Collection Title: Brecon & Radnor express Carmarthen and Swansea Valley gazette and Brynmawr district advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
15 articles on this page
New Friends and Old

New Friends and Old. BRECKNOCKS IN INDIA. I "A" COMPANY GOES TO INDORE. ) Sergt.-Major Green, of the Brecknocks, who has sent us so many interesting football reports con- cerning the Brecknocks in India writing under date December 11th, says :—Owing to "A" and "D" Companies changing over—"A" to Indore and "D" to headquarter and other garrison duties —there has been no league fixtures this week. We have at last said good-bye and God-speed to the 1st Home Counties Brigade (R.F.A.) and are now busy extending a welcome to their relief, the 1st and 2nd Batteries of the 2/4 Wessex Brigade (R.F.A.) from Bangalore. We hope we shall be as good friends with the incoming batteries as we have been with the out-going brigade, who were all jolly good fellows and great sportsmen. "Wait and see" must be our motto. ( Frendlies. [ A return friendly was played on Monday even- ing between reresentatives from the Divisional Staff and Remount Depot versus 1/lst Brecknock- shire Battalion. The teams lined up under Sergt. Major Green as under. Staff.-Goal. Brooke: backs, Cullen and Hud- son: halves, Hyland, McKay and Goddard; for- wards, Crooke, Wheeler, Martin, Knapps and I Mitchell. Brecknocks.;—Goal, Hall; backs, Miller and R. C. Price; halves, Taylor, Hoddinott and Lce.-Sgt. J. Powell; forwards. Carter, J. Davies, W. Wil- liams, J. L. J. Williams and W. Powell. The Staff lost the toss and were put to face the sun. This, I think, accounted for two of the goals going in—Rooke could see nothing. There was little to choose between the sides in mid-field. The infantrymen controlled the ball better in front of goal. The Staff missed quite a number of chan- ces when well placed through erratic shooting. I From a run down the field by the Brecknocks, which spelt danger, the goalie getting to a shot in the nick of time from W. Powell, and punching away the leather was trapped by Hoddinott, who returned with a high shot, the ball glancing off Rooke's hands into the net. The second goal came from J. L. J. Williams, who tricked Cullen and shot low, the third goal coming from J. Davies who followed up his own shot and breasted into the net as the goalie pulled the ball down. Half time Brecknocks 3 goals, Staff nil. The second half was very evenly contested, some good runs being put in by both teams, but the de- fences held out. Full-time, Brecknockshire Bat- talion 3 goals, Staff nil. A friendly was played between "C" Double Com- pany and the Specialists on Tuesday, when the Company won by two goals to nil. Team?.—"C" Company Goal, Coombes: backs, S. Smith and W. Powell; halves, J. Powell, Hod- dinott and H. Davies; forwards, Steer, Morgan, J. L. J. Williams, Lydford and Main. Specialists.—Goal, Hall; backs, Miller and Pugh halves, Nicholls, Ireland and Lichfield for- wards, Carter, Preece, Davies, Thomas and Cot- trell. Referee, Sergt.-Major C. Green. Y.M.C.A. Tournament—Semi-Final Round. Nos. 1 and 2 Platoons Brecknocks versus Re- mount Training Depot, met to do battle in the above tourney on Thursday the 9th inst. This was expected to be a good game and full of possibilities. The Brecknocks came from Indore by the 3 p.m. train, with a dozen supporters, more not being able to get away. The teams lined up as follows Remount Training Depot.—Goal, Humphreys; backs, Crooke and Hudson; halves, Tommins, McKay and Hyland; forwards, Wilson, Stuart, Leagood, Duke and Mitchell. Nos. 1 and 2 Platoons.—Goal, Lichfield: backs, Jenkins and D. J. Davies; halves, Mickey Davies, Tim Williams, and Bufton; forwards. C. Jones, J. Davies, A. Green, Edwards and Thoroughgood, linesmen, Sergt. Kennedy and A/Bom. Goddard (Staff); referee. Sergt.-Major C. Green. Green won the toss, and decided to play with their backs to the sun. Leagood kicked off before a goodly number of spectators, and mid-field play for the first ten minutes was indulged in, when with a great kick Hyland put Leagood in possession. This player swung out to Mitchell, who was lying off side, and from this kick the Brecknocks began to press, Jones getting down on the wing centred. Crooke handled in the area, Green took the resul- tant kick and sent in an upward drive, the ball glancing off the goalie's hands under the bar. This success bucked things np, both teams putting all they knew into it. From a run down by the Brecknocks, C. Jones, when well placed, scored with a nice shot. Half time, Brecknocks, two goals, Depot, nil. A run by the Depot looked dangerous, Bufton taking the ball from the toe of Duke, and in so doing met with a minor knee injury, causing him to retire. The second half was of the usual cup-tie nature. Kick and rush tactics were resorted to, J. Davies dropping to half in place of Bufton, and with four forwards the Brecon lads came again and again. A couple of promising openings were spoilt by Jones lying off side. Full time, 1 and 2 Platoons, 2 goals Depot, nil. Crooke'at back for the Depot was very safe, but his partner was awfully wild. McKay and Hyland at halves did well. but Leagood had played a much better game. The whole of "A" did well, j Thoroughgood being on the slow side. LEAGUE TABLE. H a S Teams 3 g -S Teams ? ? ? ? S ? o ? .93 bo o '-? H ?? ;¡I 3 and 4 Platoons.. 8 8 0 0 41 3 16 (Talgarth). 9 and 10 Platoons 8 6 1 1 17 7 13 (Builth) 1 and 2 Platoons 6 2 2 2 11 10 6 (Brecon). 15 and 16 Platoons 4 2 1 1 9 8 5 (YstradynlaÍB) x 11 and 12 Platoons 6 3 1 8 8 13 3 (Cefn-Coed). 7 and 8 Platoons 6 1 1 4 5 15 3 (Hay). 13 and 14 Platoonti 4 0 1 3 5 19 1 (Brynmawr) 5 and 6 Platoons 8 0 7 1 5 26 I (Crickhowell). I

