Collection Title: Brecon & Radnor express Carmarthen and Swansea Valley gazette and Brynmawr district advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 7 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
20 articles on this page
Advertising

EADIE'S For Good Boots. Builth Wells, Llandrindod Wells, Llanwrtyd Wells and Talgarth. w .(j (4i Evans' Motor TELEG;ORS' ? can give prompt delivery of < ? M otos Buick-6 Cylinder, R345. i ?  19lo moaeis. Overland—4 Cylinder, .6275. notice. | Ford-Any model at shortest notice. <► Motor CyCleS Royal Enfields. B.S.A.'s. Harley. f. Davidson. James. ? 1916 Models. Fnr Side-car or Solo Work. ? We will get you any make you fancy at the shortest notice. ? We are authorised stockists for M Otor Ty ras Dunlop Motor and Motor Cycle. A Motor 1 yrOS Avon. Clincher. Palmer Cord. Wood-Milne and Michelin. <► <> We hold the Largest Stock of Motor Tyres, etc., in the District. i Vacuum, Castrol, Price's, and all the leading makes of < ► Oil stocked. 7 EVERYTHING FOR THE MOTORIST AT <' EVANS' MOTOR STORES AND GIRAGE9 ] ] TALGARTH. 1 < ► —— ] THE FIRM THAT GUARANTEES EVERY CUSTOMER COMPLETE 4T SATISFACTION. t i >

Spas Council

Spa's Council. THE BILLETING OF TROOPS. TRIBUTE TO SIR FRANCIS EDWAEBS, M.P., AND MR W. LEWIS. The monthly meeting of the Llandrindod W ells Council was held at the Town Hall, Llandrindod Wells, on Friday, when there were present Mr Tom Norton (chairman), Mr J. Coombs (vice- chairman), and Messrs. R. Page, W. A. Sims, T. Evans, Jeffrey Jones, C. H. Williams, J. L. Wilding, J. O. Bufton and W. Saunders, B.A.. B.Sc., with the clerk (Mr D. C. Davies) and the surveyor (Mr T. L. Oliver, B.Sc.). Sendees of Sir Francis Edwardfe, M.P., and Mr Wm. Lewis. The special committee appointed to deal with the billeting of troops at Llandrindod Wells ask- ed the council to express most grateful thanks to Sir Francis Edwards, M.P., and Mr William Lewis, of London, for the groat trouble they had taken in this matter, including the arranging for an interview with Mr L Tennant, the Under- Secretary for War. The chairman moved the a.lc-tion of the latter report, saying he hoped the caning of the 250 men would only be the beginning of a much larger movement. Mr J. 0. Buft-on said Llandrindod Wells had every reason to congratulate itself upon its suc- cess. The Western Command had such a large number of hutments that towns, like Llandrindod Wells, within its area were in a less favourable position than similar towns in other Commands. Several gentleman had done much to help the council in this matter. Mr William Lewis had used his utmost efforts to do all that-was con- ceivably possible. to help them. and, so far as Sir Francis Edwards, M.P., was concerned, no stone had been left unturned to bring about success. (Hear, hear.) It was Sir Francis who succeeded in obtaining a.n interview for them with Mr H. J. Tennant, the Under Secretary for War, and they knew that, for several days, Sir Francis spent a good part of his time in different Govern- ment offices trying to further the interests of Llandrindod Wells. The success which had at- tended his efforts on this and other occasions made them regret very deeply that they could not look forward to Sir Francis continuing as member for the county. The withdrawal of Sir Francis from the Parliamentary representation of the county would be one of the greatest losses the town or the county had ever had. They were bound to -extend to both these gentlemen their very best thanks for the splendid services they had ren- [ dered. This was agreed to. Roads Committee—Surveyor's Good Work. The Roads Committee reported that the ap- proximate cost of reforming and making good the foundation, of the portion of Temple street be- tween Temple Square and Montpellier Park Road would be £ 30, inclusive of materials, haul- ing and labour. A conference had been held with the various frontagers in Broadway, and they were inclined to have the footway on the north side properly laid in cement and concrete. The clerk had been instructed to report as to whether it was advisable for the suggested footway to be constructed by the council as "part, of a street" under the provision of the Private Street Works Act, 1892. The cost of laying pipes in the ditch on the west side of Tremont Road had been esti- mated by the previous surveyor at £120, towards ■which the Radnorshire C-ounty Council had offer- ed to contribute £ 60. The clerk had been in- structed to endeavour to arrange for a meeting -with the divisional engineer of the L. & N.W.R. Co., to which company the ditch belongs, when he was next in the district. The surveyor report- ed that the average width of the roadway between the Emporium Square and the Hospital' was 17ft. 6in., and that on the west side a. strip of waste land, about 8ft. in width, intervened between the metalled portion and a wire fence on the railway company's boundary. The cost of widening the metalled portion of the carriage-way, to the ex- tent of 4ft., would be about X50. The surveyor had been instructed to proceed with this work in due course. The question of steam-rolling had been considered, and the necessary instructions given. The report was adopted. x Military Service Tribunal. I After a carefully prepared statement had been I made by the clerk as to the constitution of the tribunals under the new Military Service Act, Mr C, H. Williams moved that the tribunal, which had been acting under the Derby group system, should be appointed to act under the Military I Service Act. He said these gentlemen had ac- quired a great deal of valuable experience, and it would, therefore, be most inadvisable to ap- I' point new men to do similar work. He was very glad to say that there were hardly any men in the town of military age who did n,ot attest under the I Derby group system.  Mr T. Evans seconded, and Mr Coombs sup- I ported the motion, which was agreed to. The tri- j lbunal will, therefore, consist of the Chairman, the Vice-Chairman, Mr J. Jones, Mr R. Page and Dr. J. Morgan Evans. The clerk mentioned that the L.G.B. were mak-- ing enquiries as to the working of the tribunals under the Derby scheme. They had selected 18- six corporations, six urban areas and six rural area.s-to give this experience, andLlandrindod Wells was chosen as one of the smaller urban areas. That was a great honour to the council and to the town. ( Hear, hear.) 1 M.O.H. Report. §f The M.O.H. (Dr. Murray) reported that there t were four births in January and three death- ? one of the latter being a soldier who did not he- 1.' I long to the town. The rainfaU fcr the month was K 3.36 inches. K Water Works Committee. I. Mr Coombs moved the adoption of the Water I "Works Committee, and, in reply to Mr J. Jones, he said the materials for carrying out the repairs to the mechanical filters and the reservoir had been ordered and had, in part, arrived. They hoped to proceed with the work as soon as possible, and to have all done before Easter. The mechanical fil- ters must be repaired 'before the work at the re- servoirs could be done. Miscellaneous. Mr Evans mentioned that a good deal of trouble was being experienced in parts of the town because of rats, and on his suggestion (supported by Mr Sims and Mr Williams) it was decided to enquire as to what terms a professional rat-catcher would be employed upon. The clerk said he had received a letter from Mr H. D. Phillips (secretary of the Convention) stating that it was probable that, if the air raids continued, it Would be impossible to erect the Con- vention marquee this year, and that in tha.t case the use of the Grand Pavilion might be necessary. He (the ckrk) took it the council would regard t.lis application favourably, and, subject to terms being arranged with the lessee, would give their consent and support. This was agreed to. On the recommendation of the Estates Gommit- tee, it was decided to allow the. use of two rooms I at the Public Library as writing and recreation rooms for the members of the R.A.M.C. shortly to be billeted in the town, subject to the various re- ligious bodies providing such furnishings as were necessary and defraying the cost of lighting and cleaning. Arrangements were made for the valu- able antiquities from the Castell Collen Camp to be temporarily housed in the "Mayor's Parlour," so tha.t the rooms may be at the disposal of the soldiers. Several other matters, including the new J.P. list and the lighting of the town, are reported in other columns. 

