Collection Title: Merthyr Pioneer

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
15 articles on this page
Advertising

THE NEW ORGANISATION. By Tom Smith. 1- See Page 3

Advertising

THE POLITICAL GAMBLERS By W. C. Anderson, M.P. See Page 3 -4K

THE MERTHYR VACANCY

THE MERTHYR VACANCY. WITHDRAWAL OF SMILLIE. I WiNSTONE NOW I.L.P. NOMINEE. Writing on Thursday with only the first returns from the Aberdare Miners' Ballot to hana, it is too early to say that the political position in tlie Merthyr Borough is free from doubt from a Labour point of view but it is not too early to say that the position is plain arid straightforward so far as the forces of Democracy in the Borough are concerned. It seems impossible that any other name than that of James Winstone can go forward to Saturday's Conference of the L.R.A. as the Mi- ners' nominee, nd should that be true, then the issue is entirely free from doubt. fffl So far only the lodges in the Aberdare area I have completed their ballot yet J. Winstone is only 747 behind the local candidate, and it is practically impossible to suppose that the fi- nal result of the w hole Boroughs can be any-; thing but an overwhelming majority for the President of the Federation. Mucli has been said abeut the I.L.P. attitude and position, but for the most part alT that has appeared has been surmise and conjec- ture In one place the I.L.P. is regarded as an out-faced plotter, and in another as a ma- fevolent disturber of constitutional rights and privileges. As a matter of fact, the I.L. P. is neither. The joint conference of the Borough I.L.P.\s held 011 October 2 in Bentley's Hall unanimously decided to forward the nomina- tion of Mr. Hobert Smillie. President of the M.F.G.B.. first by reason of his standing in the miners' industrial organisation—for it was recognised that the large percentage of miners called for specia l consideration and. secondly, by reason of his national eminence in the I.L.P. movement, It was. it is now safe to say. felt at that conference that Smillie's adoption of the post was doubtful, and so as a second no- minee the Conferenoe unanimously voted for James Winstone, than whom no man in South Walea ha." worked harder for the I.L.P.. and non ? is more faithful in his adherence to the cause. The difficulty that arose from Smillie's elimination from the ballot was not thus so great as was expected, since whilst his ac- ceptance of nomination would undoubtedly have resulted in a peculiar position, his consent to nomination had not been obtained, and the I.L.P. were confident that things would right themselves ultimately. The difficulties have beer, purely hypothetic, and have given more concern to the outside political organisations and individual busyoodies than they have to any I.L.Peer who has attended recent Party meetings, and has kept in cloge touch with the quick march of events. Smillie's refusal to accept nomination last week, whilst giving us all ugret, did not come as a surprise; and simplified matters by leaving the other nomi- nee—-James Winstone—still in the field in the Miners' Ballot, and with every prospect of win- ning through against his local contestant. So far is tli(, T.L.P. of the Merthyr Bo- roug hs are concerned; their official nominee is .Tames Winstone. who succeeded to the positiom automatically on the refusal of Bob Smillie to allow his name to go forward to Saturday's meeting. bv rea.son of the Conference decision on October 2. and this was re-affirmed at Tuesday's meeting of the I.L.P., though as a reserve" measure it was decided to adjourn that meeting to to-night, so that in the unlikely event of Winstone being knocked out of the Miners' Ballot, the IL.P. would still be in a po-stion to nominate a Party candidate. For tie I.L.P. will fight, and fight hard. against any man who will not subscribe to the plat- form of the Party which so far has held the seat for 15 years. So far as Saturday's Conference is concern- ed. it is certain now that the only names that will he brought forward are those of the Min- ers nominee, the I.L.P. noiiiinei? Winstone in the event of his toj)l)ln,()- tiie Ballot. or eon; entiiv that his name should go forward— and Mr. t. Griffiths., of Neath, who has been brought forward by the Steclsmelters; and it is not unt-il that Conference has met and de- cided. that we shall be in a position to disclose the name of the Official Nominee of the Mer- thyr Labour Party for the vacancy. notwith- standing the efforts made on many hands to de- clare otherwise.