Painscastles Concert j

Painscastle's Concert. j INTERESTING XMAS PROGRAMME. } Addullam Hall (Painscastle) concert, on Christmas Day, drew a large crowd, and a most interesting programme was gone through. Rev. J. Llewellyn John, B.A. (pastor/ presided and the programme was as follows :—Chairman's address; pianoforte duet, Misses Pritchard; solo, Mrs R. P. Whittal; solo, Mr Pritchard; recita- tion, Master Thomas Lloyd: gramophone select- ions, Mr T. Davies (Dorstone): solo. Miss Doris Pritchard; recitation, Mr James Jones; solo, Mr R. P. Whittal; recitation, Miss Pritchard; solo, Miss M. Trick; recitation, Mr James Jones; solo, Miss E. F. Whittal; solo, Mr Pritchard; gramo- phone selections. Mr Davies; dialogue. Messrs. A. Pritchard and party (Llandilo); solo, Miss Doris Pritchard; recitation, Miss Gladys Jones; solo, Miss M. Trick, recitation, Miss May Lewis; gramophone selections, Mr Davies; recitation, Master Thos. Lloyd song, Mr Sydney J. Whittal, and gramophone selections, Mr Davies. A hearty vote of thanks was accorded Mr T. Davies for the use of his gramophone, Llandilo dialogue party, Mr and Misses Pritchard (New- church), and all the friends who helped to make the concert a success.

Advertising

E UNIV ERSAL CAR There are many vastly more expensive cars. There are cars of greater ostentation. But for serviceable power, for comfort and convenience, and for quiet, I unassuming, ever-ready reli- ability, there is no car in the world that can justly claim to be the Ford's superior; not one. I I Runabouts £ 115. Five-passenger Tour- ing Car £125. Town Cai £ 175. 20 h.p. efficiently equipped. All Prices at Works, Manchester. Full particulars from- RICH & SONS, Motor Engineers, Tel. 23, BRECON. Welsh Insurance Corporation, Lti I Head °ffice HIGH STREET, CARDIFF. Beecon AOENTs-Mr W. H. Gimson. United Counties Bank Mr ????????t?? Jas. R. Probert, Cilwhybart; Mr Howell Powell, 8 Castle Street; \???.????i?/ Mr H. E J. Rich, 41, Watton; Mr W. Williams, 6, Bulwark; Mr I ?€??????? W. Lewis Pritchard, Harddfan. Fire, Consequential Loss Following Fire. All Sickness and Accidents. Burglary. Motor Car, Plate Glass, Workmen's Compensation, Boiler Explosion, etc., etc. br358

