Collection Title: Brecon & Radnor express Carmarthen and Swansea Valley gazette and Brynmawr district advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
20 articles on this page
Advertising

THE NEW Lot: Delta cwTKLKGHBoots^AvnRRivEO! EADIE'S, Builth, Llandrindod, Talgarth & Llanwrtyd. !lid 1 AND SECURE A PALR. .0"

THE LONG TRAIL i

THE LONG TRAIL. ■ SMART CAPTURE BY YSTRADGYNLAIS OFFICERS. HEAVY PENALTY FOR POULTRY-STEALING. I At Ystradgynlais police court, on the 5th inst., Mr E. G. Benthall presiding, a charge of stealing a fowl, value 12/6, the property of Mr Isaac P. Williams, Caerbont, Abercrave, was heard. Henry Davies (haul- ier), of Bwllfa, Abercrave, was the defendant, and was represented by Mr D. J. Clarke, Swansea. Inspector Williams said that on Sunday morning last, in consequence of a complaint received, he went to Caerbont Farm, Abercrave, accompanied by Sergt. Williams. In company with Isaac P. Williams, they went into a field near the road, and there saw a port- able fowl-house, a quantity of blood, and a trail of footprints in some soft mud near the base of the fow- house. Witness then traced a similar footprint across a field towards the Castle Hotel, and, also, found an occasional white feather. Other footprints were also discovered. The Inspector, continuing, said how he went to the Bwllfa Cottage near the Rheolau Arms. Upon being told that defendant was not at home, the inspector asked the landlady's permission to examine some boots in the house, and then left. Returning later, they found defendant in, and he was asked to produce his boots, and was also told that a fowl had been stolen from 4Caerbont, and that footprints had been found. De- fendant was ordered to remove his boots and put an- other pair on, and asked to accompany the inspector to ttpe fowl-house. The boots were compared with the -footprints, and witness then arrested defendant and charged him with the offence, to which he said, "You are wrong. I was never near the- place, I'm sure." The inspector then produced casts of the footprints, and compared them with the boots (produced). He stated that the boots had at least 50 marked peculiari- ties, some of which he pointed out to the bench. Cross-examined, the inspector said that defendant had told him he never had a pocket knife. Similar foot- prints to those near the fowl-house were also found -on the canal bank. He did not pick up the feathers. There was a trail of footprints and feathers from the fowl-house to defendant's home. He had also visited the home of Henry Houlder on suspicion. Isaac P. Williams, Caerbont Farm, said that on Sunday, in consequence of information given by his son, he went to the fowl-house and found that a White Leghorn cockerel was missing. Blood, feathers and footprints were found near the poultry house, and the matter was reported to the police. He valued the bird -at 12/6. In cross-examination, complainant said that the in- spector did not put the boot into the imprint. He did not keep any of the feathers which were in the field. He had never seen Davies on the premises. John Jones, landlord of the Castle Hotel, Abercrave, said that he saw the defendant on Saturday in the bar of the hotel, and he left at about 9 o'clock. The hotel was about quarter-of-a-mile from the fowl-house by road, but across the Held it would be less. Mr Clarke submitted that there was no case to an- swer, and there was no direct evidence against his client, but the bench ruled otherwise, and, when charged, defendant pleaded "not guilty." Dd. Hy. Davies said he earned about R2 10s a week as a colliery haulier at Abercrave. He denied that he was at Caerbont on the night of the theft, and knew noth- ing about the matter. He finished work on Saturday about 4 o'clock, but went out at 6.10 to the Rheolau, then to the Lamb and Flag, and, later, to the Castle, where he had a cup of Bovril. Cross-examined by P.s. Williams, defendant said no one had worn the boots except himself. Sergt. Williams: Why did you go home over the •Canal Bank?—I always go that way. Defendant further stated that he was home on the night in question before his landlord (Edgar Griffiths). Edgar Griffiths, collier, Bwllfa, Abercrave, said he -had served 17 months in France. He spoke to being in company of defendant on Saturday night, and left him at the Lamb and Flag, reaching home after Davies. Witness did not think that defendant had time to go to Caerhont from the time he had last seen him. In cross-examination, witness denied he was in the hotel at 9.45. If the evidence of Mr Jones, of the Castle Hotel were to be believed, the man would have had enough time to go to Caerbont. Mrs A. Griffiths, wife of the previous witness, said that on the night in question her husband and defend- ant were in the house at 9.40. No fowls had been brought to her home by defendant. He was not the worse for drink, but he was not perfectly sober. Four previous cases were proved agaiwfet defendant, in which the theft of poultry largely figured. The bench considered it a clear case, and inflicted a fine of £10, or two months' imprisonment. He was given seven days in which to pay.

