Collection Title: Brecon & Radnor express Carmarthen and Swansea Valley gazette and Brynmawr district advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 7 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
45 articles on this page
No title

•What shall I have for tea is a question asked 'by many a housewife, and below we give a num- ber of recipes for dainty dishes which may help to solve the difficulty

FRUIT SALAD j

FRUIT SALAD. This is a delicious ditili when prepared with several varieties of fruits. either stewed or tinned, such as prunes, valencia raisins, sliced apples (steamed), apricots, pineapple', bananas, glaci cherries, raspberries, etc., nicely arranged in a bowl with the syrups from the fruit, ami decorated with blanched almoiuls, small piles of whipped er-am or squares of coloured jelly. The salad or compote may be served with custard, cream, or as an accompaijirneut to iblanc-mange.

FRUIT JELLY

FRUIT JELLY. Take a lemon jelly and line the mould with the chosen fruit; pour in a few tablespoonfuls of the jelly and allow to set. Continue the fruit -and jelly (allowing each to Bet before another layer is put in the mould), until the mould is full. Turn out and decorate with blanched almonds.

APPLES IN RED JELLY

APPLES IN RED JELLY. 6 appl'es. 6oz. loaf sugar. 2 cloves. 1 pt. boiling water. Rind of one lemon. 1 packet of apple jelly. Peel and core the apples, place them in a rtewpan large enough to allow them to stand iside by side, pour over them the hot water in which the sugar has been previously dissolved, and add lemon rind and cloves. Cover and stew very gently until the apples are tender, (but do not allow them to fall), then remove them. Strain the syrup and use for the jelly instead of water. Place the apples in a glass dish and pour the jelly round, and allow to set.

BIRDS NESTI

BIRD'S NEST. I 6oz. flour. 3oz sugar 3oz. butter. 1 egg. I A little milk. I Flavouring. Mix the dry ingredients together, rub in the butter, and make into a soft paste with the milk and flavouring; put the mixture into a well-greased border mould, and bake twenty to thirty minutes. Turn out, spread over some apricot jam, sprinkle over chopped pistachio .kernels to represent moss, and fill with blanc- mange eggt.

BLANCMANCE ECCS I

BLANC-MANCE ECCS. I Prepare a pint of blanc-mange (either from powder or cornflour), any flavour that is pre- ferred. Previously get ready some empty egg ehelle, soaking them in cold water, and fill them with the blanc-menge after it is made. When cold, anti quite firm, peel off the shelle, and fill' the nest. The shells may be saved from the eggs 11600 for puddings, etc., after being well cashed, and allowed to drain.

TO LINE A MOULD WITH JELLY I

TO LINE A MOULD WITH JELLY. I Rinse the mould first with hot water, then with cold, and place inside it a much smaller .one. Fill up the space between the moulds with jelly, let it set, pour a little hot water inside the small mould, and gently lift it out. Your mould will then be evenly lined throughout, and may be filled with fruit or cream.

PRUNE CHARLOTTEI

PRUNE CHARLOTTE. I Rins« a mould with cold water, line it with savoy biecuite split in halves (curved portion of the biscuit against the mould) and jelly as above. Put in a cool place to 6et. Stew some prunes with sugar, and allow to cool. Drain off the syrup and .stone the fruit. Fill the cavity in the j elly- Lined mould with closely-packed prunes. Looses, the edges of the i c- I I v n nd turn carefully on to a dish. Pour the syi i: from the fruit round and decorate with the kernels from the stones. Serve with custard or cream.

FIG MOULII

FIG MOULI). I lib. figtL 6oz. sugar. loz. leaf gelatin. I 1 lemon. I 1 pint of water. I Cut the figs into small pieces, put them into a eftewpan, with the water, sugar, juice, and thinly-cut rind of the lemon, and simmer until tender. Dissolve the gelatine in three table- spoonfuls of water, add it to the Test of the in- jfredients, and pour the mixture into a wetted mould. Serve with cream or custard.

0I LEMON SPONCE

0 I LEMON SPONCE. ■i pint water. 1 oz. castor sugar. i oz. leaf gel&tme. I 1 lemon. I 1 white of egg. I Heat the water, sugar, gelatine, and thinly-cut lemon rind together, stir until the gelatine ia dissolved, then strain, and when nearly cool add to the white of egg and lemon juice previously mixed in a large basin. Whisk all together until stiff, then pile on a dish, .and, if liked, colour the last portion with car- mine or cochineal, and place it on the top. If preferred, the sponge may be set in a mould rinsed with cold water, and turned out when Arm.

APRICOT TRIFLEI

APRICOT TRIFLE. 1 tin of apricots. ;j- pint of cream. 1 tabls. castor sugar. 1 tabls. lemon juice. 2 penny sponge cakes. 1 tablespoonful blanched almonds. Angelica. Strain the apricots and boil the syrup and sugar together for quarter of an hour. Cut the cake into half-inch slices and place them in a dish. Pour the fruit and syrup over the cake and leave in a cold place for an hour. Whip the cream and pile on top of the fruit and decorate with the almonds and angelica. (Rich euetard may be used instead of cream if desired.)

A FLOATINC ISLAND

A FLOATINC ISLAND. Half-fill a dish with rich custard; then place in the centre a round slice of stale sponge cake, covered with any red jelly, then a smaller round ■of cake, with apricot jam; alternately place the rounds of cake, each smaller than the last, and' sweetmeats of varied colours till you form a pyramid. Whip 6weetened cream for the summit.

SANDWICH CAKE I

SANDWICH CAKE. I 1 cupful of flour. 1 cupful of castor sugar. 2 eggs. 2ozs. butter. 1 teaspoonful bak- ing powder. Essence of lemon. A large variety of cakes can be made from the above recipe by cutting into different shapes. different fillings, such as lemon cheese, vanilla cream, jam, or Viennese butter; also by different icings and decorations.

LEMON CHEESEI

LEMON CHEESE. I lib. sugar. 1 cupful of lemon juice. I 3oz. butter. 3 eggs. I Place the lump sugar, butter, beaten eggs, and lemon juice into a jar; place jar in a pan of I water, and cook until the mixture thickens.

VANILLA CREAM I

VANILLA CREAM. I 2oz. flour. 2oz. sugar. loz. butter. 1 egg and 1 extra yolk. I Pinch of salt. Vanilla essence. Half pint of milk. I Put all the ingredients, except the milk, into pan, mix well together with a wooden spoon till quite smooth, add the milk, and place on fire. Stir constantly until the mixture boils, .and continue to cook with constant stirring about three minutes.

