Collection Title: Brecon & Radnor express Carmarthen and Swansea Valley gazette and Brynmawr district advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
22 articles on this page
Advertising

WRITE TO-DAY I ife2|||gi§| T A postcard brings tggSg | nK5 you free by return H. Samuel's big FREE BOOK OF It 3000 BARGAINS crowded with atartlijg offers in Jewellery, Watches, Plate, Cutlery, ■ etc., at next to FACTORY PRICES I that mean enormous t savin g for you. Send a I postcard now I Every article guaranteed by a Jk j! t FULL M B HANDSOME LOC! CT. Richly chased fc-ai*. ?;  !t???? with fine Pearl C/.K_ centre. 6/6 PEARL SET RING. Usually 10/6. ?/ W SIA^rkid311" F"o'cE'c & mpm

Honesty In the Pulpit I

Honesty In the Pulpit, I PRINCIPAL REES' IMPRESSIVE WORDS. At a public welcome to Bangor of the Jvev. jj Morgan Jonest, M.A., the new Professor of Churdh History, at Bala-Bangor College, Principal T. Re-es (formerly of Brecon) in extending to Mr Jones the welcome of the tutors and students said their college, though it made but a. small show, had had an ilm- portant influeince on the religious life of Wales. It gathered its students from every corner of the Principality, and sent them forth all over the world. Mr Jones brought with him scholarship and intellectual ability. But he aJso brought with him an aggressive and even violent honesty which was greatly needed in face of the present intellectual and rligiousl problems they had to face. Really, the only criticism made upon his appointment was that he was too aggressively honest. He was not afraid of that, because it was said tha.t they, as ministers, lacked the courage and honesty to say in the pulpit what they bad said in their studies and private conver- sation. That idea might not be well founded, but it must be killed or it would kill the influence of their ministers. (Applause.)

Heard In the Streets of BreconI

Heard In the Streets of Brecon I Wherever one goes one hears the same high opinions expressed. Here is another interesting Brecon case: — Mrs J. Thomas, of 61, Orchard strtSafcj KB^ posits the Uanfaes schools, Brecon, says:- "About six months ago I had a bad at.tadk of kidney complaint and was obliged to lie up for a The pains in may back and loins were sharp and shooting, and I couldn't turn in bed. "The urinary system was not right either, but I soon began to mend after using Doan/s b""o kidney pills. They freed me of the pains and cleansed the kidneys. I generally have some of the pills in the house, and if I get airy pain after a cold they soon put me right again. I think Doan's pills a splendid kidney medicine, and always recommend them. (Signed) (Mrs) J. Thomas." Prx t- 9d a box, 6 boxes 13s 9d; of all dealers. or from Foster-MoClellan 00., 8, Wells street, Oxford street, London, W. Don't ask for badbache and kidney pills,- ask distinctly for Doan's backache kidney pills, the saiae ,-is MTs Thomas had.

Farm Labourers I

Farm Labourers. I MID-NIGHT CAROUSAL AT RHAYAi>ER. I Before Messrs. RtLcihard Morgan (chairman), B.P. Lewis and Evan W. Jones, at Rhayader on Wednesday, D. Evans, Cefnfaes, Nantmel, faatm-servant, was fined £ 1 and 12s 6d costs for "fling indecent language at Rhayader on the 20th ult. Defendant did not appear. P.c. Evan Ingram said he heard several young men shouting "in Bast Street, and commenced a quarrel. Defendant used very bad lan- guage repeatedly. Dd. Beedle (Smith's Shop, Rhayader), called by the police, added he horurd the young men singing as they passed his place. Witness put the street-lamp out for the. town lamplighter, and no sooner had he done so, than Evans tried to light it again. Defendant returned to the gang, and bogan using language not fit to be heard. Sespgt. O. Rogers observed that he had re- ceived complaints about defendant's lan- guage. Thomas Bowen, Owmheithog, Namtrael, farm servant, was summoned for drunken- ness on the 21st ult. P.s. C. Rogers stated that he found a gang of men, shortly after midnight, near the blacksmith's shop in East Street. Some of them were sitting down in the ditch. Witneaa told them to go home. Bowen fell down, as he attempted to rise, two or three times, and was drunk. Defendant was fined 5s and 59 6d costs.