ICruelty to Cow

I Cruelty to Cow. I HEAVY RHAYADER FINE. Before Rhayader magistrates, on Wednesday, Edward A. Evans, of Esker-Rhiew, Nantmel, farmer, was summoned by Mr Walter Thomas Laird (R.S.P.C.A.) for causing unnecessary suf- fering to a cow, the property of defendant, at Esker-Rhiew on the 11th ult. P.c. Ernest Worthing stated that on the date in question he visited Esker-Rhiew farm, and, when near the house, he came across a cow lying down. At first she appeared to be dead. The animal afterwards groaned, and knocked its head against the ground. The animal was in a very emaciated condition, and her hip appeared to be out of joint. Witness went to the house and saw Evans, and then asked him if he knew about the cow, and, in reply, he said "yes." Witness then asked him how long the cow had been in that state, and the reply was, "for two or three days." Evans fruther told him that the cow had hipped herself on the 4th ult., and that nothing could be done to her. At his request, defendant came out with him to the cow, and brought an instrument with him, and the animal was then killed by Evans on his advice. There was no trace that the cow had been fed or watered where she was. The ground had been knocked about and the ani- mal had been struggling where she wa.s. Inspector Laird also gave evidence, adding he saw the defendant and asked him if he had any explanation to offer. Defendant said the cow hipped herself last summer, but had only been down on the ground about a week. He (de- fendant) had not called in a veterinary surgeon, as he thought she would mend. Defendant also told witness he had tried to move the cow by pulling her tail, 'but she was not able to get up. Defendant had not killed the cow, because he thought that while there was life there was hope. Defendant told witness he had fed the cow three times a. day. Witness then went with defendant to the spot where the cow ha.d lain. The grass was yellow and badly cut np. Witness could not see any trace of hay or corn, nor could defend- ant show him where any had been put. The magistrate said the case was a very seri- ous one, and inflicted a fine of .£15 upon defend- ant, who did not appear, and who had been pre- viously convicted for a similar offence.

The Local TribunalsI

The Local Tribunals. I KNIGHTON ELECTIONS. The Tribunals, appointed under Lord Derby's group scheme, have nearly finished their work, and, by the provisions of the Army Service Act, Urban and Rural District Councils are required to elect new tribunals, with additional powers. The Knighton Urban Council re-elected its tri- bunal of five members at the monthly meeting on Wednesday evening. On Thursday, the Knighton Rural District Council (which comprises the Rad- norshire parishes of the Knighton Union, with the exception of Knighton and Presteign), met in the Board Room, under the presidency of Mr E. Kinsey, and the following were elected as the local tribunal for the council's area :—Messrs. E. Kinsey, W. Watkins (vice-chairman of the coun- cil), Rev. E. Lewis Jones, Messrs. B. Wilding, J. C, Jones, Evan Nicholls, J. Morris, n. Price, T. B. Dove, T. H. Harris and John Williams. The Tome Rural District Council (comprising the. Shropshire parishes of Knighton Union) also met on Thursday (chairman, Mr J. Bevan), and the following were elected to act as a tribunal for the are8.. :-Bevs. E. W. Brown and H. E. Mason, and Messrs. P. M. Matthews, J. R. Bache, F. W. Chandler, T. S. Jones, G. Deakins and R. Bright. The. following is a passage from "Instructions to Members of Tribunals" :—"Members of Tri- bunals should not, of course, allow themselves to be approached respecting any case, and, if any at- tempt of this kind is made, they should report the matter to the tribunal."

