Collection Title: Brecon & Radnor express Carmarthen and Swansea Valley gazette and Brynmawr district advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
19 articles on this page
POLITICAL NOTES I

POLITICAL NOTES. I — —. The Lords have now sent down the Amend- ing Bill "amended" even beyond Lord Lans- downe's expectations. Lord Morley very just- ly said that if the transformed Bill were to be taken as the last word of the Lords, then clearly the debate had only been an over- elaborate way of rejecting the Home Rule Bill, and it would have been far better and more straightforward if it had been openly rejected. The Lords have not only inserted into the Bill a "clean cut" for Ulster, no re- ferendum for the Ulster people to say whether they want exclusion or not, power for the House to over-ride OrdeTS-in-Council, and removal of the Judiciary from the appoint- ment and control of the Irish Executive but at the last moment they carried a new clause in spite even of Lord Lansdowne's hesitated objection, to hang up Home Rule indefinitely until a Commission shall have reported on the oonstitutional relations of Ireland to the other parts of the United Kingdom." In the report stage of the Amending Bill the Lords rejected Lord Weardale's very rea- sonable proposal that at any time after the passing of the Amending Bill a vote should be taken upon exclusion on the demand of one- tenth of the Parliamentary electors in any four counties of Ulster. An amendment was carried to give the small Unionist and Pro- testant minority in the rest of Ireland pro- portional representation. On this question the genuine voice of the Protestant minority in the South was heard almost for the first time in these debates. Lord Langford said that the Unionists of the South had a keen desire to be represented in the Irish Parlia- rrLATTf nl the exclusion of Ulster had strengthened their desire for representation. He therefore pleaded for proportional repre- sentation as likely to give these Unionists some possibility of taking part in t'e govern- ment of the country which they lo-ved. Lord Langford evidently does not regard the com- ing of Home Rule as a menace to the liberty and safety of the Unionist and Protestant minority. Nor, it would appear, dees Lord Lansdowne, for he urged his followers to con- centrate on Ulster, where the Unionists are :fighting, not for equality or security, but for ascendancy. It is a symptom of the esitraordinary situa- tion which always prevails in the House of Lordb, that it was Lord Crewe who had to move the third reading of a Bill of which Lord Lansdowne had by that time practically taken complete charge. Lord Crewe pointed out that the Opposition had excluded from the Home Rule area Roman Catholic count- ies i/n niKirih t.nA tiomind for Home Rule was "J not less than the demand for exclusion in the NQrtt counties. The Opposition leaders seem- ed to forget that, just as they could not undertake a solution which left out Sir Edward Carson and his followers, so the Government were equally bound to consider the views of their followers and Lord Crewe addressed to Lord Lansdowne, for whom it had & specially personal interest, a reminder that a Unionist Lord-Lieutenant, and two Unionist Chief Secretaries, had made no sec- ret of their sympathy with the desire for the government of Ireland according to Irish ideas. Lord Lansdowne's reply to Lord Crewe, if it really presented what was in the speaker's mind, was extraordinary. He based his de- fence of the clear cut" on the ground that nothing less would restrain the Ulster Volun- teers from flying to arms. He argued that the Home Rule. Bill had bad the bottom knocked ouft of it" by the Opposition Amend- ment to exclude, the whole of Ulster; and he then went on to argue that the Amending Bill was of no use because it had been defied by the atiollal Volunteers. If Lord Lan&- downe had drawn his loose ends together he would have concluded by saying that the two sets of Volunteers ought to cancel each other out, and a solution should now be sought with the disturbing factor of civil war elimina- ted. < It may probably be true that the best way to a solution of the Irish problem is through a conference, if it were possible, in which the Irish themselves should reach a settlement. Lord Beauchamp stated that the Government I would rot bar the way to a conference if there was a general desire for it in aU quar- ters. But the proposal to hang up the Home Rule Bill indefinitely, while a Commission in- quired into wide and vague questions, would be much more likely to produce a volcanic eruption than a peaceful settlement. As Lord Morley said, Here is a problem which has been discussed, almost exhaustively, for twenty-eight years, and now it is proposed to settle it by passing two Acts of Parliament, and suspending their opemfion 1" The pro- posal is academic and impracticable. < The House of Commons has been engaged in di.scfussing the Finance Bill. Mr Worthing- ton-Evans wanted the amounts paid for un- developed land and mineral rights duty to be deducted from the amount on which super- tax is payable. His argument is just on all- fours with the man's complaint that it was not fair that he should have to pay tax on his full income when part of his income was expended on, cigars and champagne, which were already taxed! Mr Lloyd George has accepted the principle that the system of death duties ought to be amended in such a way as to prevent a sudden jump at dividing points in the scale. This system is not only unfair to the person taxed, but leads to evasion. The general attack upon death-duties was one which the Chancellor of the Exchequer had no difficulty in repelling. The fall in the value of securities is not to be accounted for by the death-duties in th if; country; it k an incident in a world-wide tendency, the result of a trade boom. Securities had a much lar- ger fall under the previous Government. If, as a consequence of reduced taxation, na- tional defences became inadequate, education inferior, public. health neglected, securities would certainly not rise. An "early winter session" has been aji- TKmnoed by the Prime Minister. Parliament will, it is conjectured,, meet at some time in late November. Good progress may be made before with, the Revenue Bill. In that case, the necessary condition may have been laid down by statute in time to allow the grants to local authorities in next year's Budget. As far as the Plural Voting Bill is concerned, the earliest date at which it can be placed on the Statute-book in the teeth of the resistance of tre House of Lords is June 1st. 1915.

