Collection Title: South Wales Weekly Post

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 6 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
30 articles on this page
Advertising

■s—gsasniisn i jwMuliaitwtiuaBagK I.K. t-arns-I them down j For insect pests it means I absolute extermination. I Suddcn dath in a handy I sprinkler-top tin. This 1 I new vegetable pcwder is being used by I' 1 thousands o? wi3 housewives as a preventive 8 J 8 Hgainst discase-carrying insects, beetles, wood- | ;to  n. r¡ A. F d h  vermin, fleas. Arm yourself to-day with I | s Hawley's I fra Insect 101&0 Killer | L3^d^fid & V- Chemists every:'here.

I TRANSPORT TOR PEDOEO WT

I TRANSPORT TOR. PEDOEO. W'T DISASTER IN THE AEGEAN, i MANY LIVES LOST. Six Hundred Saved. The Secretary of the Admiralty issued the following on Tuesday:— THE BRITISH TRANSPORT ROYAL COWARD WAS SUNK BY AN ENEMY SUBMARINE IN THE ÆCEAN SEA LAST SATURDAY MORNINC. ACCORDING TO THE INFORMA- TION AT PRESENT RECEIVED THERE WERE ON BOARD 32 MILi- TARY OFFICERS AND 1,350 TROOPS, IN ADDITION TO THE CREW OF 228 OFFICERS AND MEM. THE TROOPS CONSISTED MAINLY OF REINFORCEMENTS FOR THE 29th DIVISION, AND DETAILS OF THE R. A. M. C. FULL INFORMATION HAS NOT YET BEEN RECEIVED, BUT IT IS KNOWN THAT ABOUT 600 HAVE BEEN! SAVED. <

Advertising

I -r-1 & The Welshman's Favourite. ä | MABON Sauce I iqr As good as its Name. DON'T FAIL TO GET IT. I ¡!anu.íacturu-:r-BLANCH'S, St. Peter St., Cardiff. I •=■

I SWANSEA RAMC I

I SWANSEA R.A.M.C. I BELIEVED TO BE SAFE. i T h ere is reason to believe that the Swan- Thf'l'e is l'eaon to beli.:Ye that the Swan- ¡ sea men are ?afe, as Lce.-CpL Powell (son of' Mr. Tom Powell, f the Swansea rrelegraph Office), who was attached to the R.A!M.C. that left Bedford a few weeks ago, has writ- ten home a postcard saying they were at Alexandria, in Egypt. I He sailed from Keyham, and as ,the Royal Edward is believed to have sailed' from Bristol direct, 'there is a distinct chalice that the Swansea contingent were not on board the ill-fated transport. The postcard from Lance-Corp oral Powell was received at Swansea on Friday.

Advertising

THE MATRIMONIAL CIRCLE. ¡ A N introductory journal, centain'ug .A hun-droos of gennin.e ;Idverti:mefit.s, I appealing to atl classes of ladies and gentle- men, many jn good bcial position; post i ijree, od. sealed envelope.—Editor (No. 31), HOGARTH-ROAD, EARL'S COURT, LONDON. (See Article, John Bull," Dec. 18th, 1914, on Busyness methods of this Journal}.

LIVING IN THE CLOUDSI

LIVING IN THE CLOUDS." I NEATH REGISTRAR AND I CLYDACH GROCER. At Neath Bankruptcy Court on Tuesday, J. T. Jones, grocer, Civdaeh, appeared for his adjourned examination. The Official Receiver said that debtor had submitted amended accounts and he had no further questions to ask. Mr. R. T. Jones asked that the examina- tion ba closed. Debtor, he said, had dis- closed the whole of his affairs as far as he possibly coiild. Registrar I am glad you said As far as possible." It has beeu very unsatisfactory. Apparently this gentleman, wbilst going on with his business, has been living m the clouds. He was no more fit for business than a boy in the streets, and if he comes 'before the judge for his discharge I hope it will be suspended for several years. The examination was closed.

SUNDAY SCHOLARS ENLIST

SUNDAY SCHOLARS ENLIST. Happy Young Patriots from 'I Sketty. fcijietty Baptist Sunday School has fur- nished six additions to the Naval Division, viz., George Riley, serving in the Dardan- elles; Oliver Humhpreys, William Hum- phreys, James Collins, Percy Stephens, and Dcnald Peters, f;ho joined recently, be- sides eight who are attached to other branches of H.M. forces. Mr. Herbert L. Morgan, superintendent of the Sunday School, is very proud of the lads patriotism and the other evening en- I tertained his class at his residence, King- ston-road, to enable the members to bid Au revoir" to the five latest recruits who were leaving on the morrow to undergo training. Mi. Morgan, in the course of a happy address, commended the young men on the step thep had taken and felt sure they would be a credit to their King' and country, before their departure next morn- ing Mr. Morgan had the whole class photo- graphed, and afterwards, in company with the Rev. Emlyn Morgan, saw the five lads off from High-street Station, giving each a souvenir, as did also many other Sketty friends. Since their arrival at the Palace, Mr. Mor- gan has received a letter from each of tha boys thanking him for his kindness and in- terest. They also 'stated that they had plenty of good food, ample rest, and much drill. They were happy and did not regret enlisting.