VIENNESE BUTTER ICING I

VIENNESE BUTTER ICING. I ?)z. icing sugar. 2oz. butter. j Flavouring. I Beat butter and eugar to a cream, add the favouring, coffee, lemon, orange, rose, etc., pre- ferred (about one tablespoonful if juice of fruit be used; if essence is used, fLavour to taste, then *dd one teaspoonful of cold water). This butter icing makes a very rich filling for cakes. Also -very dainty are small round sweet biscuits, the tinder-side of one covered with raspberry jam, a thin layer of the icing put on another, and the two placed together—icing and jam. They can then be coated with plain sugar icing and "decorated according to fancy. »

Advertising

There's a oharrm about "ExpreeB" printing. Tim W.

IKnighton Guardians I

I Knighton Guardians. THE HEATING APPARATUS. BELGIAN WOUNDED. I At Knighton Board of Guardians on Tuesday, I Mr J. R. Bache,.J.P., presided. A Seasonable Generosity. I The master reported that there were 40 inmates in the house as compared with 50 for the same period of last year. Mr W. Green-Price had kindly sent a cheque, for providing extras for the children. The chairman expressed the thanks of the board to Mr Green-Price for his kindness. A report was read from Mr Wellings-Thomas, architect, Llandrindod Wells, who had been ap- pointed to superintend the installation of the heating apparatus. The report stated that the whole of the work done had been completed with the exception of the disinfector, which could not be obtained at present. Mr Wellings Thomas had also given instructions for the addition of a few minor details.—The report was considered satis- factory, and adopted. The clerk reported that all the wounded Belgian soldiers had now left the childrens' block at Offa's Lodge f four had gone to the front, one to the hos- pital and the remaining five were being boarded and lodged at houses in the town. Mr W. Green Price Are there any more likely to come in? The Chairman Yes; after Christmas. Tenders. I Tenders for three months' supplies were accept. ed as follow :—Coal, Highley cobbles, 19/10 per ton, The Radnorshire Coal Co., Ltd. petroleum, -61 8s per cask of 42 gallons, Messrs. Meanley and Pugh; milk, 4d per quart, Mr W. Williams, Up. per Woodhouse; meat, beef, 8fd. mutton, 9!d per lb., Mr William Jones, Broad street; linoleum, 3/6 per yard, Messrs. Clee and Sons; bread, 5Jd. per loaf, cake 2d per lb., flour, 14/9 per sack, and other groceries, Mr J. L. Allcock.

FRIENDS SUNDAY SCHOOL I

FRIENDS' SUNDAY SCHOOL. I CHRISTMAS ENTERTAINMENT AT THE I SPA. The principal public entertainments at Llan- drindod Wells on Christmas Night were The Kino (where Mr Hands had a special show) and the annual entertainment of the Friends' Sunday School at the Albert Hall. Mr Morgan Morris presided at the latter place, and there was a good attendance. The programme was as follows :— Part I. Pianoforte solo, "Polonaise," Miss E. Bentley, L.R.A.M.; anthem, "Break Forth," Sunday School Party; solo, "Return to Thy Home," Miss M. Greenwood; duet, "Come, sing to me," Miss G. Jones and Miss M. Grind- lev; violin solo (encored), Mr George Evans; solo, "Robin's Song," Miss Evelyn Jones; action Bong, "Good-night," Children's Party; solo, "Come, sing to me," Miss W. Sherbourne; reci- tation, "English Lads," Master W. Greenwood; quartette, "You know what my heart is now say- ing," Mr J. Sherbourne, Supt. R. Jones, and Misses G. Jones and M. Grindley; dialogue, "Out of debt, out of danger" (in character), Mrs Greenwood, Miss Baker, Miss M. Grindley, Messrs. H. Crowther, D. Binyon, S. Pugh, W. Lloyd, T. J. Cross and A. Adey. Part II. Pianoforte solo, Miss Rebo James; anthem, "Glad tidings," School Party; solo, "There is a land," Mrs T. Cross; recitation, "In preparation of the invasion," Miss V. Burton; duet, "Where my caravan has rested," Misses E. and C. Bent- ley; action song, Quakeresses," big girls' class; pianoforte solo, "Valsette (A Mdlle. Natalie Jonotha), Master E. Binyon; trio, "A bird in hand" (in character), Misses G. Jones, R. J. James and M. Grindley; recitation, "The alarm," Mr C. M. Binyon; anthem, "Onward," Sunday School Party; dialogue, "Minding his own wife's business" (in character), Mrs Pritchard, Miss Baker, Miss V. Burton, Miss G. Jones, Miss M. Grindley, Messrs. H. Crowther and A. Adey; National Anthems, by the children. The choir was conducted by Mr John James, and the children's action songs were prepared by Mr G. Lloyd Hughes and Miss R. J. James. The accompanists were Mr Lloyd Hughes, Miss E. Bentley, L.R.A.M., Miss R. J. James and Miss Rebe James. The programme was well-sustained throughout, and the chairman delivered an excel- lent address at the commencement of the proceed- ings. The usual vote of thanks was passed to the chairman, on the motion of Mr C. M. Binyon, seconded by Mr H. D. Phillips. The profits were shared between the Sunday School and the local War Relief Fund.

iCHRISTMAS AT LLANDRINDOD WELLS I

CHRISTMAS AT LLANDRINDOD WELLS. I The various services at Holy Trinity Church were well-attended, and the singing was of the high order invariably associated with the name of Mr W. H. Dean. The church was nicely de- corated. Services were also held at the several Free Churches; and, at the Weslcyan Church, the Rev. J. Reeves Brown gave an able and most interesting address on Christmas. Delight- ful entertainments were provided at the hospitals for the wounded soldiers and the Belgian re- fugees by local artistes, whilst other local singers went out to assist in entertainments at coun- try chapels.

