Collection Title: Brecon & Radnor express Carmarthen and Swansea Valley gazette and Brynmawr district advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 5 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
16 articles on this page
Scathing

Scathing Brecon Landlord's Criticism. TOWN COUNCIL'S "CONSISTENCY." A representative of the Express" has had an interview with Mr Edmund Adney, Devon House, Brecon, the owner of cottage pro- perty in the town, and who a few weeks ago wrote a striking letter to the Express showing the manner in which the Town Council had treated his appeal to them to consider the necessity of closing a certain cottage which, he said, had been reported by the Medical Officer to be in a deplorable con- dition. and unfit for human habitation." Mr Adney said he was the owner of some •cottages! in Silver street, Llanfaes. Some of the cottages were vacant, and about 18 months ago he was served with a notice from the Surveyor to the effect that unless the property was repaired, one of the houses kNo. G), which was occupied, would be con- demned. As he did not intend to repair the property, the house had been closed. Some time ago he himself drew the attention of the Council to No. 7, pointing out that this house should also be condemned. The Medi- cal Officer reported that the house was in a deplorable condition and unfit for human 1la bi tation. Proceeding, Mr Adney said that the Coun- cil In this case did not carry out the law, and the house, which was in a. far worse condit- ion than the adjoining condemned house, was still occupied. Is it consistent on. the pa.rt of the Coun- cil," proceeded Mr Adney, "to condemn one house and not another which is admitted, according to the Medical Oiffcer's- statement, to he in a 'deplorable condition ?' "I understand, from a report in the Ex- press." he said, "that the reason the Coun- cil will not condemn No. 7 is that the ten- ant has no other house to go to, but if that is so that is no reason why they should leave an insanitary house to be inhabitated. Where does the law come iu?" What Mr. Adney Wants. I Mr Adney abated t what the Council asked him to do was to spend k30 or 1:4,0 in repairs, but in doing this he would be simply throwing money away, as he would be re- quired to praeftically piull the houses down, in order to provide another bedroom accord- ing to the Act. What he wanted was to get the tenant out of an insanitary house, and then the houties would be put in proper order. Why Not! I With regard to the housing question in general, Mr Adney asked why could not the Council formulate a. scheme for improving cottage property in the town? If they could not see their way to build houses of their own, could not money be borrowed from the Local Government Board for improving exist- ing cottages? If that could be done, and the Council secured a mortgage on the pro- perty, it would go a. long way to solving the problem and it would not affect the rates at all. Pavement# Improved. I "The Council," he went on, ''seem to be spending money in improving the Promenade and the best parts of the town, instancing the making of pavements, but nothing much has been done to improve or do away with the shuns." "Look," he said, "at the fine pavements that have been made in front of some houeles! A few years ago Mr Conway Lloyd, when he became Mayor, led us to be- lieve that the Council would do something to provide better working class dwellings in the town,, but with all their wisdom the Council hart not yet attempted to embark up- on a scheme." Mr Adney sa.id ho had read the articles in the "Express," and he musit say that the Council had been "having: it" pretty thick, "but apparently," he added, "they've got tbiiek skins—like that of a, rhinoceros." I must say it is simply a disgrace to the Council that they don't move in the mat- ter," observed Mr Adney. "We had an out- break of diphtheria recently. Supposing a bad fever broke out? I don't know what the end of it would be. It is a policy of a penny wi se and pound foolish, and nothing else, and the Council, by its action, are en- dangering the life of the town." COVENTRY WORKMEN'S ATTITUDE. I Among the bodies affiliated to the Coventry Trades and Labour Council a. vote is to be taken on the advisability of declaring a "no rent" strike if the City Council fail within two iiioiitilis- to adopt a scheme for the erect- ion of at least 300 houses for the workers.

II BRICKS NOT WORDSI

II BRICKS NOT WORDS." I A CALL TO ACTION. I Mr Edgar L. Chappell, Secretary of the South Walte Garden Cities and Town Plan- ning Association writes — The Brecon and Radnor Express" deserves the hearty commendation of refoi-mers for the persistency it has shown in advocating the cause of housing reform all over the ex- tensive area in which it circulates and es- pecially in the town of Brecon. I have not a personal acquaintance with the housing ques- tion in the latter centre, but I have followed very closely the discussions that have taken place in your columns, and it seems to me that a very strong case has been made out tor niunicipal action. The Local Government Board, before sanc- tioning loans under Part III. of the Housing iof the Working Classes Act, requires infor- mation on three main points: — (a) Is there a shortage of working-class dwollingg in the district? (b) Is there a probability that private en- terprise will not be able to supply the deficiency ? (c) Can the Local Authority build dwellings to let at moderate rentals without in- cut ring any loss on the undertaking? It seems to be genera 1 ly agreed that the | .answer to the first question id in the affirma- tive, and ciiie fact that a scarcity exists shows that private enterprise has failed. The only serious ground of difference is as to the pos- sibility of municipal building schemes being unremunerative. It was formerly the prac- tice of the Local Government Board to dis- courage schemes in areas where there was any likelihood that the prevailing level of rentals wa.& too low to admit of the dwellings being self-supporting. Happdly this, rule has now been somewhat relaxed and sanction is often given for sfhemes which cannot yield an econ- omic rental. This is, from the housing re- formers standpoint, perfectly legitimate as xhe public health and the convenience and happiness of the workers are of far greater importance than any slight loss. which mar accrue to tho municipal scheme. I am not convinced, however, that/the looa authority cannot undertake housing schemes without incurring Joss. There must be at Brecon a considerable number of men who can well afford to pay from 5s Od to 6s per. week as rent for a well-planned and substan- tially built dwelling w ith a. good sized garden attached, and if the Tonal authority catorq. for people of tbi-, the pro-babilitv is that the smaller and lover ranted dwellings would be vacated and become available for workers of lower grades. I have not at hand the local particulars relatinsr4 to cost of building, rente paid, rates and rateable values, etc., but arguing from the conditloins: prevailing else- where I should say that there would not be any difficulty in building dwellings at Brecon to rent at less than 5s 6d per week, without involving any log, to the ratepayers. The time for discussion is now surely past, a.nd the time for action arrived. For many months the question has been considered from all standpoints, but the people are etili suffering from the house famine. New dwel- lings are needed, but they cannot be built from words*. I wmld su agf'st therefore, that the Town Council be agl,-ed to undertake a "building scheme without further delay. If the-v are i-ndispose4 to move of their own