RHAYADER BAPTISTSi

RHAYADER BAPTISTS. ANNUAL TEA AND ENTERTAINMENT. A GOOD TIME. The annual tea, entertainment and Christmas tree were held at the Baptist Church, in connection with the Sunday school, on the 30th nit. A goodly company met to enjoy the cup of tea on the tables, presided over by Mrs Howells, The Manse, and Miss Price, Llwyncwtta, helped by --N;l ri Lewis and Miss Humphreys, and other ready hands with the cutting-up and attendances were found in Mrs Evans (superintendent), Miss Evans, Miss Williams, Mr George Davies, Miss L. 1 Price, Miss Davies and Miss Alice Webber. j The tree, given by Mr Davies,. Cefnfaes, was laden with a valuable present to every scholar of the Sunday school, collected and dressed Iby Miss M. Price and Miss G. Webber. I The donors of the tea this year were Mr David Davies, New House, and Mr Albert Evans, Cefn- ceido, who were heartily thanked by vote, proposed by Mr G. Davies and seconded by Mr E. Davies ymTh> e entertainment, presided over bv the pastor IRev. R. A. Howells). was full of Viiripfr .s. children singing, reciting and performing with a zest and finish. Two innovations were introduced in action songs ("The Babv Show" and "The Handkerchief Song") by Miss M. Price and her juvenile choir, and a dialogue, entitled "There's a pinch in every shoe," by Miss L. Price and party, viz., Mr Hubert Davies, Mr Gwyn Price, Mr Gordon Davies, Miss Price, Miss G. Webber, Miss S. Williams, Enid Howells, and Tom and Mary Lancet. Both items were heartily applaud- ed. The adult choir sang three choruses, con- ducted ably by Mr Onfel Price and accompanied by Miss Hughes. Mr George Davies presented each scholar with an orange on leaving. Appended is the programme :—Recitation, D. Hope; recitation, W. A. Morgan; recitation. May Whitfby; solo, Brynwen Price; recitation, Trevor Pugh; pianoforte solo, Miss Eunice Hairier; re- citation, R. W. Price; solo, Irene Price; recitation. Daisy Whitby; action song, "The Baby Show." Miss M. Price and juvenile choir; chorus, ''Rin; bells, ring," choir; recitation. Lily Whitby; solo. "God made my life a little light," Dennis James: pianoforte solo, Enid Howells; recitation, Ada In- t gram; solo. Miss Dorothy James: recitation. Mar- garet, J. Williams; recitation, "The conceited car- rot, Gwyneth Williams; chorus, "God's love." j I choir: solo, Miss Emmie Hamer: recitation. • "Little Christie's letter to Jesus," Dennis James: pianoforte solo, Miss Dorothy James: recitation, | Richard Lancet; action song, "The Handkerchief Song," Miss M. Price and choir; pianoforte solo, "Autumn memories," Gwyneth Howells; solo. Hilda Price: recitation, Richie Davies: duet, Miss- es Adeline and Florrie Price; recitation, Mr Gor- Jon Davies; solo, "The day star," Miss Gladys Webber; dialogue, "There's a pinch in everv shoe," Miss L. Price and party; choms, "Sing" and rejoice." choir: recitation, Hubert Dav* es; solo, Miss Olive Price; duet. Misses M. Price and A. Jones; recitation, Gwen Pugh: and recitation, Mr Gwyn Price.

Advertising

I NO PRELIMINARY FEES. | ^ONEY LENT pRIVATELY In large or small Sums (not less than £10), ON BORROWER'S OWN PROMISSORY NOTE. ESTABLISHED 45 YEARS, And now Lending UPWARDS OF £80,000 ANNUALLY. Prospectuses, Terms for Advances, or any information desired, will be supplied, free of charge, on application either personally or by letter to GEORGE pAYME & SONS, 7, KING STREET, HEREFORD; or I 5, TOWN WALLS, SHREWSBURY. II Established 1870. LOANS. ?10 TO ?100 LENT on note of band £ 10 TO £ 100 to Tradesmen, Far- mers, Business-men, and others, worthy of credit, with or without sureties or securities. (Business completed immediately without any delay). Re- payments arranged to suit applicants convenience. ?100 TO ?o?-l?O?O?O? ?VANCEDTO enable persona to buy the bouses they occupy or other property. Loans also made upon property already in possess- ion of applicants, existing mortgages paid off and more money advanced if required. Interest from 41 to õ per cent. per ann'um, on all mortgages.— Apply, J. L. CUNNINGHAM, 19, Glebeland Street, br476 Tel. 70. Merthyr Tydfil. LONDON & PROVINCES DISCOUNT Co., Ltd. Immediate Cash Advances. £10 to iel,ooo are privately completed at 24 hours' notice on your simple pror*e to pay without prelimiinar7y ^eee. h (,?zil or write to the Maer, W. Sm?RLzy, Stokes Croft, Bristol, or to 101, East Street! Hereford. 179õp CASH ADVANCED PRIVATELY. From £10 to £ 5,000. To Tradesmen, Profes- sional Gentlemen, Farmers and Respectable Householders, without Security or Sureties. A written promise to repay is all we require. No fees, or fines. Strictest privacy guaranteed. Repayments to suit the convenience of borrowers. Terms mutually agreed upon before business com- pleted. Distance no object. Loans from 6 per cent. can be arranged for persons entitled to money, investments, or pro- perty under wills or settlements. Such advances may remain unpaid for any number of years. CHARLES STEVENS LTD., Hayes Buildings, Caadiff, Telephone No. 467.

Advertising

DO YOUR BEST j w to keep yourself fit. Give your bodily organization a fair chance to w I ? cope satisfactorily with the work it is required to perform. Many ? people recognise the value of a periodic cleansing of the Internal H ? organs for maintaining their health in full measure. This is no W ? doubt an excellent plan-providing, always, that a suitable medicine H ? is used. Drastic purgatives should certainly be avoided; so also ? should new and unguaranteed methods which frequently do more ? harm than good. A natural remedy-vegetable in composition and y ? of indisputable efficacy as a mild, yet perfect aperient-is the [j ? widely known preparation, Beecham's Pills. There is no better K W medicine for purifying the system and eliminating the impurities that give rise to disease than this tried and trusted remedy which ? has been used with such signal success for so many years in almost K id every quarter of the globe. The present Is a time of urgent needs. I It is up to you, and indeed, everyone, to keep strong and well. Yon I can most certainly do this in the easiest and most satisfactory H way by taking B CHAM"S s I PILLS. B ? H ?????,- ?????????????????? ????X???????i???u ????????????????????htf??????????????? ?

