Collection Title: Brecon & Radnor express Carmarthen and Swansea Valley gazette and Brynmawr district advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 7 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
22 articles on this page
Advertising

I Your Agent I ■ will show you one of the new H Continental Special I Fabric Covers You may see others with thicker treads, ■ but one tread of reasonable bulk and H Continental" quality will outlast many H exaggerate d covers of the putty type. H Continental Special Fabric Covers are H tough, resilient and full of life." They ■ are Guaranteed for 13 months and cost ■ jj  r Wired or I I 8 Beaded Edge. 81 S mrMn^ iiuuiuiiiii.iiiiiiuiuuiiiiiiliiHiiituuimiuiiiiuiinBniiiiiiimiiiui^iniitui H CO-N- TI N EN TAI?;' Thc;Tcmisl3tal ?/P-,fec?CBCJWIM I :0 CONTINENTAL TYRE & RUBBER CO (Great Britain), Ltd., H 3 & 4, Thurloe Place, London. S.W. C.404.

No title

•••These columns are freely open to the ventilation of any matter oi public in- terest, local or general. Offensive personalities or abusive epithete are, however, rigidly excluded. Every communication must be duly and pro- perly authenticated. (m cases where anonymity is desired, the writer must privateily and confidently furnish the Editor with his name and address, as a guarantee of good faith. The Editor cannot undertake to return any rejected communication. I Letters received cn the Saturday preceding the week of publication are more likely to be inserted than those arriving later.

THE BALFOUR LICENSING ACT

THE BALFOUR LICENSING ACT. Si-r,-In your reply to my enquiry as iu whether you "blamed the Act of 1904 in its administration" you say that the magistra- tes powers are limited by Mr Baliour 6 M passed by the brewer's friends for the bene- iit of the drink traffic." I ta.ke it that you do not now blame the administrators of the Act. You will pardon roe for saying that your charge against the BaLfour Gover:llmellt of having passed tbe Act for the benefit of che drink traffic s hows political bias, and is unworthy a paper of your standing. Even from the point of view of the extreme tem- perance reformer who swears by reduction in the number of licences a? the remedy for ex- cessive drinking, a4nd will not accept, nor even consider any other solution of the great problem, even from his point of view, the Act has been useful, for, since the passing of the Act- in 1904 licences have been aboi- ished at a. far greater rate than W36 tiile case previous to that date, Is it not reasonable to conclude then that from this point ot view at any rato, the act could not be looked upon as beneficial, in any corrupt sense, to the drink traffic. Since its passing close upon 12,000 licences have been taken away. Al- though this may not satisfy the extremist it -certainly points to the fact that where it is considered necessary the licensing authority may reduce the number of licences in any neighbourhood. It is true Perhaps that the Act does not stipulate that the judges as to redundancy shall bo the extreme temperance party which perhaps a?tor aM? the oY?\ provision vhich would be sa-t?ia?tory to some people. I thank von for your definition cf S?.

LlSING BILL FOR WALES

"LlSING BILL FOR WALES. Sir,MT D. M. Davies, Waumarlwyd, -seem. to rejoice in tho fact that there 16 a likelihood of a. new Licensing Bill for Wale. being promoted. He evidently is a supporter of the Disinterested Management fad. Has Mr Davies over studied the question, and ha.s he ever looked into the working of the scheme in countries where' it has been adopted. Unfortunately for him, the ad- vocate of Prohibition'' as the remedy for immoderate drinking have proved that dis- interested Management" has been an utter failure. Although plausible to the super- ucial student of the great question, it should be very carefully examined before it is aC- wpt-erL The truth is that no system has as yet been found to work as successfully as our present licensing system, and if temperance reformers in this country could only make up their minds to assist the publicans to .improve the trade', much more good would be done than- is dene at present by continually look- inér. out for fresh schemes. A G. HAKKib. Ormond Hous