II BRICKS NOT WORDSI

BRICKS NOT WORDS "—Continued. I accord it might be advisable for some out- side agency, for example, the local branch of the Nation,a,l Uiion of, Railwayman, to prefer a formal request for -,be erection of a satis- factory number of dwellings. I do not ad- vise, except aa a last resort, the application of compulsory powers to compel reluctant or recalcitrant councils to action. It cannot be too widely known, however, that on a written requisition from any four inhabitant householders to the effect that a local author- ity refuses or neglects to take steps to deal with a housing difficulty in its area, the Local Government Board will send down an Inspec- tor to hold n, local inquiry and if the com- plaint is justified the Board will order the local council to underta-ke immediately a building scheme. This provision is one which local reformers would do well to bear in mind. The point to emphasise now is that the time for action has) arrived. "Bricks not words" this shouki bo the marching order. Even if the Council takes action at once at. least nine months must elapse before their proposals can mature. Every day's delay puts further off the solution of the looal problem. The Ex- press" has done excellent work in leading the people through the "wilderness; the next march must be into the Promised Land.

I IN INDIA

I IN INDIA. MR. SIDNEY ROBINSON, M.P. HIS IMPRESSIONS OF THE COUNTRY. NI. P writing to a Mr Sidney Robinson, M.P., writing to a friend on 26th November from Anuradha- pura, says that Ceylon appears to be very prosperous, for to tea, rubber, cocoa, banana aind rice growing are now being added to- bacco and cotton. He was greatly impress- ed with the Rock Temple; and the Rest Houses which are run by the Government for the use of travellers are a feature. These are clean and well managed. The arrack shops were numerous. There is an outciry, says the hon. memlber, against the Govern- ment licensing theele shops, for arrack is a most deleterious spirit distilled from oocoa- nut. Roman Catholics had an orphanage and were at present the largest section of Christians in the Anuradhapura district, but the English Church is fast adding to its mem- bership. Glories of India. I Crossing to India and arriving at Madura, the hon. member says: "We seem to attain from glory to glory, and anything we have seen before is. left far behind." The advent of the two travellers at this place evidently created miudh. interest, for Mr Robinoon says that during the wholec of one afternoon the natives followed them about in crowds. They met only two Europeans. The Temple when the interior is illuminated defies description; it covers 14 acres of ground. The city has a population of 134.000. Mr Robinson de- scribes an incident in the Market Place which emphasises the caste system. Mr King, his companion, was about to buy something at a stall, and when stretching forth his hand to examine it was asked not to touch it, as it would have "polluted" the whole of the stall. Some of the native industries ap- peared primitive, especially the dye-works and the extraction of linseed oil. On the native temples the amount and variety of ornamentation was marvellous; the age of the figures of granite wad from 2,000 to 3,000 years. The native missionaries state that Christianity was appealing to the low- er caste, and it Was their opinion* that the native made plenty of money, but spent too mucjh on the vile con- coction arrack. Bishop Heber's Grave. I Writing from Trichktopoly. Mr Robinson states that he had just seen the spot where Bishop Heber, the auftihor of Greenland's Icy Mountains," was buried. A wonderful feature of thisl part of the country was the rocks, which rose up over the Great Plain 200 feet and over in height. Arriving at Madras on December 1st, a motor car was placed at the disposal of the visitors, which enabled them to see much of the city. They visited the local School of Art, where silver and braste work was done, and had "a run round" the fort. They also visited the Advar Club—the best European Club in South India, which is strictly con- fined to Europeans. The High Court Judge received them, and after accepting his, invi- ta.tion to luncih a visit was paid to his Courts. Calcutta was reached oil tfhe 4th Decem ber. An invitation was received to lunch at the Government House, and another to stay at the Government House, Lucknow, on reach- ing there. The Government House, says Mr Roinson, is a beautiful building, but all the b,efA pictures had gone to Delhi. During the evening the hon. member and his fi-ientl sltrolled aeiross the city and saw the site of the historic "Black Hole." Calcutta, he says, is a. huge city, and an air of great prosperity pervades it. A visit was1 pa,id to Tagore, the native Port (this year's Nobel' prize winner), ii,iid Capt. Willis, R.E., took the visitors round the Mint which turns out a greater number of coins than any other in the world -from l. to 21 million coins daily. They had a glimpse of native home-life, and subse- quently dined at the Calcutta Club, where a party of Indians had assembled, and many public questions were discussed between tile toasts. A Sound of the Home-land. I In concluding his letter, Mr Robinson writes of going to the Scotch Church, where a militaiv service, was held. His Excellency Has escorted by the pipes—"Truly in a dis- tant land," saysi the hon. member, "there is no suet music as the pipes."