Wesleyan Methodist Intercession Day I

Wesleyan Methodist Intercession Day MOVE THAT CAME FROM MERTHYR. Noxt/ Sundav October 31, is a Day ol lntci- cession for the 'Empire and our Allies through- F ile ap- out the Wesley an Methodist Church. The ap- pointment of the day was made by the annual conference, which represents the churches of Grut Britain and the Mission Field. The Irish and Cohanial Churches are not under the direction of the English Conference, but they are affectionately invited to hold similar services. Thus universal Wesleyan Methodism will offer an act of simultaneous intercession. The remarkable organisation of the Chnrch makes this possible. The "direction" of the conference is held sacred by every minister, lay official and member of the church. One of the prime movers in this matter is directly connected with Merthyr Wesleyan Me- thodism. This is Lieut.-Col. C. S. Dennis. Di- rector of the South Wales Railway Company. Col. Denniss is the lion, treasurer of the Mer- thyr Mis'-ion. and is deeply interested in the cause. He was the mover of the resolution in conference, and is a member of the committee appointed to arrange the order of service. Another fact of interest to South Wales is the presence on the same committee of the two Cabinet Ministers who came down with Mr. Lloyd George to assist in the settlement of the coa! strike—Mr. Arthur Henderson and Mr. Walter Hunciman. Tn" Wesleyan Churches in the Merthyr Cir- cuit. which include Wesley, Pontmorlais: Shi- loh C'liurch Street: Dowlais High Street, and Wesley. Troedyrhiw, will give prominence to the Intercession Services.

THE MINERS THIRD BALLOTI I

THE MINERS' THIRD BALLOT. FIGURES GOING WINSTONE-WARDS. S.W.M.F. PRESIDENT LEADS BY 1,757. All the returns for the third and final Miners' Ballot for the choice of a .Federation Nominee for the Merthyr seat are not to hand as yet Aberdare being not yet completed ,and Taff and Oynon not having come to hand at the moment of going to press, but Winstone has a big lead on the ifgures to date. On the figures given below, Winstone has a lead of 1.757-his total poll being 5,292 as against Stanton's 3.535. Here are the results, Merthyr and DowJais be- ing complete, the other districts incomplete: — MERTHYR (Complete). Stanton. South Pit No. 1, 104: South Pit -No. 2, 44; Graig Pit- and Level, 84: Clynmil Drift, 97 Castle Pit and Level. 131; Getliin Pit, 73; CWlll ])u and Mountain Level. 26: Llewellyn Mer- thyr, —total. 594. Winstone. South Pit No. 1. 373; South Pit No. 2. 254; Graig Pit and Level, 267; Clynmil Drift. 122; Castle Pit and Level. 370; Getliin Pit. 269; Cwm Du and Mountain Level. 256; Llewellyn 1,966. DOWLAIS (Details not to hand). I Stanton, 4S5. I Winstone. 1.617. L. ABERDARE. I btanton. I Dvllas Colliery, 161 Bwllfa No. 2. 249; Blaennant. 133; Bwllfa 286; Blaengwawr, 63; LJettyshenkin, 462; Penrhiwceiber, 357; Aber- anian, 548; Cwmneol. 197-total, 2,456. Winstone. I Colliery, 66: Bwllfa No. 2, 304; Blaennant, 33; Bwllfa No. 1, 365; Blaengwawr, 53; Llettvshenkii). 87: Penrhiwceiber, 324; Aberaman, 254; Cwmneol. 223-total, 1,709.