I CAROLS AT BEULAH I

I CAROLS AT BEULAH. I I PARTY'S EFFORT FOR WAR FUND. Whilst the young men of Beulah an d district have responded very well to their country's call, those, who are left at home and unable to join the colours just yet, have been doing their s hare ot duty this Christmas by way of getting proceeds towards the War Fund. A Carol Party was formed, and a veteran musician appointed as conductor in the person of Mr W. Davies, Twynyrhaul. On Christ- mas eve the Pqrty-r-ome sixteen in number-set out on a circuit of the district, giving the inhabitants of the district quite a musical treat, until they had obtained the handsome sum of jE7 lis. Too great praise cannot he given the conductor, 'Mr Davies, a man well on in years, who carried out his duties full of zeal and good humour to the end of the circuit. COMPETITIVE CONCERT. I To further augment the fund a Competitive Concert was held Boxing Day at the Reading Room, Beulah. There was a crowded house. Rev. J. Y. Evans, vicar, was chairman and the duties of adjudicators were efficiently carried out by Mr Rhys Thomas, Dole-craig-llyn, Doldowlod (mukic), and Mr T. D. Griffiths, School House, Beulah (recitations). Miss Evans, Vicarage, was the accompanist. The following were the successful competitors :— Open recitation, Miss S. Morgan, Esgairdafydd Llanwrtyd duett, Messrs H. Richards and T Evans, Llanwrtyd quartette, Messrs Thomas an friends, Llanwrtyd open solo, Mr W. Evans, Maesgwaelod, Llanwrtyd; party of 8 voices, An- gylion," Llanwrtyd Party, conducted by Mr H. Richards. The following also contributed to the programme Songs, Messrs W. Davies (opening solo), Rhys Thomas, and Henry Richards, Misses Phillis Arthur and Mary J. Graham. Recitations, Mr Cyril Jones and Miss Phillis Arthur; also selections by the choir under the leadership of Mr W. Davies. All items were highly appreciated. The duties of treasurer and secretary were dis- charged respectively by Mr M. Thomas, Tycomel, and Mr Cyril Jones, Dolderwydd. The treasurer hopes to be able to send a sum of about £11 towards the War Fund.

GERMANS CRY FOR MERCY I

GERMANS CRY FOR MERCY. I Lance-Corporal Jack Danton, of the 2nd Royal West Surrey Regiment, now at home wounded, gives the following description of a bayonet charge made by the regiment near Ypres, in con- junction with the Gordon Highlanders and South Wales Borderers. Six hundred Germans were captured and many killed and wounded. "We went for the Germans like madmen. As we approached them many exclaimed 'Mercy, mercy We don't wish to hurt the good Eng- lish It was a horrible sight to see them fall- ing before our bayonets. I had a narrow escape. I had just killed one German, when another made a thrust at me, and I only fell down in time. Some of the Germans did not want to fight, but their officers were flourishing their ewords be- hind them, threatening to kill the man who turn. ed back."

I Boxing Day Eventi

I Boxing Day Event. I INTERESTING COMPETITIONS. I The 23rd annual Boxing Day Eisteddfod was held at the Albert Hall, Llandrindod Wells, on Boxing Day, but in consequence of the exceptional circumstances, the programme was of a less am- bitious character than usual. The presidents were Councillor Tom Norton and Mr Edward Jenkins, J.P., and the other officials as follows hon. sees., Mr R. M. Morgan, B.A., and Mr 0. E. Hughes; treasurer, Mr John Powell; accom- panists, Mr G. Lloyd Hughes, Miss Gwladys Jones, and Miss Myfanwy Hughes: adjudicators music, Mr Alfred P. Morgan (Builth); literature, Messrs. John Phillips and H. D. Phillips; draw- ings, Miss Ida Humphreys, B.A.; conductor, Bev. Stephen George, B.A.