Llandrindod and the BenchI i

Llandrindod and the Bench. I ADDITIONAL NAMES PROPOSED. I NAMES PROPOSED. EXTRAORDINARY SPEECHES. I ——— At Llandrindod Wells Council on Friday even- ing, the question of suggesting names of gentle- men from the urban area for appointment on the magisterial bench again occupied the attention of the Council. In accordance with notice of motion, Mr H. Page moved, "Th&t the list of magistrates suggested for this division, 'for submission to the Lord Lieutenant and the Advisory Committee be sup- plemented with four additional names." Mr J. L. Wilding seconded. He said his reason for doing so was because he thought Councillor Jones's list was very ill-advised. With regard to the inclusion of the name of the Rev. R. W. P. Singers-Davies, he thought Councillor Jones must have known that ministers of the Gospel had not for many years been appointed as magistrates in this county. Before they left there that nield, he hoped a revised list would be agreed upon, and a, list drawn up which would not bring down such ridicule as Councillor Jones's list had done. Mr J. Jones said he thought Councillor Wilding should withdraw his remarks. He was present at the meeting when the previous resolution was pas- sed with unanimity, and was present from the be- ginning to the. end of the discussion; and it was most extraordinary for him now to get up and make the remarks he had after having voted for the list which was suggested— Mr Wilding I did not vote for it. Mr Jones The names were agreed to unan- imously. If there was anything wrong in the list, ,Councillor Wilding should have been the first man to jump on his ifeet to say so; but he never ought to have supported the list and then come here to- night and make the remarks he has. Mr Wilding I did not support the list. Mr Jones You never said anything against any name, and I thought we were unanimous in the steps we took; but now I am blamed in language which is hardly Parliamentary. I did what I did in the very best of faith, and everything was straight and above-board; and to insinuate that anything I have done has brought ridicule upon anyone is carrying things very far indeed. If Mr Wilding is vexed or hurt by the list, and con- siders he himself should have been in the list— Mr Wilding I am not vexed, but if you had any sense of gratitude, my name would have been the first on the list. Mr Jones The resolution now proposed speaks for itself. I am sorry. Had I known, Mr Wild- ing, that you were a man of weight, I would have included your name; but as I omitted it, some of the men on the council ought to have got up and proposed your worthy name. They did not think very much of you, or else they would have done so. The chairman (Mr J. Coombs) appealed to Mr Jones not to be personal. Mr Jones said he had been attacked, and he was prepared to defend himself, and to give reasons for every name which he included in his list. If they would only think of what the men he had proposed had done for the town, they would agree that there were good reasons for every one of them being included in the list. The chairman now asked if it was the wish of the council to continue this discussion. Had they not better go into committee ? Mr Jones Committee 1 No, I will never again support doing anything in committee. We may as well shout the whole affair to the world at once. I shall oppose any business being taken in com- mittee from now on. You all know what hap- pened last time. I ask, Mr chairman, that Mr Wilding withdraw the remarks which he made. H lie has any respect for his colleagues on the list, the least he can do is to withdraw the statement he has made. Mr C. H. Williams said he did not agree that Mr Jones had brought any ridicule on anybody. What appeared in a certain paper was silly non- sense at the best, but he enjoyed reading it. (Laughter). But to say that ridicule had been brought on the name of any person in the list was wrong. At all events, he could not see it himself. If Mr Wilding had said that the list was too re- presentative of one party, he would have agreed, and said, "Let's have some more names." How- ever. he had more cause to complain than any- body else. (Laughter.) The Chairman I did not understand Mr Wild- ing to say that the list of names had brought ridi- cule upon the council. Mr Wilding No, I did not say that. All the names are quite eligible. What I meant was that the list had caused ridicule because it was so one-sided. Mr C. H. Williams, continuing, said the laugh- ter seemed to indicate that he had been misunder- stood. He did not want to go on the Bench or to go before the magistrates. (Laughter.) Still, he had more reason to complain than anybody else. Mr Jones seemed to have selected men from the different churches: and his church, the Baptists, were the second largest church in the town, and they were only given one magistrate. If Mr Jones could not find any Baptist, he (Mr Williams) could. tell him of a few. (Laughter.) Mr Jones seemed to know more about the Method- ists (Presbyterians). There were already two from that church on the Bench, and Mr Jones proposed three more. ("Oh. ") That made 5. to one Bap- tist, one Friend, one Congregationalist, and one Wesley an. Mr J. L. Wilding said he did not say that the names suggested had brought ridicule upon the council or upon the councillors; but the fact that the list was so one-sided had caused ridicule. Mr R. Page I had no idea, my proposal was going to cause such a row or else I would never have moved it. (Laughter.) Mr Jones said he was quite prepared to support Mr Page's motion, and he believed everybody else was. He was also prepared to defend every name that be had proposed on the grounds of what the men had done ifor the town. To say that such a list of names had brought ridicule on anybody was disgraceful in the sight of the world. Such an insinuation should be withdrawn. It was shame- ful. shameful! He must insist on Mr Wilding withdrawing the statement. Mr Wilding said he would withdraw the word "ridicule," and say the list was too one-sided. (hear, hear.) Mr Jones said he did not mind that, and would at once accept it. Mr Wilding said he was afraid the words he used had hardly conveyed his meaning. What he meant was that the list was too one-sided. The chairman said there was not a single name in the list but what was deserving of the honour. Every man would 'be worthy of the position if the Lord Lieutenant appointed him. The only com- ment he had to ma.ke was that some of the names —one or two—were those of young men who might have waited a little longer. Mr Jones And probably they will have to. The Clerk said that as his name was in the un- fortunate list, he wished to say a word or two. He wa-s one of the oldest men in the list, and cer- tainly the oldest inhabitant of Llandrindod Wells. He had never suggested to anyone that his name should be included but what he did complain of was that the list should have been dissected, and the several men said to be Liberals or Conserva- tives. Although he went to a Nonconformist place of worship, he was not a Liberal in the sense in which the word was used. He had never belonged to any political association, and it was taking liberties with his name to associate him with any political party in the way it had been done. It was very unifair, and he objected to it very much. (Hear, hear.) Although he had not sought this lioiiour, yet if he was appointed he should appre- ciate the honour very highly. He was sure Mr Jones would bear him out when he said that he had never directly or indirectly influenced or sought to influence, anybody to have his name in- cluded in the list. He was a Nonconformist, and hoped to ever remain so; and a member of the Congregational Church. It was quite true that another gentleman attended that church, and also their late friend, Nlr Evan Bufton, did so; and so, even if his name was put on, the Congregational Church would only have two of its worshippers on the Bench as before. Mr C. H. Williams I am quite willing for the Congregational Church to have two. The chairman said he was proud to be what he was, 'but he did not despise those who differed from him. It .was a great pity that church and chapel,