Advertising

lI ONIARIuyi CANADA the land  t c  

A Brecon Woman Gives Evidence I

A Brecon Woman Gives Evidence The value of local evidence is indisputable. It is the kind of evidenoe we accept as true because we know we can prove it for our- selves. There has been plenty of such evi- dence in the Brecon papers JillCIN., and this straightforward testimony has established a confidence in the minùs. of Brecon people that will not easily be shaken- On July 26th, 1909, Mrs E. Middleman, of 22, Lion Street, opposite the Plough (Jon- gregational Church, Brecon, said:—" I have I been, suffering with severe pains in my back and other signs of kidney disorder for nearly two years. After doing any housework that meant stooping, the pains would be like a. stab in the back. I was often dizzy and troubled, with bad headaches, an d t-here was not a natural action of the bladder. I had oft-ell heard Dean's baekaehe pule spoken highly of by my friends, and at last I got a box to try. From the first I found they were doing me good', and gradually thev removed the pains and made me feel brighter and better. They are the best medicine I have ever had for kidney trouble, and I do not hesitate to recommend them. (Signed) (Mrs) E. Middleton. (Tn June 2nd, 1913—nearly four years later —Mrs Middleton said —" Mv health is good, I a.m p' le-ased to say, and I keep free of kidney complaint. I always recommend Doan's pills. Price. 2s 9d a box, 6 boxes 13s 9(1 of all dealers, or from Foster-McClellan Oo., 8, Wells Street, Oxford Street, London, W. Don't ask for backache and kidney- pi. lis ask distinctly for l)oan\ backache kidney pills, the same as Mrs Middleton had.

Appointment of CountyI Magistrates

Appointment of County I Magistrates Sir,—An Advisory Committee was appoint- ed several years since, for the purpose of as- sisting the Lord Lieuteinant in the selec-tioai of suitable- persons, for the office or justices for the County. So far as I have been able to ascertain, it does not appear that a )ist has been prepared by these gentlemen. The need of addit-ional justices is clearly appar- ent and the delav in the appointment of suitable persons to fill tihe vacancies. caused bv death, ago and nifimimties, is detrimental to the interests of the community. Ihe- Ad- visory Committee is a strong one, and a strong list of magistrates. capable of dis- charging their duties judicially, and with- out fear ou- favour is to be exacted' trom I tliem.

No title

The March Munsey is. a most interesting sixperuivwwth for it contains besides five I short. stories and a, complete novel some f verv fine illustrated articles. Sixty-three illustrations aid the reading of "Th Giant Hotels of New York, and Mr J. L. WeUi-yer writes in a most entertaining lashion on the b??T. bank in the wodd. The num?r r