Llanwrtyd Competitions I

Llanwrtyd Competitions. I Y.P.G. MEETING.. I Under the auspices off the Young People's Guild a competitive meeting was recently held in. the vestry of the Cailvinistic Metho- dist Church. Rev. Rees Evans, C.C., pre- sided over a crowded meeting. Messrs. Isaac Williams and Edward Richards were the ad- judicators at the evening performance, and Rev. R. James adjudicated on the essay. Awards:—Pianoforte solo (children under 14): Miss Enid Lewis. Solo: Divided be- tween Mis sea Bronwen Richards and Annie Price. Solo: Mr Win. Evans. Duet (6 par- ties) Divided between Messrrs W. Thomas and R. Evans and Mr W. Evans and Miss E. Evans. Welsh essay, "Y Tri Llanc" Di- vided between Mr John Williams and Miss Kate Williams. Verses on the Guild Mr Rees Willi Jims. Choral competition (parties I of 12), "Llechryd"—composed by Mr John Thomas. Four parties competed, and Dow- lai.s)" won, under the conductorship of Mr IC-f-s Price Rev. Rea? Evans distributed prizes to the successful children at the previous meeting for knowledge of "Rftodd Mam" and Ha.nes Joshua." Mr Edwin Lewia proposed, and Mr Roger Pugh seconded, a hearty vote of thanks to the adjudicators, chairman and others.

Blacksmiths Union I

Blacksmiths' Union. I ADHERE TO RESOLUTIONS. A meeting of the Brecon and Radnor Smiths' Union was held at the Green Dragon Temperance Hotel, Brecon, on Saturday, to consider the proposals of the Farmers' Un- ion. Mr I. Williams. Brecon, presided over a good gathering. After discussion, it was unanimously passed that the Union adhere to the recently issued schedule of prices which were considered perfectly reasonable. It was also proposed that meetings be held 1 at Presteign, Knighton and Builth Wells.

IThe LandI

I The Land. I I Breconshire Councillor's Views j I INTERESTING EXPOSITION. I Special interest was evinced in a publSo meeting held on Thursday last under the auspices of the Brecon Liberal Club, when Mr Elinest Jones, C.C., Cefn, read an ex- cellent paper on "The Rural Land Ques- tion" to a. large and representative gather- ing. Air W. D. Smith (Millbrook), a prominent member of the Farmers' Union, presided, and he was supported by Councillor E. M. Meredith (president of the Club), Mr W. R. Price, and Mr Roland Thomas, B.A. Others present included Prin. Thos. Lewis, M.A., B.D., Prof. Joseph Jones, M.A., B.D., Prof. John Evans, B.A., Revs. T. Gwyn Thomas and R. J. Williams, Mr Howell Powell, Mr Thomas Rees, Mr J. Morgan, etc. The Chairman, who was warmly received, said probably the reason he had been, asked to preside over that meeting was because be belonged to that most patient and long- miffei-ing ciass-tho farminig community- (laughter)—and it was in that capacity he came there that night. The land question was now topping the list, occupying as it did the attention of all the best minds of the country, because it was felt that there was something wrong with country life—(hear, hear)—and it wanted amending in some re- spects. (Applause.) How it was to be done was another matter, and he thought the so- lution would be one of the most difficult, if it was to be fair to all parties concerned. They had a gentleman with them that night who would address them- on the subject, and it would take him a great deal of time to cover only a part of the question. Mr Ernest Jones had studied the question both by read- ing a.nd observation, and he had now great pleasure in calling upon him to read his paper. (Applause.) MR. ERNEST JONES. I Mr Ernest Jones, who had a most cordial reception, in an able and exhaustive exposi- tion, dealt first with the chief historical events which contributed in the main to bringing, about the present condition of things in rural England, and divided the survey in- to three periods, namely, from early times to the institution) of the manor, from manorial conditions to the Black Death and the vari- ous la.bourensl' revolts, and from then to the present day, showing how the landlords, who held political power. had passed laws in their own interests. There were 647.300 acres of common land in England and Wales, but the wonder was, he added, that there were any commons! left. The records showed that 5,686,400 acres mad been enclosed by the great landlords, and of that only 2,220 acres went into the hands of the farmer. Mr Jones then went on to refe-r to the landlords, dividing them into two classes—(1) those who, on the one hand, regarded their land as a portion of the country which had come into their keeping to be administered for tne country's good, and (2) those, on. the other hand, who regarded their land as their abso- lute property to be exploited solely for their personal profit and pleasure. The good land- lord, so far as possible, gave his tenants se- curity of tenure, and enabled them to put forth their best and to reap the just fruits of their labours. He believed he was cor- rect when, he said that they had at the pre- sent time at least two or three Good Landowners I in Breconshire. Passing on to the farmers, he referred to the attention which had been paid to the farming industry by the Go- vernment of the last half century, and stated it was pleasing to note that of very late years agriculture had been wonderfully pros- perous throughout Great Britain. It was a good sign of the times that to-day, in a time of agricultural prosperity, the nation was being aroused into a genuine interest for the welfare of their agriculturists. But, in spit-e of this prosperity, it might safely be stated that at least one-third of the total yieLd of agricultural land went into the poc- kets of the landlord. This condition of things, observed Mr Jones, should be al- tered without delay. There were miany ser- ious difficulties, too, under which the farmers laboured so far as the tenure of their land was concerned. These, Mr Jones enumerated, and then proceeded to deal with The Labourer, who, he said, had been sadly neglected sinC^ the days of the Peasatitd Revolts, when he was cowed into hopelessness and shrinking fear. To-day, after generations of suffering, the kindly sympathy of the best men and women in the land had been drawn to the farm labourer, and,, thanks -to, many humane writers and studeof social science, he had been iinea,rth-ed. as it were, aind placed high in the horizon of a politic which, they nuift devoutly hope, would end in his social salvation. In the virtues of patience and long suffering, the labourer was an expert. The farmers could and did form themseh'es into unions, and they heartily welcomed that onward niove so far as it tended to better and to strengthen the position of the farmer. But so far as the farm labourer was con- cerned. the condition of hist labour, the dis- tance he had to travel to arrive at a, meeting place with his comrades of other farms, the miserably poor wages he earned to enable him to pay his union dues, the anta,gonism of mosit large farmers to such unions, and other causes, all militated against, and might even make it impossible, for hi-nii to form a union. The formation of a strong branch of the Farm La(bourers' Union in every county would do much to better the. condition of the labour- ers. In Lancashire last year the farm lab- ourers, by organised efforts, secured an in- crease of 2a a week in wages, extra pay for overtime, and a half holiday every Saturday. Referring to the Emigration of the Best I and most enterprising of t'be manhood of the country, Mr Jonies said that in England very few labourers expected to become independ- ent abroad, almost all of them expected to become independent. Here, poverty was al- ways with them atbroad, it was only a tem- pora-ry phase in life, with the hope some day of becoming independent. The total earnings of labourers varied in different counties, for example, in Oxfordshire, they were as low as 14s lid, whilst in Derbyshire they reached 2Us lOd. Mr Jones then went on to show how the present best average wage of the ag- ricultural labourer was only sufficient to maintain mere physical effciency. They were then told how, by State ownership of the land, following upon the complete valuation of the land, the Small Holdings Acts and the Housing and Town Planning Acts could be administered with comparative ease; how rates could be saved by the consequent re- moval of the need for promoting Bills in Par- liament, how schemes of afforestation could then be put into effect with advantage and how the evils of the principle of primogeniture and of the rmortgaging of estates for the pur- pose of meeting estate duties would be re- moved. Mr Jones dealt fully with the rural educational problem and submitted that the present system of Elementary Education was responsible for the difference, in quality and quantity, of such education in our rural areas as compared with that in our towns. Unless the method of paying Education grants was changed so as to be based, not on the num- ber of pupils in a school, but on the number and quality of the teaching staff, it would be impossible to level up the education in rural areas to the standard maintained in the towns. In conchisiont, Mr Jones characterised the present proposals for dealing with the land problem as bold and definite, but incom- plete. The creation of a ministry of land with powers. to control the monopoly of land as a whole the promise of a minimum wage for agricultural labourers; the establishment of land courts and the many other excellent details of the scheme, were bound to be fol-