No title

Messrs G. W. Bacon and Co., Ltd., 127. Strand, London, have just issued a map of South and Mid-Wales (contour), scale ->0 milefc to an inch, which efcould prove very useful to motorists. Accompanying the map is a selection of cycling and motoring routes, giving the mileage from one t-own to another. The price of the map is Is. net, paper, and Is 6d cloth.

Advertising

Wm. Treseder, Ltd., The Nurseries, CARDIFF. Bedding Plants. pplicatior,. Phone Telegrams: 597. TRiinDim, Florist, Cardiff. Garden and Flower Seeds. Wreaths, Crosses and Out Flowers at the shortest possible notice. «

No title

THE FLOWtER GARDEN. Hardy Carnations. During the coming several weeks should i the can-nations be layered; whilst the pre- sent is more favourable to propagation by slips, seeing that a cutting takes longer to establish itself than a layer The layer has the resources of the parent plant at its back. Carnations, cfoves and pacotees can a.11 be layered but the pinks are usually propagated by planting slips now, or by root division next April. Some gardeners favour huge clumps; others, plants with only several stems. The one layer their carna- tion stems, but do not sever them from the parent root; the others transplant the new plantletsi in the spring. And with the pinks, during the summer the stems can be spread out and pressed into the soil. They will root, and send up shoots, and there will be large compact chimps another year. Both methods, large plants or small ones, have their merits. Masses of lovely blooms of moderate ize are certainly more striking ob- jects in the border than plants having but one, two or three flower stems; yet the lat- ter must produce the finest individual blooms. Clumps are suggested tor garden  decoration, and the single plants for button  holes. j Slips. I This manner of increasing the stock is advised when the present roots are too small to be layered, and also when a large number of fresh plants are wanted. The sole disad- vantage of propagation by meams of cuttings is that whiJea layer will come into flower inside a twelvemonth, a cutting inserted now will not ibloom properly tiU '16. The slips (pipings or cuttings) to be chosen are the young shoots that have not flowered. Pre- paring the slipa is 4clonef by making a cut a: little below a joint and halfway through that joint. Then take the leaves off the part to be buried. Bed out the cuttings three in-, dhes deep, and be sure that each actually touches the bottom of its hole, which could be made with the flat end of a lead pencil. Press the soil tightly about the embryo plants. 1 Layers. A carnation is layered in much the same way as any other plant. The length of the stems does not matter, nor whether they have carried bloom. The foliage must be stripped from the underground portion. The layer ought to go three inches beneath the surface. Prepare a layer by making an outlet for the sap into the soil. A "callus" is then formed at the base of the wound. A callus is a mass of cells that have taken in nutriment from the atmosphere through the leaves. Presently root-hairs are sent into the ground and the layer has become a plant- let. Twisting, but not severing, the stem is a rough and ready method. So is the stem fractured and an outlet provided for the sap. The usual way of making the wound, how- ever, is by an upward out with a sharp knife on the underside of the selected stem. Make the incision, as with a slip, beginning in front of one joint and finishing half the way through the next. Thus is a "tongue" formed. The tongue is the hanging out- pieoe of stem. This toaigue must be kept from uniting with the stem again, else roorts cannot be produced. When pegging the shoots into the soil, for which purpose pro- per layering pains are to be obtained, see that the tongue is well opened, and make the earth flairly firm around to keep it from olosins. Afterwards. The after-care of layers and cuttings con- sists in watering as the mould becomes dry, and in occasionally stirring up the surface. Watch for soil pests. Carbolic powder, that can be sprinkled upon the soil of an evening and may have to be applied as often as week- ly, will effectively protect against slugs and snails. Forking one of the soil fumiganto into upper crust will preserve the plants from wire worm. Slips are generally planted at several-inch intervals in patches. Layers and slips should not be bedded into their perman- ent positions till the arrival of genial spring weather. Following the removal of the lay- ers in spring-time, the parent plants should have a dressing of well decayed manure forked in around. Do not manure in the autumn, as carnations disliko overmuch) wet in winter, and do not throw the manure upon the cen- tres of the clumps, as that is likely to harbour pests. A final word towards having complete success with this charming race of plants is to use a nicotine wash for the fly and to dust with pepper upon the damped foliage for ear- wigs. THE VEGETABLE GARDEN. I Tomatoes. Out-of Doors. I It is not in every district that tomatoes are a success in the open. Where they are, the tomato is a most profitable crop. So soon as three or four trusses of flowers have set, the plants should be stopped. The side shoots ought to be suppressed all the way through. Stopping; the main stem and the laterals oouooatrates the sap in the swelling of the fruits; and the extra sap, that would otherwise have gone to leaf, is used in enlarg- ing and forwarding the crop. And later blossom is of no good, since the weather would become too wet and chill, and the hours of sunshine be too few, for the fruits to ripen. Colouring ie assisted through the removal of several, or a portion of several, of the over- shadowing leaves. By-tihe-bye, some growers favour the plan of completing the ripening of the fruit indoors. When the fruits have be- gun to yellow, and earlier if the weather turns damp and chilly, lay them in a single layer upon a wood en table in a sunny window. This procedure is far more satisfactory than Ichancing ones luck during a sunless autumn. Indoors. Within the unheated greenhouse, more tri sses of bloom can be allowed to set. The inside temperature will be warmer, light frosts are not felt, and the air is drier. These conditions apply to the cold greenhouse in spring and in autumn. The gardener who buys his tomatoes as plants will be able to make the start earlier than waiting for out- door planting. The plants will be more for- ward. In the greenhouse the fruit can also be expected to hang further into the autumn. One method of training tomato plants under | glass is to stake with, and tie to, stout bam- boo canes. Another manner of support is to place the plants in pots along the greenhouse shelf, and hold them erect as far as the roof with sticks. From the tops of these sticks, string raffia tape near the glass to the centre of the house. Inside a large but unwarmed glass-house the plants will never reach the middle, yet they most certainly will in the small one. Outdoors and In. In the open-air feeding could take the shape of an inch mulching of half-decayed horse manure now, whilst in pots and boxes half-an-inch would be sufficient at a time. Under glass, two smaller dressings are more likely to leacl to truotiivity. Keep the, plants well watered, outdoors &nd in, and the sur- face mould loose, and opened to weather in- fluences. Stir up the surface, mulch, and trowel-in in about three weeks time. Pro- vided the roots have sufficient moisture, wash- ing down the foliage nightly, but not more than wetting the flowers, will make for more I speedy progress. Don't hose the pollen-that yellow fertilising dust in the heart of some i of the blossoms-away, or the crop cannot set. | An Insecticide. 1. I A good insect wash is a boon. The tollow- ing has proved itself in our gardens. We can vouch for its destroying fly and mildew, and for rendering plants distasteful to mag- gots, caterpillars, earwigs, slugs, snails, etc. It will not kill the latter nuisances, however, but cause them to seek a home in neighbour- ing plots. The recipe is: One medicine table- spoonful of paraffin and an ordinary table- spoonful of soft soap to a one-and-a-half- gallon can ai1 water. A cheap oil is prefer- able, having the stronger smell. Dissolve the soap and paraffin in a little hot water. Re- member to wet the undersides of the leaves with the insecticide. Spray only of an even- ing. E. DALLMAN PAGE, F.R.H.S.