I AFTERNOON SESSION

AFTERNOON SESSION. The afternoon session was' commenced by Mr R. E. Davies rendering an eisteddfod song. Mr G. Baillie presided in the absence of Coun- cillor Norton (who was kept away by indisposi- tion), and delivered a pleasant speech, in course of which he said it was a very good thing this Eisteddfod had been carried on as usual. He hoped that at the 1915 Eisteddfod there would be songs of peace and songs of victory. (Applause.) This was the 23rd year in the life of this Eistedd- fod, and much of its success in past years had been due to the enthusiasm and energy of Messrs. Jeffrey Jones and Edward Jenkins. (Applause.) Miss Alice Collev followed with a solo. Children's action song (own selection), 1, Friends' Sunday school party, conducted by Mr G. Lloyd Hughes.—The adjudicator said the party knew how to sing, how to act, and how to dance. They had done their work exceedingly well. Solo for children (under 10), "If I were a beau- tiful twinkling star," 1, Miss Nellie Davies (Builth Wells.) The adjudicator said he was delighted with the rendering. She had a nice little voice, and was quite in sympathy with the piece. Open solo for ladies (between 15 and 20), 1, Miss Annie Jones, Geufron, Nantmel. The adju- dicator said she was decidedly the best. She had given a good rendering of the song selected. Com- menting on the other competitors, Mr Morgan said two of them had got out of tune, and in two instances the songs were too much for the com- petitors. They had good voices, particularly two of them, and one (Miss Squires) was a very nice singer, with very good enunciation. Mr Thomas's choir followed with a couple of choice selections, which were heartily cheered. Drawing a sketch, open to boys or girls, under 16, 1, John William Lewis, Grove Villa, Knigh- ton. The adjudicator (Miss Humphreys) said se-,en drawings had been sent in for competition. Most of the competitors were young, but the work on the whole was good. The one sent in by "Winter" was undoubtedly best, and "Young beginner" and "Hands off" were next in order of merit. Solo for girls, under 15, "The Blind Girl," 1, Gwenllian Edwards, Llether, Newbridge-on- Wve; 2, Hilda Mason, The Green, Newbridge-on- Wye. The adjudicator said the winner was quite a finished singer, and sung as if she had been at it for many years. She was decidedly the best, and would be difficult to beat. The rendering of the second prize-winner was also very creditable in- deed. A capital rendering of "The Trumpeter" was then given by Mr David S. Jones (Brynawel). Recitation for children under 16, 1, Eva Davies, Pontardulais: 2, Gwenllian Edwards, Llethr, Newbridge-on-Wye.—Mr J. Phillips said they were both good reciters, but the winner had re- cited correctly, whereas the second had omitted two lines. Recitation for chilrden under 8, 1, Miss M. Ellen Eadie (Bijiltli Wells). Pianoforte solo for children under 16, "Petit Mazurka," 1, Master Tom Brain (Llandrindod Wells); 2, Miss Gwenllian Edwards (Newbridge- on-Wye).—The adjudicator said he was 'very pleased with the three competitors. All had done creditably, but the winner stood cut prominently. He had a good, firm touch; and was crisp and ac- curate throughout, and was steady in time. The second was a little unsteady at the start. A vote of thanks was passed to the President on the motion of Mr W. Thomas, seconded by Mr T. L. Vaughan, C.C. Children's choirs, "Mountain Melodies," 1, Llandrindod Wells juvenile choir (conductor, Mr T. L. James.)—The adjudicator said they had given a very pleasing rendering, and the voices were very sweet. Solo for boys (under 15), "The Minstrel Boy," 1, Douglas Morgan Williams, Cross House, Llan- wrtyd Wells. The adjudicator said the lad had sung very well indeed, and his only regret was that he had not learned all the verses. Evening Session. I In the evening, Mr Arthur Edwards opened the proceedings with an eisteddfod song, "Long live the King." Contralto solo, "Friend," 1, Miss Edwards, Newbridge-on-Wye. The adjudicator said they had had three excellent competitors on a difficult solo. Each had done creditably. The first, who was also the winner, had an excellent, real, full contralto voice; her phrasing and words were good, and she threw her whole soul into the per- formance. The second wa.s a good contralto voice, but of a, lighter class. Her phrasing was good, but not equal to that of the first. No. 3 (Miss Annie Jones) had an excellent voice, and her rendering was very good. The voice, however, was not equal on this occasion to the first, and the first singer was just a little way in front. (Applause.) Mr D. S. Jones followed with a solo. Quartet, "Tra bo Dau," 1 and 2, divided be- tween Mr H. Morris and party and Mr Granville Davies and party, both of Llandrindod Wells. These prizes were given by Mr E. Jenkins (Gwalia.)—The adjudicator said he had had a difficult task. Neither party sung in tune. Both parties were fairly equally balanced. The voices of the second party were rather fuller, and the fairest thing he could do was to divide the prize. (Applause.) Presidents Reminiscences. I The President (Mr E. Jenkins) indulged in some interesting reminiscences of early eistedd- fodau and concerts held at Llandrindod Wells, stating that the first of the present series of Box- ing Day Eisteddfodau was held at the Assembly Room in 1891, when Mr Jeffrey Jones and him- self were the secretaries. Earlier eisteddfods were held, one on the Recreation ground and one on the site of Park Crescent, but these were or- ganised by visitors. One of the best concerts ever held at Llandrindod Wells was a professional con- cert at the opening of the Assembly Rooms. Tenor solo, "Be thou faithful unto death," 1, Mr T. L. James. The adjudicator said the win- ner had sung well, and was very worthy of the prize. (Applause.) Soprano solo, "The Cuckoo on the Birch Tree," 1, Miss Squires, Llandrindod Wells. Mr Thomas's ladies choir here interspersed two selections, which were immensely enjoyed by the audience. Adult recitation, "The Owl Critic," 1, Miss C. Thomas (Dolau, Llanfihangel Rhvdithon), now of The Emporium, Llindrindod Wells.-Mr J. Phil- lips said they had had an excellent recitation, and Miss Thomas was very deserving of the prize. Bass or baritone solo, "Y Milwr Clwvfiedia," 1, Mr Powell Jones (Llandrindod Wells).—Mr A. P. Morgan said the competition had been a very close one, but one was slightly better than the other. Both had good voices, and they both lack- ed in the same way. They both lacked finish, and both had made the same slips in notes and in time, but not many of them. The last singer, he felt, gripped the song somewhat better and put more soul into it, and it was for that reason he had given him the prize. (Applause.) The other competitor was Mr R. P. Gouph, junr. A brief address was given by one of the Belgians, a large party of whom were present by special in- vitation. The gentleman had a great reception, and subsequently at his request, the audience joined in the singing of the National Anthem. Mr D. Jones followed with a couple of songs ex- cellently rendered, and loudly cheered. There were three competitors on the test for im- promptu reading, and the winner was Miss Owens, Rose Villa, Tremont road. Mr H. D. Phillips said the three had done excellently, but the win- ner was more correct and caught the spirit of the story better. Male voice quartet, "Massa's in de cold ground," 1, Mr Davies (Penybont) and party.—The adju- dicator said they had given a very good rendering, and the blend was very nice. They had certainly deserved the prize offered. Special choral contest, 12 mixed voices, The Marseillaise," 1, Llandrindod Wells party, con- ducted by Mr R. E. Davies.—The adjudicator said this spirited anthem had been sung very well by the choir. They had gripped the thing with all their souls, and given a very creditable rendering. (Cheers.) Thanks were accorded to the President, the soloists, the choir, the accompanists, ana the ad- judicators; and a very successful day was brought to a close with the National Anthems of the Allies.

IHAY GUARDIANSI

I HAY GUARDIANS. I I THE BUILTH CONFERENCE. I Rev. W. E. T. Morgan (chairman) presided at Hay guardians' meeting on Thursday. Others piesent were Mrs Crichton, Mrs Parry, Rev. Leigh Spencer, and Messrs. J. Davies (vice-chair- man), E. George, T. J. Stokoe, J. W. Jones, J. R. Griffiths, W. V. Pugh, Charles Butcher, J. Jonos, D. P. Powell, E. i Charles Butcher, J. Jones, D. F. Powell, E. D. Weaver, and R. T. Griffiths (clerk). The clerk read the minutes of the Builth con- ference, sent by the Clerk of Builth Board of Guardians. Mr John Davies observed that they attended the conference, and met several competent men, who had had a great deal to do with the administration of Poor-Law Orders. They all disagreed with the Order so far as they were asked to provide for able-bodied men, believing they should be made to earn their living. The Order, so far, had proved a failure, and the conference would not re- commend the establishment of way-stations. They were, however, bound to carry out the Order, be- cause it came from the Local Government Board. jLney couia not stop young people going on the road, neither could they be kept out of difficul- ties. This class of men used to be in the urban areas, but now, through the new Order, they would find them in the rural districts, and every- where about the country-side, having a jolly good time, especially in the summer time. He had en- quired into the work of the Local Government Board during the past five years, and he was astonished at the numerous Orders that had been passed, and how the work of officials had been multiplied. He would not have been surprised if their clerk had applied for an increase of salary, and it was impossible, in his opinion, for them to carry out the Orders of the Local Government Board and keep down the rates. Mr J. W. Jones said the Hay delegates attend- ed the conference at Builth, but did not get all things all their own way there. Those present pointed out that it was futile to protest a.gainst the Order, but this had not altered his views on tho matter. They also pointed out the spueriority of the Local Government Board, and that they would have to submit to their authority. Nothing favourable to the Order was said at the meeting, although tl conference agreed it would have to be carried out. He would now suggest to the Board that they carry out the Order at Hay till the end of the three months specified in a. previous resolution. Rev. Leigh Spencer said that the resolution at Builth conference was carried unanimously, ac- cording to the communication received by their clerk from the Builth Clerk. Mr J. W. Jones observed .that the Hay dele- gates had. to some extent, fallen into line with the other delegates, but he (himself) did not vote. Therefore, the resolution was not carried unani- mously. The Hay delegates were also under the impression the word "protest" was to be includ- ed in the resolution. Rev. Leigh Spencer said the majority of the members of that Board favoured the carrying out of the Order, and, perhaps, it would be wise to rescind the resolution that was passed against that course. The chairman said that the board was in an awkward position at present, as the conference had decided that they had no option but to carry out the Order. Eventually, the members agreed to adopt the Order on the 1st prox. Rev. Leigh Spencer reported that he visited the workhouse on the 15th inst. and found every- thing satisfactory. The tender of Mrs James for the supply of meat for the "house" was accepted, as also was that of Mrs Harries for bread. There was an increase of id per lb. in the meat. I

