Collection Title: Brecon & Radnor express Carmarthen and Swansea Valley gazette and Brynmawr district advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
19 articles on this page
Advertising

^pPwRITE TO-DAY! i^j||||g||ji A postcard brings U53|Sjb:^g3j you free by return SS H. big FREE BOOK OF 3000 BARGAINS crowded with startling offers in Jewellery, Watchea, Plate, Cutlery, | Jewellery, Watches, Plate, Cutlery, ■ FACTORY PRICES I that mean enormOU8 -?!??. I a?ving for you. Send a ..????? I postcard now I Every ?N??S?a! article guaranteed by a ?.?3?? FULL TRIAL I HANDSOME LOCXET. Richly chased hle. ??j??S? with fine Pearl  r centre. 6/6 KARL SU MIM Usually 10/6. ?/ v 21/.?B? 2 1 18-et. HwaiUth-FREE PRIZES Gold,medwith FREE PRIZES ■ 5 lustrous Pearls. for all purchasers. .Å.mazm value 1 M

To Save the Child

To Save the Child. LLANWRTYD AND DR. BARNARDO. Mr Alfred J. Meyer's visit with a company of musical boys from Dir. Baroardo's Homes, to Llanwrtyd Wells, on Wednesday was at- tended with great success. The events, held in Victoria Hall" afternoon and evening, were liberally patronised. Mr D. Rowland Gay occupied the chair in the afternoon, and, in the evening, Rev.' Rees Evans, C.C. The performance, in the afternoon, was given more especially for children, but a good number af admits attended. Mr D. Rowland Gay expressed his sym- pathy with Mrs Penry Lloyd (the president) in her illinees, and wished her a speedy re- covery. The story of the Homes was well known. A Fociad, worker had said Save the children and the world is OUTS." and to-day there was a large number of agencies working for this emd. He had no hesitation in say- ing that Dr. Baroardo's Homes were the most prominent. They realised that the child of to-day was the parent of to-morrow. This wonderful organisation, created by Dr. Bar- nardo, had given an impetus to legislators and a great part of present-day legislation was directed towards the helping of child life. There were same he was sorry to say, that did not know what childhood meant, but since the formation of the homes some 50 years ago, 78,000 children had passed through, and of the 8,500 children that were always in the Homes, a thousand were in- fants. The chairman impressed upon the children that Dr. Barnardo gave up all the bright prospects of his nohle profession, con- sidering them of no value when faced with the prcywvition to 861Te his country. (Oheers.) All the Homes were kept up by voluntary contribution" and he hop«d that the visit of Mr Meyer create a more lively inter- est. He was sure they would see the neces- sity for this when they knew that a very small subscription kept the doors open for one minute.

No title

At Witley, Surrey, the Parish Council have accepted the offer of the Boy Scouts to work in conjunction, with the small fire bri- gade that has been formed in the village. The Scouts will drill1 and attend fires with the firemen, and have undertaken to look af- ter the brigade tooøe.

Advertising

CANADUN PACWle READY MADE FARMS Make it- easy for the British Farmer to settle in Canada. NO pioneering hardships. Easy terms qf payment spread over twenty years. Loans to Settlers for the purchase of live stock. Good Land a" moderate prices close to Railways, Schoo's, Churches, etc These Ready Made Farms are situated in the best "agricultural districts in the Provinces of Alberta & Saskatchewan and are available for men with moderate capital and farming experience. House and barns already bu lt, and a portion of each fa-m seeded with suitable crops. Write for particulars of conducted parties leaving for Canada in the Spring. For further particulars and application forms:— apply LAND DEPARTMENT, Canadian Pacific Railway, 62-65, Charing Cross, London, S.W., 18, St. Augustine's Parade, Bristol. Booklet entitled the Farmers' Opportunity in Canada" sent free on application.

