Collection Title: Merthyr Pioneer

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 8 of 8
Full Screen
11 articles on this page
Esperanto

Esperanto. (To the Editor of the PIONEER). Sir —With your courteous permission. I would fain draw the attention of the more thoughtful part of your readers to the auxiliary Interna- tiona! language. Esperanto. Already the word Esperanto is a synonym in the English langu- age for anything universally comprehensible, and this fact is eloquent testimony to the spread of the Esperanto movement. The Inter- naticnal language is the invention of Dr. Zairinhof. a Polish Jew. It was first given to the world as long ago as 1887, but during its infancy it had to prove its fitness to survive by encountering the struggle for existence which is the lot of all new projects and novel ideas. The rapid and triumphant progress of Esperan- to. however, only dates from the beginning of the piesent century. From 1905 until the outbreak of the present war a series of World Congresses in Esperanto have been held in various Continental towns-Boulogne. Geneva, Camliidge. Dresden, Cracow, etc. The great- est of all was to have taken place during the first week in August, 1914 in Paris, but the outbreak of hostilities destroyed what would have been an unparaJelled demonstration. The present writer, with many other fellow-Esper- antists from South Wales, who had journeyed to Paris to attend the congress' had a most unpleasant experience. Their "fay was limited to eight hours—surely a record in "flying vis- its." The return from Paris was a panic-stric- ken Htgiza. Had the congress been held. it wouH have reached the high-water mark in Esperanto Congresses—some 4,000 people from all over the world having sent in their names. Coming nearer home, we find the British Esoeranto Association with over 150 affiliated loca! clubs, and. a more homely fact still, we can boast of the South Wales Esperanto Lea- gue whose secretary is W. E. Davies. 97 Con- way Road. Treorchy. This League was star- t-ed four years ago after the Antwerp Esper- anto Congress, where the scattered Esperanto ist.,3 of South Wales first "found themselves." Since then. quarterlv meetings of the League havj been held at Cardiff. Merthyr (three times), Pontypridd. Swansea and Treorchy. It cannot be said that Esperanto is un-I known in Merthyr, though permanent organ- ised expression has not yet been attained, de- I spite many brave attempts. The mainspring of wha'- successful activity there has been in the Merthyr district has hitlierfo been at the little village of Pontsticill. Clashes have from time to time been held at Pontsticill. Pant, or Dcwlais. In addition, many dozens of the booklet. "Esperanto for All." have found a rea(i. sale at our bookellers and newsagents. But i-. cannot be said that Esperanto has yet set the Taff on fire. And yet Merthyr is a cos- moj v litan town. We find here Welsh, English. Iris I Jews. Spaniards, (and now) Belgians, the French governess or dancing master, and the odoriferous Breton onion seller "Shoni Wim- ons I dare not begin to enumerate the vari- ous isms which w-e-find in Merthyr s con- gema. soil, lest I encroach overmuch on vour valua ble space. But is it too much to h£ ope that those of your readers who have broad ideals and sympathies—people of cool heads and ware hearts—will give the Esperanto ideal and movement a careful and unprejudiced examina- tion s We have been told to "think imperial- ly, but the present crisis, while making such thinking easy. encourages us also to think "in- ternationally." To all those who think interna, tionally and in terms of humanity as a whole, Esperanto should make a special and irresisti- ble appeal. It i impossible to csfcivass a- tithe of the sub- ject it. a letter like this, but a wrd must be said about Esperanto and the present world- conflict. The British Esperanto Association has by voluntary subscriptions among its members bought and equipped two motor ambulances which it has placed at the disposal of the Bel- gian Army. The Universal Esperanto Associa- tion whch ha, its headquarters at Geneva, is a society for the utilisation of Esperanto for practical purposes—commerce travel, etc. Since the outbreak of the war it has busied itself with the task of tracing those who are report- ed a. "lost" in the casualty lists of the various belligerents, and it is gratifying to learn that it has succeeded in tracing many thousands of prisosers. to the jo and gratitude of their sorrowing relatives. Finally, it may be men- tiore- that the German Government has offi- ciaUv been making use of Esperanto in its pro-r?ganda to innence neutral States. _Tlh^es present writer was the recipient of a bulky pac- ket of literature, including such documents as the German White Book. Speeches of the Kai- ser. etc., and all printed in Esperanto. The sender: even begged for my "esteemed opin- ion" (>f the situation, which. I can assure vou, Sir I gave them in no ambiguous terms. U Tne war is not over vet. but when the world again enjoys the blessing of peace, it will be. verv different varld from what it was before the wai It will be a time of repair and reconstruction, of progress and advance to- ward: a new world wherein dwelleth righteous- ness. It will be. let us hope. a new era of In- ternational inter-communion. But if cosmopoli- tanism in Internationalism is to be something more than a simulacrum, and something more than a Tuxurv for a favoured few then Espe- ranto or its equivalent—if such can be found- is absolutely necessary. Any international move- ment worthy of the name must be based on mutual understanding—a mutual community of thought. To attain tkis there must be a eommoi medium for self-expression: commun- ity of thought postulates a common idiom. Fun her, it is imperative that the community of thought should embrace the rank and file— the genera l body of citizens. Esperanto alone olatmw to be able to create and diffuse a really demcratic international culture. ESPER ANTISTO.