IThe LandI

THE LAID-Continued, I lowed by a rise. of rural land values as the re- stutt of the inevitable rural revival. If a gradual nationalising of the land (not only by local authorities but also by the proposed land courts), immediately on the completion of the valuation of tlhe land next year, was ori-ina-ted and carried along with the pres- ent proposed sttheme, the State and the local authorities would be able.,to, benefit (and not the landowners by the rise in land values, and the financial benefit thus accruing to the State would be of inestinjable value in the later complete nationalisation of the land. Much was berng done, at last, by the Press and by the Church in this matter of RjuraJ Reform, and he was particularly glad to note the good work of the Brecon and Radnor Express" in this respect. With a. determined effort to- wards land nationalisation, alongside of an early adoption of Mr Lloyd George's land pro- posals:, and with the Church and Press more alive to the purposes! of their great calling, they could look forward with happy confidence to a gradual but certaim arrival of a large measure of what tlhey as Liberaic,, regarded as their loftiest political ideal, namely, the foundation1, absolute and complete, in our body politic), of the fundamental principles of liberty, equality, and fraternity—the fruits of whicdi) shall then become the blessed heri- tage, not of privileged classes becaiuse of their wealth and power, but of every person in the land who proved himself worthy of the name of citizen. (Loud applause.) Discussion.- I In the discussion which, followed, the Chairman said the condition of the farm labourers in Breconshire wast as good as that of working men in large towns. The major- ity of the farmers in Breoonshire were small farmers, and the labourers who lived in got practically the same food as the farmers, and if the balance sheets of the two were shown, it would be seen that the rewa-rd of the for- mer was not much better than that of the meiK Mr Smith spoke as to the quality of the work of farm labourers nowadays, and said a farmer had great difficulty in getting value for .his money. Marty of the men they luid on the farms understood very little ab- out their work. He doubted wheth- er State ownership of the land would be able to stem the tide of emigration to the Colonies, but if the proposals, now submitted would do something to reniedy a most diffi- cult problem nobody would be more delighted than, the farmer. (Applause.) Others who took pa rt in, the discu/ssion were Mr W. Morgan, Mr Thos. Rees, Prof. Joseph Jones, Mr F. Jenkins, and Mr Howell Powell. On the proposition of Councillor E. M. Mere- dith, seconded by Prof. John Evaiis, a hearty- vote of thanks was accorded to Mr Ernest Jones for giving what was "termed "A master- ly paper." In reply. Mr Enneslt Jones said the paper had taken him four months of quiet serious study, and it had been a, pleasure to him to come there and to understand that, it had been appreciated. It was quite eyident that the Chairman, and himself could not enter into a discussion—(laughter),—but he would like to point out that he dealt with the whole country, and not with one particular county. He would also like them to remember that the best men had left the country, and the men who were behind were the scrap." On the motion of Mr Ernest Jones, second- ed by Mr W. R. Price, a cordial vote of thanks was accorded the chairman for pre- siding. Mr Price said Mr Smith was a stal- wart Liberal, and had the courage of his con- victions to MaY what he meant. (Applause.) r