POULTRY

POULTRY. ) SEASONABLE TOPICS. I When thinking over the different qualities of each breed, it so often happens that the all-round usefulness of the variety is not taker "ito con- sideration. It is easy to say that the i -;Iiorn is the best layer, and that it is the only breed to keep where eggs are the first consideration, but there are many other points -which should be taken into account. Suppose, for instance, that the leghorn lays 200 eggs a year, and one of the heavy 'breeds will only lay 150, the first thought is that the Leghorn must be the best fowl to keep. But nearly every poultry keeper knows that the Leghorn, and, in fact, all Mediterranean breeds, lay best during the summer, whereas many of the heavier varieties will produce most eggs at a time .when they make most money, and this, naturally, is during the winter. The first thought should be then which collection is the more valuable—the 900 or the 150? Eggs, for the past six weeks, have been making at least threepence each, and we can reasonably expect that when the spring is here the price will drop at least to twopence, and it needs but little reckoning to see that the lower lot will pay the better. There is another point which needs takipg into account. Suppose you want, say, 100 Leghorn pullets to fill up your houses for next season. To do this you must expect to hatch at least 200 birds, for nearly, if not quite, half will be cockerels, though should the greater percentage be pullets then, of course, you have the advantage. But I have frequently known cases of where moi?,,?tl.. half have come cockerels, so it is only fair to work on the half-rate to keep within the mark. Now the Leghorn cockerels are not worth much unless you have a record laying strain, and then most of them could be sold for breeding purposes, but, if just a useful lot, nearly the whole will be sold off for eating. But what can you make of them? The Petit Poussin trade is the best for these, and they should not be kept longer than eight weeks, then they will pay very well at 1/3 or 1/4 each, but, if you cannot find a sale this way, then they must be kept till at least sixteen weeks old, and then you are lucky if you can find customers at 2/- each, but more likely you will be offered 1/6, or even less. Now if we take any of the larger breeds, such as the Sussex, Orpington or Wyandotte, it is not much trouble to make up to 5/- for each of the cockerels when sold at the same age, so that any- one can see that what is lost in one way is more easily made up in another. To get the cockerels up to this pitch it means a little more food, but, if a shilling is spent extra ou each bird, the result is then more satisfactory from the financial side, because the total income is more than enough to meet the outlay. Some breeders may not want to bother with the fattening of the cockerels, as this involves a little extra trouble, but, even then, there is plenty of chance to clear these out in a store condition for other men to fatten, when they will easily make from 3/6 to 4/- each. I know one man who makes a splendid income by produc- ing chickens of this sort. He just hatches and rears, and, by feéding well, grows large framed chickens, but there is no attempt to fatten. There is no trouble in marketing, because the higltrs' carts come round and take all his birds as soon as ready. Anyone taking up poultry keeping, as a means of profit, should decide on his line cf operation? by the district into which he is going. If only just fancy stock where showing is the primary object, then it matters little where he resides, providing the ground is suitable and good enough to grow big birds, but, if the poultry is to be reared just as a business undertaking, then, by all means, con- sider your district and see what chance you have of a ready sale. Suppose you go into the country near or within easy access of some big town, whether inland or the seaside matters little, you will have at hand a good chance of selling all you can produce at a remunerative value. This may be by delivering to some of the shops, whereby you can save the middleman's profits, or, probably, you can find enough private customers, like the best class hotels or boarding-houses, and they will pay you well and claim an advantage by being able, to advertise, "All eggs and poultry direct from the farm." It only needs a little energy and enter- prise to make a name and create a trade for all the stuff you can produce. '——'—' i

i i RAMC Poet i I

i R.A.M.C. Poet i TO A FRIEND AT THE SPA. j R.A.M.C. man, who is now at Calais, has drop- ped into poetry in writing to a "Friend" at the Spa. The muse seems to have iburned whilst he was on night duty at the hospital. This is -what he produced :— Kind sir, to write to you a line or two Has aye been ma' intention, That note to write and send awa' X noo' mak' earnest pretention. Nine months ago I left the Spa Your "Bon jour" went wi' me, My thoughts have until this day, Been continually wi' ye. Of a' the folks that I have met, There's none can beat the Friends, sir, What they did for me, is yet More than tongue can tell, sir. He adds, "I have got on excellently at Calais. There is plenty of work-there always is attached to a hospital, but one does not mind that. I sup- pose it is our 'bit. It was for that reason we were all willing to leave the Spa and the pleasant times we had there."