SWANSEA VALLEY DROWNINGI FATALITY

SWANSEA VALLEY DROWNING I FATALITY. A lad. named James Price (10), of Celmaen Gwvn. Ynysmedwj near Pontardawe, was drowned on Monday evening in the canal a ear his home whilst playing on a barge..

Advertising

revelation in Sweetmeats—MACKIN- !rOSH'S TOFFEE DE LUXE. >

ADVANCE IN AUSTRIAN VALLEYS

ADVANCE IN AUSTRIAN VALLEYS. I ITALIANS PUSHING AHEAD. i PROGRESS ALL; ALONG THE LINE. 4 I (Press Association War Special.) « ROME, Monday. The official communique issiied here this evening says:— In the zone of Tonale and in the sector of Valassa (Settecommuni) the artillery duel yesterday was of considerable inten- sity. Fresh progress is reported in the Valley of Sexten (Drava). Our artillery wrecked enemy entrench- ments on the Seikofel and tjrcxla-Rossa, and silenced the enemy artillery which attempted to oppose it. Our infantry advanced along the valleys of Bacherbach and Bodenbach, (taking the enemy's defences by assault, and making several dozen prisoners. During the night of August 14-15 the enemy attempted, by a counter-attack, to retake positions lost on Bodenbach, but was repulsed. Subsequent information received re- garding the action on August 13, in the Popena Valley, reported yesterday, con- i firm heavy losses suffered by the enemy. 200 Dead in One Trench. In one trench were found two hundred dead, including some officers. In Camia during the night of August 14-15, the enemy made a violent attack against the positions of Pol Piccolo Friekofel and Pol Grande, bnt the firm- ness of our infantry, supported by the fierce and effective fire of our batteries, repulsed the enemy along the whole front, causing him severe losses. In the Montenero zone yesterday we made fresh progress, notably in the direc- tion of Piezzo, and we took three hundred prisoners.

lCHIEF OF THE MINE SWEEPERSI

CHIEF OF THE MINE- SWEEPERS. CAPT. HENEAGE MEN- TiOhicD ï J\J | "FREQUENTLY UNDER HEAVY FIRE." Captain A. W. Heneage, M. V. O., of Park L Breos, near Swansea, is amongst the ofifcers who have been commended for ser- vice in action by Vice-Admiral de Robeck, commanding the British Fleet in the opera- tions against the Dardanelles, who has sent to his Majesty's Government a stirring ac- count of the landing of the troops. Captain Keneage has been. specially commended fori organising and training the mine-sweepers. He joined his ship, H. M.S. Albion, when the Grand Fleet was mobilised en the out- break of the war, and the next Swansea heard of him -was that his ship was at the! Dardanelles engaged with others in deeds that will live in history, for the landing of i the troops on the peninsula of Gallipoli has never been surpassed for courage and dar- ing. The mine-sweeping, especially in the Narrows, lias been arduous and dangerous work. Capt. Keneage, Special reference is made in Vice-Admiral de Robeek's report to Captain Heneage in the following passage — On the 25th and 26th, Wolverine (Com- mander 0. J. Prentis) (killed in action), Scorpion (Lieutenant-Commander, now. Commander, A. B. Cunningham), Renard (Lieutenant-Commander L. G. B. A. Campbell), Grampus (Lieutenant-Comman- der R. Bacchus), Pinchcr (Lieutenant- Commander H. kV. Wyld), and Rattle- ¡ snake (Lieutenant-Commander P. G. ) Wodehouse) carried out mine-sweeping i operations under Caption Heneage inside J the Dardanelles in a most satisfactory manner, being frequently under heavy fire. Captain Algernon Walker Heneac<- P. X., M.V.O., is 44 years of age and the nephew of the late Mr. Graham Vivian, the bulk of whose fortune he inherited a few years ago when he and his family came to reside in this cliskict. Entering the Royal Navy in 1886 he was second in command of the Naval Division in defence of Ladysmith and war; mentioned in dispatches. During his residence at Park le Breos, Captain Hene- aze has proved immensely popular in Swan- ea, and at the last annual meeting of the Swansea Conservative Association was ap- pointed chairman of the Swansea Conser- vative Association. Mrs. Heneage, during her husband's absence on active service, has devoted her energies for the successful issue rf the war, especially by collecting litera- ture, etc., for the mine-sweepers.

