Collection Title: Adsain

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
3 articles on this page
CORWEN DISTRICT NOTES

CORWEN & DISTRICT NOTES. Private Williams, No. 8371, 4th Batt. King's Liverpool Regt, and of Queen's Square, Cor- -wen, has been again seriously wounded in his back during the recent fighting at Loos. He is now lying in the N.G. Hospital, Leeds. Last Sunday morning an umbrella stand in the porch of the Corwen C.M. Chapel took fire and several valuable umbrellas were destroyed. The stairs which lead to the gallery would soon have been ablaze but for promptness and presence of mind of Capt. T. Lloyd Jones of the Corwen Fire Brigade, who happened to be on the spot, and who obtained assistance and carried the massive umbrella stand, which was burning fiercely, oat of the porch into the grounds and extinguished the flames. There was a large congregation in chapel at the time. The fire was caused by some unknown person having dropped the remains of a lighted cigarette into the stand which was full of costly and handsome umbrellas some of them being burned to ashes. This careless person ought to be forced to purchase new umbrellas for the owners, also a new umbrella stand together with Captain of the Fire Brigade's fee. Will the local bakers and bread sellers employ men who can read and understand Welsh in futute ? Last Friday a man from Llangollen got his master into trouble at Corwen Police Court through not being able to read Welsh posters. There are several bread sellers who can only say Eisieu bara heddyw mum," or Torth soolt or Torth quaek or something else as the case may be. No wonder some of them forget their scales it takes them all their time to remember what bit of Welsh they know. The bakers, no doubt, will weigh every loaf with scales and with pleasure if asked. No trouble not a bit. The Merionethshire Police are keen on the bread subject and are anxious that people of all classes should receive full weight for their money. There are some wonderful people in Corwen they are called the know-all janglers," who promenade all day long from one house to the other telling stories" about how much money people owe in shops in the town, at the same time forgetting the time they were cc helped out of the mire by a whip round or a collection. Hush b A great social is to be held in aid of the Starving Belgians in Belgium." This idea is being ridiculed by a section of middle-class people in Corwen, who consider the collections recently made in the town ought to be suffic- ient especially at these hard times, and further these middle class people consider the idea of feeding their little Marys here in order to help starving people is not the right thing. In our opinion a Social will take well about the end of this month although food is very dear. Lieut. Howard Williams and Sergt.-Major W. 0. Jones, of the King's Royal Rifles, have rejoined their regiment during the week-end after spending a few days at their homes at Corwen. Corwen has lost two good soldiers in the deaths which occurred at the Dardanelles of Sergt. T, Oswald Davies and Private Robert Rees Williams. We regret to state that noth- ing more has been heard of Sergt. A. Pearce, Corwen, who is reported missing in Gallipoli. Several Corwen lads are suffering from enteric fever out there but they are progressing towards recovery. There are several alterations in the railway time tables on the G.W.R. (Dolgelley branch). The 9-50 a.m. train Corwen to Ruabon has been discontinued. A new train leaves Corwen for Ruabon at 11 a.m. The train which used to leave Corwen for Bar- mouth at 3-40 p.m. now leaves at 3-50 p.m. The 5 p.m. train to Bala leaves Corwen at 4-40 p.m. The last train from Ruabon arrives at Corwen at 9-20 p.m. instead of 10-40 p.m. The alterations came into force on Nov. 1st. The Corwen Territorial Committee has forwarded through the local Red Cross Work Party 40 shirts, and 40 pairs of socks, for' D Company, l/7th R. W.F. now on active service in Gallipoli. —————— ——————.

DIGWYDDIAD TRIST YNI 0ALETTWR

DIGWYDDIAD TRIST YN I. | 0ALETTWR. Cymerodd damwain ddifrifol le yn Cae- crydd, Calettwr, dydd Mercher, trwy i ferch fach bum' mlwydd oed i Mrs. Williams, Cae- crydd losgi i farwolaeth. Digwyddodd hyn tra yr oedd y fam wedi myned i gae cyfagos i ymofyn y gwartheg. Cynhaliwyd trengholiad ar y corph dydd Iau. Cydymdeimlir a'r teulu oU yn eu profedigaeth lem a sydyn.

ICORWEN PETTY SESSIONS

I CORWEN PETTY SESSIONS. NEW LICENSEE AT THE I EAGLES HOTEL, CORWEN. The above Sessions were held at Corwen Police Court on Friday last, before the Dr. H. E. Walker (Chairman) Hon. R H. Eden, Messrs. David Davies and T. Lloyd Jones. Transfer of License. Mr. J. R. Jordan, Bala, applied on behalf of Mr. David Thomas, Tanybwlch, Bl. Festin- iog, for the transfer of license of the Eagles Hotel, Corwen, from Mr. Chesterman. Mr. Jordan stated that Mr. Roberts had met with an accident to his leg during the explosion which recently took place at Penrbyndeudraeth Munition Works. The transfer of the license was granted, the Chairman adding that he wished Mr. Roberts success. Selling Bread without Weighing. Deputy Chief Constable D. T. Morgan, Bala, charged Mr. E H. Lloyd, Central Stores, Llangollen, with selling bread without weigh- ing it. The bread was sold by his man- servant, Thomas Griffiths, who said that he never weighed bread except when he was asked to do so. Mr. E. H. Lloyd stated that the bread was always weighed before being put in the oven and after it was taken out of the oven. The magistrates dismissed the case. No Bread Scales. Mr. Lloyd was charged with having allowed his man-servant, Thos. Griffiths, to take his bread van out for the purpose of selling bread without carrying the bread scales. P.C. Parry, Glyndyfrdwy, stated that he saw Thomas Griffiths selling bread at Glyndyfr- dwy, on Sept. 15th. Griffiths sold two loaves in his presence. Witness then asked Griffiths for his scales, and he replied that he had not got them. Witness then reported him. Mr. Foulkes-Jones, solicitor, Llangollen, for defendant, stated that the employee and not the employer should have been summoned in this case. Mr. Lloyd had given definite orders to his man servant to take the scales with him whenever he went out to the country to sell bread. Questioned by Supt. Morgan, T. Griffiths stated that he had seen posters on the walls warning bread sellers to carry scales with- them, but he could not read them because they were printed in the Welsh language and he could not understand Welsh. Griffiths stated that he had been in the business about ten or eleven years. He admitted having forgotten to take the scales with him on this particular occasion. The case was dismissed upon payment of 6s. costs.