these were not thought of then, and I doubt whether they came within the range of even the most advanced and enthusiastic edu- cationists of those times. I recall now, the low-roofed room under a chapel, where sun- shine had to make a very desperate struggle to enter our modest little academy; and, believe me precioil-, little came in after the struggle, and there we were condemned to toil at our ju- venile tasks for long and weary hours in a ioul and vitiated atmosphere; and those were the days 4 small things in educational methods of teaching, and. consequently the teaching was a^ barren of brightness and sunshine as the room in which we were entombed. Everything seemed to be permeated and tinged with a dull and grey monotony. Little wonder, then, that the one great desire we had when we entered the school was a long- ing for the time to come when we could get out asgain. And, truly, what a happy release it was! However, since then educational ideas have moved rapidly, and we now realise that such things were all wrong. Childhood is the period of sunshine, happi- ness a.nd pleasure, and the -urrounding* should be in consonance with these. Indeed, it is a. privilege to be young to-day, and to be sur- rounded with the best of educational facilities. The Old Condition II Things. But let me remind you. that, it was not al- ways so in Dowlais. because we find that, one of the Commissioners in Council on Education who visited the stchools in this district in 1846 reported as follows — Of the 37 private schools which existed in Merthyr and Dowlais at the time of my visit 21 wore Dame SchooK The generality of the children in them were very young the schoolroom was usually the kitchen of the house and instruction was given upon no plan or system whatever. Of the entire number not more than three can be pro- nounced moderately good. 26 indifferent, and eight very bad. It is but fair to point out that there had boen previous to this an awakening in Dowlais to the needs of education. We find that there was for some years a school held at Gwernllwyn Uchaf under Mr. Thomas Jen-kins, a very able man with strong literary proclivities, and he was the father of Mr Wm Jenkins. Consett, and father-in-law of Aid. R. P. Rees. About 1844 the hoys' school was removed to a long room in the. building now used as the stables bv the Dowlais Company, and there in 1S44 Mr. "Matthew Hirst, the veteran scholomas- ter, commenced his ?^iocessfutl career in train- ing the lads of Dowlais. The girls and infants were taught for some time after this, in a building that had, in days long past done ser- vice as a bai- or graDen' to Gwernllwyn Uchaf j Farm. The*ucation of the Gellyfaelog dist- rict at that time was provided at a school held in a long room in the Plough Inn-hence for iiiativ vejys it was known as the Plough School. It is but right at this stage to recognise with deep and sincere gratitude the liberal and ard- ent encouragement given to the provision of schools in Dowlais by the proprietor, and suo ceeding managers of the Dowlais Iron Works, as thev were then called and especially to the late gifted Lady Charlotte Guest, who gave the good cause the greatest impetus of all, when The secured in 18,54-5 the erection of the magnificent school buildings in the heart of the town which were designed by Sir Charles Barry (the architect of the present Houses of Parlia- ment. In addition to these large central schools, the Company opened in 1857 what must now be called tiie old Gellyfaelog School; the Pen- garnddu School in 1860, and Pant School in 1383. It has been truly said that the schools of Dowlais are the highest testimony to the en- thusiastic interest of Lady Chartotte Guest in the work of education but upon her departure and the arrival of Mr. G. T. Clarke as resident trustee of the works they had the active vigil- ant oversight and heartfelt encouragement of one of the finest, educatftmists in the country, and the honoured Chairman of the first four School Boards in Merthyr. You will realise the great strides we have made since then, if I quote the following figures iiiveii by Mr. Oferk in a report on the work of the schools in the Dowlais District in 1857. !n 1848 there were in the Dowlais Central Schools 150 boys, 95 girls and 129 infants; in Gellifaelog 83, made up of boys and girls. In TS.-2(i. when the new schools were openecl. the numbers were: Dowlais School 634 pupils, Gelh- taclog 261. The total number educated at the primarv school? in the Dowlais district then being §95, whereas at the present time we are educating in the primary schools of the Dow- lnist district 5,374 children. The schools of Dowlais hi 1857 had a staff consisting of 6 head teachers and 9 assistants wlwrea to-day we have in the Dowlais district 14 head teachers and 155 assistant teachers of all grades. In the Borough we have at pre- sent in our school a staff of 59 head teachers, 570 assistant teachers, and a roll of 17.360 7 0 ass],ttnt teacber?,, an d a i-ol l of 17,.360 After the School Board came into existence, the Dowlais Company and their workmen, by means of the poundage system, met all the de- mand s of the Act of 1870. and made provision for the extra accommodation required, and in that way saved the ratepayers a large sum of money However, the passing of the Free Education Act iR 1891 precipitated the transfer of the schools to the Merthyr Tydfil School Board. So long as fees were to be paid. the Dowlais work- men were content to pay their customary £ d. poundage, supplemented by large contributions I from the Company, on behalf of these schools; but upon abolition they not unnaturally began TO feel that they should be participators in the benefits of the new Act. The Company also saw the new situation which had been created, and arrangements were made for the old School Board in 1892. transfer of the Dowlais Group of Schools to the The schools of Dowlais have always had a great reputation, and let me bear testimony as Chairman of the Education Committee that that j-eputatiofi is being fully maintained to- day by the competent staff we have at work in the schools at present. And this is equally true of the schools through out the borough, for they rank with the best schools in the country, and we are fortunate in having a capable staff of teachers—men and women of sound moral characters and sterling worth-who are imbued with noble ideals, and £ #re ready to do everythmg in their power to promote the highest and the best in the inte- rests of those entrusted to their charge. It is most important that our teachers jftiould be men and women of strong characters because, after all the greatest end of education is the harmonious development of the child's charac- ter and I am a firm believer in securing the best type of teacher for our primary schools an d securing the most efficient system of edu- cation