FOR THE SAKE OF THEII CHILD

FOR THE SAKE OF THEII CHILD. MAGISTRATE'S APPEAL TO I SOLDIER'S WIFE. The conduct of the wife of a soldier at I' the front was revealed to the Alfemanford magistrates on Monday, when Rosy Richards, of Margaret-road, Llandebie, was charged with being drunk in charge of a child. C^ She was s-een by P. S. Mcrgan on Bank Holiday evening lying against a gate in Swan-road, quite incapable of taking care of herself, and there was a child, four years old, with her. There were also two men, and on the sergeant's representations these took her and the child home. Deputy Chief Constable Evans intimated that she was the wife of a, soldier, who was now at the front. She received 25s. weekly I allowance from the War Office. In fining her 9s., the Chairman (Mr. G. H. Strick) told her to try to restrain herself for the sake of the child.

MINISTER OF MUNITIONS I i

MINISTER OF MUNITIONS I i Confined to Room with Feverish I Cold. I The Press Aqsec?ati-Dn states that Mr. j Lloyd George is confined to his bedr?tm j with a feverish cold, amI has been obliged to cancel hi? proposed meeting at SheSield,} and Newcastle.

NOTHING COULD STOP SUCH MElioill

 NOTHING COULD' STOP -SUCH MElioill -#. EPIC OF THE DAR- DANELLES,, I HEROES OF THE "V" I BEACH. Two Middy V.C.'S. Six Victoria Crosses are announced as having bsen won by naval men, fiva of them being for the historic landing at V Beach in CaUipoli, and two of these being for midshipmen. awards are based on recommendations contained in a dispatch from Admiral de Robeck, issued rc! the Press Bureau on Monday night, dealing with the operations carried en April 25-26th. Among the many stories of bravery and incomparable courage told in the dispatch the story of the commaJider, two mid- shipmen and two seamen of the River Clyde is the most thrilling. All five have received the Victoria Cross. They are mentioned in the concluding para- graphs of the Admiral's dispatch, in which he sa.ys The great traditions cf his Majesty's N a vv weJl wdl maintained, and the. list of names sulffnitted of necessity lacks those of many officers and men who performed gallant deeds unobserved and therefore unnoted. "This standard was high, and if I sl)c-cally mention one particular action it is that oi Commander Cnwiin and the two young offi- cers and two seamen who assisted him in the work of establishing communication be- tween River Clyde and the beach." These five heroes head the list of the Admiral's "Special Recommendations as follow :— < Commander Edward Unwin, R.N.. While in River Clyde, absfcivnig that the lighters which were to form the bridge to the shore had broken adrift, Commander Unwin left the ship and under a murdetocis fire attempted to get the lighters into posi- tion. He worked on until, suffering from the effects of cold and immersion, be v.as obliged to return to the sJlÎp, where he was wrapped up m blankets. Having in some degree recovered, he returned to his work against the doctor s order and completed it. He was later ugain attended by the doc- tor for three abrasions caused 1 y billets, after which he lonce more left the l ip, tillis time in a liiefooat, to save swue wounded men who were lying in shallow water near the beach. He continued at this heroic labour under continuous fire, until forced to stop through pure physical exhaustion. Midshipman George L. Drewry, R.ft.R. I Assisted Commander UruVin ao the work I of securing tho lighters under heavy nfie and Maxim i r c. He was wounded in the head, but continued his work and twice subse- quently attempt.ed to swim from lighter to lighter with a line. Midshipman Drewry will be 21 years old in November next, and lias previously had many startling adventures. At the age of 13 he was picked up unconscious in the road after being knocked down by a motor-car. Then, at the age of 15, when in the mer- chant service, he fell overboard from aloft into the sea, and was rescued by the ship's mate. Two years later he was shipwrecked off Cape Horn, and was for fourteen day.sa ca«tawav on Hermit Islrnd. Midshipman Wilfred St. A. Mai Jason, R.N. Also assisted Commander Unwin, and after Midshipman Drewry had failed from exhaustion to get a line from lighter to lighter, he swam with it himself and suc- ceeded. The line subsequently broke, and he afterwards made two further but unsuc- cessful attempts at. 