PATRIOTIC CONCERT

PATRIOTIC CONCERT. BUILTH ROAD CHILDREN'S EFFORT. I Pupils of Pencerrig School. Builth Road, gave a patriotic concert at the Iron Room, Builth Roadi on the 16th inst. Rev. J. L. Bryans, M.A., R.D., presided over a crowded audienoe. The accompani- ments were played by Mr E. T. Jones (headmaster), and Miss S. J Edwards (assistant teacher). The children did their respective parts in an excellent manner reflecting great credit on the headmaster and teachers who taught them. Appended is the programme :—Pianoforte solo, National Airs," Miss Lucy Lewis; chorus, British Grenadiers," School Choir; song, Hearts of Oak," Master Jas. Davies (dressed in naval uniform); recitation, "Mrs Binks," Miss Maggie Williams chorus, "God bless the Prince of Wales." Infants; sketch, An awkward case," Girls and Boys; song, "Jennettee and Jeanot," Miss Mildred Evanson; recitation, A straight question," Miss Gertie Williams (dressed as a Red Cross nurse) ursery rhymes, "Someone," Infants; recitation, Girl guides song," Misses M. Wood, Milia Rice, Annie Middleton, and Irene Jones chorus, "Red, White and Blue," Standards II and III; pianoforte solo, Wandering, in the Woods," Miss Gladys Price chorus, "Rule Brittania," Stand- ars IV, V and VI; recitation, "Avenged," Mas- ter Harry Evans (nephew of Lambert Tidman Evans, a victim of H.M.S. "Monmouth"); song, "Go to battle," Master J. Davies; drill, "National Flags," girls; recitation, "A child and the war," Master Jas. Evans; song, "Minstrel Boy," Miss Susie Evans; recitation, "Red, White and Blue," infants; chorus, "Cossacks' war parting; choir; dialogue, "Welcome," infants; solo and chorus, "Land of my Fathers," Master Ronald Davies (in Welsh), and Miss Unis Field was attired in Welsh costume; and finale, "God save the King." All the items were rendered in character. The chorus, "Rule Brittania," concluded with a tab- leux, depicting Brittania and her naval and mili- tary defenders. The event was in every way a success, the au- dience loudly applauding the artistes. A sum of over £4 was realised, which is to be devoted to purchasing materials to make articles, &c., for the soldiers and sailors.

TEME COUNCILII

TEME COUNCIL. I BUCKNELL WATER SUPPLY. I At this Council last Tuesday, Mr P. Mor- ris Matthews presided. The clerk said he wrote to the gentleman who conducted the enquiry at Shrewsbury, with regard to the amalgamation of Medical Officers' districts in Shropshire, and stated the council's reasons for wishing to remain outside the proposed scheme. He had received a reply, stating that the clerk's letter would be incorporated in the official report to the Local Government Board. A copy of the Salop Medical Officer's annual report had come to hand, and the attention of the Council was drawn to a number of matters therein, among others being the Bucknell water supply. Rev. E. W. Brown said he had been informed by a person living in Bucknell that he bad no water in his house, and that the water obtained from the pumps was very muddy. The chairman said there was plenty of water at Bucknell, and they liad plenty of expenses to meet at the present time. Bucknell men had answered the call to arms very well, and if there were two or three disagreeable persons, who wanted some- thing extra with regard to the present water sup- ply, these must wait while they looked after the men who were fighting their battles at the front. Rev. E. W. Brown asked if something could not be done to make the road from the Anchor to Bettws more suitable for traffic, and after dis- cussion, the surveyor was instructed to do what he thought advisable for the improvement of the road without having the steam roller.

I S AND SFA

I S. AND S.F.A. I HOSPITALITY AT PRESTEIGN. I CHRISTMAS ENTERTAINMENT. On Saturday afternoon an entertainment, given by the members of the local Soldiers' and Sailors' Families' Association, to the families of Presteign men serving with the Forces, was held in the As- sembly Rooms. The president of the association is the Hon. Mrs Cleg Hill, of Greenfield, the vice-president Mrs J. S. Arkwright, of Kinsham Court, Presteign, and the hon. secretary Mrs Drage, of Rhodd, Presteign, and these ladies, as- sisted by other ladies of the town and district, carried out the admirable arrangements which I were made for the entertainment. The room was decorated with flags and bunting, and presented a charming appearance, the work of decoration be- ing undertaken by the Rev. H. L. Kewley and others, whilst much assistance was rendered by Mr J. T. Price and Mr H. J. Sparey. Tea, pro- vided by the association, with the help of other ladies and gentlemen of the town and district, was served at four o'clock, the wants of the guests being attended to by numerous ladies. Af- ter tea, there were selections from a gramaphone, kindly lent by Mr J. T. Price, and a Christmas tree, kindly provided by Mrs Clegg Hill, and a fish-pool, provided by Mrs Russell, and Miss Holt added to the enjoyment of the entertainment. Af- ter the entertainment, the audience gathered to listen to speeches on the war. Mrs Simpson, of Nciton Vicarage, presided, and amongst those present were Sergt. Russell, of Bryane Ground, Mrs Drage. the Hon. Mrs Clegg Hiil, Miss Holt, Mrs Russell, Mrs Brydges Moberley, Mrs Stack, Mrs Whitmore Green-Price, etc. Sergt. Russell, who was warmly received, then addressed the meeting on the subject of the nation's need of more men for the army, pointing out that the very existence of the Empire depend ed on the manhood of this country responding to their country's call in this the greatest crisis in t')e history of the nation. (Applause.) Mr Charles Millichamp proposed a vote of thanks to Mrs Drage, and the other ladies with her, who had invited them to this entertainment. No one had taken greater interest in the move- ments of our men who had joined the forces, and in their wives and families, than had Mrs Drage, and their hearty thanks were due to her and to those ladies who had assisted her for their kind- ness. (Applause.) The vote was carried with enthusiasm. The proceedings then concluded with the sing- ing of the National Anthem.