Llandrindod and the BenchI i

Llandrindod & the Bench—Continued. I Liberal and Conservative, should have been brought into this matter at all. Mr Wilding Hear, hear. Those are my senti- ments. The chairman added that he also thought it was a pity any allusion had been made to the local Press. The resolution was then agreed to. Mr Jones then asked if it was certain that there would be an objection to the Rector. He certainly thought there was not, as other clergymen bad, sat on the Bench. The clerk said there was no legal reason why the. Rector should not be appointed. It was unanimously and most heartily agreed that the name of the Rector should go forwa.rd; Mr Jones saying he would be no party to striking the name of the Rector off. Mr Page then proposed that the names of Mr Edwin Brown (Granby House), Mr Thomas Evans (councillor), Mr G. P. Careless (Hafod-y-bryn), and Mr Thomas Heighway (Highland Moors) should be added to the list. Objection was taken to the last two names as Mr Careless resides in the parish of Llanyre, whilst it was stated that Mr Heighway had gone to live at Llanwrtyd. to start an opposition show" to Llandrindod Wells. Mr Page then withdrew the last two names, and proposed Mr W. W. Johnson. These names were all seconded. Mr C. H. Williams then proposed, Mr J. L. Wilding, and this was seconded by Mr T. Evans.. Mr J. Jones proposed Mr H. D. Phillips, and Mr C. H. Williams, in seconding, said he asked about Mr Phillips at the last meeting, and was told that his name was not included, as he did not wish to act. Except for that, his name would have been in the original list. Mr T. Evans wished the public to know that his name had been brought forward quite unawares to him. He was in no way responsible. Mr W. A. Sims thought some committee should sit on the complete list and reduce the names. Such a list had never been sent in to the Lord Lieutenant before. He had never sought the honour, and was quite ready to stand down now. His view was that the men recommended should be of sound judgment and of good stand- ing in the town. Men who had been in the town for years and done their best for the place should have the preference. He did not think his own name was worthy to be in the list. He ag- reed that politics and denomination should not be considered, but it was a fact that there was not a Wesleyan Methodist on the whole batch of magistrates for the county. Mr Williams said he was neither a Liberal or a. Tory. C'Oh.")- The Chairman Then you are a jelly. (Laugh- ter.) The Chairman I beg your pardon, Mr Wil- liams. Mr Williams repeated that he was neither, but said his point was that if the names put forward were acceptable to the Conservative party, they. as a council, should accept them. The chairman expressed regret that politics had been brought into the matter at all. The chairman went on to say' that he believed in working men being put on the bench, but they should be men who had done some public work for the county, or for their own association or union. Mr Jones, in course of some further comments, said that this discussion was really ridiculous at a time when they were all supposed to have sunk party for the time being. Mr Page now proposed Mr C. S. W. Harvey. The Bungalow, and Mr C. H. Williams said that if the name of Mr Edwiu Brown were with- drawn, he would propose that gentleman himself. It was then agreed to vote on all the fresh names submitted, and the result was that it was agreed to add the following names to the list :— j Mr J. L. Wilding, Mr Thomas Evans, Mr C. S. W*. Harvey and Mr H. D. Phillips.

RAMC Arrive

R.A.M.C. Arrive AT LLANDRINDOD WELLS. UNIT'S COMPOSITION. The long-expected arrival of the Welsb Unit of the R.A.M.C. took place on Monday afternoon. About 220 men came, plus 10 or 12. who arrived on the previous Saturday. They were met at the railway station by Col. Allender, of the Western Command. They presented a soldier-like appear- ance, and were favourably commented on by the crowd which assembled to greet them. The men were marched straight away and passed into their billets with all possible speed. It transpired that the unit are more mixed than was at first sup- posed. Although Welshmen predominate, there are a number of Englishmen in- the unit, and the students are not solely theological, but comprise men from the Normal Colleges and other Univer- sity students. Many of the theological students from the Welsh Colleges joined before the form- ation of this unit, and are attached to other com- panies. "Trefecca," for instance, sent over 30 students to the corps, and none of them are with this unit. Writing and Games' Rooms. i The Rector is giving his cordial support to the proposal to establish writing and games' room for the. men at the Public Library, and we understand that this project will be pushed forward as ra.pidly as possible. The Castell Collen antiquities will be removed from the museum into the "Mayor's Parlour," and the surveyor (Mr T. L. Oliver, B.Sc.) will have the support of Mr Morgan Morris and Mr Seymour Edwards (representing the Free Churches and the Church of England) in the mak- ing of the needful arrangements.