I POLITICAL NOTESI

I POLITICAL NOTES. I A noble utterance was. Mr Long's assertion that the Ulster volunteers would prove "in personnel, training, and equipment, to be in no way inferior to the best army in the field." The zeal which inspired such panegyric was too hot to pause for the reflection that such comparison migjht be odious to the officers and men of the British Army. And the com- parison has another very practical applica- tion. It is an unqualified condemnation of the case urged by the National Service League and all the advocates of compulsory training. If the drilling which the Ulster Volunteers has received makes them a match for the best army in the field, it is obviously unreasonable to baSe any argument on the supposition that the Territorials do not re- ceive enough training to enable them to deal with sporadic raids which would, at the earliest not take place, till the Regular Army had left these shores and Territorial mobili- sation had taken place. However, Mr Long's opponents), no less his friends, welcome the assurance of his return to health and strength, which is given not only by his plunge into the Irish question, but by his. bold challenge to the Government to give effect immediate- ly to Mr Lloyd George's sketch of a policy for the urban land question, which, when it was put forward at Holloway, the Opposi- tion Press denounced as hasty and ill-con- sidered. Mr Runciman announces that the Government will, during the present Session produce a plan for eliminating the hereditary element in the Upper House, and constitu- ting a Second Chamber on democratic prin- ciples!. It would be sheer waste of time at the present moment to enter upon a. discussion of the possible lines which an endeavour to reach an agreement on the Irish problem might follow. It would be a truly academic discussion, for it would correspond very close- ly with a famous definition of metaphysics: the search of a blind man in a dark room for a hat that is not there. All the guidance which Sir Edward Carson gives is to lay down the ultimatum that "there is no use in hold- ing converetations or negotiations unless they give us a basis the preservation under the 11 ve us a Imperial Parliament of those rights which our ancestors won. We are not told what rights or what ancestors. He may mean that a Protesttant and Unionist ascendancy must be preserved in effect, though under an altered form. He may men that the repre- sentation of Ulster in the Imperial Parlia- ment as fixed by the Act of Union, is not to he diminished; forgetting that the Union- ist" Party, in proposing a scheme for reduc- ing the total Irish vote, has itself proposed to reduce the number of Ulster's representa- tives. Or he may mean something moich more consonant with the principles of poli- tical equity, democracy, and of the liberty which has become the life-blood and the chief cementing influence of the British Empire. But if he means something of this nature, his words give a very faint indication of it. < < < To those who imagine that the words of the Opposition leaders have any definite meaning, their attitude presents an insoluble riddle. If the Opposition are honestly fight- ing against a measure which they believe would indict "slavery" or "serfdom" upon a part of the British Empire, it is unthinkable that the Opposition leaders should bind themselves by any self-denying ordinance not to oppose such slavery" or serfdom," if it is to he inflicted under the mandate of a majority of British electors. Perhaps "sla- very" and "serfdom" are not, per se, so ob- ?r -Re, so ob- noxious an idea, to Tories as they are to Liberals. Perhaps this repugnance to "sla- very" and "serfdom" is only ad hoc; quite satisfactory for the British agricultural lab- ourer, but loathsome if enforced upon an ascendant" Party. Yet it seems almost un- thinkable that a Party which would resist "serfdom" and "slavery" for any class of the British people would consent to acquiesce in it. provided that the gambling change of another General Election were secured to the Party which froths over with righteous indig- nation against something which it will take lying down if it has bad that gambling chance. Mr Bonar Law, whose entire rectitude throws Sir Edwards Car-on into a passion of admira- tion, declared in 1911. speaking with the ut- most deliberation." that if his Party could force a dissolution, and failed in winning a General Election, his advice to the "loyalists of Ireland" would be: You have got to sub- mit." "Slavery" and serfdom" are trivial things in the balance against a gambling chance for the Tory Party to get back into office. It would not be difficult to sum up the whole Ulster question, as far as it makes a part in what might be nominally called "practical politics," and is not involved in the whole Irish question, by a single phrase. The Tory Party, which formerly wanted to gamble in the food of the nation, now wants to gamble in Ulster stock in the hope of "bearing" the Parliament Act. The Parlia- ment Act goes some way, but far from the whole way, in putting Liberal measures on a, fair level with Tory measures. If it had suited the "book" of the Tory Party to cut down Irish representation, the question of Ulster representation would have gone through on "oiled castors." For what does a hereditary Upper House exist? To pass, submissively, every legislation that the Carl. ton Club dictates, and obstruct Liberal legis- lation. Ulster is but a. pawn in the game that the Tory Party is playing in the hope of checkmating the Parliament Act, which haa its mandate, on. principle from one, in de- tail from a second, General Election. Mr Bonar Law has let the secret out of the bag. What the Tory Party wants is not .security for Ulster against "slavery" and "serfdom," but another opportunity to defeat the Parlia- ment Act. In the course of a speech of wide range and great vigour, Mr Burns has brought into prominence two points which deserve con- sideration equally from friends and foes. Mr Burns has laid emphasis on the need of Im- perial Parliament to concentrate on Imperial questions and on the requirements of the dif- ferent parts of the United Kingdom, and also on the absurdity of the Tory Party in pro- fessing to recogn ise now-as they would not have recognised if Mr Lloyd George had not enforced the urgency of the question—the grievances of town tenants. The Tory Part" wants to make us think of nothing but the grievances of Ulster. The grievances of the British elector a.gainst a system which makes Parliament a battlefield for local complaints and controversies in Ireland is much more serious. Mr Long wants a, judicial body to consider the grievances of the town tenant, which the Tory Party would never have re- cognised if Mr Lloyd George had not forced the consideration upon them. Mr Long can- not see tlip necessity of a judicial body to consider the grievances of the existing rural system.