'I-ills self-imposed task. Able-Seaman William Charles Williams, O.N. Hekl en to a line in the water for over an hour under heavy fire, until killed. Seaman R.N.R. Csorge McKenzio I Samson. Worked on a lighter all day under fire, attending wounded and getting out lines. Two others who helped in ccunection with the River Clyde are mentioned, and both have been awarded the Distinguished Service Order. One is lieutenant John A. V. Morse, R. N w ho assisted to secure the lighters at the bowB of the River Clyde under a heavy fire, and who was vesi-y throughout the 26th and 2bth at V beach. n H&raic Surgeon. u 1 1 I auiigeon r. i>tveny, JV-N., attacneci to the Royal Naval Air Service, is the other. Although wounded in th? fo-ot on the morn- ing of the 25th in the River Clyde lie re- mained on the ship until the morning of the 27th. During that time he attended 750 wounded men, although in great pain and nimble to walk, during the last twenty-four hours. Four petty officers and an ordinary sea- man have received the Conspicuous Gal- latttry Medal for the dseds iu connection with the liner Clyde. Other Gallant Middies. I Ten other midshipmen are mentioned in the Admiral's dispatch under the heading of "special recommendation," and ten others are recommended for service in action. The first ten have been awarded the Dis- tinguished Service Cross, and their names Rupert Edward Maximilian Bethume, R.X. (Inflexible), Eric Giioff de Wet, R.N. (London), Charles Wilfred Or oxford R.N.R,. (Queen), Cecil Aubrey Lawson Mansergh, R.N. (Queem), Alfred Martyn Williams, R.N. (Fiuryalus), Hubert Mal- colm Wilsou, RuN. (Eu.ryalus), George Francis Dudley Freer, R.N. (Lord XeJson), Raclijard Victoa* Symonds-Taylor, R.N. (Agamemnon), Ceril Hurgh Clinton Matt- hey, R.N. (Queen Elizabeth), John Saville Metcaif, R.N.R. (Triumph). Tn the "London Gazette" it is announced that, for sendees in operations in the 'Dar- danelles prior to April 25-26, the Distin- guished Service Cross has been awarded to the following midshipmen:—J. C. Woolmer Price (Ocean), Hugh Dixon, R.N. (Queen Elizabeth), John Blaxland WcoUey (also b e'6 1 i ) commemded for sendee in action), Midship- ma,n Sir John Stuart Page Wood, Bart., I "commended for service in action." "ABSOLUTE CONTEMPT FOR DEATH." GLOWING TRIBUTE TO THE I "ANZAC" MEN. Points uf the Admiral's dispatch are as I follow — "Such actiols as the storming of the Sed dul Bahr position by the 29th Division must live in history for ever; innumerable; (ieeds of heroism and .taring were per- formed; the gallantry and absolute con- tempt of death displayed alone made the operations possible. "At Gaba Tepe the iandi-n, and dash of the Australia^ Brigade for the cliffs was magnificent—nothing could stop such men. j The Australian and New Zealand Army Corp in this their very first battle set a standard as high as that of any army in history, and one of which their country- men have every reason to be prottd. "It is impossible to exalt too highly the service rendered by the 1st Battalion of Lancashire FiirriHers in the storming of the beach (U. W.) the dash and gal- lantry displayed were superb. "The troops on board the Implacable were all landed by 7 a.m. without any casualties. The nature, of the, bearh iXJ was very favourable for the covering fire from s hins, but the manner in which this landing was carried out might well v. a naqdaL"1 # The capture of this beach (V) called for a display uf the utmost gallantry and perseverance. Saved the Inflexible, How the cruiser Inflexible was saved after being mined is told in the "London Gazette." TllC Distiwguijslveid Ssr vjce Order jjhas. been awarded to Lieutenant-Commanda*' (now Commander) Hon. Patrick Geo- L' ward Cavendish, M.V.O., R.N., Acting Stil5- Lieutenant-A. E. B. Giles, R.N., Engineer- Commander Harry Lashinore, C.B., R.N., Engineer-Lieutenant Commander Arthur Ellis Lester, R.N. Engineer-Lieutenant R.' G Parry, R. Surgeon M. H. I'?n?forci R,   .? During the t?ms H?M.S. InQcxI'b? ???'? steaming to Tenedos-?aUtarbo-Lieutenant Alfred E. B. Giles, Chief E.R..A. 2nd Class Robert Snowdon, O.N. 270654, and Stoker 1st Ctars Thos. Davidson, O.N. K. 14753, went down into the fore magazine and shell-room of j H.M.S. Inflexible when the parties work-1 itig in these places1 had q::?! driven out by fumeS caused by the explosion, of a mine under the ship. They c.led valves i. and wa.Mrngmt doors, lights being out, the shell-room hav- ing two feet of water in it, rising quickly, -;nd the magazine flooding slowly. The fumes were .beginning to take effect on Acting-Sub-Lieutenant Giies, but neither ho nor the others left until ordered to do so by Lieutenant-Commander Acheson, who was the last to leave the sheH room. Another V.C. Hero. The Victoria Cross, it was stated in the "'London Gazette," has been awarded LieuJ ten an t-Commander now Commander G- Robinson, R.N., for the conspicuous bravery ati the Dardanelles specified below — Lieutenant-Commander. Robinson on February 26 advanced alone, under heavy fire, into an enemy's gun position, which might well have been occupied, and, de- stroying a. 4in. gun, returned to his party for another charge, with which the second gun was destroyed. Lieutenant-Commander Robinson took part in four attacks on the mine fields--always under heavy fire. <