Motor and Cart Collide I

Motor and Cart Collide. I WOUNDED TOMMIES' ALARMING I EXPERIENCE. An alarming collision oetween a motor ear and a horse and cart occurred in Swansea Road, Merthyr, on Thurday night of last week. The car, which was in charge of a chauffeur named Charles Morris, was the property of the Hon. Miss L. T. Lewis. The Mardy, Aberdare, and contained three wounded soldiers from the Merthyr and Aberdare Military Hospital, who were proceeding thither after having been en- tertained in Merthyr. The cai-L. belonging to Mr. J ames Boulton, horse slaughterer, of Merthyr. was proceeding in the opposite direc- tion w hen the collision occurred. The cart driver, Eli Spiller, was thrown out and re- ceived serious injuries to his head. and the horse received several wounds. None of the car occupants were hurt. but the car itself wa.s so badly damaged that it was unable to proceed any further. P.C. Evans, of Cyfarthfa Works, rendered first aid to the injured man, and Chief Inspec- tor Phillips communicated with Aberdare. Spiller was afterwards removed to his home at 3 Mardy Tenace, Merthyr.

Temperance HallI

Temperance Hall. Speaking generally, I am not fond of trick cyclists. The Robbins and a few others I have enjoyed, but in the main trick cyclists weary me to boredom, and when I saw that Mr. Israel Price had stared the Selbinis for this week at the Temperance Hall, I groaned in spirit. I groaned too early, for I learned to my surprised enjoyment on Monday night that the cynical philosophy that has been all too often true of turns had at last proved false. The Wonderful Selbinis are not imitators; they have actually evolved something new a-wlieel —something that has a touch of artistry, a breath of excitement, and an indescribable charm of entertainment not often met with, even in the supposedly artistic turns nowadays. Their dancing and balancing arc none the less cTever or pleasing. I am not sure that I 1-iav. met the Selbinis before, but I shall cer- tainly look forward to our next merry meeting eveu. though it be across a larger auditorium than that of the Temperance Hall. The Omega Trio are also wonderful performers in a dis- tinctive piece of work. Revolving equilibrists are not common indeed. I question whether the Trio are not the sole performers of this parti- cular daring speciality. At all events, they are second to none, and their great ladder feat is unique in its conception, and startlingly clear in its execution. Will Murray and Co. are well known to all plaf goers as the last word in Irish Humour, and "Casey's At Home" is the best thing they have done. "Casey's At Home" is one huge laugh, a gargantuan gurgle that is bettei than physic. The Comerfords, Britain's leading acrobatic comedians, are clear artists in thl it. 1.ine, and dainty Ena Cairns is a pleasing comedienne and dancer with a style all her own Marquis and Truly, the acrobatic droll and soubrette. are as pleasing as anything I have seen wIlIlp Will Austa hits the house everywhere with his good comedy; and Maxford and O'Neill, the popular duo. have some ex- tremelv cross-patter and tuneful stanzas packed with smiles. Next week is to be a London week at the Temperance Hall, for which we are to have that great top liner, Sam Mayo, supported by the great Sutsliffe Family, a charming Scotch clan of entertainers Nellie Sylvester, the pret- tv International singer and dancer; Miss Jose- phine Richards and Company in "A Baby's The Four Shapes, in a delightful vocal interlude; Keen find Doller, original comedy act; and Allan Martin and Watler O'Brien, Those Two Boys and a Piano." PLAYGOER. 1