I Farmers Cooperation 1

I Farmers & Co-operation 1 Lord Clanusk's Suggestions. ) IMPORTANT MEHITIKG AT TALYBONT. For some time a movement has been on foot in the district of Talybont to form an Agricultural Co-Operative Society. Certain persons met and discussed the matter, and eventually a committee was appointed, with Mi* Maurice, agent to the Buckland Estate, as chairman. The Society has been register- ed as the Talybont and District Agricultural Co-Operative Society, Ltd. On Thursday a largely-attended public meeting was held at the Parish Hall, Taly- bont, for the purpose of explaining to the farmers and others the benefits to be de- rived from such a society. Col. H. R. Jones- Williams presided in the unavoidable a bsence, through indisposition of Mr Maurice, and was. supported by Lord Glanusk, C.B., -D.S.O. Mr A. A. Mitchell, J.P., C.C., member of the- Agricultural Or- ganisation Society; Mr R. B. Sparrow, Rev. J. Dnvics, Aberyscir (secretary of the Cradoo Co-operative Society), and Mr Walter Wil- liams (secretary of the Agricultural Organisa- tion Society). The Chairman expressed regret at the cause of the absence of Mr Maurice, who was heart and soul in the movement. He was very pleased to see such a large gathering of farmers. It showed that the farmers of the neighbourhood were keen, in the move- ment. In forming themselve6 into co-opera- tive societies, let their motto he, Each for alii a.nd all for each." (Applause.) He spoke of the growth of the co-operative movement in continental countries, and said the posit- ion of agriculture to-day bad changed im- mensely to what it was half-a-century ago. The Carmarthen Society, which had a turn- over of over £ 90,000, included; almost every farmer in the district, a.nd that was What they wanted to see at Talybont (hear, hear) This. was no political organisation, no State interference, and herein would lay the strength of the movement. (Applause.) The Cradoc Society. I The Rev. J. Davies, vicar of Aberyscar, who is not only the secretary of the' Cradoc Co-operative Society, but also president of the Brecon and District Co-operative. Society, gave a brief outline of what they had been able to do at Cradoc. The Society was start- ed a bout 12 years ago, and was one of the oldest 3grictultural societies in South Wales. When they started they did not have the support of the landlords of the district such as was the case there that night. (Applause.) He was pfeased to see the landlords taking an interest in the movement. He was con- vinced that the interest of the farmer was also the interest of the landlord (hear, hear). The late Mr Cleasby, P'enoyre, took a cer- tain interest in the Society, and ultimately when he understood that the movement was for the benefit of the farmer he joined and look a- share of £50 (applause); and Mr Cleasbv's sister, Mrs McChntock, was to-day one of the best supporters of1 the Cradoc Society. Their turn-over for the first year was something liko £ 1,000. Lasf year the turn-over was nelarly £ 10.000—(applause)— and the balance disposable was over L450. ]'< thought that during the time the Society had been trading in, the neighbourhood they b id distributed over £ 1.000 in dividends on purchases to t'he shareholders, and they had ■i.is'v saved a. re-at deal more than a thous- and pounds indirectly. They had nearly 200 members, and ib<,Rit 300 customers, who se- cured. half the profits. If they paid share- hoVlers Is in the £ they paid non-members CWl in the ,-C.. Ho gave instances of the bene- fits to be derived and wished every success •o the Talybont and District Society. (Ap- nlause. ) Lord Glanusk -1. I i Lord Glainusk, who was received wiwi ap- plause, said that although he had come there for informatioin, he was perfectly convinced that co-operation for farmers and for agri- culturists was a sound thing to go on in these days. (Applause.) There was only one strong objection he could see, that was, that they would injure and possibly ruin the small shopkeepers in the district, and that, to his mind, was a very serious point, but- at the same time they had got to remember—he was sorry to have to say it—that a great many shopkeepers charged an uudue. profit, e&- pecially in a place where they had no com- petition, and after a11, putting two and two together, they had' got to legislate for the many rather than for the few. (Applause.) It was not a very long time since that he was t,alking to a farmer who did not live very far from there. His lordship asked him whv they did not co-operate, and the, farmer said, "We have tried it." "But I didn't know there was a society," said his lordship. Three or four of us have tried it," said the farmer. We bought a. ti-uck of coal be- twceni four of us (loud laughter). At any rate, proceeded his lordship, he was the last 10 go for his load of coal-(iiioie laughter) and he said lie- had got his weight all right, but it was all dust—(much 1aughter)-and, added the farmer, "That is the last I am going to have with co-operation krenc)wect laughter). Continuing, Lord Glanusk said that to him the chief argument in favour of co-operation was the fact that, they had got to realise—which he had realised for a long timthat the poor man actually paid coiisiderablv more for the goods he bought than the man who could afford to huy in bulk (1) ear. hear). His advice, to them was: "Douvt start too quickly; start it steadily: and start it in one or two articles and he hoped that they would not only be a buying pocietv but also a selling society. Let their pioi-to be: Bach for all and all for each. (Applause.