Llandefalle I

¡ Llandefalle. I Social.—There was a large attendance at a social in the Schoolroom on Saturday week. A first class supper was provided, and those in charge wene MifH Morgan (Maescoed), Miss Price (Brynllys), and Mrs Evans (School House). A musical programme was given, and games, dancing, etc.. indulged in till about midnight. Mr James (Trephilipi was; M. C.

No title

A valuable" Labour Dermand Circular" has just been issued by the Emigration Branch of the Department of the Interior, Govern- ment of Canada. It contains the require- ments of the Canadian Government Employ- ment Agents in the Provinces of Ontario and Quebec for farm hands and domestic ser- vants. Copies may be obtained from Mr J. Obed Smith, Assistant Superintendent of Emigration, 11-12, CJhaaring Cross, S.W.

Agricultural Education

Agricultural Education BRECON AND RADNOR SUPPORT A Resident Organiser. COUNTIES TO OO-OtERATE. At the Education Committees of Brecon- shire and Radnorshire on Friday the import- ant new scheme for agricultural instruction was discussed. The scheme is as follows: -1. A grant will be received fram the farm institute fund i'n respect of the additional expenditure (ex- cess expenditure over and above the aver- age expenditure incurred in the three years ending 31st March, 1912) of each county, and this grant, it is proposed, will be paid direct to the College. 2. The County Edu- cation Authority can only receive the bene- fits of the scheme by incurring expenditure in excess of the standard expenditure (aver- age expenditure during the three years end- ing 31st March, 1913) of the county upon agricultural education. 3. Under the scheme the contribution from each county will include (a) the standard expenditure, (b) the additional expenditure. 4. The aggre- gate funds at the disposal of the College to be expended in each county will consist of: (a) The contribution from the county (Par. 3. a and b); (b) the grant earned from the farm institute fund in respect of the addi- tional expenditure of the county. 5. The work will be carried out by the Agricultural Department of the College, Aberystwyth. Each county will be represented upon the Agricultural C'ommitee. (j. The College will appoint a resident organiser for each county as well as a staff of lecturers and instructors to carry on the work under the general supervision of the head of the agricultural department of the College. The county au- thority will have a voice in the appointment of the county organiser and the other agri- cultural instructors through its representa- tives on the Agricultural Committee of the College. 7. The salaries and travelling ex- penses of the; sftaff employed, together with the cost of the work, in each county -will be defrayed by the College out of the funds placed at its disposal by the county and by the Board of Agriculture from the farm in- stitute fund. 8. The work carried on under the scheme in each county will consist of — (a) Courses! of instruction by means of lec- tures and demonstrations in agriculture, dairy work, poultry management, horticul- ture and such other technical agricultural subjects as may from time to time be deemed desirable, (b) Field experiments, (c) Ad- visory work. The funds at the disposal of the county will be allocated each year under the following heads:—(a) Courses of in si ruction. at local centres, (b) Field experi- ments. (0) Scholarships. (d) Salaries and travelling expenses of staff. 9. The arrange- ments for the work in each county will be under the direction of an agricultural com- mittee to be appointed in each county. 10. The, College authorities shall submit an esti- mate of the work and the cost at the be- ginning of each year to the Agricultural Committee of each county, and at the end of the year a report on the work done and a financial statement showing the actual expen- diture incurred. 