BRECON LADYS CASE

BRECON LADY'S CASE. JUDGMENT FOR DEFENDANT. The concluding stage was reached on Wed- nesday, the loth, of the actions tried by Mr Justice Warrington in the Chancery Division by Mrs Ethel Mildred Devereux, of Tregoyd, Three Coctks, Brecon, and Viscountess Gar- nocik, of Giaxton Hall, York, daughters of the late Mr John Shaw, of Welburn Hall, York, who died intestate, against Col. John Reginald Shaw, of Cantley Hall, Doncaster, I administrator of his father's estate. Plaintiffs contended that their father crea- ted a, trust for each of them of JET.0,000 in de- bentures of the South Kirkby, Featberstone, ;ll

IHereford Horse Sales

Hereford Horse Sales. I MESSRS. JACKSON AND McGARTNIEY'S SALE. The July sale was conducted by Messrs. Jackson and McCartney in the Cattle Market, Hereford, on Saturday with very successful results. 220 horses were catalogued, and comprised an excellent entry for this time of the year with harvesting operations in full swing. The judging in the heavy horse sec- I tion was carried out by Mr G. S. Price, The 1 Homme Farm, Ross, while Mr R. Whitfield, Liverpool, undertook the judging of the light horses. The first prize, a silver cup value £10, for the best cart gelding or mare, was awarded to Mr HL Williams, 'the second go- ing to Mr W. H. Wigjmore, Goodrich, Mrs A. Morgan, Crumlin, being placed1 reserve. The trade in this section was wonderfully keen for tie time of yeal-, buyers from all parts be- ing in attendance taking the best horses at highly satisfactory prices, a few of which were as follows —Mr H. Williams, bay shire geld- ing, 56 gns.; Mr C. F. Goodwin, black shire mare, 60 gns. Mr W. H. Wigmore, bay gelding, 48 gns. Mr J. W. Robinson, grey gelding, 47 gps. Mr A. J. Harris, brown mare, 46 gns.; Mr J. Reynolds, roan mare, 45 gns. Mr A. J. Harris, bay gelding, 44 gas.; Mrs M. A. Boore, dark brown mare, 44 gns., Mr O. Price, dark brown mare, 43 gns.; Mr F. Bailey, brown gelding, 43 gns. Miss J. Kerr, bar mare, 42 gns. Mr Morgan Davies, bay gelding, 42 gns., etc.