Advertising

Wm. Treseder, Ltd., The Nurseries CARDIFF. Phone Telegrams: 597. Trksbdek, Florist, Cardiff. 8-sirdea and Flower Seeds. Rose and Fruit Tree Lists on application. Wreathes, Grosses and Cut flowers at the shortest possible aotioe.

POLITICAL NOTESI

POLITICAL NOTES. I What was legitimately achieved, it would be interesting to know, in the view of the Tory Party, by the Liberal victories at the last two General Elections. True, the con- tention was advanced in the House of Lords, after the General Election of January, 1910, that the verdict of the electors, gave a man- date for the passing of the Budget, but not for any legislation to curb the veto of the House of Lords. But the General Election of December, 1910, gave the constituencies yet another opportunity to declare whether they wished the veto of the House of Lords to be curbed. The result of that General Election was to reaffirm the desire of the electors to curb the Lords' powers of obstruction. The mandate which the Liberal Government recei- ved was given with the text of the Parlia- ment Bill in the hands of the electors. But, the Opposition object, the electors had no sus- picion that the Parliament Act would be used to pass a Home Rule Bill, and the electors only approved the Parliament Bill because they understood that the Liberal Government was pledged to reconstitute the Second Cham- ber. Now, on Lord Lansdowne's own show- ing, the Prime Minister had made it perfect- ly alear that, amongstt other legislation which it was intended to pass under a Parliament Act, an Irish self-government measure would be one of the most important. And the elec- tors also knew, from the preamble of the Par- liament Bill, that the Government's inten- tion was to curb the veto of the Lords im- mediately, and to enter upon the task of reconstituting the Second Chamber after- wards. Under the Parliament Act, the Opposition clamour, the Constitution is suspended, and the Home Rule Bill must not be passed until another General Election has been held. If the Constitution is suspended, the Opposition is cowardly and remiss in merely demanding another General Election on Home Rule. They should demand1 another General Elec- tion on the still more pressing issue of res- cuing the Comsfcitution from duress. But at any rate the electorate in December, 1910, did not vote for an more power to be given to the Second Chamber than it enjoys under the Parliament Act. The Opposition, it is more than merely probable, hoped to be able, under colourable terms, to re-establish the permanent veto of the Tory Party, through a Second Chamber, on progressive legislation. But the electorate voted, in approving the preamble to the Parliament Bill, for Uie crea- tion of a Second Chamber which would not, like the existing House of Lords, oppose with a blank negative progressive legislation and the electorate's support for the main body of the Parliament Bill was given in order to al- low long over-due reforms—including. Home Rule—to make their way to the statute-book. Apparently the Opposition is quite incap- able of understanding the attitude of the de- mocracy to. the relations between the Home Rule question and the constitutional ques- tion. The Opposition would like to raise a difficulty over the Home Rule question under cover of which they can strike a vital blow at the Parliament Act. The British democracy, while they might pre- fer to see the Irish question settled by an agreement which would reassure the Ulster imiinority, are determined not to have the Parliament Act wrecked. For to what end were the two General Elections of 1910 fought and won? For this end in an especial degree, that it should no longer be possible for the Tory Party, when in Opposition, to force a General Election an any and every issue on which they chose to invoke the veto of the House of Lords. The British democracy is resolute against surrendering to any man- oeuvre or any clap-trap the rights which it asserted and won at two General Elections. « Lord Lansdowne and Mr Bonar Law, have from time to time, gone so far as to intimate that they would lend all the weight of their Party to the support of insurgency in Ulster if the Government would not dissolve upon the Home Rule issue. It was a grossly un- constitutional act of the Tory Opposition to force a dissolution upon the 1909 Budget through the instrumentality of the House of Lords. And the efeefcorate showed proper resentment at such a course. But what is to be thought of the attempt to force another dissolution under threat of violence? Is every Liberal Government, from now for ever, to live under a rejgime of dissolution under duress ? < If the Opposition were seriously professing to champion the Ulster minority against any danger, or hint of danger, from political, racial, or religious perse- cution, the situation might be different. Birt the Opposition do not even pretend to ask for safeguards against such dangers. The main farce of their argument is concentrated upon the plea that the Ulster minority must not be "thrust out from full citizenship of the United Kingdom." In plain words, since the Tories themselves are eager to diminish the Irish representation (including Ulster) in; the Imperial Parliament, the Opposition's only honest and open ca&e, apart from in- sidious attempts to work on prejudices which they are ashamed to avow before the tribunal of public opinion, is that Irishmen axe not fuN citizens of the United Kingdom unless they can raiete questions at Westminster about the Ballvmeim town-pump and the Bally- hoolev post-office. Mr Lloyd George has sent an interesting letter to Mr Raffan, M.P., who asked for some indication of the Government's intent- ions with regard to the taxation of Land Values. Mr Lloyd Gieorgje said: » • "I propose dealing with the question of Land Values at the end of January, probably in my stpeech at Glasgow. You may depend upon it that the Government definitely in- tend to utilise the valuation, which they are putting through at great expense, for the purpose of compelling the owners of the sites which are now not bearing their share of local taxation to contribute an the basis of the real value of their property. 0 "There is no intention of shirking the ifauo-of that I can adbure you. As you know full well, there are several alternative pro- posals for taxing site values. The members of your committee are not in agreement as to which of those methods is the most effic- ient, and you murft allow the Government some time to consider their respective merits." < Mr Lloyd George is due to speak at Glas- gow on the 28th.