ST MARYS BUILTH CHURCH LADS i BRIGADE v LLANDRINDOD WELLS JUNIORS i

ST. MARYS (BUILTH) CHURCH LADS' i BRIGADE v. LLANDRINDOD WELLS JUNIORS. A friendly encounter took placeleetween St. Mary's (Builth) Church Lads' Brigade and Llan- drindod Wells Juniors on Groe Green, Builth Wells, on Wednesday. Play was hampered by; heavy showers. The spa eleven proved themselves to be the superior side. Teams were :—Church Lads' Brigade H. Hamar; J. Campbell and W. Wheeler; L. Prit- chard, G. Bradley and J..Evans; and W. Grocock, A. Thomas. G. Simcock, J. Metcalf and E. Downes. Llandrindod Wells E. Edwards; C. Weale and S. Oliver; H. Hughes, S. Harris and D. Price: and J. Edwards, J. Crane, W. Powell and C. Edwards. The visitors played with but 10 men. Mr J. D. Harper (Builth Wells) had charge of the whistle. The brigade opened play. The visitors invaded, but failed to pierce the home defence. Later, the Spa front line attacked again, which resulted in J. Crane netting the first goal. The brigade re- taliated, and a scramble ensued in front of the Llandrindod sticks. J. Metcalf, seeing an oppor- tunity, seized the leather and, with a capital shot, beat the Spa's custodian. Receiving the ball from a cotner-kick, G. Bradley severely tested Ed- wards with a high shot, which he cleared in an excellent manner. Half-time Church Lads' Brigade 1 goal. Llandrindod Wells Juniors 1 goal. On resumption, the Juniors invaded the Bri- gade's domain, J. Crane shot, and the home cus- todian fumbled. J. Edwards taking possession, registered a further goal for the visitors. The Brigade then put more energy into their play, and came within an ace of 'finding the net on several occasions. Eventually, the venue was changed, and J. Crane netted the third goal for the Spa side. Shortly afterwards, W. Powell added another point for the visitors, and J. Crane scored the fifth with a capital shot. The brigade became aggressive, and attacked in fine style. One of the Juniors handled the ball, and the homesters were awarded a penalty. W. Wheeler, who was entrusted with the kick, placed the ball between the sticks. Dur- ing the last few minutes play was in the Brigade territory, and another goal was added to the score of the Spa eleven by C. Edwards. Final score Llandrindod Wells Juniors 6 goaJs. Church Lads' Brigade 2 goals. J. Crane, C. Edwards, J. Edwards and W. Powell were conspicuous for the visitors, and the shooting of the forwards was excellent. J. Metcalf and G. Simcock worked hard in the Brigade forward line, and W. Wheeler and J. j Campbell defended well at back.

i Builth Congregationalists

Builth Congregationalists. SUNDAY SCHOOL-CHILDREN. ENTERTAINED. Children, attending Horeb Congregational Sun- day School, Builth Wells, were entertained to tea in the schoolroom on Thursday. A concert also took place, games were indulged in, and the scholars were presented with presents, which were attractively arranged on a Christmas tree. The tea was kindly given by Mrs W. Black Jones, and those who attended to the various needs of the little ones at the tables were Mrs Lewis Beynon, assisted 'by the Misses Beynon, Miss M. Davies (Groe Villa), and Misses Gertie and Eva Jones (Brookland House), Mrs Rice (Irfon Villa), and Mrs Williams (Crosswav House). Those who helped in various other ways were Miss Gwynne (Radnor House), Miss M. J. Pugh, Miss L. Williams (Claremont), Mr W. J. Williams (Lyndale House), Mr T. Jones (Wye Bridge House), and Mr S. J. Davies (Bristol House). Mr W. J. Williams presided over the subsequent entertainment, and Miss Gertie Jones was the pianist. Appended is the programme :—Part-song, chil- dren; recitation, Miss Doris Samuel; solo, Miss Nellie Davies; recitation, Miss Joice Davies solo, Miss Morfa Hamer; recitation, Miss Ethel Samuel; solo, Beryl Beynon; solo, Master Ernest Davies; part-song, children; solo, Miss Muriel Williams; and quartette, Mr T. Jones and party. An impromptu speech competition created much amusement, the prize being divided between Mas- ters Ellis Williams and Ernest Davies. Mr T. Jones and Miss M. J. Pugh, who were the donors of the presents on the Christmas tree, handed them to the scholars. Miss Gertie Jones also helped in the work of distribution. Votes of Thanks. On the motion of Rev. Lewis Beynon (pastor), seconded by Mr W. J. Williams, Mrs W. Black Jones was heartily thanked for her generosity in providing tea. The children also gave her three cheers. Mr W. J. Williams proposed a vote of thanks to the tea-makers, and all who had assisted to make the evening an enjoyable one for the scholars. He also thanked those who had so prettily decorated the schoolroom and thochristmas tree. This was seconded by Mr F. Davies (Fairfield) and carried with acclamation. Before dispersing, the children were presented with oranges.