When Life was Simpler Life was Longer

When Life was Simpler Life was Longer. When the organs begin to weaken, whether early or late in life, the hardworking kidneys usually tire out first, and should have first con- sideration. Failing eyesight, stiff, achy jointS^ rheumatic pains, backache and distressing urination are often due only to weak kidneys. At the first sign of weaknes give the kidneys prompt attention. Drink water freely to flush the kidneys, and use Doan's Backache Kidney Pills to strengthen them. Go back to the Simple Life, to the sensible habits of your boy- hood days. Eat less meat, avoid over-work, ex- cesses and worry; and take more outdoor exercise, rest and sleep. Everybody dreads kidney trouble, but this sen- sible treatment will keep the kidneys in condi- tion, lengthen life, make it easier, and perhaps avert altogether the more serious kidney diseases. Brecon people have recommended Doan's Back- ache Kidney Pills to their friends and neigh- hours 'for over 15 years. The good they do and the continual use of home testimonials inspires an ever increasing confidence in THIS SPECIAL KIDNEY MEDICINE. All dealers, or 2/9 a box from Foster McClellan Co., 8, Wells Street, Oxford Street, London, W.

Rhayader Police Cases I

Rhayader Police Cases., DICENOE TRANSFERRED. I At Rhayader Petty Sessions, on Wednesday, Penry James Powell, Llanyre, pleaded "guilty" to having driven a motor cycle without a light on the highway at 11 o'clock at night. Defend- ant was finedX2. Thomas Roberts, Gwystree farm. Nantmel, was summoned for keeping a dog without a. licence. Defendant said he had made a declaration for that particular dog. The bench imposed a fine of 10/- inclusive. Reuben Owen, Cwmbir, Cwmdauddwr, was fined 7/6 for driving 'without lights on the 24th ult. Richard Lewis, Penphistill, St. Harmons, was also fined 10/ for having been drunk near the police station, Rhayader. P.c. Pitchford proved the case. Alfred Jones, skin-collector, Llanwrthwl, was ordered to pay a fine of 10/- for having been drunk in Rhayader on the 11th ult. The licence of the. Vulcan Arms, Doldowlod, was transferred to Mr Edward Lawrance, 8, Oak- lands, Builth Wells.

Knighton Topics

Knighton Topics. DISCUSSED AT URBAN COUNCIL. RE-ELECTION OF TRIBUNAL. Knighton Urban Council met on 'Wednesday evening, when Mr Joseph Blower presided, the other members present being Messrs. A. M. Pugh, E. Probert, H. Smith, T. A. Lote and T. B. Dove, with Messrs. W. A. Collins (clerk), D. Lewis (surveyor) and R. Thomas (collector). The financial statement for the month showed re- ceipts :—From general district rate, C40 6s 7d; surveyor's stallages, 13/ sheep market tolls, 19/4; highway rate, £14 12s 2d; allotment rents, JE2 Is 6d; cemetery fees, £5 12s; county council, moiety of sanitary officer's salary, £ 29 10s; total receipts, £ 93 14s 7d; treasurer's balance, £ 230 4s lOd; total payments, £.1.35 58 7d. The surveyor reported that during the month, repairs had tbeen attended to in Frydd road and the Cwm that a tree had been uprooted and re- moved that the Cwm sewer had been stopped up, and on opening it, a mason' s chisel and other things had been found that the pumping engine had needed repairs and the defective parts had been sent to the maker's. A circular, received from the Social Welfare Society, requested the council to form a local committee to assist naval and military men to find employment on their re- turn from the war. The chairman said the circular would scarcely affect this locality. There would be so few re- turning who would need assistance. He had his name enrolled as a soldiers' friend by a soc- iety who bad written him and perhaps others of them had, but he thought they might adjourn the formation of the committee till it was re- quired. This course was adopted. May Fair. Mr Marshall Hill applied for the use of the Re- creation Ground for his shows and round-a-bouts for May fair. Mr Lote asked if the council lost money by the Recreation ground last year. On referring to the accounts the clerk stated that last year's receipts for the ground were £ 36 16s 6d, while the expenditure amounted to R43 6s 3d. They had to remember, however, that the ground was used by the children and others for recreation, and was not expected to make profit in all cases. £17 12s was the actual figure paid by Mr Hill last year. although he should, accord- ing to the council's order, have paid C20. The chairman said he thought a reduction had been made because of the bad weather on the first fair day. Mr Dove said tHe money ought to be £ 20, as the keep at that time was very good. They must have the matter quite straight this time. He proposed the ground be let to Mr Hill at V-0. Mr Probert seconded and the resolution was car- ried. A letter was read from the Local Government Board embodying new regulations in connection with the Local Tribunals, and asking the council to appoint a Tribunal to deal with all cases under the Military Service Act. The number of members should be determined according to the needs of the district, but the Tribunal appointed under Lord Derby's scheme might be re-appointed if desirable. Mr Dove proposed that the- existing Tribunal (Messrs. Bache, Blower, Lote, Probert and An- thony), be re-appointed. This was seconded by Mr 'Smith and agreed to.