Advertising

Rtt?f)? C It is the ?71 i7u olive oil in PURITAN J SOAP which ???? saves the K; I li D l clothes. no j

Brecon Horse Mart

Brecon Horse Mart. OPINIONS AS TO SUCCESS. The question of a horse-mart for Brecon aagin came up at the Chamber of Trade on the 12th inst. The sec- retary said a letter had been received from the Secre- or- tary of the Farmers' Union, in which he stated that they were willing to do all in their power to establish a mart, but he was rather doubtful as to whether it could be accomplished, They had appointed a commit- tee as requested, and he suggested that they should meet on Friday. Mr Howell Powell (auctioneer) wrote that he was ready to co-operate with the Chamber of Trade in the establishment of a horse-mart. Mr T. J. Phillips (auctioneer) wrote that the foal-show and sale which he held were quite successful. He had every confidence that their efforts to establish a horse-mart would be successful, and he was willing to do all he possibly could to make it a success. Messrs. David and W. J. Price also wrote to the same effect. No answer had been received from the Secretary of the Shire Horse Society.

POULTRY KEEPING

POULTRY KEEPING. By "FEATHERS." I think, perhaps, that some of my experiences i poultry feeding may be helpful to others, and, therefor,. I will recount them to the best of my ability. I haw fed poultry on the wet mash system. Finding it was a great labour to me, I have tried lately the dry mash feeding, and I have come to the conclusion that the latter way is by far the more satisfactory. It saves much trouble and time for the busy house-wife and gives better results. I have reared poultry for a few years with good suc- cess. I hardly ever lose a chick from the shell, and I attribute this to my love of rearing young things and to the care and trouble I take with them. Before the war, the work was easy, as I only reared comparatively few, but now, to help our country in these trying times of food shortage, every6ne who is not nursing or munition-making or doing anything else for their coun- try, should re-double their efforts to increase the egg and poultry supply. Other years I have usually reared from 50 to 60 fowls, but this year I have increased it to over 200 head of poultry and ducks. As labour is short, I tend and manage the farm-yard myself, feed- ing, watering and cleaning out the fowl.houses. Any- one who has done it knows how much time is entailed in such work, as fowls must be kept clean and well looked after to repay one. Hitherto, I have fed the fowls on the wet mash sys- tem of mixing thoroughly to a crumbly consistency two or three different meals. -To mix sufficient of such food for 200 fowls is hard work, and when it is dis- tributed as evenly as possible, it is quite unsatisfactory, as you will find that the strong, greedy fowls, in the rush for- food, get most of it. They gorge and gobble till it is gone, while the weaker ones get compara- tively little. It is the same with the grain feeds dur. ing the day. This unfair distribution of food troubled me, as I felt for the small and weak ones. One day, when reading my poultry journal, I saw a good article on the dry mash feeding. I read how the dry mixture of two or three meals was always kept before the fowls in hoppers in the scratching sheds, or runs, and how the birds fed from these hoppers whenever they liked. The weak and strong alike had their turn. They cannot eat so much dry mash at a time, and so there is plenty for all. It explained how the birds were always con- tented and flourished. I wondered if my birds would take to it. Anyway, I thought I would give it a trial. I therefore fixed up boxes in my runs and scratching sheds (all my fowls are on free range, even in winter). I put into these deep boxes a mixture of one part bran, one part Harswood complete poultry meal, one part Old Calabar 'Laon,' and half-part meat and bone meal. I left the fowls to try it, and, when I returned, to my astonishment, from the first day I found some fowls always with their heads in it, contentedly picking and eating what they wanted. I feed grain twice daily- 12 and 3 o'clock—scattered in dry leaf litter. The dry leaves I collect and put in the houses and runs. I can- not speak too highly of the same as a litter, as it takes all offensive smells away and is always dry and clean under the fowls. The dry mash I mix up at night and put it all ready in the hoppers, where the fowls find it in the morning. Then, if you are busy with household duties, you need not visit your fowls till 11 or 12 to give them fresh water and scatter some grain. I have also a few grain automatic feeders on the farm. The birds can feed themselves as they like. By this simple method, I find I can manage a large poul- try farm without being over-worked. I can show good results, too, as my hens and pullets are laying now in December. One of my Buff Orpington pullets laid 30 eggs in 36 days, beginning on October 13th, which is quite a good record. I should like to hear other people's opinions, as one learns much by comparing notes. I hope to bring up all my chicks this spring on dry mash and chick food always before them, as I am sure wet mash is not good for chicks. Later on, I hope I will be able to report good results.