Off to the Bungalow

Off to the Bungalow MERTHYR MOTORISTS FINED AT MONMQUTH. Kotoi cases again occupied the attention of the Monmouth Magistrates on Wednesday, Ar- thur X. Fisher, chauffeur. Merthyr, and Henry Harvey Boots, dentist, Merthyr. were summon- ed for dr iving motor cars at a speed dangerous to the public in Momnouth-street, Monmouth, on the evening of Saturday, August 14. Defendant" with others, were going to a bun"alow at St. Briaxels to spend the week- end Police and other witnesses described the excessive speed at which the cars were driven. The layor reina rked that some motorists ap- peared to have the idea the roads were prac- ticallv made for thf111 Each defendant was fined L5.

Advertising

Has your name appeared in our 10,000 Shil-I lings' Fund list? If not, let it be there next week.

THE BAD BOY OF MERTHYR I

THE BAD BOY OF MERTHYR. I TEACHERS' CONFERENCE 10 TACKLE I THE PROBLEM. Speaking at Wednesday's meeting of the Mer- thyr Education Committee, Coun. D. W. Jones said he had noticed lately in the local Police Court that there had been quite a large num- ber or j mall boys brought up lor various offen- ces. The amount of wilful damage' done in the borough was exceedingly great. They had had to complain of damage done to their public pro- perty in various ways. Only on Tuesday he saw a lot ut smal l boys brought before the Stipen, diary for damaging the schools at Troedyrhiw, and it had been reported to him that they had had. hundreds of panes of glass broken in vari- ous schools in the district during the holidays, and large number of children were brought up tor stealing coke and things of tha. sort. It occurred to hun that they ought to take steps with a view to inducing the teachers to deal with this very important question, and trying to create some sort of improvement in this im- portant direction. Otherwise the state of things in the borough would become very dangerous. The amount of damage was enormous, and stone throwing and little things like that were get- ting almost beyond the powers of the police to deal with. It seemed to him that if the Direc- tor of Education could confer with the head teachers to see what could be done to improve matters, they would be doing a really good work to the community. Coun. Francis regarded Coun. Jones' state- ments as a reflection on the teachers. He went about the streets a good deal in the evening, and he did not see that they as an authority were doing much to assist the work the teach- ers already did. Little boys were allowed to roam tlie streets until 11.30 and after selling papers. A tightening of the bye-laws so as to prevent this would, in his opinion, do much to improve matters. A teacher had on one night recently called his attention to one of these little boys who had entered a shop and who, in the absence of any other person at the mo- ment. was making strenuous efforts to reach the till. Coun. Jones disclaimed any attention to re- flect upon the teachers. Coun. Francis always twisted his words. He knew very well that it was chiefly the home life that was responsible for this thing, and that the teachers were do- ill a II in then- power to fight it. But the tea- chers had got opportunities, and if they could draw public attention to this evil, and so effect an improvement, they would be doing the com- munity a real service. Unless they did this they were bleeding up a lot of hooligans. It was decided to ask the Director of Educa- tion to convene a meeting of teachers to dis- cuss the matter; the Chairman and any mem- lrei- of the Committee who desired w attend and air their views, to lie at liberty to do so.

