Collection Title: Monmouth Guardian

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
8 articles on this page
Advertising

k Mend Choice Highland Malt Whisky. Buchanlls Old 3QSended Scotch Matured, Blended and Bottled only by BUCHAN A CO., Wine and Spirit Merchants, RHYMNEY.

Advertising

A Blend of Choice Highland Malt Whisky. Buchan's r Oid Blendd Scotch Matured, Blended and Bottled only by BUCHAN GO., Wine and Spirit Merehanta, RHYMNEY.

Advertising

P. E. GAN E Late TrapnellLTDO FURNITURE, CARPETS, i FLOOR COVERINGS, H BEDSTEADS & BEDDING. I 4 ft. 6 In. Oak Sideboard 28 8s. BOD ttOOfrl SUITES In all Styles at Moderate Prices. GANE'S 38 & 41, Queen St. UrA? H< 0 CARDIFF. ALL GOODS CARRIAGE PAID TO NEAREST RAILWAY STATION. "A.B.A." (ALL BRIGHT ALE). Analyst'sReport The Laboratory, 69, Dock Street, Newport, Mon., September 13th, 1905. Messrs. A. Buchan & Co., Rhymney. Dear Sirs, I have analysed a sample Gallon of your "ALL BRIGHT ALB" received from you in Screw-Stoppered Flagons, and beg to hand you my Beport. This is a most inviting looking beverage, being absolutely free from all traces of turbidity, and, as its name implies, is bright to the last drop. The results of my analysis shew it to be a Light Bitter Beer of the very highest grade of purity, and in my opinion, is I the product of Malt and Hops of first-class quality. The amount of Alcohol present renders it strictly a Light Ale, and its aroma and flavour are excellent. The characteristic bitter of the Hops being well in evidence it forms a most agreeable drink. There is not the slightest trace of any objectionable metallic substance present, and I consider it a very High-class Beer in every respect. Being sent out in Screw-Stoppered Flagons its high aeration is preserved to perfection in consequence, and there is no chance of its suffering in condition. I consider it a distinct advance in Bottled Beers for Table use, and its high general excellence should command a ready sale. It really is a splendid sample of Beer, and I must congratulate you on its production. I am, dear Sirs, Yours faithfully, GEORGE R. THOMPSON, Public Aanalys*. ,¡ PURITAN SOAP ) ???? -??? 0??  I is used in Britain's happiest homes 260