No title

r Substituted gpods have no reputation of their own. Refuse them. We have received a pamphlet under the title of "Flannelette Question," containing reports of 230 burning fatalities recorded in various newspapers between September, 1913, and May, 1914. In practically every one of the eases flannelette was specifically mention- ed as being the real cause of the fatality, and in many the Coroner commented strongly on the danger of using this material for cloth- ing, especially for wear by young children.

Advertising

Every box of "ENGLAND'S GLORY" Matches used means MORE WORK for Brit- ish workpwple.-Moreland, Gloucester. 516 The Smokol Fumigator. "GRIFFITHS' PATENT," For KILLING INSECTS ON PLANTS, Ac. A Boon to Beekeepers. A CURE for GRIPES IN CHICKENS. Price 2/6. from Ironmongers & Seedsmen, or poet free from GRIFFITHS BROS., Patentees, WKOBLEY. Lccal Agents: Meredith & f-;onii, High St Brecon Wilcockaon, Tobacconist, High St, Brecon. br585

Ystradgynlais Council I

Ystradgynlais Council. I Colbren Water Supply. I SURVEYOR AND DRAINAGE SCHEME. I Ystradgynlaig Council met on Thursday, Mr W. D. Walters in the chair. Others present were Messrs S. J. Thomas, David Lewis, Rhys Chapman, J. Howells, J. W. Morgan, D. R. Morgan, and Lewis Thomas, together with the clerk (Mr A. Jestyn Jeffreys). Tlhe Surveyor reported that for the first time since he had been connected with the council there were no plans to report. I Water Supply at Abercrave and Colbrem. I Mr David Lewis: said that there was he thought a bad leakage of water near where he lived, and them were serious complaints at Colbren. Mr Howells said he had heard that people at Colbren were using tap water to teach their diuúks to swim. (Laugihter.) On the proposition of Mr David Lewis (Ool- bran), seconded by Mr D. R. Morgan, it was decided that a man should be sent to over- haul the taps, and ma-ke necessary repairs. The Isolation Question. I The report of the committee appointed to discuss with the Pomtardawe Council the question of aocommiodatilon for infectious cases wag read. A letter from the council stated that they would be prepared to accommodate patients except those suffering from Sllian pox when there was accommodation at a rate of 7s 6d per day, together with removal and, disonfeetmg fees, lhey could give no guar- antee of accommodation, which had to be wholly reserved for the Pontardawe district as provided by the regulations of tlhe County Council. They would agree, however, that Ystradgynllaas should have preference over any other district, and they would enter into an agreement for twelve months. Mr Jeffreys thought the, committee were willing to give the Pontardawe suggestion a tri'al. This would be bettor than making an outlay themselves of aibaut £ 7,000. Mr D. R. Morgan thought k2 12s 6d per week a very large sum. Of course, it was the desire, of the L.G.B. for Ystj-adgynfais to join Potntardlawe or Llandilo. Pontardawe should be fair and only charge the actual cost. Mr Lewis Thomas said the Hospital had to be kept open whether there were patients or not. After further discussion the offer was ac- cepted for one year, on the proposition of Mr T. Willi&ms, seconded by Mr J. W. Morgan. Mr D. R. Morgan said that the time had come to appoint a new waterman. When Mr Jones was appointed cderk of the works the council appointed Mr Tom Evans deputy. Mr Evans had earned out the work satisfactorily, and was a, resident in the district and a rate- payer and a plumber. He moved that he be appointed at the same salary.—Mr Howells seconded. Mr J. W. Morgan said lie had nothing ag- ainst Mr Evans, but as they had now sixtj houses of their own to consider, for which plumbing work would have to be done, he thought they might get an experienced man, Mr S. J. Thomas did not think either of the men thoroughly understood the work. i Mr J. W. Morgan said the remarks of Mi Thomas were most uncalle d for. He thought the council was satisfied as to the ability of Mr Watkiris after all his years of service. (Hear, hear.) Mr David Lewis thought Mr Evans was a good man, aaid when they had experienced men in the employ of the council these should have the preference. Mr Howells said Mr Sam Thomas should' withdraw his remarks. He seoonded Mr D. R. Morgan's proposition. Mr Thomas refused to withdraw, and Mr! Evans was unanimously appointed. The Sanitary Inspector stated that the i time had arrived when the council should frame drainage sbye-lawg for the purpose of regulating the work of proper and efficient drainage within the district. Owing to com- plaints regarding the improper use of chlor- ide of hme he had made inquiries, but could laid nothing giving rise to the complaints. Re- gardiing the disposal of sewage from the ootin- ovls property at Colbren, he understood that the council contemplated constructing cess- pools. Apart from being insanitary, the method would be an expensive one, involv- ling about £ 60 per aainum for cleansing. He I would reoommend the council to construct a 9-mch main drain to, convey the sewage to a small septic tank with one-or two small fil- ter beds. The efPhient might then be dispos- ed of to the site used for the disposal from Oolbren?booJ The estima-ted co? would be about ?60. A hut in Maesyfron road Aber- crave, consn^ sted of one room only, and being a  ? decayed and as di- lamdated. There was no sanitary convem- enoo and many other inslanitary conditions, rendering it totally unfit. He recommended ?e servmg of a ci!o? order on the ow?r Mr Francisco Gamro.-Tilis w?s ag?d??