I Bible Society at the Spa j

I Bible Society at the Spa. j I PRESIDENT AND THE WORK. The annual meetings of the local auxiliary of the British and Foreign Bible Society were held at Llan- drindod Wells on Wednesday, when the deputation, Rev. Crwys Williams, of Swansea, addressed a child- ren's meeting, and, also, a public meeting. Both ser- vices were held at the Congregational Church, and the president (Mr D. C. Davies) was in the chair on both occasions. In the evening, Mr Jansen Griffith, on behalf of the secretaries, submitted the financial statement, which, however, was far from being complete. The year start- ed with a balance of R2 13s 5d in hand, and the follow- ing-further sums had been received :-Miss Bradley, collector, Rl 7s 6d; collection at last annual meeting, 19/1; Rev. Arthur Edwards, collected in Llandrindod Rural and part of the South Ward, 92 Is; Mrs Owen (Merlwood), collected in South Ward, £2 12s 6d; Miss Owen (Brookville), collected in South Ward, £ 2 2s; Mrs Baillie and Miss Edwards (Tycanol), collected in West Ward, £1 Os 8d. The collection in the other wards has not yet been completed. The president observed that the collection was, as yet, far from being worthy of Llandrindod Wells, but they could rely upon the other collectors completing their work at their earliest possible convenience. He v, as proud of his position as president of the local auxiliary, having been associated with the society throughout his life. He remembered his parents put- ting his name down as a subscriber when he was a child. and, also, attending the meetings when Dr. Thos. Phillips, of Hereford, was the deputation. He was fol- lowed bv the Rev. Henry Griffiths (Swansea), Dr. Dickens-Lewis (Shrewsbury), Dr. Cyndyllan Jones (Car- diff) and Rev. Eurcf Walters, and now they welcomed the Rev. Crwvs Williams, of Swansea, who was ome of the crowned bards of Wales. The president proceeded to enlarge upon the great work done by the society for missionary societies of all the churches, mentioning that the Church of England had missions in which 180 dif- ferent languages and dialects were used, and that in 170 of these languages aud dialects the church was de- pendent upon this society for their versions of the Scriptures. The Free Churches were all similarly indebt- ed to the society. The society had converted the awful world-wide struggles which was going on into a glorious opportunity for circulating the Scriptures, and, in this connection the deputation subsequently mentioned that the society had supplied the Scriptures to five million soldiers in fifty different languages. At the close of the meeting, Mr Jeffrey Jones, J.P., moved a vote of thanks to the deputation, confessing that his stirring and eloquent address had brought home to him the fact that he ought to do more for this society, and he hoped many others had been similarly convinced. Mr E. W. Cole seconded, and this was agreed to. A similar vote of thanks was accorded to the secre- taries, treasurer, president and collectors, and Mr Cole (who provided hospitality for the deputation). Rev. Austin Edwards (Howey) sent an apology for his absence, and those who took part included Rev. Stephen George, B.A., Rev. James Jones, lUk., Rev. D. Arthur Davies and Mr H. D. Phillips.