ILP and Conscription I

I. L. P. and Conscription. I I STRONG ATTITUDE ADOPTED BY I N.A.C. I DISTRICT CONFERENCES TO BE I CALLED. The National Council of the 1.1,.P. has done all that we hoped it would, says the "Labour Leader." It has given the Party an inspiring and encouraging lead. In the event of Con- scription becoming the law of the land, it de- cided. at its meeting in London last week to call on the men of the I.L.P. to resist its operation, and unanimously the members of the Council pledged themselves to do what they ask the Party to do. This is a serious and un- precedented step for the National Council to take The Party has always respected the law of the land, and has carried on its activities by constitutional means. But Conscription would so outrage the liberty and conscience of the in- dividual that Lhe Council felt justified in ta- killb this momentous step, and we are cer- tain that the Party will rally enthusiastically to it. lead. At the same time the Council does not desire that any of the members of the Party should accept its advice with their eyes closed. Severe penalties may follow resistance to Conscription, and, whilst the Qouncil will do all that it can to assist those who may be prosecuted, funds are not inexhaustible, and members must decide what their attitude is to be on their own responsibility, calmly and de- 1 lioerately. A series of divisional conferences, covering the entire country, is immediately be- iLlg summoned, and at these gatherings repre- sentatives from all the branches of the I.L.P. will be able to confer on the best means of meeting the situation. Every branch of the Party should consider its attitude carefully, and it would be well if the names of all mem- bers who have decided to resist. Conscription were registered. Already thousands of men of enlistment age are banded together in the No-C onscription Fellowship for the purpose of resisting Conscription, and now that the Na- tional Council of the I.L.P. has taken this stand, the resistance should be so formidable that though the Government may enact Con- scription. its enactment will prove to be in vain. The I.L.P. may be on the eve of a test- ing time such as it has never had to face be- fore. If we act unitedly and courageously no difficulties can be too great, no obstacle can prove insurmountable. And when the day of reason and love dawns, our loyalty to principle will be recognised as service, not only to our own natoin, but to the Commonwealth of na- tions.

I Aberdare Red Cross ConceitI

Aberdare Red Cross Conceit. I GOOD AUDIENCE AND SPLENDID I ENTERTAINMENT. Under the combined influence of a worthy object and an enjoyable entertainment, the grand orchestral concert held in the New Thea- tre and Hippodrome, Aberdare, on Sunday last proved an undoubted success. The services had been obtained of many of the leading local musicians, and these were also augmented by artistes from other districts, all of the highest class. The orchestra, was composed of all the leading instrumentalists of Aberdare. The principle vocal numbers were supplied llf Messrs Richard Owen and John Jones and Mrs Gordon Williamson, whilst the elocu- tienarv items of Mr. David Davies were duly appreciated. Some of the local juveniles who have obtained prominence on their respective instruments were also present, amongst these ii, Masters Money, Griffiths, and Thomas, and Miss Griffiths, w hose violin solos were uni- versally appreciated. The services of Mr. W. li Miller as accompanist in this section otice again proved his capacity in such work. The chair was occupied by Mr. C. Kenshole (High Constable), who has already taken such a prominent part in the furthering of charit- able causes. There is no doubt that as a re- sult the funds of the Red Cross Hospital, Oil oehalf of which the entertainment was organ- ised will be materially benefitted. <

Merthyr and Aberdare Red Cross Hospital Maintenance Fund

Merthyr and Aberdare Red Cross Hospital Maintenance Fund. Amounts previously acknowledged, JE717 6s. 4d.: Mr. H. B. Yarlev Intermediate School Sale of Work, £ 37 • Howell It. Jones, Tre- wern Dowlais, £10 10s. Ely Brewery, jE5 5s. Collections in Heolgerrig District, per Mr. R. E. Davics Danyronen, f,3 lis. Sd. Elim Welsh Baptist Church, Penydarren, £3 2s. 6d. Dow- lais C. School, C2 6s. 9d. Wesleyan Metho- dist. Dowlais. per Mr. Dockeray, £ 2 3s. 7d. Mr. Evan Phillips, Grocer, Mount Pleasant, Troedvrhiw. t2 2s. Dowlais Railwaymne, per Mr. John Collins, £2 Os. 8Jd. Salem Congre- gational Church, Merthyr, 2nd weekly con- tribution, £ 2; Cannel Church, Troedvrhiw, per Mr. D. Evans. tl 7s. Mrs. Mabel H. Evans. Gwemllwvn. Queen's Road, Merthyr, £ 1 Is. Mr. Win. Thomas, 5 Sourtland Ter- race Merthyr, Cl Is. Bethania Chapel, Dow- lais. 8th contribution, £1 Os. 2d. Gwernllwyn Welsh Congregational Church, Dowlais, per Mr. D. R. Davies, £ 1; Seventh Standard Girls. Dowlais School, per Miss Bond, £1 Mrs Rachel Davies, 18 Gwladys Street. Peny- A Friend, Dowlais, 5>1 Balance of Contribution from Dowlais Miners, 5/ to- tal £ 794 17s. 8-J-d.