IRoadmens Wages

I Roadmen's Wages. BREGONSHIRE SCHEDULE OF WAGES. At the Breoonshire Main Roads Committee on Friday the County Roads Surveyor, in accordance with instructions, submitted the following schedule of wages paid to roadmen: Eastern district, 3s and 39 4d per day; Brynmawr, 3s 9d and 4s; Cefn and Vaynor, 36 6d; Builth district, 3s and 3s 4d; Devyn- nock district, 3s 4d; Ystradgynlais district, 4s and 4s 6d. In reply to Mr Ernest Jones, the County Roads Surveyor said he could not report definitely on the roadmen in the Cefn and Vaynor district. Mr Jones asked that, provided the roadmen in that particu- lar district did their work satisfactorily was there any special reason for the difference be- tween the wages paid them and at Bryn- mawr ?—Mr Harpur, in reply to this and other questions, said rates paid by local councils entered into the ques- tion. After discussion it was decided, on the motion, of Mr Ernest Jones, to alter the schedule for Oefn and Vaynor to rary from 3s 6d to 4a.

Ystradgynlais CouncilI

Ystradgynlais Council. I J.P.Is COMPLAINT. I The Cefnyrerw Road. I WATER STREET TENANTS. Present at Ystradgynlais Council on Thursday l-t: Messrs. J. W. Morgan (chair- man), W. Waiters (vice-chairman), D. R. Morgan, David Lewis, Rihys Chapman, Thos. Williams, J. HowelLa, Sam Thomas, and I Lewis Thomas, with the clerk (Mr Jestyn Jeffreys) and other officials. I Preserve the Footpaths. The Commons and Footpaths Preservation Society wrote for a renewed expression of approval to the Public Rights of Way Bill. The Clerk said the idea was that any pri- vate right of way which had been used 20 years inclusive by the public became a pub- lic right of way. Mr D. R. Morgan said they should heart- ily support legislation in regard to rights of way. The Premier had already stated that wJhen a Bill was promoted he would support it. They knew how much money was spent in fighting right of way cases.—On Mr Mor- gan's motion, seconded by Mr J. Howe lis, it was decided to support the Bill. The Norwich Union Fire Insurance Society wrote that it was their intention to make a claim against the Council for alleged damage done to a motor van belonging to Messrs. W. Thomas and Co., Swansea, owing to the bad filling in of a road at Penrhos, Ystradgyn- lais. The Clerk said 'he had replied that the District Council were not responsible for the main road. It was under the control of the County Council. The Surveyor: It arises fiom the laying of our 8-inch main. It was decided to refer the claim to the Coutity Council. I J.P.'s Complaint. Aid. W. M. Morgan, Abercrave, wrote re- ferring to the serious obstruction caused by the Midland Railway Company in keeping the gates at Claypond croeising closed for such a long time. Last Friday and Tuesday he, his wife and children were delayed each time fully 20 minutes. Mr W. Walters said it was time this nuis- ance was stopped. The Chairman moved that the Clerk issue a summons against the Company. Mr D. R. Morgan said this was the first instance of a county magistrate making a complaint against the Company, and he mov- ed that a copy of the letter be sent to the Company. The Company had asked them to supply them with a specific case. Air W. Walters: I don't want to prose- cute the Company, but to send the letter to them, and if they don't alter things we must go to the Board of Trade, and if the. Board of Trade doesn't move, we must ask Mr Sidney Robinson, M.P., to get something done through Parliament. It was decided to send a copy of the letter to the Company. Landowner's Generosity. I The Chairman, reporting on the conference between Mr Moore Gwyn and Mr J. B. G. Price with regard to the proposed Cefnyrerw road, said Mr Moore Gwyn kindly volunteer- ed to subscribe £100 towards the cost of the new road, but Mr Price could not see his way to give more than the land and £ 25. The committee recommended that the matter be deferred for the present, and ascertain whe- ther further subscriptions can be obtained from persons interested. He moved the adop- tion of the report, and Mr D. R. Morgan se- conded. Mr J. Howells said he had been speaking with a farmer in the district, and the latter could not understand all this fuss about this new road. This particular farmer said there was not more than 30 tons of coal going over the road every year. Mr