Municipal Housing I

Municipal Housing. I SOUTH WALES MOVEMENTS. I The Swansea Housing Committee have re- commended applying to the Local Govern- ment Board for sanction to borrow £ 101,990 tor the Town Hill housing scheme of 500 hous- es of the types of the six specimen houses, the rents of which were estimated at 6s 7s 6d and 8s per week. Mr Molyneux, the acting chairman, said if they put up a thousand houses of the type of the specimen houses he was assured they would all be let at once. If that was the position now, what would be the position at the end of five years, with tho population increasing at the rate 2,000 per annum ? There was no doubt as to the dearth of houses, and that affected the bor- ough industrially. He knew that legislation was assisting the housing in rural districts, but rn his opinion it ought to do something for the urban districts, and whatever Govern- ment went into office the next time they would have to do it, in which event the local authorities would be able. to Jet houses at cheaper rates The report was adopted, together with a suggestion that the 500 houses be electrically wired The Cardiff Housing Committee received 230 applications for 30 houses recently erect- ed, and' decided who should become tenants by a ballot conducted by the City Treasurer.

I GRWYNEFAWR I

I GRWYNEFAWR. I Waterworks. Abertillery and District Water Board, which was constituted to con- struct a large impounding reservoir in the parish of Llanelieu and a pipe track from thenoe to the constituent districts of Abertil- lery, Abercarn, Risca, and Mynyddislwyn, give the following particulars relating to the flow of water on the Grwyne Fawr, situate in the Blacik Mountains of Breconshire: —" The flow of water was 376,000 gallons in excess of the amount to be given as compensation wat- err. The engineer reported that there were 71 days between June last year and June of this year in which the Board would not have given the full compensation water. Of course, it should be distinctly understood that if the Grwyne Fawr reservoir were completed and full there would be no deficiency at all eith- er in supply or compensation. The Board think that the ratepayers and other persons interested. living in the constituent districts should undersand that whilst there is an ab- normal flow of water during the winter months, as previously stated there were 71 davss on whicth the full compensation water could not have been given."

Life on Welsh Farms I

Life on Welsh Farms. I Less Class Distinction. I INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLBOY LABOUR I CONDEMNED. In their report on the land difficulties in Wales (the first portion of which was dealt with last week) the sub-committee of the Welsh Liberal Party report that the tendency I immil,,rate to the of the rural po-pulaition to immigrate to the towns was more marked in WaJes than in England. The sub-committee attribute the shortage of agrioulturallaoour to the superior draw of town life, where wages were higher, hours shorter, and social possibilities more at- tractive, and above and beyond these the feeling that industrial life offered more fre- quent opportunities for rapid individual ad- vancement. In East and JVfid-Glamongan there was a serious deficiency in the supply of perm ant labour, Raw a stall greater defi- ciency in temporary labour. Referring to the question of the, agricul- tural laibourer, the sub-com mattee state that the position of the labourer in Wales relative to the farmer was quitel uniliike that which existed in England. The English labourer and his employer were drawn from two dif- ferent classes in the social scale, whereas in Wales it might be said there did not exist that class cleavage between the farmer and the labourer. This was chiefly owing to the fact that the majority of Welsh farms were small in extent, and, consequently the farmer himself was often little better off financially than his paid labourer. The intermixing of the two classes in the organisations of the various religious deuiomiiia,taons bridged the gulf which othei-wise might to a certain ex- tent separate them. The Welsh labourer frequently became a. small farmer on his own account, and sometimes even on a consider- able scale." As regards boy labour, the report gives the astounding fact that the London County Council during the years 1889-1911 sent to the districts of which Llandilo is the distribu- ting centre no few. than 2,453 boys from the industrial schools, and large numbers had ar- rived from Bristol, Leeds, Birmingham, and from siudh homes as Barnaxdo's, Muller's, aind the Church Army. Mr G. R. Carter, M.A., refers to this system as a factor working ag- ainst the maintenance of agriculture in West Wales, and not only checked improvement in wages and hours, but displaced able-bodied agricultural workers, and in-troduced, an un- natural economic and social element into the Welsh agricultural system. In reference to small holdings, the sub- committee give as their opinion that the failure of the Small Holdings Act of 1892 was due to the passavemess of the County Coun- cils, the unfairness with which tenant appli- cants were dealt with in the Act as compared with those who desired to purchase, and the optional character of the Act. In no case in Wales had land been let to Small Holdings Associations during 1913, and there were 001- ly two instances in Wales of Co-operative Associations who had sub-let land rented from the County Council to their members. The committee poant out the extreme impor- tance of co-operative organisation in a coun- try like Wales.