Advertising

OUR PRINTING IS GOOD, OUR TERMS ARE MODERATE, OUR STAFF IS TRADES-UNIONIST, And we give a guaranteed undertaking to DELIVER IN TIME.

Council Housing at Merthyr

Council Housing at Merthyr COMMITTEE CONSIDER QUESTION OF RENTS. CONSIDERATION OF INCREASE LEFT OVER TILL END OF WAR. The question of revising the i-eiits of the Council houses in the various districts was dis- cussed at a special meeting of the Housing Com- mittee of the Merthyr Town Council which met on Wednesday, Coun. W. Lewis presiding. Attention was drawn to the matter by the aud tor's report, in which he pointed out that the scheme was being run at a loss, the adverse balance being approximately £ 2,500. The ar- rea• were also highly unsatisfactory. I I Returns were then submitted by the Borough Cot troller (Mr. W. R. Harris) showing an aver- age loss on the various schemes for the last four year- as follows: -Penydarren, E122 2s. Od. Pen\wern, first scheme. £ 562; second scheme. ?1]? is. Od. Twvnvrodvn. ?61 6s. Od. Dam" den .?11 9s. 0(t: and Pentrebach. ?73 8s. 0d.. making a total of £ 420 15s. Od. Mr. Harris pointed out that the upkeep of the houses would probably remain at the same figure as this year. 1 Th j loss on the 100 houses in the Penydarren scheme for the past year was £192. but when the rental of these houses was fixed at 5/3 per week, the rates were only 6/8 in the R. Since thel there had been a large increase. Conn. Wilson If there had been no increase in the rates there would be no loss. The Controller then pointed out that not one penny piece out of the rates went to the hous- ing scheme. Whatever was short had to stand against the houses. Coun. Owen said he was not in favour of rais- ing the rents at the present time in order to make up the deficit. Many of the occupants of the houses were in the trenches fighting for their country, and they did not want these men to come back and find their rents had been raised. Coun. Francis said his objection to raising the rents was different. Speaking from a re- tun. for 1913 he saw that the Penydarren houses were at the very commencement saddled with a deficit of R363. This was for work done before tenants occupied the houses. and ought not to be reckoned as a deficit balance. He did not think there was much sympathy in the auditor's report, which only contained plain facts. t was also pointed out by other members that under the Acts of "Parliament, it was not necessary to rna the hi,uses at a pio'it, but just to make them hold their own. The object of the- housing scheme was to provide better dwell- ings. and so do away with the slums. Coun. Owen said he agreed with Coun..Fran- cis on several points. It was eventually decided not, to take any I action in tbe matter at present.

Cefn Police Court I

Cefn Police Court. I Fi iday.—Before Col. J. J. Joile, 1(11 the chair' and other magistrates. Persistent Cruelty. Sarah Ann Jones, of Fiel Street. Cefn. sum- moned her husband, David Jones, for per- sistent cruelty. Mrs. B. Cross, a neighbour, said that on Wednesday night, a month yesterday. Mrs. Jones was in her house, and her husband came to fetch her. Mrs. Jones had said, I will com- in a minute after vou," but before she had had time to get up he struck her in the face P.S. Davies deposed that he had seen Mrs. Jones and her child turned out of the house by her husband at midnight and 1 o'clock in the morning, and that when he had knocked at the door and asked the husband whether he was going to let her in. he refused. On one occasion she had had to go to Abercanaid with the child in her arms. The defendant offered excuses for his con- duct and made certain allegations about his wife's mis-management of the house, to which the Chairman retorted "Y ou must remember this when you marry a woman you marry her for better or for worse." The Bench found th* case proved, and made an order for 22/- a week. There are 4 chil ciren of the marriage. F?.gs, Sir." Emily Maria Phillips, a small shopkeeper with two sons at the front, was summoned for trading on September 26 last. P.C. Jones aid he was standing right op- posite the shop on the day in question when he saw defendant serving a boy named Thos. Rees Lloyd with some sweets and pears. The boy came out of the shop. but on seeing wit- ness hurried back into the premises. from which he was allowed to loa,,4 by the back entiance by the defendant; as a result of this manoeuvre witenss was not able to obtain the pears and sweets from him. Defendant; Did you find any pears on the hov-Xo, out I saw him get them. Defendant, in evidence, said the boy Llovd was a companion of one of her sons, and had neve left the house with the pears, but had eaten them in an inner room. In reply to the Chairman, defendant said site sold "sweets, pears and fags." Cl aii-i-nin "Wha't that "—" Fags. sir." Deputy Chief Consta ble Hands: Cigarettes, she means, sir! Chairman Ti en why don't you call them cigarettes instead of fags ? Defendant; Well, that's what we call them flovTi at Cornwall. A fine of :?! was imposeo. A Taste for Horticulture. Harry Evans was summoned for allowing two pigs to stray on the highway, and Sergeant Davies. in proving i he case, stated that the animals were found nibbling at the flowers on the lawns in front of Vaynor Villas. F^ ans was fined 5/ Horse Unattended. Wm. Smith was mulct in 10! for allowing a horse to go unattended near the Cross Bychan Inn Hirwain Road.