for our younger children. We must see that the foundation of our educational system is thoroughly sound and efficient; otherwise it will not be much use in spending money lavishly on the upper sections of our system. We owe a great deal to our primary schools. Indeed, this terrible war has silenced most of the adverse critics be- cause there has been revealed on the battle- field and 1R theticeiaches the silent and potent influence of the schools on the brave feliows mostly products of the primary schools-in those great qualities of mind and heart which have always been the pride of the British na- tion the fine qualities of these brave men have evoked unstinted praise from the officers; and their undying deeds of gallantry have won the admiration of the whole world. And we shall again look to each school to attune its life to what, is bvst in the national spirit, in such a way as to slir within its scholars high hopes of living to be brave men and worthy patriots: to make men and women of intellectual vigour, balance, and strong personalty; of tempered character and of noble purpose, and swayed by motives answering to the deeper things in hu- man nature, and thus to take their part in the physical, intellectual and moral improvement of their nation. But in the accomplishment. of this very great purpose, let us not forget that the school oannot. do everything. Between the child's in-school and out-of- sichool environment, there is constant inter-ac- tion. It is desirable that this inter-action should be harmonised for the child's sake and to bring this about, and to get the best out of the school, there must be a good mutual under- standing between parents and teachers. I be- lieve one of the greatest educational needs of the hour is to bring the parents of the scholars into line with the work of the schools first, to know it; secondly, to sympathise with it: and thirdly, to support it. by reinforcing its influ- ence upon the child, through the influence of the home. There is a danger to-day of parents shirking their responsibilities to their children they want to delegate everything to outside au- thorities. For instance, the school is expected to do everything for the intellectual, moral and spiritual training of the child and very little —if any at all—is done in the home. But let us not forget this sWIm fact, that the school was never intended to supplant the home, but sim- ply to supplement it. Let me beseech the parents present, not to expect too much from the school, but rather let them more fully realise their great and far-reaching responsibilities by seeing that the home influence is always of the purest and the best, saturated with high and noble aim. strenuously pursued, oven though it may mean a great deal of self-sacrifice and self-denial. We want to see both parents and teachers co- operators in this great work of educating the children of this district. Such we devoutly hope will be the case with this magnificent school. The head teachers—Mr. Williarms, Miss Att- wood, and Miss Williams-and their colleagues have the fullest confidence of the authority and I am certain they will always heartily wel- come the hearty and sympathetic co-operation of the parents and. further. I can assure yon of the help of our able Director and the Educa- tion Committee. In this way only can the work of this school be most effective and la.sting in its results, and will ensure that harmoay and concord between school and home which will have an abiding and uplifting effect on the community. The Site Controversy. Coun. D. W. Jones then addressed the gath- ering. He congratulated the people of that district upon the success of their efforts in pla- cing the scholars in one of the finest schools in the whole of the borough. He felt very sorry for the people of Gellyfaelog. He felt that they had not had a chance in the buildings in which their children had been educated. But at last they had attained to the proud position of having the finest schools in the borough. He was quite sure that those magnificent buildings would have a pronounced and enduring effect upon the children educated within their walls, He remembered the time very well w-hen the scholars in the Dowlais Schools used to look down upon the Plough Schools," they tfced to think the boys and girls were inferior, but he could only say now that the position was entirely different. He hoped they would make the best of it as the time went on. Mr. Harpur had, in his address, touohed upon the history of these buildings. He would tell them a little more. In 1906 the Education Committee were confronted with a scheme for re-building the Gellifaelog Schools upon the old site. It was af- ter two or three years' steady work by a very few members of the committee that they suc- ceeded in inducing the Council to at last see the folly of spending JE20,000 upon a site of that kind. and to get the old site altered to the present one, which was one of the finest in the district. b, 1908 the question of the site again came up. The plans for these new build- ing- had been passed by the Board of Educa- tion. The Mayor had said that a great calam- ity would befall the district if they built the schools on the old site; yet they would be sur- prised to know that when the Council divided on that resolution, seven menabers voted for and 11 against, and the motion was lost. Chief Inspector Edwards, of South Wales, came up. and saw the old schools, and he saw the new site proposed, and they very soon af- terwards got the report from the Board of Edu- cation. The most serious objection was that of the iron and steel works. When the wind from that direction blew the smoke over it ne- cessitated the windows being kept cleeti and closed on that side of the school, or the dust would find its wa-v inte the rooms to the detri- ment of each child. The Education Committee re-considered the whole thing very soon after- wards. and this new motion was thoroughly considered, and they determmed to fight this battle to a finish, and instead of the dfd school they had that magnificent building. He referred to the excellent work of Mr. Wm: Edwards. H.M.I. for South Wales, had done in connection with those schools, as well as the magnificent oareer which had just come, to a close as an inspector. He was quite sure that his services would be remembered by many generations to come. Coun Wm. Lewis, Penydarren, urged that the teachers would not be abte to do their work thoioughly unless they wouia have the stippore of the parents at home. He said that too often what was built up during the week was pulled down the week-ends. A vote of thanks to the Mayor for presiding was proposed by Ald. Abraham, and seconded by Aid. Griffiths. Items were rendered by the school children. The proceedings were brought to a close by the singing of the National An- thems.