Advertising

Insurance Clerkship

Insurance Clerkship. BRECONSHIRE COMMITTEE'S SELECTION. CLOSE VOTING. I Of the four selected from the list of candidates for the clerkship of the Breconshire Insurance Committee to appear before the committee, on the 12th inst., only two put in an appearance, namely, Mr T. J. Parry, Brecon, and Mr S. R. Elms, Cardiff. Mr Richard Wilson, Preston, had written asking whether his travelling ex- penses would be paid, and Mr C. D. Willett, Northamp- ton, wired to say that he had missed his connection at Hereford and could not arrive until later in the day. The committee (over which Mr W. S. Miller presided) discussed the point whether they would proceed with the appointment or adjourn the meeting for the pre- sence of the two absent candidates. Ultimately, it wa,s proposed that they proceed, and if the two, or one of the two, finally selected were absent, an adjourn- ment would be made for an interview. For this pro- position, 15 voted for and 15 against, the chairman giv- ing his casting vote for the proposition. It was then decided to interview Mr Elms and Mr Parry. Before doing so, Dr. Black Jones suggested that one of the questions asked the candidates -should be: "Are you familiar with the regulations of the Welsh Insurance Commissioners?" Dr. Jones (Crickhowell): I should like to ask whether any member of this committee is familiar with them? (Laughter.) Mr J. Pritchard (Talgarth): We are not applicants, doctor! (Renewed laughter.) Another question asked of the candidates was whether he had ever assisted, or had been responsible for, the preparation of the accounts of any public body for a Government auditor? The first vote resulted as follows:— Mr Wilson. 26 Mr Parry. 25 Mr Elms 22 Mr Willett 20 The second vote resulted:— Parry, 22. Elms, 20. Wilson, 20. A vote on Elms and Wilson resulted in favour of the latter by 18 to 13. Mr T. J. Parry, Brecon, and Mr Wilson, Preston, were therefore selected to appear before the committee the following Tuesday for final selection.

How Many

How Many? ( How many bilious attacks- have you had? If few, you should be thankful If many, then you are entitled to sympathy. But sympathy won't cure or even relieve you of this trouble. And the trouble, a.s we know, arises through the faulty action of the liver. It is apparent, then, that to be free of Biliousness or Bilious Headaches you must keep this important organ of the digestive system healthily active. Through the many years that Mother Seigei's Syrup has been before the public, in no one thing has it been more suc- cessful than in conquering or preventing bilious- ness. Proof of this we have from the thousands of people who have voluntarily testified to the fact. Mrs Robins, of Walnut Tree Hall, Charlton, Wilts, says:—"From early infancy. I had been subject to Biliousness. But between the ages of 16 'to 21 I think was my worst time. Headaches were common, and some bouts of biliousness 'lasted for three days on end. After one bottle of Mother Seigel's Syrup I felt a benefit, and four bottles made me we'll, and I have been so right up to now, a period of close on 30 years." What Mother Seigel's Syrup did for Mrs Hobinsit is capable of doing for you. Put it to the test to-day.

Teachers SalariesI

Teachers' Salaries. BRECON ASSOCIATION MEETING. 1 A general meeting of the Brecon and District Teachers' Association was held at Mount Street Council School, Brecon, on the 9th inst. Mr C. W. Gulbridge, Bronllys, presided. A vote of condolence was passed Mr and lfrs Morris, Hay. It was unanimously decided to adopt the following resolution of the Manchester Teachers' Association "(a) That, with a view to assisting Local Education Authorities to afford vitally necessary relief to teachers in respect of the great increase in the cost of living this meeting calls upon the executive of the National Union of Teachers to petition the Government as fol- lows:—'That an immediate grant from the National Exchequer, at the rate of V-6 per annum for each quali- fied teacher, be made to all Local Education Authori- ties for addition forthwith to the salaries at present received.' The opinion was freely expressed that with the clos- ing of so many of the men's training colleges, in ad- dition to the large number of male teachers on active service, the Local Education Authority would find it difficult to secure the services of competent teachers for some time to come. The members were unanimous in their disapproval of the action of the L.E.A. in excluding married women teachers from benefits under the war bonus scheme.