Advertising

Wfr at H. b SAFFUEL'S W than 10 spent elsewhere! K | The big profits charged by the K ordinary retailor are actually j iSACT F P Y0U>J solid cash in your pocket with A™ g^ | every purchase you make! ffl Only his colossal sales at LTJOKY 70 largo Branches enable WEDDI(; HIMS. | H. SAMUEL to offer such 2-Ct. SoM?o?' ? value In Jewollary, Lifetime's wear? I Watchas, Plato, etc. Sold by weight, 1016 15  2r;- up. B T y p i e a 1 \f Sea the wMds.v?t.hand- bargains: Yf windows! ome Wedding ClfT FREE I § si3ecial Wedding G i ft S PSEN 69LB PKOTC t ?01(is 2 rb o t o Alany ot ge r d e ???????'?OKB?C??E? |  Marked Gold setting, i r lehly car,,ed flall- ? '???S????. i°-?edGo}d setting. < IFC "3 AXROISED L ? ?)?????'? ?XYOtSEO @ key.ess movement. ?B???,

ARE YOU ENVIOUS

ARE YOU ENVIOUS,? Envious of what? Why the men and women who are so cheerfully tackling the difficulties of these troublous times. They never worked harder or longer: yet the stock of their vitality cloesn't give out. You think of your pains after eating. Your lack of relish for even the most appetising food. Your headaches: de- pression. The dizziness that at times seems to overwhelm you. The contrast is simply explained. It is a matter of digestion. You are weak and ailing. probably because you have not a sound stomach: an active liver; regularly-working howels, I If you would change this state, try! Mother Seigel's Syrup—the remedy which tones up the whole digestive system. When that has been accomplished, you; will regiiin vitality. Your feeble body j will gain new strength: your worn ont nerves be built up, because your blood is once mo-re enriched by thoroughly digested food.

SEVEN SISTERS SAPPER KILLED I

SEVEN SISTERS SAPPER KILLED. Official intimation has beenJ received of the death in Flanders, in action, of Sapper E. Ja.tnes, of tho Royal Engineers, a native of Seven Sisters, Neath, where he was for- merly employed as oollierv engine-driver. Deceased leaves a widow and three children.

Advertising

A nourishing nibble—MACKINTOSH'S i TOFFiiE DE LUXI.

TO COT THE TIMSI E b 6M iOFF

TO COT THE TIMS I ?? E? ??b 6M??& i, OFF. ■■■ ■ IMPORTANCE OF SUVLA BAY, JUNCTION WITH OUR LEFT WING. ATHENS, August, 15th (Received yesterday). The new successful landing on the Galli- poli Peninsula at Siivia Bay (on the west coast of the peninsula, 20 miles N. of the. entfarice to tha-Dardinelles), and the manner m which it was effected, cannot fail to exer- cise a moral effect on the enemy. The landing took place on the foreshore in front of the Salt Lake. Only a small obser- vation force of Turks was ori the spot, the Tok,s having been led by recent activities and reports to concentrate their forces on the Asiatic side of the Dardanelles and at Smyrna, where they thought attacks were probable. Our whole landing force, with its ammunition, baggage, and artillery, reached the shore practically without opposition, and with only very few casualties. The force immediately advanced, and quickly seized positions which it was planned should be taken. There strong entrenched positions were organised, the right wing was thrown out, and a junction effected with the left wing of our forces established before Sari Bair. Our new positions 1- Threaten the Turks' Communications I by land with the extremity of the peninsula. The enemy eventually brought up forces to attack the -newly-landed troops, but these were easily repuiijed with serious loss. I his defeat ox the enemy enabled our forces skill further to consolidate the posi- tion. The fleet dining the last few days has been very active.(" Daily Chronicle" correspondent.) THE TURKISH ACCOUNT. I (Press Association War Special). AMSTERDAM, Monday. An official' communique issued in Con- stantinople to-day says:— On the Dardanelles front the enemy, who has landed fresh divisions since August 6th and August 7th, attacked our positions with them. 'i-hanks to the heroic assistance of our troops aind our counter-aitacks tilio enemy achieved no result. In the district of Afiafarta, on Aufust 15th, we repulsed an attack. We captured one captain, some soldiers, two machine- guns, and a quantity of rifles. Off Ari Burnii an enemy torpedo boat was hit by our artillery. Near Seddul Babr (cn our right wing) we exploded a mine two to three metres before the enemy's trenches, by which a. hostile position with-bomb throwers and wire ob- stacles was wrecked. The enemy replied all might with an un- successful waste of ammunition. On the other fronts there is nothing to report.