Merthyr Judges Rejoinder

Merthyr Judge's Rejoinder. A defendant at Merthyr County Court on Thrrsday last pleaded thait he could not pay a debt for. which he was sued on a judgment summons. Questioned as to his means, he said that a business in which he assisted belonged to his wife. His Honour made an order for paymerft. I cannot pay," said the defendant. I have no money." "You need not, my good man," replied his Honour, "yon can go to gaol instead."

FOOD FOR THE PEOPLE

FOOD FOR THE PEOPLE is as necessary as shells for the enemy. Yet thousands cannot find sufficient to keep them in a reasonable condition of health. There is one remedy, and only one—Socialisation. Help to spread the good news by taking up shares in the Pioneer."

Advertising

r"-II II II II 00_ l I DOWLAIS CO-OPERATIVE SOEtE?, Limited, j ? 16, 17, 18, and 19, Union Street, Dowlais. I OUTFITTING DEPARTMENT. j I WHERE QUALITY REIGNS! I = People nowadays know what Quality means. As Outfitters we go in for I J Quality in everything we stock. This we desire you to keep very closely in I I mind. And we desire to make Old and New Costumers feel and to realise I I that nowhere can a selection of Outfitting be made more advantageously than t? 5 by paying a visit to this Department. I Be sure to keep this date in mind t  ??""?*???????* ? I 1- Be sure to keep this date iu mind! I AUG. 30th, 19?5. II j j Because it maDs a money saver! j BARGAIN WEEK! t t 'The following Bargains will be offered for One Week on/y:- =1 s IMe, n's Ready-to-Wear Suits 22/6 I I Youths' ? „ ? 17/6 j  Boys 120 „ to „ 10'2d. „ From 6/11 I I !20 Ties to cfear, 10 ?d. each. Boys' Washing Blouses and Suits (Assorted 6izes), from 19. I  Gloves, Caps, Collars, Shirts, Umbrellas, Stockings, &c  SEE OUR WINDOWS. THEN COME IN AND SEE US. t i.1I It II It 1I_i