11. The county will not be called upon to meet any expense under the sc heme except the annual grant made by the county to the College. The Agricultural Commissioner for Wales attended and addressed the com-inittee with reference to the scheme. The aver- age annual payments made during the three years ended 31st March, 1912, were 4;174 lis. It was resolved to recommend that a fur- ther sum of £100 per annum be granted for agricultural education in the county in pur- sance of the above scheme. An application was received from the Rhayader Fur and Feather Association for a course of lectures, in dairying, and was referred to the official or- ganiser to be appointed. The committee con- sidered the short courses in agriculture at Aberystwyth, and recommended that Mr H. W. Griffiths, Evenjobb Post Office, and Mr Basil Jenkins, Penybont, be awarded scholar- ships. At the Radnorshire Committee, Mr J. Hamer moved the adoption of the report, stating it embodied a full account of the scheme submitted by the Agricultural Commissioners for Wales, who attended the meeting of the committee and very fully ex- plained the working of the scheme Radnor was rather too small to appoint a resident organiser of its own, and the suggestion was that they should be joined with Brecon- shire. They were at present joined with Breconshire for asylum purposes; and there would be no difficulty in their co-operating with Breconshire in this matter. Prof. Bryner Jones stated that the accounts would be kept quite separate for both counties, so that whatever Radnorshire got from the Government would be credited to the county. The scheme provided that they should expend for the next year or years to come the average of their expenditure for the three years ending 31st March, 1913; but if they were wishful for obtaining a grant from the Government they must expend a still further amount. To obtain a Government grant of t:200 they had to expend an additional P,100, and thus) the total sum available would. be t475. That money could be expended in agricultural lectures, demonstrations in ag- riculture, dairy work, poultry management, horticulture, other technical agricultural subjects, in. experiments, scholars hips, etc. C475 see.med rather a big amount to call for, but £100 was received from what was known as the whisky" money, and that reduced the amount to be provided by the ratepayers to il74 11s. The other £200 came from the Treasury in grants. It would be a mistaken policy not to accept the grant, as it was quite likely that in the future there would be larger grants from the Treasury towards this object, and if they did not provide the funds now they might staffer in the long run. The committee quite agreed in recommending that the additional £.100 be voted for agri- culture education in the county. Mr T. Davies seconded, and the report was adopted. Breconshire's Support. I UNANIMOUS APPROVAL. I The scheme was also discussed at the Bre- conshire Education Committee on Friday, the Higher Technical and Agricultural Sub- Committee reporting at length upon it. Prof. Bryner Jones, the committee reported, advi&- ed the county should increase their expendi- ture to t247, being £100 in addition to the standard expenditure, which together with the grant would fbring the amount available for agricultural education up to approximate- ly JE447. The amount spent in 1913 was more than £200, so that an expenditure of t247 would mean an increase of approximate- ly The committee were of opinion that one organiser would be sufficient for Brecon nnd Radnor, and the arrangement would lea,ve more money for the other work. They ajsked Prof. Bryner Jones to suggest this to the Radnorshire Committee. The committee un.animously resolved to iv- commend the County Council to join the scheme, and to contribute a sum of P-247 per annum, being L100 in addition to the stand- ard expenditure. Mr Miller moved the report, and said that by spending a little more they would get back a very considerable portion, whereas if I they did not spend more they got back noth- ing for what they already spent. Archdeacon Bevan: That is a position which other people share: with you. (Laugh- ter.) Mr Miller: I am afraid it is a position which people share in their dealings with the Department. Mr Beckwith said much as he was against additional expenditure, he cordially sup- ported the scheme—{hear, hcar-)-because he believed it would have very practical re- sults. He was strongly in favour of resident scholarships: those were thjp things that had done. good in siuch countries as Denmark. The committee adopted t>*e committee's re- commendation without further discussion, and appointed the following committee — Messrs. Owen Price;, W. S. Miller, T. Mor- gan, David Williams, Benjamin Davies, Levi Jones, J. L. Davies, H. A. Christy. James Matthews. Major the Hon. W. Bailey, and the Hon. R. C. Devereux. It was pointed out there was no represen- tative for the Brymmawr district. A Voice: There is no live stock there. (Loud laughter.) Mr J. E. Williams (Clydach) was appointed on the committee to represent that district.