Cefnllys Licensing Sessions

Cefnllys Licensing Sessions. THE LLANERCH NEW HOTEL. The magistrates present at Cefnllys licensing sessions were Mr T. Thomas-Moore (chairman), and Messrs. Joseph Hurst, J. O. Watkins, Joseph Watkins, J. Hamer, Jeffrey Jones, R. Page, E. M. Jones, J. W. Owens, 0. Owens and J. Evans, with the clerk tMr E. Powell Careless). Chief Constable's Report. The acting-chief constable (Supt. H. Jones) presented the following report :—There are for renewal at this meeting the following licences, viz., full licences, 7 days, 13: six days, 1; total, 14; off-licences (beer, wine and spirits), 2; bil- liard licences, 2; total, 18. There are also two registered clubs in this division. There were 10 persons proceeded against for drunkenness dur- ing the year ended 31st December, 1915, and 9 convicted, as against 9 proceeded against and convicted in the previous year. During the past 12 months, no proceedings have been taken ag- ainst any off the licence-holders. One licence has been transferred, viz., the Severn Arms Hotel, Penybont. By order of the military au- thority, the hours of sale, of intoxicating liquors in this area were temporarily reduced, as from the 7th December last. In this division there were 14 on-licences to a population of 5,780, an average Of one licence to every 413 inhabitants. The average (for the county was one licence to every 248 inhabitants." The chairman said the report was very satis- factory on the whole. The. cases of drunkenness were as last year. The Acting-Chief Constable There is an in-' crease of one. The Chairman Yee, hut the convictions were the same. Do you offer any objections? The Acting-Chief Constable No, sir. The Chairman Then all the licences will be renewed. Mr H. Vaughan Vaughan (solicitor) said he had to apply to their worships for the renewal of the provisional licence granted for the removal of the licence of the Jjlanerch Hotel to another building which it was proposed to erect in the same vicinity as the existing hotel. He need hardly say that, owing to the war, it had been practically impossible to proceed with any new building this year. The chairman said that explanation would be satisfactory for this year at any rate. This year, he thought, a-li would agree there was an excuse for the scheme not having been proceeded with. Mr Vaughan-Vaughan We have to pay the licence fee. It is not very much, but it is some- thing for the county. In reply to an observation from Mr Jeffrey Jones, the chairman said' that last year, and, in- deed, more than once, they ha.d mentioned from the bench that the new hotel ought to be proceed- ed with. This year, however, there was an ex- cuse. Mr Vaughan-Vaughan Yes, sir. I hope by another year we shall all be in a different and better position. There was no other business, but, before fix- ing the sessions for next year, the chairman said he had something to say, and. at his request, the court was cleared. No public announcement was made as to the nature of the business which was taken en camera.

Advertising

Wanted, Buttermakers. "DRITISH Butter is unquestionably better than for- J-J eign, yet the latter is often bought in preference. This is an injustice both to the British producer and to the buyer. It i.« an injury which could easily be avoided. The British housewife believes that butter presenting a rich Roldt-n uniform colour is the ideal. The foreitrn producer meets her wish, and all his butter has the rich golden colour which sells. A per- fectly sale means is provided whereby the British maker enn impart to hi? butter ju?t that golden colour- ing which will commend it to the eye, aa decidedly as its quality will commend it to the p?ate. The remedy is g. Ii;ilmÿ,thBtWE'R Tg)û1l manufactured by OLDFRELI). PATTINSON, & Co., of Manchester, the successful survivor of the sever- est tests at the principal shows, where it has gained Firat CUa'? awards for 3? yeara. EquaUy "atis- F-ai= is the high p'-aMe it has won in the numerous dairies where it is regularly u?ed. Theee competent approvals are due to the absence of any unevenne^ or muddincss in the colouriug, and to it, fact th:: t the use of "SILVFR CHURN" does nou nifect tlw buttei- milk. The butter itseb is not injured in the process it is improved. Its delicate creamy flavour is en- hanced It should be clearly undfr"tood that" SIL- VER CHURN" is a ropetfbl,. product, entirely free from any aniline dye. [A truHraiiT-oe by the makers to this erfect will be piven any user desiring it,). It may 1. obt-ah-ed from Ch« tfi.-r- <»r;d •'•ipply 'n fid. ts. 2. r,, 8s, and Ha bottles. To secure satisfaction obtnin the "SILVER CJiUl:" brand. Free tri; 1 samples irom the manufacturers. ■1 VEU CTIURN P,vrier Otieese 'Ro.r. nt. „ Ch, CokuTiug. hl5