FRIDAY

FRIDAY. Before the Stipendiary (. R. A. Griffith) and Dr. O. Ward. Case Against Motor-Cyclist Dismissed. V.'illiam Evans, of 99 High Street, Penydar- ren, was summoned for driving a motor-cycle in a manner dangerous to the public, and also with the identification plate obscured. Defendant said he started with two soldier friends, one in the side-car and the other at the back. Directly after he started the con- trol wire of the throttle valve broke, with the result that the machine got away pretty sharp, but he regulated it by raising the valves. Replying to the second ebaiage, he said that he particularly warned the soldier at the back not to obscure the number but eventually his coat overlapped it. The two charges were dismissed on payment of the costs (10/) Assault. Emily Matthews summoned Virgina Jones for assault.—Complainant saitl she was going down the town last Sunday nilt. when she saw Mrs. Jones, and some words passed, with the result that defendant caught hold of her hair, causing a large crowd to assemble. Inspect.or Neill said he was coming through Plymouth Street, when he safcv a large crowd, and heard defendant use filthy language. There was also a cross-summons issued ag- ainst Emily Matthews.—Virginia Jones denied having struck her, and deolared that her neighbour gaAje her great provocation. The summons against Emily Matthews was dismissed, but Virginia Jones was fined 12 ¡-, and bound over to keep the peace. Wounding Charge. Robe lit Sullivan was charged with wounding I his wife, Mary, by cutting hea7 throat with a table knife.—The case was adjourned in order to give complainant time to attend court. Prisoner was let out on his own bail of £ 20. Damage to a Tree. e -01 Six young boys were summoned ior causing, damage to a tree. to the extent of 6/ at the C-vfai-thfa, Park.—George Evans park keeper, said he saw the defendants up a sycamore tree in the park. He caught two of them, who told him the names of the rest. Stipendiary Ca:M.'t you go into that beauti- ful park without doing any damage there ? Each of these boys must pay a fine of 6/ and I hope you will stop tnis thing. If you come her again, the fine will be very much heavier. Fruit Stealing. Five boys were summoned tor stealing rruit, belonging to the Corporation, at the Cy- farthfa Park.—The Park Superintendent said that on August 7 he saw the boys plundering the trees. He caught two who brought the others back afterwards. The fruit was roughly valued at 1/ -.—Inspector Neill said he visited Cefn. and questioned the defendants, who ad- mitted the offence.-Fach of the defendants was fined 6/- and dismissed with a caution. Damage to a School. Four other small boys were summoned for committing damage to a school belonging to the Corporation.—A Police-Constable said they were walking from one roof to the other by means of a. ladder. A pane of glass was bro- ken.—The Stipendiary: Thege four boys must pay a, fine of 6/- each. I hope your mothers will do their utmost to stop these boys doing this damage.