The PalaceI

The Palace. I The fine weather seems to make little differ- ence to the attendance at this popular house; evidently the excellent programmes submitted by Mr. Hall-Jones, the manager, are taking the pu blie fancy. He makes every effort to provide what his three years' experience of Meithvr audiences indicates as to what they like iri first-class Cine plays, and he seldom fails to meet the demand, to the satisfaction of a large and appreciative clientiel. As has already been announced, a very fine production has been secured at considerable cost in "The Ama- zing Mr. Fellman." for Thursday to Saturday of this week. This picture has many attractive features, the principal being the fact that many of the scenes were enaoted on the famous White Star liner, "Tlie Olympic." Consequently it is rightly called an 'Oceanic drama." Sensa- tional incidents are a feature of the program- me for this part of the week, as in addition to the above fine picture, there is another good picture, "The Great Railway Smash." Follow- ing these are a number of amusing pictures and the latest news. On Monday next the special picture is a fine Pathe drama entitled "Rods of Wrath." a three part American drama, introducing unique pic- tures of an explosion and a fire on board a sailing ship. This drama features the produ- cer and Eleanor Woodruff. "The Master Key" still goiiig strong. is in its 13th episode, and will reaeh the rlirnax in the 15th. Another dra- ma is "On the Stroke of 5." and still another, A Fight for Life." Comedy, interest and news items complete a fine programme, supported by, charming and appropriate music. On Thursday of next week. a problem play will be introduced, "Shadows," It British and Colonial production In Harold Weston. and featuring Fay Temple and A. V. Bramblej i. a storv of the power of convention. A fine histori- ca l drama, The Earl of Essex. will also be a hown, and the usual selection of up-to-date comic and comedy pictures. The Directors of the Merthyr Palace, Ltd.. have decided to give a special benefit in aid of f he •funds of the Merthyr General Hospital, on Thursday. Sept. 9. when the whole proceeds of that day will be liandeZI over. Tickets are now on sale, and may be obtained from the Nurses. Further particulars of the programme. etc., will be duly announced. Every ef- fort will, be made to secure a successful benefit entertainment, sc that the funds of the Hospital may be considerably augmented. All picture lover5 should keep in mind the Palace, and watch future announcements. There are some Tory special productions com- ing on which will set Merthyr talking and, incidentally, the Pa-lace will be the centre of attraction for many days to come.

ss Pictures and Stories of the Jr Great War

ss| Pictures and Stories of the ;'î,J:r" Great War. The Mayor is actively concerning himself with his new task of raising between jEl,800 and £ 1.500 by voluntary effort to help swell the funds of the Merthyr and Aberdare Joint Hospital of wounded soldiers before the close of his year of office. Already His Worship has got several schemes afoot, and one of these which will, we trust, commend itself to all our readers is the Stories and Pictures of the W ar Evening that he' has arranged for September 4th. The Mayor has been successful in obtain- ing for that evening Miss S. Macnaughten, who has been at the Front in Belgium since September last and has brought back with her some vivid impressions from the slaughter. A keen observer and fluent speaker, her lec- ture gives us the woman's point of view of war. a point of view that has been too much ignored during these last few months of hor- ror. The pictures too. are wonderful slides from photographs taken right on the spot by the lecturer, and they will be shown by Mr. J. Victor Harrison. It is to be hoped that the Mayor will have an opportunity of presiding over a large audience in the Drill Hall on the occasion. The prices have been very sensibly graduated from 3d. to 2/ and we trust that the hall will be crowded.