I REV W G HARDIE I

REV. W. G. HARDIE LEAYINC SWANSEA FOR .1 LOWESTOFT. The Rev. W. G. Hardie, vicar of Holy 'Trimty. Swansea, ha's been offered and has accepted the J'vin? of St. John's, Lowes- tDft, and will shortly be leaving to take tip? his new duties. The rev. gentleman came to Swansea in 1911 from Sierbcine, and during the past four years has identified himself not only j Rev. W. 0. Hardie, M.A. the Church v/ork of his parish but the social work of the town, and in both he dis- j played considerable onergv and ability. 1- A POPULAR SUCCESSOR SUCCESTED. Officials of the ciuucli much deplore his departure and say that he lias proved very pppular since he has been here. There is a. strong lec-liiig that t1 living should he, g*iven to hi.s curate, the Rev, N. L. James, who h

I MUNITION WORKERS

I MUNITION WORKERS I Raid on Port Talbot Orchard. At Aberavon Juvenile Police Court on Monday nine young munition workers employed at the Port Talbot Steelworks, im-ol-o jointly charged with stealing 60Ibs. of apples, valued at 15s., the property of Edward Williams, 35, Beverly-street, ort Talbot. Prosecutor, in evidence, said that at 6 on the morning of the 30th ult. he visited his garden and found that the trees had been stripped of ail their fruit. One tree was damaged, and another prac- tically destroyed. He gave information to the police. He estimated the stolen apples at between 60 to 80tbs., and valued at least 15s. He had previously suffered from similar thefts. The lads raided the garden during the midnight supper hour. Defendants pleaded guilty. The Chairman (Mr. Charles Jones) said that the prosecutor did hot wish to' pres- s the charge.. As it was their first appear- ance in court the magistrates would take ji lenient view. Defendants were all dismissed on pay- metot of 6s. costs.

JOINED THE ARMYI

JOINED THE ARMY. Summons Against Neath News- agent. The- Neath Borough Police have recently been carrying on a campaign against boys under 12 selling newspapers in the streets of the town, and at the Gwyn Hall on Mon- day, before the Borough Bench, Thomas H. Richards, Wind-street, Neath, was sum- moned for employing a lad under 12 in J street .trading. The Chief (onsl-tble said he saw th-e lad seUing newspaper? in the street. He had had complaints from the Education Com- mittee about this offence. He understood, however, that the present defendant had tance joiner) he Army. Deiendant was ordered to pay 2s. 6d. towards the costs.;