I RheumatismKidney Trouble

Rheumatism—Kidney Trouble. Rheumatism is due to uric acid and crystals in the joints and muscles, the result of excessive uric acid in the system that the kidneys failed to remove as nature intended, and this acid is also the cause of backache, lumbago, sciatica, gout, urinary trouble, stone, gravel, dropsy. Estora Tablets, a specific based on modern medical science, are the successful treatment, and have cured numberless obstinate' cases. after the failure of all other tried remedies, which accounts for them superseding out-of-date medicines sold at a price be- yond all but the wealthy. Estora Tablets fully war- rant their description-an honest remedy at an honest price, 1/3 per box of 40 tablets or 6 for 6/9. All Chemists or postage free from Estora Co., 132, Charing Cross Road, London, W.C. Brecon Agent, Walter Gwillim, M.P.S., Medical Hall; Builth Wells Agent, T. A. Coltman, M.P.S., The Pharmacy. 888p

I Builth Guardians

Builth Guardians. [ CONSIDERATION OF TENDERS. Present at the last meeting of Builth Board of Guard- ians were 3Ir Thos. Davies (chairman), Rev. S. H. Wenham, Rev. D. Lewis, and Messrs. J. Jones, W. Pro- thero, R. Powell, Dd. Davies (Brynhaul), Jas. Pryce, Isaac Davies, Thos. Pugh, Dd. Davies (Poityn), C. W. Woosnam, Ed. Owen, W. W. Lenftàrd (deputy-clerk), T. P. Lewis (relieving-officer) and D. J. Richards (mas- ter). A letter was read, requesting the Union to join the Vagrancy Committee of Glamorganshire, Monmouth- shire and Breconshire. The deputy-clerk explained that that Union, Hay Un- ion and Brecon Union were the only ones which had not joined. The chairman said the decision they came to at a previous meeting was that, if Hay and Brecon Unions joined, they would follow suit. The previous decision was again unanimously agreed to. A letter was read from the late Mrs A. L. Careless (Llandrindod Wells), asking the Union to contribute its usual donation towards the Llandrindod Wells Nursling Association. Rev. S. H. Wenham proposed, and it was agreed, that the usual donation of 10/6 be forwarded. Tenders for the supply of meat, grocery and provisions for three months, from January 1st, were also receiv- ed. Three tenders for the supply of meat were con- sidered, and the contract of Messrs. A. Davies and Son (butchers, High Street), the old contractors, was ac- cepted. Only one tender for the supply of grocery and provisions was received, the contractors being Messrs. W. Price and Co., Ltd. (High Street). The contract was accordingly entered into. 11

Advertising

THE GREAT SKIN CURE. BUDDEN'S S.R. SKIN OINTMENT will cure — Itching after one application, destroys every form of Eczema; heals old Wounds and Sores acts like a charm on Bad Legs; is infallible for Piles; Prevents Cuts from Festering will cure Ringworm in a few days; removes the most obsti- nate Eruptions and Scurvy. Boxes 9d and 1/3. —Agents for Brecon, Mr Stanton and Mr Morris, High Street, Chemists; Builth Wells, W. Price & Co., T. A. Coltman; Llandovery, J. Nicholas, Chemist Hay, J. L. Davies and Son; Talgarth, J. Parry, Chemist; Crickhowell, Mr Kirkland, Chem- ist; Brynmawr, Mr A. M. Jones, Chemist; Knigh- ton, Mr Perkins, Chemist; Pontardulais, Mr Jonee, Chemist. b987 j