COMERS FUNERALI

"COMER'S" FUNERAL. I Tributes from All. I CHANCELLOR'S TELEGRAM. I The funeral of the Rev. J. Gomer Lewis, D.D., the well-known Welsh preacher and lecturer, of Swansea, took place at his native place, Drefach, near Newcastle Emlyn, Car- marthenshire, on Thursday, and was one of the largest ever seen in West Wales. Among those from whom messages of sym- pathy were received during the day was the Chancellor of the Exchequer, who telegraph- ed expressing sympathy with the, bereaved family and regret at the loss which the nation had sustained by ",Gomerls" de-.tth. The Great Western Railway Company ran a special train from Swansea which stopped at all the intermediate stations to Henllan, and this brought in aoout 500 sympathisers. It is estimated there were over 2,000 persons present, and all shades of political opinion and religious thought were represented-a. strik- ing tribute to Gomer's" popularity. Tributes. I After a &hort service at Frondeg, the resi- dence of the decease d minister's sister, the cortege proceeded to the Drefladh Baptist chapel, where Gotuar" first commenced to preach, and there a very impressive Welsh service was held. The Rev. D. Davies, pas- tor, presided, and the chapel was filled to overflowing. The Rev. E. B. Lloyd (Bwidhnewydd) hav- ing opened the meeting, messages of condol- ence and tributes to the deceased leader were read from Lord Pontypridd, Sir D. Brynrnor Jones, M.P., Sir Alfred Mond, Bart., M.P., the Rev. J. Towyn Jones, M.P., the Right Hon. W. Abraham, M.P. (Mabon), Mr T. Edmunds (president of the Baptist Union of Wales), etc. Sir D. Brynmor Jones wrote that he would not attempt to give an expression of Gom- er's fine, robust, and typioally Welsh char- acter, nor to measure the loss they had sus- tained, but he wished to &ay how greatly be felt his loss personally, as well as from a national standpoint. Gomer" had been a pillar of the Nonconformist cause for a. long season of years, and they much regretted his death just as they were triumphing after their long struggle. The Rev. Towyn Jones, in a letter in Welsh, said that Gomer" was always so much aJive, that it was hard to think of him as dead. "The heroes; of a. nation never die, and while water flow in the rivers of Teify and Towy, the name of 'Gomer' will live in Wales." Principal Edwards, D.D. (Cardiff), who was the first speaker, said he regretted' the loss of a life-long friend, and of a warm and loyal supporter of the Baptist College at Cardiff. "Gomer's" care for the poor and needy was remarkable. He once said at a meeting, I am not a, guardian of the rates: I am the guardian of the poor." Mr John Hinds, M.P., in a touching tri- bute, referred to the deceased minister's large- heaffltedness and tender sympathy. He knew of no one who was the friend of1 so many, and his loss would be keenly felt for many years to come in numerous cim-les. A whole na- tion was in mourning for one of its noblest sons, one whose chief object in life was to be of service to humanity. He (Mr Hinds) mourned the loss of a personaJ friend. Mr John Williams, M.P., who followed, spoke-as a member of Gomer's" Church. spoke -as a mem b er of C "Gomer," he said, was their first and only minister, and the severing of the tie which had existed for over 35 years was acutely felt. What the late Mr Joseph Chamberlain was to English politics "Gomer" was to Welsh Non- conformity.

Advertising

SKIN & SCALP Bczema, (¡t Summer akin tpl Z t- chØH. ulcers, scaJp aora I and ringworm divappaax WrrT like magic under the Jfy ty unique Zam-Buk treatment. ITCHING A INFLAMMATION j-/ are quickly allayed by jB| 6||i the cooling and purify- -4v ing action of Zam-Buk 7!\< which has no equal as g V»7 a healer and akin-cure. M M JLLARIL. mm 