I TUESDAY i

TUESDAY. Before Mr. R. A. Griffith (Stipendiary) and Mr. D. C. Evans. Indecent Language. Sarah Jane Murray was summoned ior using indecent language at Picton Street, Merthyr.- P.S. Hunter said that he saw defendant in the above-mentioned street busing most filthy lan- guage. He followed her into the house and took her address.—Defendant, who did not appear, was fined 9/ or 7 days. Number Obscured. I 1 nomas Weston Beech was summoned lor rid- ing his motoa- cycle with the identification plate obscured.—P.S. Hunted testified to seeing de- fendant with the number not visible.—He ad- mitted the offence, and was fined 3/ Excessive Speed. I Elias and Trevor Jones, ivoeraare, were sum- moned for driving a motor cycle in a manner dangerous to the public.-P.S. Hunter said that at 5.45 p.m. on Sunday last he saw de- fendants going about 25 miles per hour, one of the cycles nearly knocking down an old ladv. He shouted to Elias Jones to slacken up a l?-? tie, which he did, the other continuing bis pace.—Chief Constable Wilson said that he saw one of the deferidantk; driving a motor- cycle. He estimated the epeed at anything bet- ween 2;") and 40 miles an hour. The cycle wm goinit around the Gwuelodygarth corner like a fiash.—Defendante were fined 40/- eae. More Neighbourly Summonses. jVlaiy "Williams summoned Maud PrioB for us- ing insulting language at Primrose Hill.—Com- plainant said she came back from town. and saw Mrs. Price, who called her a lot of names, at the same time coming into the passage with a stone in hea- hand, which she had taken up to throw at he,Defendant, who was fined 9/- or 7 days, stated that the trou ble arose over her child. Wounding Charge Dismissed. Kobert bulhvan was charged with wounding Maiv Sullivan on August 18.—Mr. Lewis (so- licit,ol appeared for defendant.—Mary Sullivan said she lived at Adam and Eve Court with her husband (prisoner). On Wednesday last. Aug, 18, she left the house at 9 a.m. Her husband was then out. She stopped out till In o'clock, and then returned .—She said prisoner was sit- ting down tnying to cut up some bacon. He said, "Where have vou been: Why don't veu come in and get some breakfast rèady?" They began to quarrel. It was stated that at ta time the prisoner was standing between the door and her, and in order to escape and get out of the way of her husband, she came into contact with the table knife.—Rose Gladwin corroborated the above evidence.—The case was dismissed, as there was no evidence of any felo- nious intent. Drop of Stout." Jane Evans was charged with being 41rank and disorderly in High Street. Penydarren. Defendant pleaded not guilty and said she onlv had a drop of stom.-Stipendiary: 9 í-, or 7 days. Drunk and Disorderly. Cornelius Connelly was charged with -being drunk and disorderly, and was Rifhard Fenwick was chargei with a similar offence, and fined 13/

Penrtiiwceitier DCM Hero

Penrtiiwceitier D. C. M. Hero. WELCOMED HOME. J enrhiwceiber did honour to a D.C.M. hqro on .Friday evening last, when a smoking ooJt- cert, which was presided over by Coun. G. Hall, was he)d in the Lee Hotel Penrhiwceiber, on the occasion of the visit on leave from the front of Sergt. F. C. Norman, of 63 Church Street, Penrhiwoeiber, who was awarded the Distin- guished CondtJct Medal for conspiouou-q gal- lantry in the field, both in handling the men under his charge and in tending the wounded. at Neuve Chapelie on March 14 last. Sergt. Norman, who worked at the local col- liery prior to the war, re-enlisted in his old regiment, the 2nd W arwickshires, having seen active service previously in South Africa and India. He re-joined his regiment last January, and was quiokly drafted out to the front. H. was in the severest fighting around Fleur Beaux and Armentieres. His regiment led the charge at Neuve Chapelle, in which the Wiltshires and Greimadier Guards suffered heavily. They had to advance 1,600 yards in order to captilre the enemy's trenches. This they succeeded in ac- complishing at a big loss, his platoon losing 27 out of 64 and the regiment in a similar pro portion. They retired at nightfall after fight- ing since 9.30 tn the morning. They were ob- liged to fall back. Sergt. Norman was reluctant to speak of the service he had rendered in most gallantly ten, ding the wounded in this battle whilst under a heavy tire from the enemy. He had a number of miraculous escapes at the front. On one OC" easion a piece of shell struck him with the re- sult that the Princess Mary presentation box, which he carried in his pocket, saved him by receiving the force of the impact. On another occasion a shell burst near to him, and a piece of it took away his knapsack buckle from off s back, but inflicting no other damage. Sertg. Norman, who has spent a few days with his wife at Church Street, left home to" return to the front on Tuesday.

Advertising

HAVE YOU PAIN? J, Svrift, -ttercliffe, Shefiield. $ays: The first close gave me great reliet. I can confidently say that one box of these pills has done me more good than all the medicine I have taken. Mrs. A. Wilkinson, i) f Ne/son, states: "My sister, who suffered from weak kidneys, took one box, and it hap done her more good than pounds spent on medical men. HOLPROYD'S GRAVEL PILLS, a positive cure for Gnavel, Pains in the Back, Dropsy, Bright's Disease of the Kidneys, Gout, Sciatica; is. I '-id., atl chemists; post free 12 stamps.— HOLDROYD'S MEDICAL HALL. Cleckheaton.