Breconshire AppealsI

Breconshire Appeals. I Farmers Sceptical of Substitution I CHAIRMAN'S CLEAR STATEMENT. WELL-KNOWN FLOCK MASTERS AND THEIR I SHEPHERDS. Breconshire Appeal Tribunal sat at Brecon on Wednesday in last week for the whole day, dealing with a large number of cases principally from the Bre- con rural (local) tribunal. Members present were Messrs. David T. Jeffreys < chairman). W. S. Miller, H. Evan Thomas, Ed. Butler and W. F. Parry de Winton with the clerk (Mr H. F. W. Harries). Mr Gwilym C. James represented the military authorities and Mr Owne Price, the Board of Agriculture. j Brecon Town Cases. I In the application for further exemption on behalf of Albert E. Hughes (32), secretary and accountant to a Colliery Company, by his employers, Mr Best (military representative) said Hughes had been before the Medi- cal Board, who had ordered him to report himself for re-examination in three months' time. He suggested exemption just to cover that time Exemption was granted till 1st March. In an adjourned case, Roland Hopkins (IS), dental mechanic, Mr Best undertook in deference to the em- ployers' wishes that the man should not be called up until 9th January. The Chairman: You are able to give that undertaking? Mr Best: Yes. The Chairman Very well, 9th January. In the cases of Mr J. O. Jackson, Brecon, and Mr J. Clark, Brecon, photographers, the tribunal granted no further exemption, but left it in the hands of the mili- tary representative net to call these men up till Janu- ary 16th. Hay Brothers. The causes of Mr A .W .Watkins (37), baker and gen- eral manager, Hay, and his brother, Mr F. G. Watkins (35), baker, again came before the tribunal. At the last hearing the case of A. W. Watkins was adjourned to enable the case of his brother to be reviewed. Mr Jones Williams, solicitor, appeared for F. G. Watkins. ) The Chairriian The case was adjourned on the under- standing that the younger brother was willing to serve. If that is so do you make that offer? Mr Jones Williams said the two ment were engaged in tJ10 business. They took two turns, the elder in the morning and the younger in the afternoon. They had a 20 mile round and baked about ten or twelve sacks of flour a week. The two had an interest in the busi- ness, the mother was feeble and aged, and could not do anything in the shop. Appellants S3 id they had the oldest business in the town. They had been passed in low categories and they considered it was in the national interest that they should remain in their present employment. If one were taken a substitute for him would have to be found if the business were to be carried on. They were the only dealers of salt in the town. The Chairman: 0 yes, you are the man who had the monopoly of salt in Hay. (Laughter). Appellant: We got out of five tons one fortnight this winter. Mr Gwilym James: They are both single men. One of the Appellants: And well over the age. The Chairman: The tribunal decided that one of you will have to serve, which is it to be? If you can't de- cide I will. Applicant: You had better decide. The Chairman The one who has passed in Class B, that is Arthur Wm. Watkins, and conditional exempt- ion to F. G. Watkins. Appellant: Will you give me time until loth January. The Chairman: Perhaps Mr James will not call you up until then. Mr James If it pleases you, sir. What Substitution Means. I There were a large number of appeals by farmers ag- ainst decisions of the Brecon rural tribunal in cases of men under 30, the local tribunal having refused exempt- ion subject to a substitute being provided. In the first of these cases, the chairman made an im- portant pronouncement with respect to making it clear what was meant by substitution. Mr Lewis W. H. Jones, solicitor, appeared for appel- lant in this case and said he understood that the local tribunal had rejected this and similar cases without hearing them Oti their merits. The Chairman In this case as there is one son left who can manage the selling of the stock and so on, we think it is a case of substitution. We want to make our case quite clear with regard to substitution. This man is exempted until a substitute is found, such sub- stitute to be approved of by the agricultural representa- tive, and unless so approved of, his exemption continues. Mr Owen Price: So far I have received no instruct- ions at all in that matter. The Chairman But. I understand, you have appointed representative.s in various districts. Mr Owen Price Yes, but none of them have received instructions yet. Mr G. C. James: They will hear in the course of a day or two. The Chairman Very well, you don't get this man un- less a substitute is provided to