THE PIONEER 10000 SHILLINGS FUND

THE PIONEER 10,000 SHILLINGS FUND. THE FIRST PRINCIPLE OF SOCIALISM. lhe "Pioneer'is progressing; and, what is better, the ioileer is progressing on ita merits, and uot upon any mere sporadic out- burst ol enthusiasm on the part ol our own particular political friends. Sio'viy it ifc ever- oomiiig the obstacle* that at one time looked like overwhelming it; surely it is working to- wards its ideal; that great ideal we have set oursblves of becoming the mouthpiece of the Soul. ales coal valleys. But progress, like evolution, is a t-odious processj and we have no desire to buoy ourselves up with false optimism. We are better than we were last week, just as last week we were better than the week be- fore and so on back for some time now; and we would here like to thank the many friends who are doing so much to help us along the road to becoming the power we feel we ought to be in the world of South Wales. It is in- vidious to mention names, but one cannot help but feel that a public recognition of the indomi- tables of the Pioneer Leagues, the comrades III Mountain Ash. and Pengam and Bargoed and Dowlais, for their great work. They tell us that the paper is worth it, and we feel that if it wasn't the marvellous results which are ac- cruing from their efforts could not be so stable as we feel we are justified in claiming they are. 

I 1 1 I Merthyrs New Mayor

— Merthyr's New Mayor. CROWNING HONOUR FOR MR. JOHN HARPUR. I A GOOD EDUCATIONIST. The Merthyr Borough Council on Tuesday sd- leoteei Mr. Councillor John Harpur, J.P., as successor to Mr. John Daries in the Mayoralty of Merthyr. The new Mayor, though not a native of the borough, has been resident amongst us for the past fifty years, having arrived in Merthyr With his parents from his native town of Derby. He has been closely connected with the public work of the borough from his younger days, being engaged in the construction of the Peny- bryn Filter Beds. for which his father, the law Mr Samuel Harpur. was contractor, and also the Pentwvn Reservoir. His father was well knowu as the surveyor and engineer to the old L00.:J Board. The Mayor-elect, who, by the way. is cashier to Messrs. Crawshay Bros., Cyfarthfa Colliery Company, has been a member of local govern- menT, authorities for the past 23 years, and is a TP. for Breconshire. He has done much good work for education, both a.s a sympathetic educationist. a member of the Education Authority, and chairmas of that body. and one of the proudest moments of his public life was quite recent, when he had the honour of opening the new Council School at Penydarren. an educational monument- of which the town is insth- proud that was con- structed during his chairmanship of the Edu- cation Committee. His choice is likely to be a popular one with all classes of the community, for he is one of the few councillors who do not exhioit palpa- ble prejudices and bias in the consideration of the multitudinous municipal problems that occupy the attention of a local authority. The chief magistracy has been well placed.