FEVER AT BRYNMAWR I

FEVER AT BRYNMAWR. I School Closed Isolation Impossible. MEDICAL OFFICER S SUGGESTIONS. I Brynmawr Council met on Wednesday week. Mr T. B. Jones presided, and there were also present: Messrs. T. M. Jenkins (viiae-cibadrnran), Huigjh Jones, F. Bailey, D. On-eii, E. Swales, R. Jones, E. Williams, T. Jones, Morgan, J. Bloor, J. Tippins, and R. Evans, with the clerk (Mr J. Thomas). Survey of District. I The Surveyor reported that the total yield of water was 7,000 gallons per 24 hours. The heavy rains of the post few weeks had not af- fected the water inthe rererv-oit very much, and the supply was rapidly decreasing. As dry weather could still be expected, it was necessary to exercise economy, as the reser- voir did not contain more than eljit weeks' supply. Plans had been submitted of the proposed altemtion of 89 Bailey street, ex- tension of Alnua terrace for the Beaufort ES- tate, and of a house in Alma terrace. Scarlet Fever Epidemic. The Medical Officer (Dr. C. Nyhan) report- ed that 14 oases of scarlet fever had been re- ported, which number compared with the fact that there were only 38 cases reported for the whole year, was a very high percentage. He had visited a nunibet of the houses, and no- ticed that in most of them little or no at- tempt was made in regard to isolation by the pa-rents. He had aliso observed that there were no disinfectants supplied at any of the homes he had visited. He considered that not complying with these two very important factors was very apt to spread the disease, and suggested thlait disinfectants should be supplied and, iristtuctionr, given to all the oc- cupants of houses where there were patients. He had advised the closure of the Roman Catholic Sdhools owing to the number of cases of scarlet fever, amd suggested that the build- ing should be disinfected as soon as possible. In front of the gate leading to the schools Was a refuse tip where dangerous matter was allowed to accumulate. This ought to be at- tended to at once. In some of the cases the houses were so small and the occupants so many tihat it was impossible to carry out iso- lation. It would be well if the council con- sidered the advisability of having an isolation hospLtall. It was decided -that the county authority should be waritton to in regard to the pro- posal to disinfect the Roman Catholic Sdhools, but no remark was made as to the ?tlhh tugg4wA-ions in the report of the medical officer. The Water su_wiy. I Mr D. Owen moved that steps be taken to convey the water found by the diviner at RJhoe Meredith into the reservoir, which was seconded by Mr F. Bailey, who said it would add about 18,000 gallons per day to the sup- ply. Mr T. Jones did not think the eight days supply would justify tihe oexpeiIlSte, and strongly deprecat-ed any effort to deceive the inhabitants. The Surveyor: It would cost about £200. Mr E. Williams su^ested that as the wat- er wonítd not require any filtration it oould be conveyed into the mains direct, which would be cheaper. The Surveyor explained that even if the water was obtained itt would not solve the pi oblem. It was very necessary to increase the storage rapacity and to extend the catch- ment area.. There were complaints as to the stench arising from the street galleys, wlicfh was due to the Want of water for flushing purposes. The council should consider a scheme which would meet with the require- ments of the people for some years to come. Mr Bloor said he had always been conr .ys b c,n con, vm* ced j that there was plenty of -water in the mountain, and the experiment of the water finder hiad proved it. Water had been found by that method at other places, and there was no reason why it should not be done at Brynmawr. He wiould be in favour of spend- ing £ 600 on the scheme Eventually the Surveyor was directed to prepare an estimate of the, cost of the four simemes that had been discussed by the ooun- cil.

School Nurses Appointed I

[ School Nurses Appointed. I BRECONSHIRE EDUCATION COMMITTEE I MOVE AT LAST. At the Breconshire Education Committee on Friday the Chairman, Archdeacon Bevan, -1 proposing the report of the Medical Inspection an-1 J!lt,a. Deficiency Commirt.tee sa.id that  ix nad been decided to. appoint one Queen's ?su;ree and four other nurses to deal with the work in the county, amd steps were also being taken to ascertain the number of mentally defective dhildlren. The only point now to be settled wias where the nurses should be placed, and this was a matter which would be decided in consultation with the sub-committee. He trusted that at the next me-etiug of the com- mitoe there would be a full attendance. The report of the Comm/ittee showed that it is proposed to set aside the sum of £100 for treatment, travelling expenses of child- ren to hospital, spectacles and so on. Bryn- rriawir,and Hay had agreed to pay only £ 5 per annum towards the scheme, but this the com- mittee had accepted. Miss Gertrude Line, of Ion Pentre, had been chosen as the Jubilee -N urse, amd would be paid £ 92 per ajuniim with £!j for uniform and travelling expenses in ad- dition (£12 of which would be paid by the R'V. Nursing Association.) Nine applica- tions were received for th? other four ap- pointments and the following were appoint-?, ed: J. W. ?? Merthyr Vale; Miss R. A. Saoodley, Burnley; Miss E. Routledge, Burnfey; Miss F. M. Julian. Mountain Ash, ,i,t a sa.lary of R80 with Z5 for uniform and tra voeIlimg expenses in addition.

No title

17ule Iliiy lint-vest is ritn full progress around LlandriThdod Wells, and, generally speakim, crops are somewhat Sigjht. Here and there, however, a good fiold is met with. Not a great deal of grain iR grown in this vinicitv. The crops are likely to be of average quality aaid quantity. Oats are promising particu- larly well.