D. Lefwis was surprised at the remark of Mr HowoUs. He (Mr Lewis) was not only voicing his own opinion, but that of the rate- payers of Ystradgynlais Higher, that the road was required. Mr T. Williams said Mr Moore Gwyn act- ed the gjeoitleanan towards them, and they should try to meet Mr J. B. G. Price again, and get hÍJIn to give something more than he promised. Mr Sam. Thomas: What about Lord Tre- d,rP He receives benefit from the land there. The Chairman: Our recommendation is that we can go to Lord Tredegar again and ask himi to contribute. Mr S. Thomas: I believe that he will do his bealt, if he is like his uncle. That is OUr ex- perience at Owmtwrch. Mr W. Walters, replying to Mr Howells, said the farmer referred to probably lived in Glvntawe, which was in the Brecon Union. Mr Lewis and himself were prepared to call a ratepayers' meeting within a month, and they might find another £100. He added that YstradigyniLais Higher did not have a fair share of the money spent by the Council, and they paid rates. Mr D. Lewis said he was going against his conscience in going out to collect money for the making of thiis new road, but in order to have the road he was willing to sacrifice. He must thank Coun. Thomas Williams for his offer of £ 5, and if all the councillors did the same they would have the money collected very soon. The report was adopted. I A Source of Disease. i The Sanitary Inspector reported upon the complaints received in r W the accumu- lation of road scrapings on the side of the streets. In the absence of proper man-holes such deposits were allowed to become dry, and with high windd the dust was blown about, and in many instances it had been at- tributed to be a source and conveyor of epi- demic diseases. The haulier had been in- structed to allow the deposit to remain in the streets, as it was to be used for binding when metalling the roads. Some provision should be made at various points on the highway for the proper storintg of all the road deposits to be used for metal binding.—The Surveyor was instructed to make arrangements. The Inspector also reported upon the in- aanitary condition of a dwelling house occu- pied by Wm. Alexander, Cwmgiecld. The house consisted of two living rooms on the ground floor and two sleeping rooms on the first floor, the height from floor to wall plate being 5ft. only. The ground floor was very dilapidated. There were deep cavities at various points which provided a, passage of air from the ground to gain access into the living rooms. The lean-to at the rear of the house was dilapidated beyond description. All the woodwork in the house was in a state of de- cay, and there was no proper troughing and conveniences. He recommended that a clos- ing order be*served1, and this was agreed to. I Water Stroot-Tenants Leaving. The Inspector reported that 14 days notice had been served on December 27tli, on seven- teen occupiers and shop-holders in Water Street, Ysltradgynlais to further refrain f ro--n ooaupying the houses. Four of the notices had been complied with. The Clerk said he had seen Mr C. B. Jen- kins, who told him, that Mrs Owen was going to comply with the notice and close the houses, and she would be prepared to trans- fer the landi—with the houses closed on it- to the Council for street improvement. He (Mr Jeffreys) told Mr Jenkins that he had better write officially, and give some idea of the price required by Mrs Owen. The houses remained on Mrs Owen's lands because Mrs Davies would not complete her contract. Replying to questions, the Clerk said if they wanted to make street improvements they would have to purchase the land. The Sanitary Inspector stated that he had not served notice on the owners of the vestry. The Clerk You cannot demolish a vestry. Mr Walters: What about Mr Lake's pro- perty ? The Clerk: I don't know anything about that. Mr Lewis Thomas: For the sake of street YstradGYn Coun TWO v_- fly ?. ?. i? ? ?.? ?' ? .? '?.'?' improvements we s"ll have to take the vestry down. Mr J. Howells: There is no order on the vestry. It was stated that the tenants of the street had another month in which to leave the housesl. Miscellaneous. On the motion of Mr Rhys Chap man, seconded by Mr D. R. Morgan, it was decided to write the P.O. authorities again with re- gard to the provision of a letter box at Caer- b