I NONCON UNITY

NONCON. UNITY. Why not Amalgamation MR. C. HAY MORGAN, M.P. I Adjudicates on Essays. I A first prize of three guineas and a second prize of one guinea are offered for the best essays on this subject. The essays must deal with the matters (a) (b) and (c) [below], but the essayist is not restricted to those ma tten. (a) THE URGENT- NEED FOR THE AMALGAMATION OF THE DENOMI- NATIONS OR OF SOME OF THEM. (b) A PRACTICAL WORKING BASIS FOR SUCH A UNION, AND (c) THE ADVANTAGES RESULTING FROM AMALGAMATION. CONDITIONS OF THE COMPETITION. I The essay is not to exceed 6,000 words. It must be enclosed in sealed envelope; the word Unite" to be written on envelope. Success- ful competitor's name will be published or not, at his or her option. The competitor's name is not to be written on the essay, but only his or her noon-de-plume. Com- petitor's full name and postal address should be placed in a seaJed envelope inside the envelope enclosing the aD- say: it will not be opened until after the award is made. This envelope should bear on the outside the nom-de-plume only of the competitor. Essays to be sent to "Brecon and Radnor Express," Brecon, on or before 16th February, 1914. The Brecon and Radnor Express" re- serves the right to retain any essay sent in and to publish any essays or any part there- of without remuneration. The adjudicator shall have the right to withhold the prize or any part thereof in the event of there being no essay of sufficient merit. MR.. G. HAY MORGAN, M.P., Whip of the Nonconformist Party in the House of Commons, has kindly consented to adjudi- cate. Mr Hay Morgan, as is well-known is a native of Breconshire, having been born at Hay.

Benefiting Farmers I

Benefiting Farmers. I BRECONSHIRE"S NEW SCHEME. I A meeting of the Breconshire tive Stock Committee was held on Friday last. Mr Owen Price presided, and others present were Messrs. W. S. Miller, Howell Powell, John Smith (Green way), D. Williams (Ystradgyn- lais), Evan Williams (Dolinwydd, Builth), Mervyn Davies (Talagrth), J. L. Davies k-Mor- thyr Cynog>, Thomas Price, Ben Davies, the secretary (Mr W. T. Isaac), and the inspector (Mr D. D. Williams.) It wasi decided to divide the county into J thirteen areas for the purpose of the forma- tion of bull clubs, as follows: -1, Ystradgyn- lais (Higher and Lower and Glyntawe); 2, Defynock (Oray,Sonny, Maescar, Traiaxiglas. Traianmawr, Sclvdach, and Llandilofan); 3, Aberbran (Llanfthangel-nantbran, Merthyr Cynog, Aberysoir, Trallong, Battle, Venny- flach, Llandefaelog-faoh, and Llanfihangel- fechan): 4, Felinfaoh (Llanddew, Llande- falle, Talaohddu, Llanfillo, Llanywern, Llan- fihangel-Talvllyn, Llanhamlach, and Llan- gorse); 5, Builth No. 1; 6, Builth No. 2; 7, I Erwood; 8. Talgarth 9. Hay; 10, Crick- howell No. 1; 11, Crickhowell No. 2; 12, Vaynor. Penderyn, and Ystradfellte; 13, Can- treff, Glyn, Modrvdd, f Llanfrynach, Llan- chetty, and LLanfigan. Any information re- quired with regard to the formation of the clubs' may be obtained from the secretary, Mr W. T. Isaac, or any of the members pres- ent at the meeting. Thirteen bulls Are granted to Breconshire, and if all the districts do not apply it is within the discretion of the committee to grant more than one bull to any other district. The Inspector suggested that in the larger areas the location of the bull could be shifted year after year. The meeting wn, adjourned until the 6th of February.