KNIGHTON SOLDIERS FAMILIES I

KNIGHTON SOLDIERS' FAMILIES. I CHRISTMAS TREAT. I On Monday a tea organised by the Knighton Urban Council, with the assistance of a com- mittee of ladies and gentlemen, was given in the Drill Hall, to the wives and children of the men who have left Knighton to join the Army. The ladies, who assisted were, Mrs Probert, Miss Mor- ris, Mrs J. A. K. Griffiths, Miss Edwards (Here- ford), Mrs Allcock, Miss Dove, Mrs Blower, Mrs Boote, Miss Jones and Miss Claxton (The Cot- tage.) Music was supplied by Mrs Harold Mat- thews, Miss Blower and Miss Ruth Medlicott, and was much enjoyed. Mr Blower (chairman of the Council) expressed the pleasure it gave the committee to meet so many of the families of the brave men who had gone to serve their country. They were proud of the men, and in years to come, these children would look back with pride and joy on the noble self-sacrificing conduct of their fathers.—Mrs Boote distributed a quantity of toys among the children, and Mr Fred Hamer gave to all a cor- dial invitation to his picture-show.

IN BRECON I

IN BRECON I EVERY CLAIM IS BACKED BY LOCAL I TESTIMONY. If the reader wants stronger proof than the following statement and experience of a resident of Brecon, what can it be? Mrs P. Hughes, of 9, John street, near the In- fantry Barracks, Watton, Brecon, says :—"I was subject to symptoms of kidney trouble, on and off for some time. My back was painful, and there was a puffiness under the eyes. I felt tired and languid, and lacked energy for doing any- thing. But I am pleased to say since taking Doan's hackacle kidney pills I have been very much bet- ter in every way. I feel altogether brighter and better now, and I recommended Doan's pills-to any who have symptoms of kidney disorder. (Signed) P. Hughes." lhe whole body sjjffere when the kidneys are congested, for then the human drainage system is obstructed. The kidneys filter the blood, -md drain off poisonous solids and liquid waste, which if re- tained cause dropsy, rheumatism, gout, sciatica, stone, bladder, inflammation, etc. And it is in these ailments that Doan's pills are so- successful, for they remedy the cause, the weakened kidneys. Price 2/9 a box, 13/9, of all dealers, or from Foster-McClellan Co., 8, Wells street, Oxford street, London, W. Don't ask for backache or kidney pills—ask DISTINCTLY for DOAN'S backache kidney pills, the same as Mrs Hughes had.

WORTH READING I 1

WORTH READING. I 1 BEAUTY. i "To appreciate beauty fully," says a writer on art subjects, "one must labour to produce it. It is not enough to rocognise it. It is necessary to co-operate with Nature in making it poto- sible." It is another form of the kindergarten maxim, Wc- leirri by doing." The trained hand and eye wiU help the brain in ways that the one who has learnt all that he knows from books cannot appreciate. I A FEW DON'TS. I Don't lose interest in the affairs of the day. Don't bore people by talking of good times gone by. Don't try to persuade yourself that you look younger than you are. Don't think you know everything because of your experience. I POINTS WORTH NOTING. That those who are always minding other a tie's business cannot possibly have time to look properly after their own. That though there arc times when it is wise to epeak, there are a. great many more times when it is wiser not to. That if charity has a disinclination to begin at home it should at least be made to visit there occasionally. That people who slander other people very rarely know the truth about them, and if they did they wouldn't tell it. SKILL. I This little word has to do with everybody s success in life. It means something which is needed before any employment can be done pro- perly and something which is only to be had by patience, and a resolve not to without it. The little word is skill. Many great works, such as paintings or poems, can only be done by persons who have the gift of genius. Genius falls to the lot of few; but to have skill in our daily work is within the reach of everyone. It is simply this, the art of doing whatever we have to do in the best manner ? which it can be done. in the be-st cianiier :?i i?,hic i i it can be done.

Advertising

THE GREAT SKIN CURE. BUDDEN'S S.R. SKIN OINTMENT will cure Itching after one application, destroys every form of Eczema; heals old Wounds and Sores acts like a charm on Bad Legs is infallible for Files Prevents Cuts from Festering will cure Ringworm in a few days removes the most obsti- nate Eruptions and Scurvy. Boxes 7id and l/lid. —Agents for Brecon, Mr Stanton and Mr Morris, High Street, Chemists; Builth Wells, W. Price & Co.: Llandovery, J. Nicholas, Chemist; Hay, J. L. Davies and Son; Talgarth, J. Parry, Chemist; Crickhowell, Mr Harris, Chemist; Brynmawr, Mr Evans, Chemist; Knighton, Mr Perkins, Chemist, Pontardulais, Mr Jones, Chemi.st. b987

No title

*These columns are freely open to the venitij atio-n of any matter of public in- terest, local or general. Offensive personalities or abusive epithets are, however, rigidly excluded. Every communication must be dluJy and pro- periy authenticated. In oases where amonymity is desired, the writer must privately amd confidently furnish the Editor with his name and address, as a guarantee of good faith. The Editor cannot undertake to return any rejected oommunioation. Letters received on the Saturday preceding the week of publication are more likely to be inserted than those arrivinc later.

I LLYSWEN FATALITY

I LLYSWEN FATALITY. Sir,- \Vith reference to the inquest on the un- fortunate bricklayer, may I, as the architect, say that my duties comprised neither the preparation ot a specification, nor the superirtendence of the construction of the building.—Your faithfully, JAMES GUNTER. Glasbury, Dec. 22, 1914. J A:\IlS GTJNTER.