> If they would embrace a large enough awe-a-from Brecon on the one side to Cricikliowell on the cther-and if they tried to keep it purely and solely an agricul- tural co-operative society and all united to- other to make it a really big and successful socict-v, then they could be assured of his sympathy in the way of shares and his help. (Loud applause.) The. A.O. Society. Mr Walter Williams, in the course of an eloquent speech, said the Society he repre- sented was purely an educative body. It was maintained by voluntary contributions a.nd by a saibsidy out of the Development Fund, and every pound; they subscribed from volun- tary sources the Development Commission- c-rs gave theni another pound or more. The Agricultural Organisation Society did not seU or buv, but they advisied in both these things. In London they had a. staff of ex- perts in dairy, wool grading, poultry, credit, and insurance, and many more things, but before any body of farmers could get the services of these people they must form them- selves into societies. There had been ro- markable progresH during £ he last 11 years that this movement had been in existence in South Wales. There had been a. certain amount of suspicion lurking in the Celtic mind. They said when he started that it was a hopeless task to get the Welsh farmer to co-operate, but that was not the ease up to the' present, and the co-operative move- ment, he was certain, would be still more successful during the next 10 or 20 years (hear, hear). With regard to the start of the movement in South Wales, Mr Williams said that in tho year 1902 the County Councils of Pembroke, Carmarthen, and Cardigan sent de-legates to Ireland to study the movement on the spot, and they reported most favour- ably. They placed on record their conviction that the principles of agricultural oo-opera- tion as applied 11l Ireland and other Europe- an countries were eminently adapted to fur- ther the present position of agriculture in West Wales, and their adoption was hig11}y desirable. Possibly they might be surprised to learn that the County Councils had power to promote this movement. The Councils did nothing to promote the movement official- ly. but the members of the deputation d-d so, with the result that to-day Carmarthen possesses one of the most successful societies in Groat Britain. (Applause.) Their turn- over for last year was R,)1,000, and a memb- ership of over 1,400 (renewed applause). The movement had been set up at Carmarthen, which was not only a pattern to Wales, but to England as well (hear, hear) He went on to explain the nature of an agricultural co-operative society, and said he understood that at Talybont the value of the shares was £ 1. Suppose the society fa.O.ed-h,- did not think it would-vcry did-eacii member's Iia biJitv would be limited to his or her's share. In the course of an exhaustive ex- planation of the working of a society, Mr Williams said the buying was a very simple matter, but the selling side offered some points of difficulty, because they got some of the best produco in the world from the, Danish farmers. The way. he said, they made butter in Denmark was splendid— ch?n, hygienic, up-M-date. with the result that the Danish fanners had captured their mar kits, and when they sent their ununiform commodities to Denmark they could not get a, ma.rket. Breconshire was on the verge of the best population in the world for buying produce, and1 if they only knew—he wished they did—the enormous sums 01 money tnat were being paid by Glamorganshire for pro- duce from Denmark and other countries they would be surprised. Some of that money ought to go into the pockets of the home farmer, but on account of the laclk of co- operative methods; they were not ahle to tio that so far. Mr Williams said that Brecon and Carmarthen markets were the best in Wales, but what Norwegian or Danish farmer would would pack his butter in a. cabbage leaf at this. time of the day I (Laughter.) But they did it in Brecon&hire. Co-operation, he asserted, was out to adopt new methods. (Applause.) He concluded by saving that the movement at Talybont, as everywhere else, depended solely on the loyalty of the members. (Loud applause.) Air A. A. MitchéJ1, Glyncelyn, who is a great supporter of co-operation, also spoke, and urged the linking of the agricultural co- operative societies with the industrial soci- eties such as the society in Brecon. (Ap- plause. ) Questions were a.sked and replied to by Air Walter Williams, and the Rev. J. Davies, the former, in reply to Lord Glanusk, stating that he had told the Talybont Committee that he thought there would be a difficulty in getting the working men. to join at a £ 1 share. He thought £1 was too much. Mr W. Parry, Talybryn, proposed a hearty vote of thanks to the speakers, and stated, amidst cheers, that he should join the So- ciety, and would take 10 shares.—Mr R. B. Sparrow seconded, and the vote having been enthusiastically carried, Mr Walter Williams proposed a vote of thanks to the Chairman, who, he said, was deeply interested in the Societv. Creamery at Talybont. Lord Glanusk, in seconding, hoped to see the day whom. they yvould have a creamery at Talybont, a wool exchange—badly wanted in Breconshire—and perhaps a, beet factory, and possibly some day an egg train from Talybont to Mcrthyr (laughter and cheers). Ho hoped they were not treating it as a joke, but that they would do their best to bring it about. (Applause.) The Rev. J. Davids supported, and said he would be oiijv too glad to give any assistance he could to, the Society. (Aplause.) The vote was carried with acclamation, and the Chairman said he would take 10 s hares to start with. (Applause.) We understand that. 100 shares were taken up at the meeting, ,50 of which were taiken by Lord Glanusk.