Advertising

/MOOUGHS^^ tO?ndgejj U1g1õmc FOR   S r COLDSJ.p

Twins Cured of Eczema I

Twins Cured of Eczema. I A Grateful Mother Praised the WTonderful I Zam-Buk Treatment. Cuts, Sores and Piles. I The twin babies of Mrs Mary Haaelden got in a terrible state with eczema and skin rash, but Zam-Buk cleared away all their sores and gave them beautiful new skins. To an "Usldield Weekly" reporter the grateful mother, who lives at Field Cottages, Fram- field, Sussex, said — James and Joseph were only a fortnight .old when inflamed spots with mattery heads came on their face9. The outbreak spread very quickly to their necks, feet, hands, arms, and bodies, some of the sores being as big as half-crowns. Their skm got dry and crusty and steaied away. The spots, too, burst and discharged matter. "The irritation must have been very severe, for both babies were constantly ory- ing and got very fretful. A doctor said they had eczema. As they didn't gi-It better under his treatment, I tried another doctor. "But the rasih and sores got worse. We really didn't knovp what to do and I feared that neither of the twins would pull through. I decided, however, to see what Zam-Buk could do. I had used this herbal balm with great success for piles, cuts, bruises, etc. "I first bathed the twins all over with Zam-Buk Medicinal Soap, thoroughly dried their skin, and then dressed the sores with Zam-Buk. This Zam-Buk treatment acted like a charm! The irritation eoon died away and the little fellows took to their bottle with a relish and, also slept long and well. I kept up the Zam-Buk treatment and the twins' sores and rashes gradually died away. Beautiful new skin then grew, and to-day there isn't a ma.rk of any kind on either child." t Zam-Buk is an -unrivalled cure for poisoned sores, eczema, ringworm, scalp sores, ulcers, piles, bad legs, chapped hands, rheumatism, etc. Sold only in sealed boxes at Is 1 td and 2s 9d. Of all chemists and drug stores. All imitations are worthless! Zam-Buk Medicinal Soap, sold in large shilling tablets, is very v-aluable in connection with the treatment of children's skins.

ILocal RailwaysI

I Local Railways. I CAMBRIAN" AND N. AND B. The financial expert of the "South Wales Daily Newst" says: The Cambrian Railway Company estimate their increased incoine for 1913 at L14,548, but allowing for the usual under-estimate, it is probable that the actual figures will be something like E20,000 in ex- cess of 1912. In 1912 tie company paid the full interest on their A. and B. and 0. Debenture Stocks, amd also 2 oer cent. on the Non-Cumulative D. Debenture Stock. This was after setting aside £ 7,000 in further reduction of the per- manent way, bridge, and rolling stock renew- al suspense accounts and also some thousands of pounds lor renewals of engines and other purposes. Jully half of the increased rev- enue of CD,000 should be available as ad- ditional net revenue, and it thus appears as though the D. Debentures will receive an increased distribution on this ner-nawn. Am additional 1 per cent, on the D. Debentures requires £ 5,076, and it appears probable that this will be the distribution on this class of stock. In 1910 and 1911 the distribution was 2t per cent., and in 1912 2 per cent. The end of 1914 will see the termination of alloca- tions to the special1 suspense account referred to above, and from that time on the net revenue account should benefit by the £7,000 now annually being allocated. I N. and B. Progress. The Neath and Brecon had through 1913 continued the steady rate of progress that has been shown for a number of years. The traffic receipts are estimated at L92,000, and allowing for the usual under-estiinate the revenue of the year can be taken at L94,000, The working expenses of the oompany are us- ually low, but this is no doubt owing to the fact that the Midland Railway work the com- pany's passenger traffic at an annual rental. The proportion of expenses to receipts were about õ5i per cent. in 1911, and 54t per cent. in 1912. Assuming 55 per cent. for 1913, the expenses will be covered by £ 51,V00, leaving net revenue for the year of L42,300

No title

A correspondent says that if all landlords were liko Sir John Llewelyn, probably we should not hear SO much about the Land question. One thing Sir John is particularly anxious about is that no tenant should suffer through the depredations of game, and at the annual coursing match at Upper Chapel last week he gave emphatic instructions to the keeper to see that the rabbits were kept down, because rabbits, it is stated, did more harm to the, crops than any other ganne; in fact, not only do they damage the crops, but animals do not like grazing in a field where there are rabbits.