Advertising

L- Every box of ENGLAND'S GLORY" Matches used means MORE WORK for BritisÎJ Work-people.—Moreland, Gloucester. 515 TEETH PAINLESSLY EXTRACTED by Patent Proceso. TEETH I of the best materials made under per- sonal supervision. Bad Teeth are not only very unsightly, but extremely unhealthy. J. WARD gives his personal attention to all Dental matters. Advice Free. Artificial Teeth, perfect in colour and shape; mounted on Gold, Platina, Vulcanite, etc. Fillings with any material. Old plates remodelled. Cm Mr- n's Teeth need careful watching. Let J. WARD offer you advice. Charges Moderate. Full particular* given on first visit. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. J. WARD, M.P.S., 8, High St., BUILTH WELLS. To preserve Teeth, use J. WARD'S AuH-eptie Formaline and Mint Tooth Paste, large tubes, 7 £ d., by poet, 8 £ d. b7

Politics of the Year I

Politics of the Year. I A REYIEW. I SPECILALLY C-ONTRIBUTED. I The end of the year brought us also to the close of the seventeenth month of the greatest war that the world has ever seen. The broad features of the course which the war has followed during 1915 can be described in two or three sentences. While on the Western Front the Allies have ac- hieved some substantial gains, there was for a long time a position of stalemate there, of which Germany took advantage to make a tremendous onslaught upon the Russian forces. She failed to win a decisive result, either by overthrowing Rus- sia or making her willing to arrange peace, but she succeeded in creating an impression in the minds of the Balkan Rulers that the Central Powers were bound to win. Bulgaria's attack upon Serbia, in conjunction with Germany and Austria-Hungary, was replied to by an Anglo- French expedition. This expedition was decided upon by the Entente under circumstances which had become radically altered before it had even been despatched. M. Venizelos, who had invited the co-operation of the Allies, was dismissed by King Constantine, and for a considerable time ir was doubtful whether they could depend, in usin. Salonica as-tlie base for their efforts to reliev Serbia, even on the benevolent neutrality of Greece. The effect of the new situation in the Balka.ns, by affording Germany the opportunity to establish communications with Constantinople by land, made it desirable for the Allies to re- consider their position at Gallipoli, and our forces have been withdrawn without loss from Suvla Bay and Anzac to be employed in another locality. Early in the year—on February 4th, to be exact- the German Admiralty declared "the waters ar- ound Great Britain and Ireland a war area." Germany believed that she could starve out Great Britain by using submarines to torpedo her mer- chant ships, and she was in no wise deterred from adopting the plan by the knowledge that it would in many cases condemn the crews and passengers to certain death. Great Brfufin retaliated by en- forcing measures "to prevent commodities of any kind from reaching or leaving the German Empire without risk to neutral ships or to neutral or non-combatant lives." The German piracy was marked by atrocities which shocked the whole civilised world and provoked strong and repeated protests from the Government of the United States. But our Navy found means of grappling effectually with the submarine menace, while tightening its strangle-hold upon the source of Germany's supplies. Political and Social Reorganisation. The exigencies of war have necessarily produced great modifications in our political and social or- ganisation. (1) The past year has seen the Gov- ernment reconstructed on a basis which was in- tended, in Mr Asquith's words, to "take away from it even the semblance of a one-sided or party character," and to demonstrate to the whole world —Allies, enemies, and neutrals-that "the British people were more resolute than ever with one heart and with one purpose to obliterate all distinctions, and to unite every personal. and political, as well as every moral and material force, to the prosecu- tion of their cause." (2) In order to enable the Government to ascertain what resources the nation can command in this great national crisis for maintaining, on the one hand, our Army and Navy, and on the other our industrial and financial posi- tion, a measure was passed for compulsory regis- tration of all the people, male and female, between the ages of fifteen and sixty-five. Under a scheme, laid down by Lord Derby, who was appointed Director of Recruiting, every man of military age not "starred" as employed in an indispensable oc- cupation, was called upon to offer himself for at- testation, if found physically fit, and either to join the colours at once or be placed in the Army Re- serve to be called up as required., The latter class of recruits is divided into two series of groups, married and single, according to ages. and Mr Asquith has pledged himself in unambiguous terms, that the married men will not be called up on unless and until all but the inconsiderable min- ority of recruitable single men have been called up. In the case of men who, though unstarred, may claim to be really indispensible in their var- ious occupations, local tribunals are to be provided for deciding whether exemption should be granted on this ground. (3) To mobolise the nation's re- sources of skilled industry and trade "for further- ing the efficient manufacture, transport, and supply of munitions," the Government has provided for the control by the Ministry of Munitions of any es- tablishment in which munition work is carried on. This control involves (a) the prohibition of lock-outs and strikes: rb) the limitation of profits: (c) the regulation of rates of wages and discipline: (d) the prohibition of transference of labour to another establishment except under a certificate from a Munitions Tribunal. Reconstruction of the Cabinet. I The reconstruction of the Government on a broader hasis necessitated the retirement of a !iiiiiber of -Ministers who had done excellent work, it whose places were required for members of the Opposition whom the Prime Minister wished to include in the Government. Mr Balfour became First Lord of the Admiralty, Mr Bonar Law Colonial Secretary, Mr Austen Chamberlain Sec- retary of State for India, and Mr Walter Long President of the Local Government Board. Lord Lansdowne, Lord Selborne, atld Lord Curzon also joined the Cabinet, and there were many changes in the minor offices. Sir Stanley Buckmaster succeeded Lord Haldane as Lord Chancellor, and Sir Edward Carson was made attorney-General, with a seat in the Cabinet. Mr Gulland wa.s ap- pointed Joint Chief Whip with Lord Edmund Tal- bot. Mr McKenna took over the Treasury on the creation of a Ministry of Munitions, for which Mr Lloyd George was obviously the ideal selection. On October 18th Sir Edward Carson resigned, de- claring that he found himself "unable to agree in any respect" with what he understood to be the Government's policy in the Balkans. Mr Churchill, who had accepted the office of Chancel- lor of the Duchy of Lancaster on vacating the Admiralty, resigned on November 11th. The Prime Minister was unable to give him a seat on the new War Council, and Mr Churchill felt that "he could not accept a position of general respon- sibility without any effective share in its guidance and control." Mr. McKenna's Budget. I Mr McKenna's Budget, though in certain details it came in for some sharp criticism, was universally acknowledged to be an'achievement of sound and brilliant finance. In regard to direct taxation, it increased the income-tax rates bv 40 Der cent. (of which only 20 per cent. will be payable n in the current financial vear, 1915-16), reduced the Limit of exemption from £160 to X130, and the abate- ment from £160 to £120: increased the super-tax on a graduated scale, rising from 2/10 on incomes between £ 8000 and zftOO to 3/6 on the surplus of all incomes above £ 10,000. An extra duty of 4d per lb. was imposed on tea, making the whole duty 1/- per lb. the duty on cocoa was raised from Id to lid, and on coffee and chicory from lid to 2¡. the duties on dried fruits (except ctirrints) and tobacco were raised by 50 per cent.. jand on patent medicines were doubled, and the dutv on motor- spirit was raised by 3d a gallon. A higher duty on sugar was partly compensated by a reduction in the price of sugar supplied by the Royal Commission, with the net result that the rise in the retail price would be id per lb. Import duties of 33 one-third per cent. were imposed on imported motor-cars and cycles and parts thereof (except tyres) and business cars, cinema films, clocks and parts, and musical instruments. There was also an increase in post-office charges, though the pro- posal to abolish the halfpenny post was withdrawn. Excess profit, due to the war, after the deduction of £100, will The taxed 50 per cent. The Great War Loan. A new War Loan (there bad already been one of £ 350,000,000, issued at 95, and producing £ 331,000,000) was announced on June 21st. No precise sum was asked for. There were three methods of issue the ordinary Bank of England issue in stock or bonds; smaller bonds of X5 or multiples of £5 up to £ 200, obtainable through the Post Office; and War Loan Vouchers of 6/ 10/ and £1. obtainable at the Post Offices, or through the medium of the trade unions, friendly societies and various works offices. Provision was made for the conversion of the old War Loan and of Consols and Annuities by those who sub- scribed proportionately to the New Loan. The Loan proved a gigantic success. The actual num- ber of subscribers to the Loan through the Bank of England was 550,000, and the actual amount subscribed £ 550,000,000. But the methods adopt-