Advertising

Wm. Treseder, Ltd., The Nurseries CARDIFF. Phone Telegrams: 697. Trbskbkr, Florist, Cardiff. Garden and Flower Seeds. Rose and Fruit Tree Lists on application. Wreathes, Crosses and Out I Flo?era at the gwrtest possible notice.

I Keep Influenza AwayI

I Keep Influenza Away. I THE PEPS BREATHING CURE DISPELS ALL DANGEROUS GERMS. The influenza-fiend is abroad again and the  reathe-a b le demand for germ-destroying breathe-able Peps tablets is urgent. Although influenza takes various forms it has two common fea- tures. The cause of the trouble is a germ, and the germ floats about in the air we breathe. A breathe-a ble remedy is, therefore, necessary to follow this influenza. germ down into the throat, and destroy it before it has a chance of breeding trouble. If you 'have a headache, and experience a slight chilly feeling, accompanied by sneez- ing, and vague pains in the limbs), you are threatened with an influenza cold, and should take breathe-able Peps at once. The slightest delay will enable the influenza germ to complete its attack, and eventually leave you with a weakened chest. Thew unique Peps treatment is preventative and curative. In these handy little Peps tablets is stored a, powerful germ-killing medicine which is released in air-like form as a tablet dissolves in the mouth. You breathe in the influenza germ, and you must breathe in Peps medicine to destroy and expel it. Don't wait for influenza or a chill to grip you; take Peps at once. Peps instantly stop a cough or cold, and fortify the throat and lungs with a medi- cine that goes direct to these vulnerable parts. Peps are the real breathe-able re- medy, and taken regularly enable you to defy the worst epidemic of influenza. Not only are these dainty PepSi tablets guaranteed free from opium, laudanum, and. like harmful drugs found in cheap cough mixtures, but they exert a' more direct in- fluence on the throat and chest than can any ordinary medicine which is simply swallowed into the stomach. At this time of the year you should always carry a few of these salver- jacketed Peps. Beware of all worthless sub- stitutes.

IClasburyonWye Farmers I

I Clasbury-on-Wye Farmers. I I MAINING OF A ROAD. I Glasbury-on-Wye branch of the Farmers' Union held its annual meeting on the 19th inst., Mr J. W. Jones (Sheephouse) presiding. The question of canvassing the ratepayers a.s to the advisibality of crnaining the road from Glasbury to Boughrood arose. Mr T. Amos intended that the wprk would be done as soon as possible. The Chairman ohserved it was very en- couraging to find their fina.ncial position was steadily improving, and, undoubtedly, with determined effort Glasbury branch would soon be on a strong monetary basis. On the motion of the chairman, the treasurer's report was adopted. Alderman W. Price proposed that Mr J. W. Jones be re-elected chairman. He felt sure the whole of Brecon and Radnor Union was wishful Mr Jones should continue to act as chairman of Glasbury branch. He was most popular among farmers and well fitted for the post. Mr R. T. Rogers, seconding, felt sure they could not do better than give Mr Jones their support. The Chairman was sorry to say lie was not prepared to continue to act as chairman. He had had the honour on three occasions and he fully appreciated the kind offer, but pointed out that the branch had a "minute" which stated that a new chairman must be appoint- ed annually and he was convinced that it would be to their advantage, if complied with, especially as the institution was non-politi- cal. Eventually, on the proposition of Mr R. T. Rogers, seconded by Mr J. W. Jones, Mr J. Gittoes was elected chairman for the ensuing year. Secretaries were appointed for the coming year as follow:-Radnoi-Aliiiv, Mr J. Thomas (Clyro), and Breconshire, Mr A. E. Havard treasurer, Mr J. W. Jones. Representatives appointed to act on the Executive Commit- tee were:—Breconshire, Messrs. T. Price. J. W. Jones and A. E. Havard; Radnorshire, Messrs. W. Price, R. T. Rogers and T. Am- monde. Members decided to invite tenders for a supply of seedsp and manure, and., also, to have pigeon-shoote. A letter was received from the Farmers' Tariff Reform Union, asking the branch's opinion of the present policy of opposition as expounded by Mr Bonar Law. On the motion of Mr J. W. Jones, it was agreed to bring the matter forward at the next meet- ing and thoroughly discuss it from the i!iig ?tn d tl iorou?, farmers' point of view entirely. The general feeling of the meeting, however, was to take no part in the discussion at all. Proceedings1 terminated with a very hearty vote of thanks to the retiring Chairman. Mr W. Price, who proposed the vote, said every- one was grateful to Mr Jones for the splendid service he had rendered during his term of office. Membership had increased 20 per cent, last year.