214000 Scheme

214,000 Scheme. I Ystradgynlais Housing. I COUNCIL'S DECISION. At Ystradgynlais Council on Thursday last, Mr J. AV. Morgan presiding, it was decided on the motion of Mr W. Walters, seconded by Mr D. R. Morgan, to instruct the architect, Mr Cookei Rees, to obtain tenders for the housing scheme. The question of sending representatives to a conference on housing at Newport was dis- cussed. Mr Sajn Thomas said that whoever they sent should be instructed to move a resolu- tion—"knocking up this old system and be- come the owners of the land ourselves." (Laughter.) Mr David Lewis That's it; be a Socialist! (More laughter.) The Chairman ruled Mr Thomas out of order. Mr D. R. Morgan said it was essential that they should send a representative to the conference, and he believed, if the L.G.B. were appealed to, expenses would be allowed. Mr Chapman seconded, and it was agreed to. It was stated thart delegates would be pre- sent representing South Wales and Mon- I mouthshire and Herefordshire.

I720000

I 720,000. I Insured Persons in Wales. I NEW STEP IN NATIONAL ADMINISTRA- TION. A year's working of the Insurance Act in Wales has given rise to the formation of what was described as probably the first body of a Welsh national character in administra- tive affairs directly sanctioned by Act of Parliament. The declaration was made at Shrewsbury, where an important conforenc-o of repre- sentatives of all) the inslurance committees of Wales and Monmouthshire decided to esta.b- lish an Association of Welsh Insurance Com- mittees. Mr J. T. Hughes, chairman of the Welsh Commissioners, said that WaJes had 720,000 insured persons, or one to every three of the population. The Welsh National Insurance Fund had received up to September 30 LI,740,000 of Welsh money, had paid out £ 929,000, and had kgll,000 invested in gilt- edged securities, every shilling of which be- longed to insured persons in Wales.

5000 BOYS WANTED j

5,000 BOYS WANTED. AUSTRALIA'S BIG OFFER. There is employment guaranteed by the Govern- ment at good wages awaiting 5,000 British boys in New South Wales and Victoria. Farming in these two great Australian States has in recent years made unprecedented progress. There is a very keen demand for farm labour, and the farmers unable t) obtain an adequate supply of experienced agri- culturists have induced the Government to introduce growing lads from the United Kingdom. Last season 2,500 boys went from Great Britain to Victoria alone, and all secured work with good farmers at from 10s. to 15s. a week, in addition to free board and lodging. Every boy was at work on a farm within a few days after he left the ship. The offer is being repeated and extended for 1914. The average wage paid to experienced farm workers runs from 20s. to 25s. a week. and every boy who makes the venture should be receiving this sum within a couple of years of his arrival. Wages are also substantially increased at harvest time, and this makes it a simple matter for farm workers to save from £ 40 to £50 a year. When they have saved about £ 100, they are able to double or even treble their earnings by the purchase of a team of horses. Later on there are sound oppor- tunities by the assistance of shares farming for them to acquire substantial freehold farms of their own. Every lad who accepts the offer now being made has it in his power to become a prosperous farmer before he is 30 years old. The Government in addition to guaranteeing work at good wages, also grants greatly reduced steamship passages. The offer is somewhat unique inasmuch as it is extended to lads of all classes and callings. Previous farm experience is not necessary. Every boy is eligible provided he is of good character and has a sound I to. New South Wales and Victoria are also making 