Politics of the Year I

POLITICS OF THE YEAR—Continued. ed for attracting the working classes to invest their savings did not meet with the response ex- pected, and Mr McKenna decided to offer to this class of investor the inducement of bonds, which, at a somewhat lower rate of interest, would always be realisable at par. "Germany, a Beaten Nation." 1 In the debate on the motion for the adjourn- ment over Christmas, there was a discussion on the problem of transport, due to the necessity of tak- ing so many ships for conveying troops and sup- plies to the Front. Mr Balfour pointed out that the demands of those responsible for military operations had to be considered before everything else, and the best xeinedy for the scarcity of ton- nage was the encouragement of the building of merchant ships, which had almost ceased since the beginning of the War. Mr Runciman, in a striking speech, declared that "so far as com- merce was concerned, Germany was a, beaten nation, and the Government was taking c&re that she did not get her head up after the War." Lord Robert Cecil administered a scathing rebuke to the group of malcontents who insinuate that the Foreign Office is influt-need by prejudice in favour of Germany, so that it does not do its best to pre- vent supplies going to Germany. Lord Robert Cecil "I think we should be extremely careful how we make such charges against people who are honestly trying to serve their country. There are some people who are not able to bear the stress of war; they arc merely hysterical neurotics; when things are not going right for the moment they seem to think the proper thing is to turn round on those who are trying to serve their country and say, 'you are traitors: we are betrayed you are the friends of our enemies, and that is the reason we are not succe"ding.' I say it is a disgraceful state of things; > is destructive of the moral of this country, and it is the duty of all patriotic men to stamp upon it the moment the charge is made. Looking Backwards. W hen we look back on the past year we have to admit that we have made mistakes, and we have received some heavy blows. Such is the invari- able fortune of every nation in war, however suc- cessful the ultimate issue proves, and however capable its leaders may be. But the section of the nation which magnifies our mistakes and losses is a comparatively small and insignificant one, and of the nation, as a whole, the words employed by Mr Asquith at the Guildhall banquet hold good :— "After fifteen months (it is now seventeen) spent in the strenuous and undivided pursuit of the supreme aim, we have only one party. The voice of faction is silent, and, with a few in- significant and superficial cross-currents, the stream of our national life flows with gathered and growing volume in an ever-deepening chan- nel of united purpose and of concentrated re- solve. In the year which has passed since I last spoke at this table the whole face of the world. present and prospective, has been chang- ed. It is not too much to say, I think, that we here as a people have had a transformation of our own. We hpve brought together the scat- tered shreds of our varied activities, and we have gradually b- t surely woven them, to a de- gree unknown before, into a single web. Our whole life has ta cen a new, a sobered colour- ing under the si uduing consciousness of great issues steadily faced, and of at times the over- shadowing presence of sorrow and of loss. A year ago we were confronted as a people by a great and searching test. We chose what was certainly the harder, but we believed then and believe now. the better course. We staked everything on-our choice, and we have no more doubt now than we had then that we were right, and that we shall win."