Sunday Observance I

Sunday Observance. I BRYNMAWR CO-OPERATION. I At the Brynmawr District Council, Mr E. I Swales presiding, a deputation consisting of the Rev. J. Wesley Davies, Messrs. E. Wat- kinss, and J. T. Jenkins, attended from the Free Church Council to endeavour to secure co-operation to suppress Sunday trading. It was felt by the Free Church Council, it was stated, that if they could induce the local authority to move in the matter they would be able to get the support of members of Anglican and Roman Catholic Churches, whereas there would perhaps be prejudice if the Free Church Council took it up them- selves. Tlie Chairman observed that he felt sure all the councillors were in favour of a day of resit in seven. Mr J. Bloor condemned Sunday labour, and regretted that toere were preachers who drove about in traps to fulfil their engage- ments. Mr G. Morgan remarked that Sunday trading had become a sore question in South Wales. He regretted that their own people were offenders as well as the foreigners who had settled among them. After further discussion it was decided that the Standing Joint Committee should be writ- ten to, and that the co-operation of the church es and public bodies be invited in the dampaign.

Advertising

Refuse Substitutes for .r Watson's Matchless Cleanser Watson's Matchless Cleanser is the proved best soap for all Household and Laundry purposes, and every tablet bears the trade mark-a Ram's Head. Always look for this trade mark, and refuse inferior substitutes sometimes offered for the sake of extra profit. All Grocers, Oilmen, and Stores can supply. Watson's iniatchless Cleanser GUARANTEE of has the largest sale of full-pound tablets m the world. Matchless Cleanser-. give it a fair trial in Hot. Cold. Hard, or Soft Water. II you hare SAVE THE WRAPPERS "r So