r Brecon Will Dispute

r Brecon Will Dispute. I Brother Sues Brother. HEARING IN CHANCERY DIVISION. (Special Full Report.) In the Chancery Division on Tuesday, be- fore Mr Justice Sargent, the case, of in re Thomas Edwards Morgan, deceased ("Morgan v. Morgan), came on for hearing. This was a dispute relating to the will of the late Mr T. E. Morgan, builder, of Brecon. The plaintiff was Mr John Jones Morgan and the defendant Mr William Morgan, both of Brecon, and the action was for a declar- ation that defendant was liable to make good certain losses to the estate of the testator for enquiries as to accounts) and for the ap- pointment of a receiver. Mr Frank Romer, K C.. aind Mr R. Rowlands (instructed by Wrentniore and Son, agents for Mr Walter G. Spickernell, Tonypandy) were for the plaintiff, and Mr Grant, K.C., with him Mr Harnian (instructed by Messrs. Jeffreys and Powell. of Brecon), for the defendant. Mr Romer said plaintiff being a benefi- ciary under the will of his brother, the tes- tator, he and his brotheir the defendant were the sole survivors of the trustees. By his will dated the 22nd March, 1904, Thomas Edwards Morgan, appointed his brother. Wil- liam, the defendant, and hisi sister to be exe- cutors and trustees thereof, and gave to lus trustees all his property real and personal, including moneys due to him at the date of his death upon trust as to his personal es- tate, except household furniture, at their discretion to convert the same into money and after payment of the debts to invest the residue 0[1 such money as by law authorised, and to pay the income therefrom, together with the income of his real estate to his mother and his sister during their joint lives, and to the survivor of them during her life, and from and after the death of the survivor of them upon trust to divide the residue of his real and personal estate equally between his brothersl William and John. The latter is the plaintiff. There was a codicil to the will of the 29th March, 1904, whereby he declared that his sister referred to in the will was his sister, Helena Rachel, and de- clared that his household rumiture should be enjoyed by his "mother and sister during their joint lives, and should ultima-tely be- come the property of the survivor. Testa- tor died on 31st January, 1910. The testa- tor's mother, Mary Morgan, died on the 23rd April, 1910, and in order that his Lordship might understand the point in dispute, he (counseh would mention the position of the family and relations between them at the time of the death of the testator. He was a timber merchant and builder carrying on business at Brecon. He carried on the busi- ness in two builders' yards, which belonged to him. one being freehold and the other leasehold. According to his (Mr Romer's) evidence the bus.iness was a. valuable one, as he employed a considerable number ol men. Testators brothersl, the plaintiff and the de- fendant, were both employed by him in his life. He lived with his mother and sister. They lived there to the day of his death at the leasehold house, either 13 or 14, the Wat- ton. Adjoining were the builders' yards. The testator also possessed a timber yard at the Watton, Brecon, aaii office, nine houses at the Watton, a house known as Brynich House, four houses at Conway Terrace, licensed premises known as the Cock and Horsie, etc. He also had various personal estate, details of which plaintiff had had much difficulty in ascertaining. Certainly there was a very large and valuable stock of building materi- als, also certain debts owing, and apparent- ly various policies upon the testator's life. The freehold premises, with the exception of the Cock and Horse, were subject to mort- gages for a total of £ 3.400, and the interest in respect to it wasl about JE125 a year. Of the two leasehold house,, one was occupied by the mother, and the second let. Testa- tor not only employed his two brothers in the business, but allowed them to reside in two other houses. That at Brynich was oc- cupied by the defendant, and counsel was not at all sure whether he paid rent. An- other house at Lloyd terrace was Occupied rent free by the plaintiff. Testator shortly before his death failed in his mind to soma Extent, and the "business up to the date of 1136 death was carried on by his brother James, who was not a party to the proceedings. Af- ter the testator's death defendant proved tho will alone, his co-executor, the sister,, never coming in and proving the will, because very shortly after the death, of the testator her mind also failed. Slhe was in an asylum for about a year. The only other beneficiaries under the will were the mother and the plain- tiff. The mother died on the 23rd April, 1910. In December, 1907, plaintiff's mind also failed, and he was removed to an asylum until the month of July, 1909. But between the date of the testator's death and his re- moval to the asylum he continued to be em- ployed and received a wage of some 33s a week. He was obviously afterwards incap- able of appreciating the position of affairs, and certainly did not know what was going on. What, was going on, counsel alleged, was this: Defendant, having proved the will, took possession of the whole of the per- sonal estate of' the testator and continued to receive the rents of such properties; and. as far as he (counsel) could judge, took pos- session of the business of the testator and carried it on. It was now said on the part of the plaintiff tint the defendant should not have carried on the business. There was no power authorising him to dispose of any of the property, as none of the other benoificiaries had assented. Defendant con- tinued to carry on the business rightt down to the appointment of the Receiver in this action on the 14th February, 1913. In his defence the defendant said he did this in pursuance of a verbal agreement whioti was eonie to betw een the mother and sister-Eleanor Rachael Morgan—and the plaintiff. It was discussed at the office of Mr Jeffreys, solicitor, and was confirmed in meeting at the mother's house. It was de- cided to request him to continue the business for the benefit of the estate. and with liberty to employ monies from the estate in the business,, that he was to receive kl 15s a week as remuneration, u.nd be permitted to live in one oil the houses free of rent, rates and taxes. Defendant said he therefore continued the business. The first thing he did, continued counsel, was, apparently, to send out a circular say- ing that the busineasi would be continued iin, der the name of Morgan Brothers. Having quoted the circular, counsel said that meant that this business was to be carried on in partnership. The defendant carried on the business under the name of Morgan Bros. At a later date he (counsel) gathered the defen- dant carried on the business under the name of Win. Morgan himself. So far as the brotlier, the plaintiff, was concerned, he had been employed by the testator, and con- tinued to be employed by Wm. Morgan, the defendant. So far from there being a part- nership between them., he was paid 33s a week. In IXcember, 1907, apparently, or shortly before the plaintiff went to the asy- lum, the defendant terminated his employ- ment. He gave him notice. Plaintiff never received anything out of the business, ex- cept the 33f;; a. w eetk. Mr Grant: It was 3os a. week. But they were both on the same footing. Mr Romer said in December. 