Advertising

fit is difficult to I S make money. I § A quick way to do so is to use I NITRATE of SODA on your crops. That will make j it easy for you. l Pamphlets telling you how and when to use it will be acid you. gratia and post free, by g T H* CHILEAN NITRATE COMMITTEE, i ii Frlara Kaii&ti, New Broad Street, London, E.C. LMMUMmmHMM

BRECONSHIRE CONGREGATIONALISMI

BRECONSHIRE CONGREGATIONALISM. I Welsh Association Meetings. I CHURCH BI-LL PETITION. I The quarterly meeting of the Breeonshire Association was held at Brychgoed, on Tues- da.y and Wednesday, 10th and 11th irnst. There were present at Conference on Tues- day, Profs. Joseph Jones (chairman for the current year) and John Evans, Revs. R. Wil- liams, M. P. Moses, R. J. Williams T. bwydrim Davies, J. Tertius Phillips, W. M. Saer, J. J. Williams, D. LJoyd and Rev. Thomas Rowlands, of Madagascar Messrs Edward Thomas, David Thpmas, Morgan Jenkins, John B^un*, Stephen Davies. John Davies, Jenkyn Williams, J.P. Rees Davies. Gwilyni Williams, John Stephens, Thomas Evans, EvaJl Prossor, William Havard. At tho next meeting, to be held at Cwm- camlais, the preachers on eiven subjects are Revs. D. A. Griffith aJid Wm. Saer, Rev. J. Tertius Phillips will read a paper on "The Church in its 'social aspect." TT In connection wltli the report ol tne nome Mission Committee., and in the absence of treasurer and secretary, the general policy of the Homo Mission was referred to the Gy mania Conference. The case of Bethania., Merthyr Ovnog, dealt. with, but no defin- ite ajnoiual" grant was promised. Tho.repro, sentatives Oil the Council of the Welsh Union are Rev. R. Williams, Brychgoed, and Prof. John Evans, B.A., Brecon, to represent the Association, aaid tlic Camedydd Committee, Mr Jenkyn Williams. J.P., Devynnock on the directorate of the London Missionary Society, Rev. I>. A. Griffith, Troedrhywdalar. Other denominatianial matters: were dealt with a valuation, and property committee was appointed! with a representative from everv pastorate—convener, Rev. T. Gwydrim Davies. Trecrustan. The Rev. R. J. Williams, Brecon, read a paper rorrtaining valuable suggestions on "The relation. of Home Mission work to Foreign Mission work." An inspiring ad- dress was given by Rev. Thomas Rowlands, the Missionary "who has spent 35 years in Madagascar. Mr Williams and Mr Rowlands were thaJiiked for their services. The preach- er on a given subject, "Mission work," was Rev. T. G-wydrim Davieft. Others who took part at the public services on Tuesday even- ing and Wednesday were Profs. Evans and Jones, Revs. W. M. Saer, J. T. Phillips, R. J. Williams. J. J. Williams, Thomas Row- lands, D. Lloyd. The church, at Brychgoed enjoy* s a very good tradition as one of the best for extending i, hearty welcome to the qua.rterly meetiing of tihe Association. As on former ooeasionfi. so now, pastor and people were worthy of their past. I ftesofutioBs. I Resolutions were passed urgently appeal- ing to the Primoe Minister to proceed with the Welsh Church Bill under the Parliament I Act without regard to the 90-031100 "Non- conformist Petitions," and offering its (most solemn protest against the practice adopted by tho supportexs of the established church m this county to secure signatures to the so- called "Nonconformist Petition," and calls upon all the members of the Free Churches to ecscercise vigiliaiice and care in resisting the insidious ayttaoks made upon their liberty.