ALLEGED CARTH SLANDER I

ALLEGED CARTH SLANDER. I VERDICT FOR DEFENDA-N-T WITH I COSTS. At the Breoonsliire Assizes on Friday, be- I fore Mr Jusitiee Rowlatt, Mary Mar tin, Garth House, Garth, Breoonehire, was the plaintiff in an action for slander ag- ainst Evan Thomas, grocer, Garth. The Bon. H. C. Bailey (instructed by Mr H. Vaughan YaughaJi) appeared for plaintiff, and Mr Lin. colin Reed (instructed by Mr A. L. Careless), was for defendant. The Hon. H. C. Bailey said the words al- leged to have been used by defendant to Mr Martin were: Your wife was living with somebody else before she married you." He asked for damages. Arthur Edward Martin, husband, stated that on the 2nd of September he was living at Garth House, and went down to defend- ant's shop. He was accompanied by his man, Richard Hughes. Defendant had been threa- tening sending in a. claim for compensation, because of the" Park" people's cattle getting I to his (defendant's) hay. As defendant was a tenant of his on sufferance, witness asked de- fendant to remove the hay at oaice. Hughes stood outaide the shop. High words ensued between him and defendant, and he told de- fendant, "This is the first time I have quar- relled with you. You quarrel with every- body, even with your own wife." Defendant body, Your wife has been living with some- sai d one else before she married you." Witness asked defendant to repeat the words after calling Hughes to oome mto the shop. De- fendant then, said, "I said noth ing." Hughes sa.id You did. Witness then left the shop and went home. In company with Mrs Martin he saw defendant the same evening to de- mand an apology. They did not get an apology. Mr Thomasl denied ever having said the words alleged. They went out and called Hughes, who lived near, and asked him to repeat the words that defendant made use of that afternoon. Hughes repeated the words, an d defendant said to Hughes, "You are a liar. Cross-exajnined, witness said he had been OIl friendly terms with defendant previous to the 2nd of September. The friendship broke up abruptly, owing to a dispute in regard to a. stable. He knew there were differences be- tween defemdant and his wife, but he did not advise defendant to leave her. He did not say that his (witness's) grandfather had done the same thing. He denied having invented the words which defendant was alleged to have made use of. Hughes came down with him in connection with the hay, and he did not tell Hughes to stand outside the shop. His Lordsihip Does Mrs Martin Jive in this district ?- Witness: No. my lord. So Mr Thomas doesn't know anything ob- out her?—I don't think so. Richard Hughes corroborated as to hear- ing defendant making use of the words al- leged. Mr Lincoln Reed, for the defence, said the proceedings were brought as the result of ill- [ feeling between Mr Martin and defendant. I Defendant sajd there was a dispute in re- gard to the stable and the right of way. He denied having spoken the words alleged. Mrs Martin was quite a stranger to him.. He had no ill-feeling towards Mrs Martin. On the 2nd of September Mr Martin said to him, "You are quarrelling with everybody, induding your own wife." He (defendant) replied, It would be interesting to hear how you are going on with your wife." Continuing, defendant said he did not see Hughes outside the shop. Mr Martin went awav after the conversation a,nd later when Mrs Martin, accompanied by Mr Martin and Hughes called!, he told Mrs Martin he had not said the words. Cross-exam ined, defendant said he had been on friendly terms with Mr Martin since test March. He wanted dOO compensation and Mr Martin offered £ 40. He called Hughes A liar" when Hughes said he heard him us- ing the words. in?,c']: 'he jury brought in a verdict for defend- ant, with costs.

Advertising

The Pi oneers of Pro  ress are the Men that tI* l 'k ttie Canada knows what she owes to her pioneers, and she pays H them well. She encourages every capable man to become an inde- H pendent fanner, by offering him H 180 fertile. frM. ■ Tor tree map., pampbl.. and fall otBofal H Information, app17 to the 0ana41aa QoTernmsntEmlrrmU on Agent, "Adrian Count Uù, MOD; or to the Aiaiitaat 11 u4 U, or the nearest llocnMdtt ChariDI Gross, Iiondon, 8.W., Ace. A Steamship JMUWiM

I Brecons Preference

I Brecon's Preference. If a referendum was taken of every resi- dent in Brecon, there would not be found one whp did not prefer to act upon the word of well-known and respected Brecon people rather than upon the opinions of strangers in distant towns. But it is only when people are very grateful, and anxious to help others, that they can be induced. to speak out as this Brecon resident does here. Mr W. Pascoe, of "Kenwyn House," near the Schools, Llanfaes, Brecon, says:—"My kidneys got out of order the beginning of the year owing to a oold that affected them. The urinary system was disordered, too, but I found Dean's backache kidney pills soon put me right again. I had occasion to take them several years ago for backache and kidney trouble, and I found them very beneficial indeed. I never fa.il to highly reconftnend them to others. (Signed) W. Paacoe." Price 2-" 9d a box, 6 boxes 13s 9d; of all dealers, or from Foster McClellan Oo., 8, Wells street-, Oxford street, London W. Don't ask for backache a.nd kidney p, ask distinctly for Domrs) backache kidney pills, the satme as Mr Pascoe had.