FSERCE ATTACKS ONI KOVNO

FSERCE ATTACKS ONI KOVNO. I GERMANS DRIVEN BACK IN NORTH.. ENEMY SUFFER HEAVY LOSSES. I (Press Association War Spe>cial). PETROGRAD, Monday. To-night's Russian official communique says:— in the Bowsk district (32 miles north of Riga) on the night of August 15, our troops again drove back the Germans towards the Ail River, the enemy' s counter-attacks being repulsed. In the Jacobsfcadt and Dvinsk distriot there has been no essential change. The bombardment of Kovno continues without cessation, the Germans obstin-itely attacking the fortifications in the western sector. BETWEEN THE XAREW AND BLl; ON THE 14TH AND 15TH INST., illERE WAS FIERCE FIGHTING. A SERIES OF GERMAN ATTACKS WERM REPULSED WITH GREAT IXXSrS TO THE ENEMY. On the left bank of the Bug there have been no importa-nt engagements. In the other sectors in general on our front there have been local fusilades and artillery firing, but no engagements of any imrxwtansce. I THE GERMAN REPORT. I (Press Association War Service). AMSTERDAM, Monday. Today's German ofticiad. communique states:— In the East. Army group of Marshal von liinck-nburg.—In successful attacks against the enemy s advanced positions at Kovno we captured yesterday 1,750 Russians, among them seven officers. Our irruption into the Russian positions, which was opened by our successful crossing of the Narew, has completely succeeded. The pressure emanating from the point of irruption obliged the enemy, though once more he attacked along the entire front, to retreat from his positions from the Nafresv to the Bug. Our pursuing troops reached the Brainet height, capturing over 5,000 Russians. Near Novo Georgievsk the defenders have been pushed further back to th'e fortress ring. Army group of Prince Leopold of Ba- valli,.t.-D,uring the night the left wing forced the crossing of the Bug, west of Brokiszyn. After the centre and right wing yesterday morning had passed through Losioe ajid Miedzvrecze they met fresh re- sistance in the district of Czna and Klukow- sha between Brokiszyn and Biala, which at daybreak was brokefi by an attack of the Silesian Landwehr. The pursuit is proceed- ing. The -ixmy group of General von Macken- sen.-The pursuit of the enemy has already been prosecuted as far as Biala and Slaw- atysze. East of Wllodawa our troops have leached the ea.st bank of the Bug. I THE BOMBARDMENT OF LOMZA. (Press Association War Special.) PETROGRAD, Monday. Refugees from Lornza statue the German occupation of that town was preceded by throe days' bombardment, which was speci-' ally heavy at night time. The inhabitants took refuge in the basements and cellars. Several houses were blown to pieces, while others were burned. Scores of civilians were killed and wounded. Metals and everything else that could be useful to the I enemy had been previously removed. ANOTH ER EVACUATION. I (Press Association War Special.) I' PETROGRAD, Monday. In view of the exjyected fighting tha* district the inhabitants are leaving Bielos- tok. Civilian hospitals, banks and other institutions are being evacuated. (Mote.—Bielostok is north of Brest I itovsk, and is an important railway junc- tion. )

TRIPPERS ESCAPE

TRIPPERS ESCAPE. 14ARROW SHAVE NEAR GLASGOW. [ EXCURSIONIST TRAIN IN COLLISION. Aiialariniti, railway accident occurred on I Monday night at Pollolcshaws, a Glasgow suburb.. A train which had finished shunting wis ,wa I outside the station, for the signal to draw up to the platform, when a train from Stenoeks Station for Kilmarnock came up behind it and smashed into the guard's van, hurling, the wreckage high into the air and burying itself Jlalt-way underneath the wrecked coach. The adjoining carriage of the stationary train was also smasliedi but fortunately the remainder of the train and the whole of the colliding' train kept the metals. The latter was I Crowded with excursionists returning to Barrhead, a small town outside Glasgow. There were many women and children among them, but except for a se- vere shaking and minor bruises most escaped serious hurt. Unfortunately one man was lcilled-Robt. Rankin, a bank clerk, of Clarkston. Four passengers were removed to the in- firmary, and twenty other injured persons after receiving first aid in the waiting-room of Pollokshaws Station were conveyed to their homes, the uninjured passengers con- tinuing their journey in a relief train.

DEPUTY MAGISTRATES CLERK

DEPUTY MAGISTRATES' CLERK. DEATH OF EX-SWANSEA SOLICITOR. I MR. W. J. TREHARNE PASSES AWAY IN LONDON. AWAY IN LOffooN. News has been received of the death, which took place at Streatham, London, on Sunday, of Mr. W. J. Treharne, at. one time a member of the firm of Messrs. Jenkin Jones and Treharne, solicitors, Fisher-street, Swansea, and an extremely popular figure in the town. The deceased, who was about 50 years of age, had suffered from neuritis for some years past, and later complications ensued, and eventually he passed away in the pre- sence of his sister, who lived with him in London. Trained as an architect under the late Mr. J. P. Martin, the late Mr. Willie Treharne subsequently entered the office of Mr. Jen- kin Jones, magistrates' clerk, and himself qualifying as a solicitor, he became a partner of the firm and for some years acted as deputy magistrates' clerk. About seven years ago he was appointed solicitor to the N.S.P.C.C., a post which he later on had to relinquish through ill-health. After a short stay in Swansea he returned to Lonckm, wihere he carried on practice as a solicitor. He was an I ENTHUSIASTIC FREEMASON, I' and was Past Master of the Camdoc Lodge, Mtd took a gnat intei?est in the formation of the D. James Griffith Hall Lodge, and be- came its First Master. Ho was for some I time organist at St. Andrew's Presbyterian I Church, and was an ex-president of the Swansea Devonian Society. 1