INTEMPERANCE I

INTEMPERANCE Sir, May I, very respectfullv, contradict the statement made by Miss Rosina Davies that "England's greatest danger to-day is drink." There can be no foundation for such a statement. A few people, whom I cannot but look upon as faddists, do hold that the exces- sive consumption of alcoholic drink is the great- est danger in this country to-day. Rather would I agree to say that intemperance is one of the greatest dangers we have to face. I would explain to my readers that, by intemperance, I would mean not only intemperate drinking, but love of excess in other directions as well. I am very much afraid that the troubles ii-hich we are call- ed upon to face at present, as a result of this aw- ful war, are being used by some extreme men as a cloak under which to press forward their schemes for the restriction of the liberty of the people, knowing that the country would not toler- ate them at any other time. I warn these people that the future will call them to aCCDunt.-Yours, I &c., A. G. HARRIES. I

WELSH TROOPS I

WELSH TROOPS. I Sir,-I shall be glad if you will kindly announce through your columns that it has been decided to raise a National Fund for Welsh Troops, in or- der to provide additional comforts for Welsh Regiments. Lady Plymouth has been elected pre- sident of the fund, and the following ladies form the Executive Committee :—Mrs Lloyd George (chairman), Lady Ninian Crichton-Stuart, the Hon. Miss Violet Douglas-Pennant. Lady Ed- wards, Mrs Ellis Griffith, Lady Herbert, Mrs Pryce Jones, Mrs Reginald McKenna, and' Lady Beatrice Armsby-Gore. Sir E. Vincent Evans will act as hon. treasurer, and Mr Wm. Lewis as hon. secretary. The committee is anxious that all Welsh regi- ments serving at home and a broad should be pro- vided with additional comforts, such as shirts, socks, mittens, Cardigan jackets, etc., also pipes, tobacco and cigarettes. All contributions of money and kind will be gratefully received by me at 11. Downing street, London, S.W.-Yours faithfully, M. LLOYD GEORGE, I Chairman of Committee. I

BORDERERS CHARGE I

BORDERERS' CHARGE I WITH THE LONDON SCOTTISH. t From Corporal W. Smith, clarionet-player in the band of the 2nd South Wales Borderers, who writes to Mr W. J. Hillborne, 16, Clifton street, Cardiff, we get an interesting account of the do- ings of that regiment. Corporal Smith, who has lost one of his feet, is now in St. George's Hos- pital, London. He says :— "It was pouring with rain, but we stuck it like men, firing a.s many shots as we could, as the Germans come in thousands. This went on for three hours, and then we silenced them and tried to get a sleep, but it was still raining and bitterly cold. At about four o'clock next morning we were given the order to stand to. No sooner did our lads put up their heads than they got killed. Our captain got killed there, and all my other company officers. In the end we got the order to retire, as General French was coming up with the 1st and 2nd Divisions to relieve us, although a day late. We were relieved by the London Scottish. Our regiment and the Scottish made a brilliant bayonet charge, driving the Germans out of our trenches. Our division was complimented on holding the trenches, and was told to go to a place near Ar- mentieres, twelve miles from the firing line, to have a week's rest. When our poor regiment mustered we were only 200 strong out of 1,200. Only 10 were left in my company out of 185. An- other man and myself were the only two left in our section." f

Housing Conferences

Housing Conferences. Housing reformers (so-called) persist in dis- cussing everything connected with housing ex- cept the most important question-the land. I have been reading the reports of some conferences held recently to discuss the housing question, and am left the impression that it is proposed to build houses without using land. No attention is paid to the amount of land in urban districts held out of use for speculation or caprice, or to the effect of this increasing the price of land. There is much discussion of the cost of building materials, but no hint that the price of them is increased by monopoly of the land from which they are pro- duced nor is attention devoted to the effect of taxation and rating of houses and other improve- ments in increasing the cost of housing accommo- dation. The opinion was expressed that in rural districts between 100,000 and 200,000 new cot- tages were urgently needed, but where are the agricultural labourers to get the money to pay for them so long as they are shut out from the land ? It takes some of these would-reformers a long time to realise that the real housing reformer is the land reformer.

I SERVING KING AND COUNTRY

I SERVING KING AND COUNTRY. I A CREDITABLE LIST. Posted on a board in the centre of Newbridge- on-Wye is the following list of men who are aerv- ing their King and country :-Thomas Bamsey, 1st Batt. Hereford Reg.; Joseph Champ, Shrop- shire L.I.; Thomas Collins, let Hereford Reg. Evan Davies, R.A.L.C. (T.F.); Horace Daven- port, Royal Lancashire Hussars; Albert Evans, 1st Batt. Hereford Reg.; Edward Evans, sergt., 1st Batt. South Wales Borderers; Thomas Evans, 1st Batt. Hereford Reg. William Fleetwood, Shropshire L.I.; John Hall, Shropshire L.I.: John Hodges, Shropshire L.I.; George Hughes, Shrop- shire L.I.; Ivor Hulbert, Shropshire L.I.; Arthur Jones, Shropshire L.I.; James Jones, Glamorgan Yeomanry (Res.); John Jones, Montgomery Yeo- manry (Res.); Stanley Jones, Rifle Brigade; Penry Jones, Royal Engineers: William Jones, 1st Batt. Hereford Reg.; William Kille, 1st Batt. Hereford Reg.; Charles Venables Llewelyn, lieut.-col., Glamorgan Yeomanry (Res.); John Venables Llewelyn, Royal Military College: Alb- ert Mabbrett, Shropshire L.I. Stanley Mason, 1st Batt. Hereford Reg. William Morris, Roval Garrison Artillery; Charles Phillips, Glamorgan Yeomanry; Thos. Pritchard, 1st Batt. Hereford Reg.; Geoffrey Rawstorne, capt.. Royal Lanca- shire Hussars; Thomas Stockton, 1st Batt. Here- ford Reg.; James Gibson-Watt, major, South Wales Borderers (Special Reserves) Michael Wardell, Royal Military College;; George Whit- tal, Shropshire L.I.; \Vynard WJiite, 1st Batt. Hereford Reg.; J. Barnard, Glamorgan Yeomanry (Res.); Llewelyn Jones, Glamorgan Yeomanry (Res.); E. Meredith, London Welsh; H. G. Meredith, R.A.M.C.

No title

There was sense in the reply of a Radnorshire lad to an idler who boasted about his ancient family. So much the worse for you," said the I youth, as we ploughmen say, "the older the seed, the worse the crop."