I SHEEP IN THE TURNIPSI

SHEEP IN THE TURNIPS. SEQUEL AT KNIGHTON COUNTY COURT. I FARfEH'S CLAIM SUSTAINED. The only case that came before His Honour Judge William Evans at Knighton County Court, on Wednesday, was one in which Mr Richard j Powell, late of the Lawn farm, Beguildy, and now of The Cwm, C-lunton, claimed £ 4 10s as com- pensation for damage alleged to have been done to turnips by sheep belonging to Mr Win. Price, Cwmyririg, Beguildy. Defendant (Mr W. Price) was represented by I Mr Estyn Jones (of the firm of Messrs. Weyman and Jones, solicitors, Ludlow), and Mr Powell, the plaintiff, conducted his own case. ¡ Plaintiff stated that his claim -was for damage done to turnips by 42 sheep, which were marked "W.P. and which belonged to defendant. His field, about four acres, did not join defendant's land, but it joined a wood. The sheep trespassed in his field, and on Friday, 19th of last February, 18 of them were in the turnips. He sent a man to tell defendant to send for the sheep and get tli4 damage valued. He (plaintiff) got the dam- age valued on the 23rd of February, and offered to let Price off by paying a sovereign. He had sent several bills, be could get no money. It was not what the sheep had eaten, but what they had damaged, that he complained of. The frost would rot the turnips that had been cut. In reply to Mr Estyn Jones, plaintiff said that his claim was from the 19th of February, but the sheep might have been there before. He found them at four o'oclock in the afternoon, he brought them himself, and did not send a note to Mr Price. A note was here produced, stating that plain- tiff had found 20 ewes in his field of turnips bear- ing Price's pitchmark. There would be 5/- to pay, and if defendant refused, like Mr Fulford, plaintiff would recover it. During further cross-examination, plaintiff stat- ed that he was no auctioneer,, but he based his claim on the valuation of Mr McCartney. He had not seen the damage, but he would have settled it for XI at the time, as he did not want to go too low. (Laughter.) Mr Jones I don't want to quarrel with you for bringing cases to this court. I am a lawyer. (Re- newed laughter.) Proceeding, plaintiff said he had no neighbours when he lived at The Lawn. They were "Llan- bister cuckoos." (Laughter.) Mr Price's sheep did all the damage. No one else's had been there before, and the turnips were all right on the 17th. Mr Jones On the 14th January, were 60 of Mr Fulford s sheep in the field and did you drive them off-?--No. nor on the following day. I am making no claim against Mr Fulford. It was not much for Meredith and Fulfor-d to tell lies, when they came from a country where people steal your ploughs and scuffles. (Laughter.) We can say nothing if people make up their minds to tell lies. His Honour Do you leave the turnips in the ground?—Yes—the sheep oat them out. His Honour You have taken Mr McCartney's estimate?—My estimate was nothing. I had not, been on the turnips. My fences were all right, sufficient and in good repair, when I left them. Mr McCartney gave evidence as to the damage done by sheep, which he valued at R4 10s. Mr W. Price said that, on the 19th of Febru- ary, he received a postcard from Mr Powell about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, and gave it. to his shep- herd (Brown), with 51- for Mr Powell. Brown brought back 46 sheep, but plaintiff would not re- ceive. the 5/ He (defendant) went through the turnips on the 11th of February. They were cut here and there. He first heard of McCartney's estimate on the 1st of March. Powell turned his own sheep on the turnips on that date, and he was leaving the farm on the 25th. Threepence per head per week was a good price for tacking out sheep. In reply to plaintiff, defendant said Brown did not tell him to get the damage valued. Edward Brown (defendant's shepherd) gave evi- dence in confirmation of statements made by Mr Price, and added that he fed the sheep in the morning, and, at dinner-time, they were in their own pasture. Mr Fulford (The Pound) stated that Powell's fences were down and the turnip field was open to the hill, although there were other fields be- tween. The land was much trespassed. He saw some, of the rows had been damaged. It was a small crop. The turnips varied from the size of a hen egg to that of a small orange. His Honour said this was a case in which the amount to be paid was the question. There were three courses—(1) the claiiii,, T-4 10s, was too far too high. (2) 20/ which though not so high, was disproportionate. Plaintiff's first estimate, 5/- for 20 sheep, seemed a small sum, but it was 3d per head, and the sheep had only been in the turnips a short time. It was reasonable, and, calculating for the 46 sheep on the same basis, the amount would be 11/6. Defendant had paid into court 12/6. which was slightly above the estimate, and would have been a good contract price for a week's keep for that number of sheep. He awarded that sum as damages, which amounted to giving judg- ment for the defendant. Plaintiff would have to pay the costs of the esse. The case, which lasted more than an hour, created much interest among 'farmers and others who filled the court.

ILate Miss Bryan Llangunllo I

I Late Miss Bryan, Llangunllo. I IMPRESSIVE FUNERAL. The funeral of Miss A. Bryan, of "The Crun- goed," Llangunllo, took place in Llangunllo churchyard on Friday, amidst many manifesta- tions of sympathy and respect. The coffin was borne on a wagon, drawn by two black horses. A large congregation had assembled at the parish I church. The officiating clergy were the Rev. J. W. Williams (vicar), assisted by the Rev. J. Evans (rector of Llangammarch Wells. The hymn, "Let saints on earth-in concert sing," was sung, and the "Dead March" in "Saul" was played by Mr H. LI. Vaughan (organist). The chief mourners were Mr W. S. Bryan (brother), Mr and Miss Stephens, Pembridge (cousins), Mrs Vaughan, Abcott (cousin), Mr J .Owen, Cwm- brvth (cousin), Miss R. Owen, Llandrindod Wells (cousin), Mr G. Rogers, Craven Arms (cousin), and Mr R. Parker, Knighton. The bearers were Messrs. T. Jones, D. Evans, T. Watson, T. Jones, W. K. Lewis, E. Davies, P. Edwards and A. Lewis. The grave had been beautifully lined, and the coffin, which was of panelled oak with massive silver fittings, bore the inscription, "Alice Bryan, born June 22nd, 1861, died Febru- ary 5th, 1916. There was a very large assem- blage. Wreaths were sent by the following :— Brother, Carrie and Pearl, Dick (The Wern- lands), Miss R. Owen, J. and A. Jones, Misses Griffiths, Mr and Mrs Davies, Mr and Mrs J. C. Jones, Mr and Mrs Hamer, Rev. J. and Mrs Wil- I r and '?\llss Tbonias- liams, Miss A. Owen, Mr and Miss Thomas- Moore, Mr and Mrs Lewis Jones, Messrs. W. and A. West, Mr Owen, Mr and Mrs Morris, Mr and Mrs Evans, Miss R .Evans, Mr and Miss B. Stephens, Mrs Evans, Mrs Watson, Miss C. Marpole, W. and M. Pugh, Mr and Mrs Lote, Mr and Mrs Medlicott, Mr and Mrs A. Lewis, Rev. and Mrs Evans, Mr and Mr W. K. Lewis, Mrs E. Jones, Mr and Mrs Lome. A. and M. Malone, Mrs Welsh, Mrs Duggan, Miss S. E. Jones, Mr and Mrs E. M. Parker, Miss G. Edwards, Mr and Mrs J. T. Jackson, Mr and Mrs Done, Mr and Mrs D. Evans, Mrs Jones, Mr E. Davies, Miss C. A. Jones, Miss M. Bryan, Miss M. and Mr G. Rogers and Mrs Vaughan. The coffin was supplied by Mr A. Lewis, Gravel, j and the funeral arrangements were carried out by Mr L. Jones (of Messrs. Rees Jones & Co., Knighton). 498