BARGOED LADS DEATH AT BEDFORD

BARGOED LAD'S DEATH AT BEDFORD. As briefly announced last week, Bargoed people heard with regret of the death of one of the Bargoed boys whilst training at Bedford. We refer to the late Sergt. Luther Williams, Park Place, Gilfach, who was very popular in Bargoed and dis- tiict. He didn't wait long for the call to arms, as he enlisted a month after war broke out. With three other chums he joined the 2/lst Monmouthshire Regt. at Newport, in September, 1914. Until quite recently, Luther, as he wa's popularly known, was with the above Regt., but was subsequently transferred to the Army Ser- vice Corps. Only lately, in fact the 21st of August, Sergt. Williams was home on' leave. 'He then looked quite well, and was a fine robust lad. When he came back from his leave he complained of feel- ing unwell, and was taken to Hospital for treatment. Matters went worse with him although he had every attention, and on Saturday, September 2nd, the hospital authorities wired for his mother, as Luther was dangerously ill. Mr. Williams, ac- companied by her son Tom, travelled to Bedford at once. They had a very un- pleasant experience on their way up, the train being held up by the "Zepps." on the last raid. Eventually Mrs. Williams and her son arrived at Bedford, and while at the hospital, everything was done for their comfort. Mrs. Williams stayed with her son as long as possible. However, Luther lingered on until Wednesday morn- ing, when he passed away after a very severe illness and much suffering. Ar- rangements were made by the family to bring the body home, but the authorities deemed it advisable to bury him at Bedford. On Saturday last his body was laid to rest, with full military honours, at Bedford Cemetery. On the coffin, which was covered with the Union Jack and was drawn on a gun carriage, were his cap, bandolier and, spurs\ Everywhere along the route and at the graveside, the last tributes of respect were shown by all- soldiers and civilians alike. The scene at the graveside was very impressive the I firing party fired three volleys, and when the bugler sounded the "Last Post," many were moved to tears. The chief mourners were Mrs. Williams (mother), Mr Thos. Williams (brother), Corpl. Alec Jones, R.E. (cousin), Pte. G. Jenkins, R.A.M.C. (cousin), Sergt. Jack Greenhouse, 2/lst Mons., Mrs. Green- house (Bargoed), Mrs. R. Judd (Bargoed), Mrs. Morris (Bedford), Misses Elsie and Hilda Battner (Bedford), Miss Flossie Bowers (Bedford), Mr. Morris (Bedford). A detachment of the A.S.C. was present, also' many sergeants of the 2/lst Mons. Many of his old chums of the Transport, 2/lst Mon. Regt. attended the funeral. Numerous wreaths were sent, the coffin and carriage being covered with them. The chaplain conducted the service at the hospital and graveside. Many Sisters from the hospital were in attendance. The doctors and nurses, and the friends he had made whilst at Bedford, did everything that was possible for the late sergeant. Following is a list of the floral tributes sent :From Ma and Family," "Tom and Nance," "Reg. and Mair," Corpl. Alec Jones, "Cousin Gwyn," "The Officers N.C.O.'s and Men of 'C' Coy., 2/lst Mon. Regt. "Late fellow Sergeants 'C' Coy., 2/lst Mon. Regt. "From his Two Old Chums, Corpl. S. M. Pritchard and Sergt. Jack Greenhouse," Sister Reid, Nurse Essex, "Matron," "From his late Trans- port Officer and Chums of the Transport, 2/lst Mons. "Arch, Jim, and Arch," "Flossie, Hilda, Carrie, Winnie, Doris and Fanny," "Elsie," "Scott and Nellie" "A. S.C. Badge," "From His Chums." Although so far away from home, the funeral was large and impressive, and as was only right, Sergt. Luther Williams was buried with full honour to his memory. He will l be sadly missed amongst all his chums and friends-soldiers and civilians alike. He was very popular at home and at Bedford. Messages of sympathy were received from all quarters, and everyone at Bedford extend their full sympathy with Mrs. Williams and the family in their sad bereavement.

ITWOFOLD CHARACTER OF LABOUR I EMBODIED IN COMMODITYI

I TWOFOLD CHARACTER OF LABOUR EMBODIED IN COMMODITY. I In the last article we saw that a com- modity presented itself as a value and as an exchange value. We find that these two qualities stood in antagonistic rela- tions to each other; that while they were mutually connected, they were mutually exclusive, i.e., while exchange value pre- supposes use value they never function to- gether use value asserts itself only when exchange value has ceased to exist. Thereby our analysis showed us that the quality of use value is inseparable from the physical form of an article, and is j limited by the mode of its existence. This quality is quite dependent of the amount of labour expended upon its production. Exchange value on the other hand is not inherent in the natural existence of the thing, but is based on social conditions and relations. Capitalism is shaped and measured by the human labour incorpor- ated in commodities, and this human labour shows itself as the expression of simple human energy. 10yds. linen to one coa7-2w. Coat and linen are two different qualitive use values, and satisfy particular wants. They are the results of two qualitively different kinds of produc- ,v ucuivtly tailoring and weavixig. The I two objects could not stand to each other in the relation of commodities were they I not qualitatively different. As one use value is not exchanged for another of the same kind. Every particular kind of use value is the result of a particular kind of labour. A necessary condition for the carrying out of the production of com- modities is the social division of labour, where different kinds of labour are carried on independently of each other and for the 1 benefit of private individuals. The exist- ence of coat or linen is due to a particular productive activity exercised with a par- II ticular purpose; an activity that appropri- ates particular natural elements to parti- cular human needs. This labour, which produces use value, is useful labour, and is an indispensable necessity for existence of the race. A coat is made up of two elements matter a labour. The form of the matter is changed into a coat by the execution. Labour then is not the source of all material wealth. Labour is its father, and the earth its mother. If we put out of sight the use value of a coni- modity, we also, by that very act, put out of sight the special useful character 01 the labour expended upon it in the case of the coat tailoring, in the case of linen weav- ing. These are two different modes of expenditure. What has been expended is simple indifferentiated human labour. Pro- duction defines it as productive expendi- ture of human brains, nerves and muscles, or again, human labour in the abstract. But every piece of work is not merely an expression of this simple human labour. Many labour products require the applica- tion of special knowledge and skill to their production. Have all commodities, pro- duced in equal periods of time, the same value? Not at all. The product of an hour of skilled labour is of higher value than an hour of unskilled, or simple lab- our. But the values of the commodity pro- duced by skilled labour can only be ex- pressed through the measure of simple labour, and this process of reduction is carried on behind the backs of the pro- ducers. Having extracted then from the qualitative aspect of the coat and linen, and from the qualitative labour exercised in their production, they appear as crys- tals of a common social substance as values. The question of how and what recedes with our abstraction out of sight.—The question now is one of magnitude. How much ? How long a time? Ten yards of linen we found to possess only half the value of a coat. The difference in these values lies in the difference of duration of labour time, in taking twice as long to produce a coat as it took to produce 10 yards of linen. If the productive power of tailoring remain constant, every increase in the number of coats produced increases the sum of their values. If the labour time necessary for the production of coats falls to one half, and two coats will be worth as much as one coat had been before, I the use value of the coat will The just the same to the wearer as before, and the particular kind of labour will possess the same useful quality as before. If the labour time required for the production of a coat be doubled, the value will be double that of the first case one coat will possess the value that two coats had before. The utility of the coat will remain unaltered. What has been altered? The quantity of labour spent in its production. An increase in the quantities of use values means an increase in the amount of material wealth. Such an increase, however, may involve a fall in the magnitude of value. This phenomenon arises out of the antagonism existing in the relations of use value and exchange value out of the form of labour and the expenditure out of the quality and the quantity. •» •