ISports Club v SWB Depot

Sports Club v. S.W.B. Depot. PLAY ON WATERLOGGED GROUND. Last Saturday's encounteir between the Sports Club and the Depot on the letter's ground resembled more of a polo match than a game of football. The field after the heavy raim was a veritable quagmire. There was a stretoh of water in the front of both goals, another in the middle, of the field, and smal- Jer patches dotted here and there all over the playing area. FootbaU under such con- dition proved very trying, but the players stuck it well and simply wallon-cd" in the "mire." On several occasions it was difficult to see either the players or the ball with the amount of water aaid mud that was splashed! up. Nevertheless, the gain-e was not by any means means a poor one. or such a one-sided game as the score would lead one to suggest. The Depot turned out their strongest sido this season. Whittaker and C. Morgan again" jOillOO the ranks," and Sergt.-Major \1arr, who has recently come to the Depot, figured among the forwards. Old Breoon- ians well remember what a fine player Sergt.- Marr was wheal he played for the Depot some years ago. One was particularly pleased to see Staff-Sergeant Whittaker back in his old place. It was a bad day for the Depot when the brilliant centre-forward gave up playing. The Sports Club, too, were at full strength, except that Lichfield played in goal vice Hall, a.nd Phillips went into the half-back line instead of Bufton. The teams were: —Depot: Bowen Woods a.nd Tricker; Thomas, Saaidford and Mar- riott Gurney, Marr, Whittaker. Taylor, and C. Morgan. Sports dub: Liehfield; W. Yaughan and Seymour Rees; T. J. Rich- ards. Lumley, and F. Phillips; Brookes. Da vies. Monty Green, Smedley and Reg. Phillips. Referee, Sergt. Green, Talgarth. There was- nothing much between the teams in the first half, although the Sports Club were two goals to the good, both ob- tained through smart work on the part of Reg. Phillips- After a spirited attack by the Depot, Lumley sent Davies going, and the ball was kicked right between the backs and stuck in the mud. Bowen callie out, and with Davies and Phillips on him he threw the ball over Phillips' head, but ow- ing to the slippery nature of the ground failed to regain possession, with the result that tho Sports Club, left-winger shot into an open goal. The, second goal was obtain- ed as the result of an error on the part of the Depot right back. Reg. Phillips raced the ball towards goal, but Woods got in front of him and j«st touched the ball back to Bowen. However, before the goalkeeper could save Phillips dashed up and sent into the far corner of the net. The defence of Vaughan. for the Sports Club in this half us superb, his strong kicking proving of great advantage to the side. Richards, the ex-Brigade half, also gave a good account of himself. The Depot, who were aided by the wind, had very hard lines in not scor- ing M vera-l times. Whittaker on two occa- sions missed by inches only, and a rattling good shot by Morgan from the wing was saved m fine style by Lichfield, and on an- other oce*asion he got the ball away from Taylor's foot in remarkable fashion. Half-Time: Sports Club 2 goals. I Depot. Nil. The Depot played well at the opening of the second half, and with Whittaker show- ing his old-time form their efforts were at last rewarded. Taylor and Whitta- ker worked their way through the defence, and passed to Morgan, who scored their only goal-, with a good shot- After this the Sports Club had things practically all their own way. Smed- lev, from a centre by Brookes, sent in a well- directed) -?Yot, but when the ball dropped it went no further, and Bowen had no diffi? in c?t?Tin?. Lumiey was in fine fetUp in this half. Three, times he pkaced the ball in the goal mouth, and the Sports Club stored on each occasion. Davies netted the third goal, Monty Green the fourth, Brookes the fifth, and Slmedley the sixth- Final: Sports Club 6 goals. Depot   Igo'aL

Builth Wells v Talgarth

Builth Wells v. Talgarth. At Builth on Saturday. The ground was in bad condition, and, under the circum- stances, good football was out of the ques- tion. £ lr Percy Jones (Newbridge-on-Wye) refereea. Teams.: —Talgarth S. Hughes L. Shel- tou and V. Davies; W. Powell, W. Shelton and A. Williams; W. Watkins, C. Barnett, L. Powell, C. Price and L. Humphreys. Builth Wells: J. Stephens- R. Edwards and S. Stanton; R. Mytton, T. Evans, and J. Smith M- Snfeles, T. Probort, A. T. Jones. R. Jones a.nd R. Steer. The visitors st.arted with the wind in their faces. Thev immediately pressed and Steph- ens was oajlled upon to fist out. The homes- ters carried play to the Talgarth goal, but Davies and Shelton capably defended, and, eventually, the home side was driven back to their own end. Ekciting play ensued, Builth again taking the ball within dangerous range. Play was of a tame character, both ends being visited alternately. Talgarth se- cured a, corner, the kick being placed with accurate judgment just in front of goal. Stephens successfully fisted out. A. T. Jones broke away, but was prevented by V. Davies, who, "ike Shelton, played well at back. The visitors were once more aggressive, and work- ed their way up the field, gaining a good position. Tlic- forwal-ds united splendidly, and C. Price, seizing the chance, popped the ball into the net. Half-time: I Builth Wells ••• mi. B W"4.lls ni l I 1 The second half was devoid ot much inter- 1 est, and contested with remarkable evenness. J Neithor side scorned. Final: Talgarth' 1 goa1. Builth we n nil. BUILTH ROAD v. NEWBRIDGE-ON-WYE. Considerable interest was taken 111 uno friendly match between Built-h Road and Nowbndge-on-Wye on the former's ground last Saturday. Mr Lewis Corsham was re- feree. and the result was a win for the visi toi-s by four goals to two. 44+ ICRIOKHOWEfLL v. PONTYPOOL ) RESERVES. It was unfortunate that. the weather was not finer on the occasion of the, Nrisit of the noted Pontypool Reserve team to Crickhowell on Saturday. Despite this drawback, a splendid game was played, and the losers gave a most creditable display. Pontypool Avon by four tries to nil, the last scored by Lamb resulting from real Welsh passing. Three tries were scored ial the second moiety, when Crickhowell faced a. st-rong wind. Crickhowell farwerds did well in the tight and bcded rather more than Ponty- pool. Batty and Eddie Williams were good, and R ■itnisey, W. A. Davies, and Millett use- ful. At half Hubert Parry played finely, and Leonard, W. Psi-rv, and Bailey were serviceable players. For Poutypool Ben b ite Ooualtv t h ree- Evans, the Monmouthshire County three- qniiarter, Onions, Iamb, and the fuB-hack were clever players in a smart and sports- manlike side.