Advertising

"Everybody marvels ow he get well" Our portrait is of Master New. ipan, w b a a « mother writes as follows: My son suffered from tubercular Sight Hip, unrt was in and out of hospital for IS months. ? ttiree operations, which did him DO good, we decided to try your Clarke's Blood LMixture. After ta.king the nrst bottle we noticed an improvement in him, so we kept it up and now iv,? e are gla1 to say he is quite cured. Everybody we meet marvels how he got well, and we are always glad to sa.y that it is your Clarke a Blood Mixture." -(Signed) Mrs. Newman, 14, Lennox Road, Fin gbury Park, London, N. 1 CURED BY |— If VOII suffer from am such disease a.1 Eczema, Scrofula, Bad LOIM Abscesses, Ulcers, Glandular Swellings, Bolls, Pimples, Bores of any kind, Piles, Blood Poison, Rheumatism, Gout, &c., don't waste your time and monev on useless lotions and messy oint- r)-, ts which cannot get below the surface of the ,,1 in What you want and what you must have to be permanently cured is a medicine that will thoroughly free the blood of the poisonous matter which alone is the true cause of all your suffering. Clarke's Blood Mixture is just such a medicine. It is composed of ingredients which quickly expel from the blood all impurities from whatever cause aris- ing, and by rendering it clean and pure can be re- lied on to effect a complete and lasting ours. Over fifty years' success. ■ i M Mm Pleasant to the # — 1 taste, j Clarke^ L ■ 79 Blood Wp" Sold by all M ? ? P" Chem sts and | MlAllITC | Stores. 2/9 per bottlo. N Refuse Substitutes. "THE WORLIY9 BEST BLOOD PURIFIER:

CONTRABAND

CONTRABAND. ALLIES AND COTTON SUPPLIES. 41 11 INFORMATION TO WASHINGTON* i (Press Association War Special.) WASHINGTON, Tuesday. The State Department has been advised unofficially but authoritatively that the Allies intend to declare cotton contraband. The decision, it is stated, has already beent reached, and the delay in making the an- nouncement is due to the necessity of the ar- rangement of a uniform treatment of the subject by all the Allies. Great Britain, France, Russia, Italy, and Belgium have, it is stated, agreed to maka cotton contraband, while Japan's attitude it undefined. It is understood that the Entente Powera expect the United States' protest, but they intend to base their arguments on the formal proclamations of Presidents Lincoln aivd Johnson in 1865, which maintained that materials for the fabrication of munition4 were contraband..

Advertising

ML I POWDER- Ii 1',L LS" 4LE" WW BEETLES

SWANSEA BOYS ESCAPADE

SWANSEA BOYS" ESCAPADE. I 27 SPENT ON SIGHT- SEEING. STOLEN MONIES OF LOCAL J FIRM. > -1 At Swansea Police Juvenile Court oa Tuesday a boy aged fifteen was summoned for stealing £ '7 IUs. the property of Messrs. Taylor and Co., Swansea, on August 6th. The madiager of the shop in liospitaa- square said he sent defendant to the Castle. street shop for some goods and at the sanit time gave him JBo Is. in silver, B2 in gold, a. £ 1 note, and two ten shilling notes, amount- ing in all to P,7 Is. He told him to hand it to the manager at that, shop as soon as he got there. The boy did not return, and he communicated with the manager of the Castle-street shop, and in consequence of what he was told he (witness) gave informa. tion to the police. The manager of the Castle-street shop said the lad never came to the shop. Detective Gubb gave evidence of arresting and charging .defendant, who admitted tak- ing the money. Defendant later said he igtavo half the money to his cousin- They bought a suit of clothel and then went to Cardiff. From Cardiff they went to London, stayed there one night, and came back to Cardiff on August 8th. On Sunday they went to Birmingham, but did not stay there long as they only had 9s. left. So they I Started to walk back to Swansea. Defendant pleaded guilty, and said he w:m wry sorry he took it; he did not know what made him take it. P.C. Francis said the family were very respectable, and so was the boy. He (wit- ness) was surprised to see him there on a charge of that kind. The manager-of the shop said the boy had been employed there for 18 months, and dur. ing that time was a "very good boy." He believed.the other boy influenced him a lot. Chairman said they were very sorry to find a respectable boy in the police court, but th-ey thought he had been influenced by somebody else. They did not want to send him to prison, so he would be placed on probation for two years, and he and his father would be bound over in the sum of I BlO for two years.

DANGEROUS ACROBATICS

DANGEROUS ACROBATICS. I "Cartwheels" on the Landoffi Line. Five small boys were at Swansea i Juvenile Court on Tuesday summoned for trespassing on the G. W .R. line at Lan- dure. I Mr. Rupert Lewis, who prosecuted for the railway company, said the boys stood on their heads on the line and turne4 I" cartwheels. The children were brought to court to prevent them doing it again, and also as a warning to others. Detective Gibbons (G.W.R.) said the boys, to get to where they wanted to go, had to cross three sets of metals and pasfl under a goods train. The boys all promise d the Inot to repeat tho offeuco, and tfid CJUsM i were difimissed*