The OpenAir I

The Open-Air. I AN AFTER-WAR PROBLEM. I BRECON PASTOR'S SERMON. I Rev. T. Gwyn Thomas, preaching at Glamor- gan Street Chapel at Christmas, referred to the vision of the shepherds out in the field keeping watch over their flocks by night. One thing, he said, this war had done was to bring to thous- ands the life of the open-air, often, it was true. in conditions of extreme discomfort, but even at that it could not but exercise a considerable influence upon the future. Not all who had known the witchery of the open air and the blue sky and the starlit expanses would care to return to former confined and overcrowded conditions of life. This; fact would present one of the problems with which the nation should grapple in the immediate future. Those shepherds saw the vision when engaged in the commonplace task of ordinary daily duty. And the lesson for them was that they should seek the Christ beside the common path trodden day by day. Let it not be thought that He was to be found only in the unusual and extraordinary cir- cumstance, and in the midst of excitement. Those whose eyes were blind to His incarnation in the customary and the commonplace walks of life would impoverish their ordinary daily life by their refusal to see Him there. There was an inherent snobbishness in human nature, which caused it to under-estimate the dignity and opportunity of the ordinary, and to crave for the unusual and the marvellous. That was not what gave dignity to life, but rather the qualities which manifested themselves. The Christ had come into the ordin- ary and the commonplace life, had shared in its humble drudgery, its simple toil, its monotonous round. Condescending to the common task, He had transfigured that task by the dignity of His divine personality. Alluding to the desolation of spirit in which many hundreds of thousands must be spending the Christmas season, because of the conflict which had been forced upon the nations by colossal vanity and insatiable greed, and conducted with a cruelty that turned the 'blood cold to think of, he said that the world would have been an unspeakably dreary place that day if there had not been the other side of the picture, the bravery, the patient suffering, the self-denial, the sacrifice made and the efforts put forth in order that the great cause might triumph and the free- dom of the world be assured. It was because Christ had not been given his proper place in hearts and governments that such a calamity had befallen. But, if it had not been for His in- fluence in the world, matters would have been a hundred times worse. Christian people had need to be so devoted to Him, and so wise in the know- ledge of His will, that He would make a greater difference to the world than ever in the years to come.

ILlanwrtyd Concert

I Llanwrtyd Concert. I WORTHY OBJECTS HELPED. A successful concert was held at the Victoria Hall, Llanwrtyd Wells, on Wednesday night in aid of the knitting class and the Y.M.C.A. Great interest was taken in the concert, and the Hall filled to overflowing with an attentive and appre- ciative audience. An excellent programme had been prepared. Rev. R. Evans presided and the accompanists were Misses Maggie Davies, Bron- wen Richards, Gwennie Lewis and Lizzie Wil- liams. Appended is the programme :—Pianoforte solo, Miss Bronwen Richards; solo, "Three ship- wrecks," Mr E. T. Evans solo, "Little grey home in the west," Miss Bronwen Richards; duet, "Watchman, what of the night," Messrs. Emrys Jones and Rees Davies; solo, "Land of Hope and Glory," Miss Lizzie Williams; recitation, Miss Arthur: song, "The promise of life," Miss Gra- ham; sketch, "St. Valentine's Day, Miss Larw and friends; male voice party. "Soldier's chorus," conductor, Mr W. Thomas; song, "We are all under the old flag, Miss Gwennie Lewis; song, "There's a land," Mr Rees Davies: song, "King and Country, Miss Graham; song, Pte. Herbie Richards (R.F.C.); cornet solo, "Trumpeter," Serg.-Major Hope; recitation. Miss Arthur; duet, Messrs. K. Davies and Pte. H. Richards (R.F.C.); song, "Till the boys come home," Miss Bronwen Richards; male voice party, "Men of Harlech," conductor, Mr W. Thomas; National Anthem, Miss Lizzie Williams. The great stiecesp of the concert is undoubtedly to be attributed to the indefatigable efforts of Mr James, Rock House, who spared no time in 'bring- ing the entertainment to a high pitch of excel- lence. The talented young ladies who volunteered their services deserve the highest commendation. We only hope that the warm reception given to them by the audience and the worthy cause for which they laboured will afford them the satisfac- tion they deserve. Mr James at the close proposed, and Mr D. C. Williams seconded, votes of thanks to the chairman and to all who had helped to make the concert a success. The sum of it20 was rea- lised to assist the good cause.