1907. for some reason, the defendant sold or offered for sa le a considerable part of the building stock and material in tly* yard. And ap- parently he bought in on his own account a portion of it. Of course it might be that he would say, "Up to. December, 1907, I car- ried on the business on behalf of the t-state as from that date I carried it on in my own behalf, and I bought certain stock and I But ai)- .m.tierials for my own purposes." But ap- parently that was not his contention. So far as regarded the mother and sister, he (Mr Romer) did not represent them on that occa- i. l 11 } d' sion, all tliev ever reeoivt-d from the de- felldant was a sum down to the mothers death of, he thought, 22s a week. She died in April. 1910. Shortly before 'her death, the sis-ter again failed in her mind. She was at the asylum about a. year from the toes- tator's death. She came out aid lived wuh her mother until her mind again failed. The sister's death took place in February, 1912, and during the period she was in the asylum defendant apparently paid 12s to 15s a. for her. In the meantime the defendant ap- peared to have Qourijsihed. The Judge: Can you give me any idea of the rental of these houses 1" Mr Romer said the succession duty figures which the defendant, gave showed a gross rent of £ 250. and outgoing in the £ 250 he had not included any rent in respect of the properties occupied for the purposes of the business by himself, plaintiff and his sister. Counsel1 vaid he was und.-r considerable, difficulty in putting the C'^ourt in possession of the facts because the de- fendant had given no account. In 1910 he delivered an account, and it threw very little light on. what the defendant had been doing with the asstts of the testator. He would now call attention to the Succession Duty Account and an inland revenue account. The first item Oil the estate was book debts, £639 10s 4d: friendly society benefit. 1:20. Mr Grant said tlxe-re, ajiotht-r item (if £700 in addition. Mr Romer said his copy then was wrong. Proceeding, he said household goods and furniture were entered as £ 59, live and dead stock. 1:430; leasehold property. £ 129 10s. Details of the leasehold property were given. Debts were given to the aiiiouiit of £ 809 2s 3d, inclusive of mortgages. The defendant, j pleaded that the good will was) not of any value at all. What he (Mr Riomert wanted to charge him with was the full value' of stock existing at the death of the testator and the good will. Counsel then went on to give the list of the houses said to be com- prised in the estate, the rentals excluding the rent of the house occupied by the de- fendant being gross f;228 16, and the out- goings £ 194 Is 9d. There was a substantial balance. The account delivered for five years occupied one page. Judge's Question. I The Judge: Will the conflict be that there was wilful default. Mr Romer: Partly. There was t-he, carry- ing on of the business and not selling the good will. Mr Grant: That is not. wilful default. The building yard is there, and is part oi the es- tate. The Judge: Ought not it to be made avail- able for the purposes of the estate in some way, either b' v being sold toO somebody or-- Mr Grant: That is a question of income. There is no suggestion of default. The de- fendant had endeavoured to let part oi tiie property and failed. The judge: I wont anticipate the tacts. You admit some accounts will have to be taken.. Mr Grant: Obviously, ir we cannot settle, the matter. It is a matter between brother and brother, and if we cannot settle there will have to be an account. Mr Romer: I am claiming in this action a.n account of income as from the death ot the Mr Grant: I do not. dispute that. I was only speaking of "wilful deftluit- D Proceed- ing. he said he took it that that meant one had not got in something he ought to have got in, or had failed to do. something to the estate's loss. That was not the question here. The Good >> ill. I Mr Romer said he wanted to make the de- fendant responsible for the value of The, good will, the value of the materials at the date of the death of the. testator having regard to what had happened in the past. They had had what purported to be a sales account, and from that it appeared that the proper- ties were sold for a- sum just suiffcient to pay principal interest and cottt-s, Mr Grant said a mortgage had been clear- ed off by selling some of the properties. When they had got. ejiough to meet the mort- gages they stopped, and the remaining pro- perties were wlthdrawn Mr Homer said he could not altogether see daylight through the case. There were no documents. He alleged against the defend- ant tliat he had moneys, or would have bad, if he had not employed them in carrying on this business. He alleged defendant had moneys to keep down the mortgages, and there would have keen no necessity for the sale and the attendant costei. I Receiver in Posessiou. The Receiver went down and entered -Ti- to possession of the building yard and offices. He found them in the occupation of defend- ant. He did not find very much else. There was a certain stock of materials, of compara- tive small value. He received a letter from Messrs. Jeffreys and Powell stating that he had entered premises, unauthorised, v.hich were not connected with the estate, and had by his action, interfered with the continu- ance of defendant's business as a builder. Afi fa,r as oountSel knew there waa only one busi- ness. They had supposed that when the Re- ceiver was appointed they would be able to see the books of th-6 business and documents i relating to the estate. The Receiver asked the defendant for the books of account of the business, and he said all books of account there were Were in the possession of his solicitors. Certainly there were none on the premises. The Receiver, by his agent, ac- cordingly attended Messrs. Jeffreys and Powell, and t-hey had 'no books of the busi- ness. So far as he (counsel) knew there were in existence no books. Mr Grant: The difficulty in this case* is the application of technical rules to a case which does not admit of them. Mr Romer: One would expect there were some accounts which would throw light upon the 'matter. Proceeding, be said they were quite in the dark. When the. Receiver was apjiointed the business did not seem to be flourishing. The question was whether there was such agreement that defendant should carry on the business." If he was right ;n that there would still have to be an account. As to an overdraft defendant said he at- tended at the bank with the executrix named in the will. The overdraft was said to be £ 800. They were told there was. that lia- bility, but for what purpose that money was raised he did not know. There were no debts. If he was wrong in carrying on the business as against the beneficiaries defend- ant hihiself would be liable for such an over- draft. On the other hand, if such an agree- ment was come to they would have to investi- gate the accounts. The Judge said there was a carrying on without proper form when accounts must be ordered on a. proper footing. Mr Romer said one; foresaw that if they had to investigate the carrying on of the business a good deal of investigation would he wanted. If they had to make him respon- sible for the stock, etc., and good will only, that was a amall matter. The Judge- said it. was rather guess work. It might be after lie had determined one or two questions, possible to say what sum in cash would be adequate. Mr Romer: My own client's new is that he would rather have the property that is left, such as it is. I Brother and the Will. James R. Morgan, brother of the testator and builder at Brecon, said he had helped the testator during his lifetime. The stock had been one of -the biggest in Brr,("n-stocks of timber and slates. Witness estimated that at the time of testator's death there was £ 1500 worth of stock there. The testator employed 40 or 50 men. When witness managed the business books were kept, and a clerk to keep thiem was employed.