Let Us Go Forward

Let Us Go Forward. WITHOUT THE HOPE THAT SOCIALISM INSPIRES ALL IS GLOOM. WITH IT THE WORLD IS SANE, By JOHN M, WORK. 1 am bold enough to believe that any honest investigator will agree with me that capitalism is a mere temporary makeshift, and that So- cialism is to be its natural, necessary and in- ev it able s uccessor. If I am correct in this diagnosis of the state of your mind, I have one very important word to say to you. Read the fundamental Socialist work, and take an active part in the party organisation. It is of supreme importance that every So- cialist should be thoroughly grounded in the fundamental principles of scientific Socialism. It is likewise of supreme importance that ev- ery Socialist should co-operate with every other Socialist by aggressive activity in the Party organisation. Trie High Mission. The Socialist Party has started on its career with a full knowledge of its high mission. The time has come in the history of the world for conscious evolution. We Socialist,5 know full well that the economic laws compel the aboli- tion of capitalism and the introduction of So- cialism. And we have deliberately organised in ord er to make the transition from capitalism to Socialism as smooth and easy and rapid as possible. The Work Ahead. In order to do this successfully, it is neces- sary for us to remove economic bewilderment from the minds of the people, and put the clear, simple truth in its place. It is necessary for us to send speakers to every corner of the land. It is necessary for us to put Socialist literature into the hands of every person. It is necessary that we maintain a live press. It is necessary to keep on doing these things un- til the object is accomplished. To do this requires an aggressive and syste- matic organisation, ramifying into every local- ity in the country. The importance of systematic and effective organisation cannot be over-estimated. A Splendid Result. It was the effort put forth by the organised Socialists of the United States that brought such a splendid result in the Presidential election. Remember that. Organisation is the key to success. Remember that. Turn it over in your mind. Let it filter into your blood. The capitalist class has no fear of a million un-organised Socialists. It is the organised Socialist movement with its batteries that never sleep, that gives them the cold shivers. The calm confidence of the organised Socialist is the most terrific fact that the capitalists ever encountered. A Rank and File Question. The Socialist Party is a rank and tile Party. Each act of every officer is subject to referen- dum vote of the membership. Each officer is also subject to recall by vote of the member- ship. The Socialist Party never slumbers. never sleeps. It. carries on an incessant agitation be- tween campaigns as well as during campaigns. It intends that Socialism shall be speedily realised. Realisation Sure. -1 I I 1,' -1 1 Anyone at all acq nam tea with we industrial situation and with the temper of the magnifi- cent army of Socialists of this and other lands, will look upon this as a positive certaintv. In the Socialist the zeal of the crusader is combined with political common sense—a com- bination that must win. The Socialist is not a quitter. He is here to stay. The future is his. He is the man of destiny. He is practical. He is the only man who has interpreted the spirit of the age. He is the (only man who has read the signs of the times. He is the only man who has discovered the shadow8 that coming events are casting before them. He proclaims the truth. He is, therefore, invulnerable. He draws his shining lance, and challenges every other- school of economic thought in the world to meet him n the arena of debate. And they slink away, conscious that they are in the wrong. The Next Evolutionary Phase. Socialism is the next step in the evolution of humanity. The world is being urged toward it with winged speed by the action of irresistible eco- nomic laws. The fingers of all past ages point forward to In a world of trouble, sorrow, Socialism is the only hope. Without it all is gloom, the times are out of joint, and the world has gone crazy. With it, the world is sane, and the future bright with better things.