I Sir Francis Edwards M P I

Sir Francis Edwards, M. P. I We regret to state 'that Sir Francis Edwards, M.P., is not making such good progress ap was I hoped. He had expected to have left the Nursing Home early this week, but we understand that he will not be able to do so before the end of the week, if then. He is getting better, but very slowly. í'

No title

David Rice Evans (Forest View, ¡ Llandovery), who has been in several important engagements, including Loos, and is now home on i short leave, has been presented by friends with an illuminated dial watch and a. sum of money.

Advertising

.————————— BABY WILES. Splendid Recovery after Measles Baby Wiles, of 42, Coleridge Avenue, Manor Park, was very weak and poorly after three weeks of measles. The mother tried all sorts of foods, but could get nothing to suit her baby until she fed her on Virol. Since taking Virol she has so improved that she won a prize at the East Ham Baby Show. Mrs. Wiles says:— "Virol is the finest stuff I there is for babies." VIROL In Measles and Whooping Cough Virol should be given to children of whatever age. Virol increases their power of resistance and recovery and strengthens them against dangerous after-effects. In Glass & Stone Jars, 1/ 1/8 & 2/11. YIROL, LTD., imim, Old Street, B.C. S.H.B.

Post for Sir Hamar Greenwood MP

Post for Sir Hamar Greenwood, M.P. RADNORSHIRE ASSOCIATIONS. Temp. Lieut.-Col. Sir Haraa r-Green wood, South Wales Borderers, was, on Thursday, gazet- ted deputy assistant adjutant-general, a temporary appointment at the "War Office- Sir Hamar Greenwood is the well-known M.P. for Sunderland. At the outbreak of war he offer- ed his services in a military capacity and was en-, trusted with the raising of one of the Gwent Battalions of the South Wales Borderers, which, he commanded for a- time and which is now in France. Sir Hamar, who is a. graduate of the Toronto University, is the son of Mr John Hamar Greenwood, barrister-at-law, of Whitby, Ontario. He was born in 1870. and in 1911 married Mar- gery, daughter of Mr Walter Spencer, of Fownhope Court, Herefordshire. He is a descendant of a Radnorshire family. He served in the Depart- -itient of Agriculture at Ontario, and was one of the first officers of the King's Colonials' Yeomanry (now King Edward's Horse), of which he is a captain on the Reserve List. He was admitted a. 'barrister at Gray's Inn in 1906 and of the pro- vince of N. Brunswick in 1913. Between 1906 and 1910 he acted as Parliamentary Secretary to Major Winston Churchill at the Colonial Office and the Board of Trade. Between 1906 and 1910 he was the Liberal M.P. for York.

WELSH BATTLE MARCH

WELSH BATTLE MARCH. AIR "RHYFELGYRCH CAPTEN MORGAN. Freedom's your watchword and your constant boast; Now to her help and join her host! Let not conscription show her alien face, Ever disdained by our brave race. Up to arms and put the Turk and Hun, Austrian and Bulgarian on the run; Crush the Kaiser, seize the turban'd Turk; Hurl him out of Europe—to the work Belgium and Serbia feel the tyrant' s heel; Mailed is his fist; besmeared his steel Shrines descreated homes a smothered wail; Sabre the ruffian make him quail Up to arms etc. Now is the moment! Now or nevermore Come and protect our sea-girt shore. Strike out for Belgium succour brave allies Shatter the nest of greed and lies. Up to arms! etc. I fothers of heroes, nurtured on their breast Those who have given of their best All say they'd sooner lose them in the strife Than coddle "shirkers" all through life. Up to arms! etc. Forth then to battle. Up with all your might! This is a war for God and right! All feuds must vanish we've a common foe; Then with your comrades-Forward go! Up to arms! and put the Turk and Hun, Austrian and Bulgarian on the run; Crush the Kaiser! Grip the turban'd Turkl Strength be to your elbow—to the work DAVID DAVIKS- I Bronwydd, Penarth.

Advertising

iiiiBiiiiiiiiBirtieta |HAYIMirs| HAT i AN'S BA M I CURES K COUGHS&COL  ,< Bœles 1/3 and Sf-. Of &U Chemists and Sres. j 111