Advertising

  ?-?or Cakos. pmw?y,    Pu?dtnt* tn? Pi"  (?? BORWtCKSJ ??BAKINGPOWDER?? 7 S. A B., Ltd, Wasting away It is no exaggeration to say that SCOTT'S Emulsion has saved the lives of countless numbers of children. Each year since 1874, the proprietors of SCOTT'S Emulsion have published hundreds of genuine testimonials from doctors, nurses and parents-each telling how it has brought health and strength to some sicklv chilrf. TRADE MARK cn every Package. J SCOTT'S Emulsion is particularly valuable during the teething period- for coughs, colds, bronchitis, whooping cough-as a builder-up in bloodless and rickety conditions-and as a preventive of the ill-effects of measles, fevers and inflammatory diseases. scons O?tFI. I  Emulsion Beware of imitations of inferior quality and power. Be sure it is SCOTT'S with the fishman on the package. Vj/O

IYstradgynlais ByeLaws

Ystradgynlais Bye-Laws. LOCAL BUILDER AND COUNCIL. At Ystradgynlais Rural Council on Thurs- day last (Mr J. W. Morgan presiding); Mr Thomas Jones, builder, Ystradgynlais, ap- peared before the Council, with regard to the notice served on him by the clerk to stop building operations until, an amended plan of a dwelling house in Brecon road had been submitted to and approved by the Council. He was asked by the Chairman why he had not conformed with the bye-Jaws and sub- mitted a plan, and he replied that he oould not see why he diould. be asked to carry out certain things which oth<\r builders had not done. After a heated discussion, Mr Jones agreed to conform with the bye-laws and submit an amended pita 11. Mr J. G. Bees (inspector) asked Mr Jones if he still maintained that the officers of the Council had prejudice against him, and if so would he give his reasons. "ThiB is a most serious matter, he added, "and unless you withdraw your remarks I guarantee that you will hear from my Association in less than a week. Mr Jones declined to withdraw.

I Filming the Intemo FMmina theMenao

I- Filming the Intemo. | FMmina theMenao. ■' Kinematographing an awakening volcano at close quarters appealed to my imagina- tion," says Mr Frederick Burluigham in the March Pearson'si Magazine, whero he gives » thrilling account of his descent into the crater of Vesuvius. The chief danger was omo of asphyxiation." We were below the precipitous portion of the crumbling crater wall, and had left all the rope. dangling behind in order to climb back up the precipice. We were on a fairly steep inclined slope, filled with loose debris, which started moving as we slid along ana tumbled into the void beneath. Almost, direct- ly beJow us were tlis, thick yellow sulphur furmaroles. the smoke of which already was giving us concern, while out in the crater basin rose stiJù, intact the great central j column of corrosive hydrochloric acid gas. Suddenly there came the sharp craok of an avalajiche1 and the sound of falling debris. Part of the crumbling cone had caved in 1000 feet- a.bove, and the mass was leaping towards us."