Enlistment by ResolutionI

Enlistment by Resolution. I COUN. FRANCIS' SERIOUS STATEMENT. I Tile Director of Education reported to We i- nesday's meeting of the Education Committee that three more of the male teaching .taffs of the borough had enlisted, and mentioned that he might find it necessary to call in the services of married teachers. It was stated, in reply to a question, that this brought the number of persons from the Education Depart- ment with the colours to 20. Coun. ^rancis said he understood from talk he heard that a good many of these enlistments were brought about by a resolution by Ooun. D. W. Jones that anyone joining after Sep. 1 would not receive the war bonus. He did not knew whether or not it was Coun. Jones' in- tention to force their staffs into the army, but it appeared to be the result. The men argued that if Conscription were to come-and many people seemed to think it would—they laad better join the Army before September 1 and have their wages made up, else the^ would receive only their army money. When they endeavoured to economise on some points, they were sometimes out-manoeuvred by other eco- nomists in their midst. The Chairman (Coun. Morrell) said he did not think that the resolution had had very much to do with those who had enlisted. Coun D. W. Jones: It is a very unpleasant reflection on those young men who are doing their duty to their country. Ald. Thomas: No, not to their country. They are actuated by mercenary motives, he says.

Our London Letter

Our London Letter. The Labour Gazette" of the Board of Trade issued last week is worthy of study. It gives a detailed account of the rise in the price of food for the year of war ending 31st July. The rise generally showing, taking the prices for July. 1914. as normal, a sudden jump of 16 per cent. in August, a drop to 10 per cent, in September, then a steady rise up to the end of the period under review to 34 per cent. The usual heavier burden falling on the poor is shown here again. Foreign beef rose 40 per cent., whie British beef went up by 34. per cent.. the inferior cuts of foreign beef going up by 60 per cent. A like rise took place in the price of fish. The cause of this latter is easily seen in the fact that from Janaury to July, 1914. the amount of fish landed on our shores was 5.977,365 cwts., while for the same period year this year it has been 3,123,256 cwts. Potatoes have gone up 25 per cent, while the news that the Jersey crop is little over half the usual is not a good indication. Matches are likely to increase in price again owing to the shortage of supplies of Russian aspen, lack of ships for transport, and lack of labour, especially in Russia. Aus- tria. and Belgium, whence we obtain large supplies in normal times. This points to a re- ol n t ,,P, to a re- vival of the wax vesta, which fell into disuse a few years ago. Just at present there is a large supply of plums at very low prices, mainly ow- ing to the import of more than usua l of green- gages from Spain and France, which, having had to be brought by s lower transports, have become over-ripe on the way. It is little- com- fort to the poor to learn- from the Gazette that the prices of food in the enemies' land are. if anything, higher than those paid here, with, perhaps, the sole exception of sugar. In our younger days when first we came to Town, our one great dread was not of lasing our way. but of losing our not-over-bulging purse. Then it used to be "Beware ef Pick- pockets"; now it is "Mind your Pockets." that is placorded everywhere likely to he crow- ded. The type of depredator at present is the sporty one whose chief sphere of influence was the racecourse: now, except for some camps and military recuperative establishments in some of them, devoid of crowds. The places to be especially watchful at are Tube stations and car apd 'bus termini. During the last fortnight baoon has risen four times. The causes of the former high prices were mainly sinking of food ships, increase of freights, and raising of insurance rates. But this latest rise, as in the case of butter, is caus- ed by the fact that as we have ceased supply, ing coal to the Danes, they are now paying greater attention to the German markets. Ber- lin has also been a heavy buyer of cheese from Holland, so that Dutch cheese has practieallv disappeared from London shop counters. We are threatened also with a rTse in the price of bananas to 2d. each ere long, but the war is not accountable for that. A hurricane de- stroyed 80 or 90 per cent. of the banana crop of Jamaica. We thought two months ago had seen the high-water mark in the price of second-hand steam tonnage, but that is not so. Owing to the smaller choice and the concentration of ship- building firms' energies on work for the Navy, it is well nigh impossible to get an ordinary cargo or passenger boat built. As an example of the upward tendency in prices, we note a ship condemned by the Prize Court and sold in January for £ 65,000. was bought last week by a colonial compiny for £125,, and they, in turn, have already refused a sum that would