I Inspectors Hay Visit

I Inspector's Hay Visit. I HOW HE CAME. Rev. W. E. T. Morgan presided over Hay Boar d of Guardians on Thursday. Others present were Revs. H. G. Griffiths, G. Leigh Spencer and W. L. Crichton, and Messrs John Davies, E. F. Cockcroft, W. Powell, D. F. Powell, Dd. W all, C. Butcher, J. Git- toes, J. W. Jones, J. P. Bishop, Wm. Thomas, J. R. Grl ffiths., W. V. Pugh, E D. Weaver, Jas. Davies, and R. T. Griffiths (clerk). The building committee reported an insuffi- cient exit from one. of the women's dormi- tories at the workhouse. One door, it was stated, was papered over, and the staircase being of wood, wasl dangerous in case of- fire. Information was given by Mr F. B. Powell ^master) to the offecit that the door'referred to was not papered over, and, in his opinion, the exit was quite adequate. The staircase was of ,tonk-iiot wood. Asked how these mistakes! were made, the Master humourously stated that the inspector came in "like a cat on hot bricks, and was ready to depart be- on h.

Military Funeral

Military Funeral. IMPRESSIVE CEREMONY AT CEFN. The funeral took place on Wednesday a f ternoon at Cefn Cemetery, with full mIll" tary honours, of the late Oolour-sergean* Sam Davies, 1st South Wa-les Borderers. T)30 following represented the deceased's late comrades: -Claptain Collier (1st S.W.B-' and Captain Lloyd (Brecknocks), Lieutenant- quartermaster E. K. Laman, Sergeant- major Shirley, Colour-sergeants ThomaS) Robin, Perkinel, Bruntnell, Spooner, and Batemaji, Sergts. Horton, Walters, OBrieC and Strong, Corporals Lewis and DorgaJl, Drummers Bruce and Sexton, Colour-ser- geamts Attwell, Bryant, Ridgway, and DuffYt Sergeants Brown, Parish, Peters and Belcheff Sergeant-drummer D. Q. Daries, staff offi- cers; Oolour-eergeant J. Field (let Mori' iiuouthshire), Sergeants M. Askew and Lyneb (iud Monmouthshires), Sergeant Ferrymaf1 (3rd Monmouthshires), Sergeant-Major Grif- liths, s.ergt. Moses, Thomas, Lawton, and Noble (BrvcK-nock-s) and Mr H. Morris, arJ old comrade. I The firing party consisted of twelve no- commissioned officers of the deceased's ment. The band of the Brecknocks (Terri- torials) played the Dead March" en route to the cemetery, and a detachment of the 5th Welch (Territorial) Regiment, under Capt. H. Southey, followed. The deceased was popular oiffcer, and was well known in Mer- thyr. He had seen service in various part* of the Empire, having been in the regiment for the past nineteen years. He leaves 01 widow ami a young child. The funeral ar- rangements were carried out by ex-Sergeant# Edwards and Prioe Hughes, and Mr A. Jones, an ex-Army man. i

Advertising

"I am f now quite wall." im o f Mrsi it 117, TUburY doctors at different and they (fare me medicine and ointmenta. but PWI I eeemed to get worse. One dav a neighbour a*ked me to try Ciakkk's Bl-OOD Mixture, and after taking PevergJ bottles I am completely wired. At one time my left was no bad that the doctors thouprht I nhould have to have it amputated, but thankn to OLAEKK ■» Blood Mixttjbk I am now quite weU. CURED BY I If yon suffer from any such disease as ECZEMA. SCKOFULA. BAI> LEG £ AB8CE8HES.O LCKRS, GLANDULAUNWELLINGS. BOILS, PIMPLES, SORES OF ANY KIND. PILM, BLOOD POISON. RHEUMATISM, GOUT. &o.. don't waste your time and money on iu*ele"w< lotions and messy oint- inents which cannot get below the surface of the 8kin. What you want and what you must have to he permanently cured is a medicine that will thoroughly free the blood of the poi-ooous matter which alone is the true cause of all your suffering. Clarke's Blood Mixture is jnt such a medicine. It is composed of ingrediente which quickly expel from the blood all impurities from whatever cause arising, and by rendering it cle-n and yure never fails to effect a complete and lasting care. 50 YEARS' "?————————?—— Success. V"*¥ IH?yP C'?? =TO CLAIMTS  BLOOD ??. Chemista E Vefu«e MIXTUDV '??d -i?'t. St?ol eF; 2p 14(l 1, r and ■ ■ Subetitutea. THE WORLD'S BEST BLOOD PURIFIER." li