Advertising

c q:A "M,j 4: Nil (t Jf You J(ave ) ?B? something good to tell, there is no need to delude the unwary into ??s reading an apparently interesting story which proves to be a prelude ,1 5 to an advertisement. The strtHng story and the thrilling testimonial jS 5 do not add to the merit of the article advertised. If you are troubled w:tb Bad j)/?s?/o/? Jmpure ?/oo? Xanguor, g g ?erc?/yc Xiver, Sick ?ecr?arc?c, £ ? or other such ailments which arise from a Disordered Stomach imperfectly S g doing its work, you need not experiment with the many medicines so Q plausibly set before you; take I 1 BEECHAM S PILLS I ? and you have a reliable remedy, proved by thousands of sufferers to be I une qualled for dispelling Disorders of the Stomach and Liver. It is not r ? necessary to bring BEECHAM'S PILLS before your notice surreptitiously, ??? as they are openly recommended by those who have found that ??jt ?? BEECHAM'S PILLS will do all that is claimed for them—hence  they have the Largest Sale of any patent Medicine. ?S? Sold ei-erywhere in boxes, price 1/1? (56 pills) & 219 (168 pills). I õ:i,.tS

1110 Cars a Day I

1 110 Cars a Day. I THE FORD COMPANY'S RECORD. I Last week a record wa.s established—in a, single ordinary working day, without any special stamuiuB save the stimulus of public demand. waiting to be. satisfied, without even knowing until the day's end how many vehic- les had actually been completed, the Ford Motor Company of Manchester assembled in their Trafford Park Works no less than 110 Ford Cars. Such production is unknown out- side America, and even in that land the re- sult is exce.ptional}argeJy, for the reason that the demand for other cars is small by comparison wit-h, the demand for Ford cars. Large demand, factory organisation, the finest machinery obtainable, and the strictly standardised form of the Ford car, ha.Te made this extraordinary feat possible. Quite nor- mally in the Manchester Works a car will emerge from the hands of t-he asscmbtcrs in from 20 to 30 minutes. A fraction of a. millimetre out of truth would upset the whole process. It is only because every part, is dead true that extraor- dinary rapidity of building is made possible. Every gibe at Ford quickness is therefore a reflection upon the knowledge or the honesty of the giber. The Ford as it issues from the. 1 shop goes, straight out to the road, a.nd bves as long. or longer, and vastly more economi- cally, thaii any other car of its power. Because of it& economy of first and running cost, the Ford has been derided as "ebeip." Its cheapness ii only appaxo-nt, because of the comparative dearness of other vehicles in its category. The Ford car is not a cheap car either in materials or labour. Ford cars, are composed largely of the iuiest and most ex- pensive steel known. The steel the British Government his selected in the construction of the new light c(ruiseris. As for la.bour cost, the wages of the work- men in the Ford Factors- at Manchester arc not only well above all trade union rates, but are often double the wages paid anywhere in the motor industry or for a similar labour. Therefore, we have the extraordinary posi- tion that the most economical car to buy and to run is product of t-he costliest steel and the highest paid labour.

No title

Among pretty and inexpensive articles whioh; give finish to simply-furnished rooms, l either bed or sitting-rooms, are hanging bookshelves:. Thev can be bought anywhere wbera white wood-work is sold, and cost a few shillings only. I have myself painted such shelves in sealing-wax red but that cheerful colour would not tone with all rooms. These shelves conveniently hold books of small size; that books are agree- able companions! at odd moments we all know. A narrow shelf over a doorway, if de- corated with a few pieoesi of well-selected china, loendB a. charm to most. rooms, morem- pecially if there are not many pictures on the I walls.

Advertising

Every box of "ENGLAND'S GLORY" I Matches used, means MORE WORK for Brit- ish workpeople.—Morelaind, Gloucester. 615

Price of Cart Horses

Price of Cart Horses. HIGH PRICES AT CRAVES ARMS. Messrs, Jackson and McCartney held their great annual March Sale at the South Shrop- shire and Central Wales Horse Repository, Craven Arms, when they had about 30 horses of all classes stabled. Buyers, were in attend- ance from alii parts. The auctioneers offered :f:)() for competition in prize.s and the judging was ablv carried out. in the heavy horse sec- tion by Mr J. Edwards, of Broad ward Hall, Leominster, and Mr Medlicott, of Bodenham. Hereford, and in the light horse section by Mr F. C. Tombrns, of Brimfield Court. -xd Mr J. J. Git-tins, of Woofferton, Brimfield. who gave their awards as follows.: Class 1. Can, gelding or ma-re 4- years old or over, suitable for town silver cup value ?10. Messrs. T. Brercton and Soa, t)\'tou, L* ydbury North; 2- and 3, Mr T. auglian Chapman. H('llfon, LlandL Mo?omery Class II.. ??din.g or mare surt- aMe for a. light carter or vai, work, 1101 

Advertising