put a few thousands in their coffers on a fur- ther transaction on the same boat. The chief place where they are wanted is the Pacific, where the Japs are ncreasmg their carrying trade prodigiously. Preparations are being made to give notice on the first day of the meeting of Parliament in both houses—though it is not strictly neces- sary in the Lords-to ask the Premier to name a dav for the discussion of Compulsory Service. The opposers of Conscription are not likely to oppose this, as it will be far better and only proper that the matter should be threshed out on the floor of the House, rather than that the matter should be ruslied by sporadic newspaper agitation. The Government stands where. it was two months ago. The change is eminently one which must first be asked for by those in authority in naval and military matters. It is now clear that the Register will not be ready until well into October, and voluntary service will have at least one final chance after the collation of those statistics. Interest in the war re-awakened somewhat last week-end. Throughout the week, when Greek, Serbian, and Bulgarian Parliaments were re-eponed, expectations arose to its feet perhaps, but not to tip-toe. The end of the week gave us one (ioOp. Italy declared war on Turkey. These are queer problems. You will remember we were at war for some days with Germanv ere we named Austria also. Now Italy has been at war with Germany and Austria for some weeks before taking the sword against Turkey. Soon we may expect Italian soldiers to fight shoulder to shoulder with your local Terriers who are at the Dardanelles. Bulgaria still hangs back, and we are not surprised, re- membering how she was disappointed by the Treaty of Bucharest. To promise her what she wants means to take away from Serbia. Serbia is, at the time of writing, considering the proposals of the greater Powers, to which. if she assents, we will most likely be able to offer Bulgaria sue h territory as war prize that will induce her to join us. Some changes have taken place this week in proprietorship and editorial chairs involving the two Standards J) the "Pall Mall Ga- zette," and the "Observer." Although the latter is the least affected outwardly, it is in connection with this paper that the greater in- terest is awakened. Mr. J. L. Garvin, one of the greatest men in journalism to-day, was, and is. the editor of the Sunday paper, but he is relinquishing his guidance of the Pall Mall Gazette," a paper whose connection years ago with John Morley and W. T. Stead will keep its name alive. A few years ago Mr. Garvin was the Napoleon of the Unionist Party, and his powerful pen was its greatest mspirer and com- mander. Whether this curtailment is the out- ward and visible sign of waning influence of the great star remains to be seen. It is one of the most interesting problems that has pre- sented itself lately, especially to politico-jortr- nalists. The comments of the Committee of Public Accounts on matters coming under its eyes in"l various domains make an interesting pot- pourri. In 1908 they reoommended 'to the office of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland a method for saving some hundreds of pounds on his official correspondence. It has just been adopted after seven years. The National Health Insurance Fund had not put its house in order for thel period ending January 11. 1914, ifliaH: it might be prepared for the visitors. Last year th& Committee asked if persons raised to judicial appointments ought not to furnish proof of good health, as in other civil commissions. They hope the reply will be forwarded when it is ready. Let us hope they won't have to wait another seven years. A governor is supposed to pay for the installation of electric light to his residence. The bill catne to £21 but because His Excellency we hope the appellation is correct used such terrible language that he was let off. The agents for oonveying depor- tees did so last year for ;C5W less than their predecessors. In the Island of St. Kilda, Scot- land. there are neither rates nor taxes and practically no currency. The profit on prison farms was £1,239 on an acreage of 1,044 shared among Dartmoor, Parkhurst. Borstal and Felt- ham so all good Socialists who may become His Majesty's guests under the Defence of the Realm or other Acts should ask to go to one of these places to contribute towards the coffers of the State. The Post Office people ought to be pretty clean, seeing that they spend at least £ 2,000 on towels. The profit on bronze coinage for the last financial year was £ 258,318- —and yet some people think Socialism an unre- alisable dream! It is stated that the foreign newspaper em- bargo is now off in Germany, and that English and French newspapers are selling like the pro- verbial hot cakes. If this is so, we cannot help but read into it that the authorities are prepar- ing for the worst. and that they are getting the people gradually innured to a less optimis- tic view than they have been led to take through the roseate reports supplied by Wolf and the famous wireless.