r Brecon Will Dispute

—— Brecon Will Dispute- continued. Cross-examined Witness stated one of his. brothers had said that ho had not been treat- eoc] fa i rlv. When the testa tot made his will, witness believed hp, did not understand what. lie was doing. He (witness) disputed the will, but decided to "leave it hoc." He knew that his brother's two accounts were overdraw when he was taken ill, but they were not at his death. Hel brought them down. Tho account at the National Bank was £ 1934 when he wysi taken ill, and witness reduced it to £ 400 at the time of his death, and tbero was a. mortgage to oover that a.nd an insur- ance policy. \ou immediately started business in com- petition With, this?—That waa my trade. I Case Settled. I- IMPUTATIONS AGAINST DEFENDANT WITHDRAWN. Winnc, on \VriMay; (}uTL

r Football Protest

r Football Protest. I THE HOODINOTT CASE. SPORTS CLUB LOSE POINTS. I At a mpeting of the M Id-Wale* League Comittt at Builth uji Wednesday, it nis decided to deduct two points from the Sport Club for having played Hotidinott in th* Sports Club v. Llanfaes match, no fine to bo imposed. It wan stated that Hoddinott p'ayed for the Sports Club without either .< transfer be- ing; (btained from A berdare cr re-signing on as an amateur, having played as a profes- sional for Aberdare The Shorts Club repre- Mutative Mud they had appealed to the Lea- gue Secretary, who had given pernr«^ion to play Hoddinott. This decision, however, was given by the Secretary without knowledge of Hoddinott having played as a professional. and .ic (the Secretary> was exonerated from, blame.

Builth Farmers

Builth Farmers. IMPROVEMENT SOCIETY FORMED. Consequent to the reoent general meeting. a committee met to make, further arrange- ments with regard to the newly-formed soc- ietyfor ?he ]?-- f ornie d o c- iety for ihe improvement of local horse-breed- lng. Mr Beair Davies^ C.C., who was elected ciiiairman of the committee, presided. The new organisation will be known as the U Builth aul Radnor District Shire Horse Society. Resolutions, dealing with trn of hire and route of travel, were passed, an

OUT WEST

OUT WEST. INSTRUCTIVE LECTURES. -Migliiiy interesting and instructive k-eturew on Canada were given a.t Llyswen and Er- wood recently by Air D. Beynou Davies, B.A. who deputised Mr S. W. Pugh (special re- presentative or the Canadian Government in Wades), who was unavoidably absent. The interest of the lectures was greatly enhanced by beautiful lantern, slides. Mr Davies, in the course of his lectures, said that forty-tour yoa.i-s was but a short period m the history of any lotion or coun- try; yet the commencement of the Canadian. West went no further back. To-day thous- ands of prosperous settlers were farming its fertile lands; while the town and cities wen* veritable hivea of industrial activity. Stimu- lated by experience, farmers were recognisfing the merit of what was known as "mixed farming." What this meant to Great Bri- tain could not be ()ver-œtÍtm tod La?t Ye&r this country imported 1,0' }e? tha? ??L,0(?.U(!0 worth of food stuffs from ?ef- seas. Here was a. market for as much as Canada could export. Agriculture was the basis of the country's prosperity, and its interests were specially catered for in a wide variety of ways. From the d.-y when first the prospective trttter got itto touch with a recognised agent in this country until he was well aavanced upon the road to prosperity on his own farm in Canada, he was never lost slight of. Having fixed upcn his homestead were available to him the great experi- mental farms of llij Domuuon. In the mar- keting of his grain every precaution was tak- en to ensure that he shall have 110 cause for discontent. Canada. was anxious to see her vacant lands occupied by prosperous and suc- oessiul settlers, and every, inducement was acwrdingly offered to the tiller of the soil., and also to women willing to undertake do- mestic wwk, For these two clasaeg the Go vernmeni, guaranteed employment at goocT remuneration, in comfortable homes. A free gift of 160 acres of fertile land was given un- der conditions which 'had already been ob- served by thousands of prcsperous settlers. Last year no fewer than 43,(00 of these ham el stead s were taken up. That meant a.tract of land equal in to one-fifth the entire area of England. It w,as usilay Mrab!? of ?ou?e. to ?ve Mmo cxporipnre iEr" Canadian methods 

TO CORRESPONDENTS

TO CORRESPONDENTS. .J.LI; Job Tosser; and Democrat: Regret Space will not permit this week. Coromu-ni- catiolls, will appear in next issue.