Pennillion Coffa

Pennillion Coffa. AM Y DIWEDDAR BAlWH BENJAMIN PHILLIPS, PONTFAEN. Awn a'n dagrau a'n cianiadau At orweddfan Prophwyd Duw Treuliodd ef ei hir flynyddau'n N ghysgod yr Efengvl fyw; Denai Benjamin y Oenaiad Fyddin Dww o hyd ymlaen; Gwasanaethodd mewn dylanwad Dros yr lesu yn Pontfaen. Merthyr Cynog, Capel Isaf, Cartref Methodistiaeth fad, Bu efe yn dwr dianaf Dros eu hurddas yn y wlad, Degarugain o flynyddoedd Rodd yn aberth i'r thai hyn; Mae yr oil fel lili'r nefoedd Ar ei ol yn brydferth wyn. Fel ei bregeth roedd ei Fywyd Beunydd yn hysbysu'r gwir, 'Roedd ei oes fel bryniau'r Gwynfyd Yn brydferthweh yn y tir; Bu yn dad i aøIwvd dduwiol Bu i lu yn dad y Ffydd 'Roedd ei galon fawr fugeiliol 0 dan dlyelni—dwyfol ddydd. Cyfaill pawb, a noddwr ydoedd, Kid oedd byth yn danod bai; Galwodd Iesu ef i'r Nefoedd Yn nghwrdd miisol tawel Crai; Adref aoeth yn lion, bererin Ef a'i Geidwad gol ynghod; Mae ei fywyd fel Mehefin Yn blodeuo ar ei ol. MA DOG FYCJHAN.

Advertising

V ■■ 11 ?7?? M??jr? inthe power 0/ the "soldier" cells that defend the body-after feeding on Virol. Convincing Evidence An elaborate series of investigations recently conducted at a well-known sanatorium has definitely proved that the addition of Virol to the diet exercises a remarkable influence on the action of the white cells of the blood, which protect the body against germs. The experiments showed there was a distinct and progressive increase in the functional activity of the white cells in proportion to the num- ber of weeks the patient had been fed on Virol. After twelve weeks' Virol diet the power of the white cells of the blood to destroy the germs was four times as great as that of the average blood of those who had not been fed on Virol. TABLE OF RESULTS Duration of feeding with VIROL. 0 weeks 2 6 9 „ 12 Average number of germs absorbed in 15 minutes by each soldier cell. 11 1'3 1*5 3'8 4.S Everyone-man, woman and child—especially those who are delicate, wasting or run down, should therefore take Virol. Feed babies and young children on Virol they are subject to so many ills from which these soldier cells alone can defend them. In jars at 1/ 1/8, 2/11. VIROL Used in more than a Thousand Hospitals & Sanatoria S. H. B. VIROL, LTD., 152/166, Old Street. London. E.C.

One of the Best I

One of the Best. I Small Dwellings Acquisition Act I PRAISE FOR MR. EDGAR CHAPPELL. I Ystradgynlais Council on Thursday discuss- ed the bestt way of making the Small swell- ings Acquisition Act better known through- out the district. Mr D. R. Morgan did not think the Act was known as it should be in the district. He agreed that Mr Edgar Ghappell, late of Ystalyfera, but now of Cardiff, had done his best, and was doing his best at present- through the Press—to educate the people in regard to the Act. He suggested that public meetings should he held, and that copies of the Act Should be printed and distributed. Air S. Thomas oould not understand why the Act was neglected so much. If he had any children he would like to see them bor- rowing money under the Act, seeing that they could get money so fairly. The Clerk: I a.m willing to give an ex- planation of the Act at any public meeting. (Hear, hear.) Mr Thomas Williams said he had read Mr ChappelFs very interesting articles in the Press, and if working men would read these and go in for building houses themselves in- stead of paying rent, it would be a much better policy. It was one of the best Acts for the working classes that he had ever known. (Hear, hear.) He had taLked the matter over w,ith an Ystradgynlais worker, and he computed that in 30 years by a working mian paying one-fifth of the money for building houses under the Act, it would not cost him more than what he paid in rent in paying off the principal and interest, according to what rents were in Ystradgyn- lais to-day. Mr Sam Thomas aaid he wanted a man to take an interest in his house, and availing himself of this Act rather than the Council providing the houses for him. Mr Walters said he was Surprised at Mr John Burn.s--seeing that he had been a La-b- our man-tlhat he bad not made the Act a better one. It wae( a good Act as far as it went, but it did not help the very poor. All applicants had to provide one-fifths and there was also the mortgage. He thought it would be a good thing to engage Mr Chappell to give lectures in the district, and to print 800 or 1,000 leaflets. Mr Chappell could speak both English and Welsh. Masters. J. Howells and D. Lewis support- ed, the latter stating that Mr Chappell had done a great deal to make housing a burn- ing question, and he was always ready to as- sist them. He (Mr Lewis) was very pleased to see Mr Chappell taking such an active part in the Press, and especially was he pleased to road the articles. It was agreed to ask Mr Chappell to give lectures in the distriot, and the councillors undertook to make themselves responsible for the necessary expenses in each place.