I RURAL HOUSING 5

I RURAL HOUSING. 5 LOCAL COUNCILS PROBLEM. Mr Jenkin Williams (vice-chairman) pre- sided over the meeting of the Brecon Rural Council on Friday last. The Rev. T. Griffiths proposed and Mr John Jones (Llanfihangei-nantbran) seconded, that the loose stones be cleared off the roads dur- ing the summer months.—Mr John Smith moved as an amendment and Mr J. Conway Lloyd seconded that the matter be left to the discretion of the Surveyors, and this was car- ried. Mr Ricketts Better chuck the roadmen off the roads altogether and put them in the turnip field, where they will do more good. (Laughter.) The roads are right enough. The Rev. T. Griffiths then wamted to know if the Surveyors went round aJl the districts, and added1 that he was determined to bring this matter on attain. The Housing Question. The Sanitary Committee reported that the plans of house proposed to be erected at Brynr melyn, Llanddetty, were referred back, and the plans of house proposed to be erected near Talyllyn Station recommended. The following houses were reported by the Medical Officer to be unfit for habitation and it was decided to recommend that closing orders be issued: Two cottages at Pentrebach, Llandilofan; 3 cottages at Vicarage road, Trecastle; and 3 cottages in the same locality lately occupied and now vacant; and cottage at Bishops- town, Trecastle. The undermentioned houses having been reported as defective it was de* cided to recommend that the owners be called upon to execute the necessary works; two cottages at Bishopstown, Trecastle; cottage at Trecastle; five cottages at the Drawbridge, Talybont, now (or recently) occupied Llwyn- cynog, Talachddu; and cottages at Pentre- ucha, Llandilofam. The closing orders hav- ing become operative in respect of the fol- lowing oottages it was decided to recommend that notices be served upon the tenants; cot- tage at Llanfrynadh and ootta-ges at Cross Oak. The Inspector reported that he had met the agent of Bwysfa-fach, Trecastle, who had undertaken to carry out the necessary repairs. The committee were given to under- stand that the owners of Pendovery, Llany- wern, had this matter in hand, and they re- commended that for the present no action be taken. The Medical Officers were asked to report on cottages at Cross Oak, Pencelly Mill, and Warley, Garthbrengy. Mr A. A. Mitchell said it sounded a large order, but the committee had gone carefully into the matter and they oould see no alter- native but to recommend the closing of these houses. In some cases the ownera had ag- reed to carry out repairs. Mr John Jones (LI anfihangel-nant bran) se- conded, although it seemed to him that be- fore long they would have all the cottages in the country shut up. (Laughter.) The Chairman said it was not a very pleas- ant duty to issue these orders, but tlhiey must face the question. The Sanitary Committee were giving & lot of their time to this ques- tion and trying to do their best in the mat- ter. He 'know several of these cottages ce- ported upon—they were in a very bad state of repair. llir John Smith said in several cases to close ctottages was very hard lines, but he oould not see, what the committee could do otherwise, because no doubt the cottages were not what they ought to be. The Rev. T. Griffiths: At whose dictation are they going to be closed P The Chairman: It does not necessarily mean that they are going to be closed. The Rev. T. Griffiths said it was only the beginning. If the L.G.B. were going to in- sist on the building of new houses he did not know where the rates would be. He object- ed to the closing of cottages for very paltry reasons simply because an Inspector caine down from London and found the measure- ments were not up to his requirements- (Laughter.) They should put a stop to this extra expenditure. He did not object to the present recommendations, but in future he was going to do his level .best te fight against this expenditure. The Ubairman said that the issuing of these closing orders did not of necessity mean the closing -of the houses, but it was the means of getting proper attention being paid to the property by the owners, 'and no doubt the owners would do the necessary repa.irs.-The report was adopted. Dr. G. P. Flrancic,, reporting on the con- ditim of Warley, Garthbrengy, said there was very little head room, the rooms and windows were small, and t'hetrefore ventilation not good; and worse than all, there were neither belonging to this house nor to the next cottage adjoining any sanitary conven- ience of aaty kind. This matter onglbt at once to be put right, and there was no reason at all. if the owner felt disposed, Why the cot- tage should not be put in a perfectly habit- able condition.—The matter was referred to the Sanitary Committee. Worst in the County. Mr John Jones (Llanfihangel-nantbran) drew attention to a piece of road in his par- ish which was in a bad state of repair-m faot it was the worst piece in the county of Brecon. Be said that people living in the remote pcau off the district should have a little i-epair to t'her roads as well as those who enjoyed the good roads down below. (Hear, hear.)-It was decided that a commit- tee should view the road.

Advertising

leOTTERELL-Sl ,GB WALLPAPERS (\K OU2 l>ECCRATO FOL) TttE B" BOOKS. DR-OS L BRISTOL.