Appointing a Caretaker

Appointing a Caretaker. 40 APPLICANTS AND A DISCUSSION. The Merthyr Education Committee had be.- ford them on Wednesday a list of 40 applicants, for the post of caretaker of the new Gellyfaelog. School, and the meeting decided to reduce this number by ballot to 6 to appear before the Committee for final selection. Upon the papers- being counted, it was found that five men had secured places, but there was a tie for the sixth place. Aid. Thomas pointed out that in the selec- tion miners had predominated over the other men applying—two of the five were miners and expressed the opinion that some reference ought to haxe been made to the qualifications, of the men for this special work. The Chairman (Coun. JIorrelI) pointed out that lie had invited remarks before the seleo- tioa was made, but the Committee had decided to proceed with the vote. He was afraid that they would have to leave the question of quali- fication until the matter came before them for final seletcioti. Coun D. W. Jones claimed that it had always been the principle of the Corporation, when it had men in their employ, to give them a, chance of any vacancy. They were now dispens- ing with the services of two men from Oy- farthfa Park. Both of these men had been with them for some years, and there was now no work for them owing to the resolution of the Parks Pommittee to curtail work. He was assured that two better men for the vacancy they were considering that day could not be, found in the whole area, and he did appeal to the Committee to give them a chance. The Chairman: I cannot go behind the re- solution. It is no use overriding what you do, or you will never get on. He was prepared to accept a resolution that the two men who had tied for sixth place should be included. Aid. Thomas: I move that eight be selected to appear before us. Coun. D. W. Jones seconded. The Chairman: You must be bound by your own findings. v v Coun. D. W. Jones claimed that there was no reason to bind themselves now that they found that they had make a mistake. Now that they saw that there was a case made out for the extension of the number, was it not better to rectify the error now than to go on for many years, and suffer by it? That Committee was not like the Law of the Medes and Per- sians its findings were not unalterable. itie Chairman: If you sat in this chair, you. would desire to get on with your business. Coun Francis objected to any special plead- ing OH behalf of any employees. Some consider ration should be given for the men brought up. in the borough, if it was possible to give them k-,t job. Fpou being put to the vote, the resolution to Increase the number to 8 was carried by one vote and on the motion of Coun. D. W. Jones it was decided to make up this number by the two men who had tied for ixth place, and o. of the "discharged park employees.

French Democracy and the War

French Democracy and the War. GENERAL CONFEDERATION RESOLU- TION. L' Humanite," the French Socialist journal, publishes the following resolution adopted by the General Confederation of Labour. To fix the position of the Frenok working classes in the present war. the eonferenoe, disapproving of any policy of conquest, ap- peals to the international proletariat to see that the peace obtained at the price of so many sacrifices and so many horrors shall be the triumph of right over force, and that from these guarantees accepted by all countries, recourse to compulsory arbitration, the sup- pression of secret diplomacy, and the end of competitive armaments, there may arise the possibility of the formation of a federation of nations assuring to ail peoples the rigiit to dispose freely of theselves and safeguarding the independence of all nationalities. The conference, in order to affirm with force and effectiveness the above point of view urgently calls upon all- organised prole lariats to accept the proposal of the Ameri- can federation of Labour to hold an interna- tional congress at the same place and date at which the conference of diplomatists to fix the conditions of peace is held, This is spendid news so far as it goes. We trust our French comrades will see the reason- ableness of calling such a conference at once, in order that the working class throughout the world may declare the end of all war and their determination to secure such economic reforms as will ensure to the peoples of every nation control of their own land and all its resources, and so prevent in future the hideous spectacle of the working people being set to slay each other at the bidding of kings and emperors. Printed and Published by the Labour Pioneer Press, Limited, Williams' Square, Glebeland Street. Merthyr Tydfil, August 28, 19)5. or