The Quiet Moment

— The Quiet Moment. Let Thy rich grace on all be poured, That Thy Great Namle may be adored Take us in hand and Lead us so That we may learn to fight the Foe. Bokl unbelief runs rampant now, Strains every nerve to bend his bow, That he may ejhoot the, poisonous dart, Which he takes care goes to the heart. Thy Banner now has been unfurled, Thy Saints shall help Thee judge the world, Grant needful grace that they may stand A virtuous, happy, valiant band. W. MARTIN, Clovelly, Brecon. 12th January, 1914.

IEnglynion I

I Englynion. I A correspondent sends us the following which he says were written by a Welshman and a bard who epent most of his life in Yorkshire and who had forgotten the Welsh language but not his love for the form of englyn. He composed the following englynion in English when Mr Lloyd Georgt settled the railway strike some yeans ago: Lloyd George is a forge of fire rousing With reason the Empire And a sure trump as umpire Whom> I ken all men admire. (There's something of the Welsh-Anglo- Scot in the last line.) Then another on the marriage of Madame Patti: A Baron of noble bearing—is he With sound understanding I To Brecon no heart-breaking Or dark wave, will brave Rolf bring.

TAXATION OF LAND VALUES

TAXATION OF LAND VALUES Government's Position. LETTER FROM MR. LLOYD GEORGE. The following oorrespomdence. has passed between the Chancellor of the Exchequer and Mr P. Wilson Raffan, M.P., hon. secre- tary of the Land Values Group in the House of Commons: — Troedyrhiw Fawr, Newbridge, Newport, Mon. Dear Mr Lloyd George,—The members Off the Land Values Group in the House of Com- mons desire me to express their gratification at the vigour and earnestness with which you have attacked the evils of Land Monopoly in your reoent cpeeches. They view with special pleasure your exposure -of the evils of our present rating system in your speech at Middlesborough, and your statement at Bed- ford that the present system of rating, in eto far as it discourages improvements by either owner or cultivator and rewards the indolent or unenterprising or overcrowding owner Who declines to put his land to the best use, must be reconsidered and recast." This emphatic declaration appeared to us to be an unerring indication that the Rating and Taxation of Land Values would occtipy a prominent place in the proposals for Land Law Reform which would be placed before the country by the Government in their Land Campaign. We regret to find, however, that in all authoritative expositions of the objects of the Campaign which have, so far, been published, this anticipation has not been realised, and we are naturally anxious that it should be made clear that the pledge given at Bedford is to be fulfilled, and that the Rating and Taxation of Land Values will find a place in the Government's proposals at an early date. The Liberal Party, as you know, has long been committed to this reform by the de- clarations of its leaders, the resolutions of the national Liberal organisations, and the pledges given in the House of Commons. Sir Henry Campbell Bannerman denounced our existing rating system as "a hostile tar- iff on our industries," and Mr Asquith, in language of equal cogency, has asserted the right of the community to a share of the "value created by the community," which finds expression in land values. It appears to us that any land campaign which ignored this essential question would be bound to be partial in its application, and to fail in its main purpose, and we therefore trust that you will have no difficulty in giving us the assurance which we seek, that rating and taxation reform, on the lineg of the Memo- rial presented by 176 Members of Parliament to the Prime Minister and yourself, will form an integral part of the proposals which the Government intend to submit to the country in the course of their forthcoming land owmpaign.- Yours sincerely, P. WILSON RAFFAN, Hon. Secretary Land Values Groap. Treasury Chambers, Whitehall, London, S. W. My dear Raff an,—I propose dealing with the question of Land Values at the end 01 January, probably in my speech at Glas- gow. You may depend upon it that the Government definitely intend to utilise the valuation, which, they are putting through at great expense, for the purpose of com- pelling the owners of the sites which are now not bearing their share of local taxation to contribute on the basis of the real value 01 their property. There is no intention of Shirking the issue, of that I can assure yon. As you know full well, there are several alternative proposals for taxing site values. The members of your committee are not in aigreemejit as to whidh of these methods is the most efficient, and you must allow the Government some time to consider their reo- spective ri(-rits.-EK-er sincerely, D. LLOYD GEORGE.

Advertising

hHYARCHER&C??! GOLDENRETURHS 1 ? ??REeiSTEFtED??- ?  .faMMK? of O?C-OOMP ???. Afchefs Golden Returns The Perfection of Pipe Tobacco. I COOL, SWIIT AND FEACRAMT. f