BAD FOOT TORTURES AND HOW TO BE RID OF THEM

BAD FOOT TORTURES AND HOW TO BE RID OF THEM. Mdlle. Gaby Deslys tells readers what actresses do for tired, aching, caDouaed or | swollen feet and all other painfal foot misery I am telling you a secret of the theatri- cal profession. The ordinary refined Reudel Bath Saltrates compound, which most chemists keep ready put up in convenient half-pound packets, will form medicated and oxygenated water, exactly like that found at famous continental springs. This saItrates compound was originated in England, and the best quality always comes from here, but in New York, during my last trip, I found it all the rage as a treatment for bad foot troubles. It is not at all expensive, and at oncelills the water with oxygen, which you can feel acting on your skin. I find it, oh so invigorating. When the feet are tired, aching or call- oused and swollen from walking, tennis or dancing, a hot saltrated foot bath quickly relieves these and even more pain- ful foot troubles. NOTE.—The saltrates compound not only permanently removes any nuouses, corns, or similar painful foot afflictions so that they do not return, but by stimulating the blood circulation in the feet (which is usually defective through shoo pressure and their great distance from the heart) it reduces enlarged ankles, which with puffiness or swollen feet do not go well with present styles in fashionable footwear. We note that, unlike most drags, this inexpensive compound has not yet advanced in price on account of war, probably due to its not being so well known as it de- serves to be.

II SAD DEATH OF A YOUNG CHILD AT DERI

SAD DEATH OF A YOUNG CHILD AT DERI. At the Bailey's Assembly Rooms, Deri, on Tuesday, Mr. R. J. Rhys, the district coroner, held an inquest touching the death of Stephen Bishop, the 14-monthB- old child of Mr and Mrs Bishop, of 66, Bailey Street. Priscilla Bishop, the wife of Stephen Bishop, a haulier, said the child was 14 months old. He injured himself on Mon- day night, and died on Tuesday. The boy was lying in company with a girl five years old, whilst she was making the bed for the children. Deceased rolled off the bed, which was 2Jft. high, on to the boards. It cried a little, then went off into a stupor and subsequently died. Dr. McCarthy- said he saw the child on Monday night at 10 p.m. It was uncon- scious and convulsed. There was no physi- cal injury. From later developments it was apparent the child had had con- cussion of the brain by falling off the bed. A verdict in accordance with the medi- cal evidence was returned.

No title

A paper fro;n home will comfort your soldier lad as nothing else can. Send him a copy of the Monmouth Guardian," con- taining all the local news each week.