IBreconshire JP 11

I Breconshire J.P. 11 I HIRWAIN MOTOR FATALITY. I KNOCKED DOWN WHILE CROSSING ROAD. A distressing motor-car fatality took place at Hirwain on Sunday evening. Mr David Evans, J.P., of Merthyr road, Hirwain, an octogenarian, was knocked down by a passing car, and died shortly afterwards. It seems that the deceased gentleman was in the habit of visiting the house of the officiating minister at the local Methodist Church, and while crossing the road near the local Council School was knocked down by the car, which was coming from the direction of Aber- dare. Mr Evans sustained a fracture of the skull, and was rendered unconscious. He died an hour later without having recovered consciousness. News of the tragic occurrence was received with much regret in the neighbourhood, where the deceased gentleman was held in high es- teem. He was a justice of the peace for the county of Brecon, and a prominent member of the Methodist denomination. The car was proceeding in the direction of Car- marthenshire at the time of the accident

IA MOTHERS WORRIES

A MOTHER'S WORRIES. PATHETIC STORY FROM TREGOYD. CORONER'S INQUIRY. An inquest was held at Tregovd, on Saturday, by Mr W. Jones Williams deputy-coroner), touching the death of Elizabeth Winchester, wife of Henry Winchester, gamekeeper. Hon. R. C- Devereux was foreman of the jury. Henry Winchester said he had been out the pre- vious night, and arrived home about 12.35 a.m. The children had gone to bed, but his wife was sitting in the kitchen waiting for him. In the course of a brief conversation, she asked about her son, who was serving in the Yeomanry. She had two brothers also serving with the colours, and had been very depressed over her eon serving. He went out for a few minutes, and, on returning, his wife said "I have taken something to end all my troubles," and showed witness a glass ori the table. Deceased swooned, and fell on to the hearth-rug. Witness called his daughter, and got some salt and water to give deceased, but she could not take it. She said "good-bye," and "give my love to Henry." Witness, proceeding, said his wife had never threatened to take any- thing. He kept poison (for use at his work), but he always carried it with him. There was a solution of buck-thorn and arsenic in the pantry, but it had not been touched. She had been talk- ing very strange lately, and had said she would not live long. Dr. Jayne. who was telephoned for-, said when he arrived he found life extinct. There were no external marks. He came to the conclusion that death was from poisoning. The powder remain- ing in the glass looked like arsenic. Her phy- sical condition would cause her to be depressed and worried. Lizzie Winchester, daughter, said when she was called by her father she came down at onc.e.. and found her mother lying on the hearth-rug. She asked her if she could get anything, and she re- plied, "No, thank you." Whilst witness was in bed, her mother came into the room and went to a clothes box, but she did not see her take any- thing. She asked her what she wanted, and she said some stuff. Her mother was worried about her brother, and had been talking a lot about it. She had been very depressed for the last fort- night. Witness did not know of the existence of any poison in the house. Her father and mother led a happy life. Replying to a juryman, witness said the clothes in the box were her father's best clothes, and he did not keep his poison there. The jury returned a verdict of death from- poison self-administered whilst of unsound niind.

ABERYSCIR EISTEDDFOD

ABERYSCIR EISTEDDFOD. Successful Meeting. HELPING THE Y.M.C.A. On the 16th inst., at the Parish Hall, Aberys- cir, the annual Eisteddfod was held in connection with Siloam Congregational Chapel, and proved in every way to be a great success. The hall was crowded, and the proceedings were presided over by Mr Jones. Gaer. The accompanist was Miss Lena Jones. Gaer, being assisted by Miss Fisher and Miss Blanche Evans. Awards. Recitation (boys under 10), 1, Tudor Evans; 2. Willie Carpenter. Recitation (girls under 10), 1 and 2 divided between Florrie Williams and Gwy- neth Rees. Solo (boys under 10). 1. Tudor Evans. Solo (Girls under 10), 1, Phyllis Rose; 2. Florrie Williams. Recitation 'children undet 15), 1, Eunice Williams: 2, Daniel and Nancie Evans. Solo (children under 14). 1, Gwen James; 2, P. Rose. Soprano solo, Miss Williams, Llan. Open recitation, Mr Brycban Jones. Baritone solo, Mr David Price, Llwyncoed. Open solo divided between Miss Francis, Ffrwdgrech, and Mr H. Stephens, Pantglas. Unpunctuated read- ing, Miss Maggie James. Cwmhvdfer, Trecastle. Duet, Messrs. W. Williams, Fffnant, and H. Stephens, Pantglas. Best story. fiss Florrie Williams, Pool. Quartette, divided between Tra- Ilong party and Pontfaen party. Solos were ren- dered by Miss Francis and Mr H. Stephens. The adjudicators were Music, Mr W. Davies, Pendrc, Trecastle; literature, Mr W. J. Price, Pontwil- lym, who carried out their duties with entire satisfaction. Miss Agnes W. Jones, Gilfach, carried out the duties of secretary most efficiently, and Mrs George Evans, Tymawr, proved an ideal treasurer, and the success of the eisteddfod was in a large way due to them, and also the excellent ticket sellers, who worked so hard. The members of Aberyscir Chapel are to be congratulated on their effort, which has been crowned with success, as a nett amount of £8 10s was realised, and a cheque for which has been handed to Mr Fred W. Jenkins, the secretary of the Y.M.C.A. at Brecon, to be forwarded to Sir J. Courtis, Cardiff, the treasurer of the Y.M.C.A., with H.M. Forces. This event cannot be passed without a word of appreciation to the members of Aberyscir Chapel, for the excellent example they have shown to the other Churches in Breconshire. to assist the Y.M.C.A. who are doing such excellent work am- ongst H.M. Forces, and which work is so much appreciated by the officers and men both of the Army and Navy. May the Churches follow suit. "Duty done is the soul's fireside."

APPEALS AT CWMDU

APPEALS AT CWMDU. A recruiting meeting, in connection with tho local committee, was held at the Schoolroom, Cwmdu, on the 14th inst., when there was a good attendance. Mr Gwilym James, J.P., Crickhowell, presided, and, in an able patriotic address, said the towns had all done well, and it was only fair that the scattered country districts should also do their part. He appealed to the older members present to act a.a missionaries in obtaining more men, and thus prevent conscrip- tion. Sir George Forestier- Walker confirmed the statements of the chairman, and said that young men in country districts, accustomed to horses, able to ride and shoot, required very little train- ing to make excellent defenders of their country. On the motion of the Rev. David Llovd. secon- ded by the Rev. W. Arvon Davies, a cordial vote of thanks was accorded the chairman and Sir Forestier-Walker. Seven young men are al- ready serving their country from this parish. One has gone to Aden, another with the Yeomanry on the east coast, and the others are, or were, un- dergoing training at Pembroke.

Advertising

AiL. AL N E t vbequ ickefft andrmt eertain ta -re- Bf ( for HEAOACHE, TOOTHAEHE, KEIHULQIA. B[\* imitMioiw 'ttleg 134d. *+ch, III% d- t Jl cbemifftt &n