the satisfaction of the agricultural representative. In several cases the Tribunal varied the finding of the local tribunal to conditional exemption, the chair- man expressing the opinion of the Tribunal that they were cases in which no proper substitute could be found. Many of the appellants were sceptical as to the value of a substitute. "I don't know," said one, "that you can find one capable of doing what he can do. Tlv Chairman: Oh, yes, they are going to find them no-i who can do everything. (Laughter). Married Men in By-Takes. In another case appellant pointed out that the dif- ficulty he had with regard to accepting a substitute was that the man lived in a by-take and had a wife and children. He could not turn them out. The Chairman: We recognise the difficulty of sub. stituting these married men living in by-takes, and we grant conditional exemption. Tenant Farmers Appeal. The court occupied a considerable time in the hear-" ing of the appeal of Mr David Roderick Williams, Bryn- tymawr, Llandilofawr (25). single, a tenant farmer, to whom the Brecon rural tribunal had refused further ex- emption on the 25th October. Mr Careless, Llandrindod, appeared for appellant, who said his farm was 123 acres. He took the farm as tenant on the 29th September, 1915. Previous to that he had been living with his father at Maesybwlch, where his father and brother lived. Mr Careless: It has been suggested at the local tri- bunal that this tenancy at Bryntymawr was, on ac- count of your being taken for the war. Did you try to take farms before you took Bryntymawr?—Yes. How long ago?—Three or four years. Do these letters set forth your endeavours to take a farm before?—Yes. Witness further stat-ed that his father set him up at Bryntvmawr and gave him the stock. An agreement was entered into when the farm was taken which show- ed the price of the stock and the taking of the farm. He had a. housekeeper on the farm. He produced rent and bank receipts. He was entirely separate from his father and on his own. Replying to Mr C. G. James appellant said the farm he had gone into belonged to a brother-in-law. Mr James asked for the receipts of the money paid for the stock. These were dated February and May 1916. The Chairman: Were these two receipts given on the same day?- Yea. Mr Davies said he let Bryntymawr because his two servant bovs had joined the Army. R931 was paid for the stock by Mr Williams' father. The amount was paid in two sums. Mr Williams was the sole tenant of the farm. By the Chairman: Before he let the farm to appel- lant, he had two workmen on it. They both joined the Army. Mr Wm. Williams, father of appellant, said he had been trying for sometime past to set his son up in a farm. His son was now tenant of Bryntymawr, and he had given him the stock there. He had another son at Maesybwlch. After retirement for consultation, the chairman on returning into court said: On the evidence before us we grant conditional exemption in this case. j Mr McTurk's Shepherds. Mr George Tudor, solicitor, appeared for Mr McTurk, Cnewr, who appealed against the decision of the Brecon rural tribunal in respect to five shepherds, one of whom was a stockman as well, all under 30 years of age, to whom exemption had been refused subject to substitu- tion. Mr McTurk said he had 20 permanent male employees. Of those, two had been called to the colours for the 1st January. Of the five men for whom he was appeal- ing, Evan Jones had to look after 1,200 acres, attending to 1,000 sheep in summer and 600 in winter. It took him seven hours to go round the sheep walk, which was 1,100 and 1,200 feet in altitude. His medical certificate was for service abroad. David Evan Jones was shep- herd and stockman on Tredustan and Tredomen farms. John William Davies was a shepherd at Pantmawr, ab- out lit miles distant from Cnewr. He had about 1,200 to 1.300 sheep to look after in summer and about 800 in winter. The ewes lamber on the open hill. Wm. Ferguson, Blaengirherich, had about 1,200 to 1,300 sheep and Evan Davies. Blaencray, was shepherd on the enclosed land around Cnewr. Five of the 20 men on the list were ineligible. The total acreage of their takings was over 12,000, permanent grass over 845, clo- ver and rotation grasses 382, other arable land 75 acres, mountain heath and moor 10,900 acres. Further replying to Mr Tudor, appellant said all these sheep walks were on a very high altitude and required very strong men to do the work. It was no good taking on men who were physically unfit for the work. They must he strong men to stand the climate. Without these men he would be unable to produce the stock. The Chairman: Must they necessarily be Scotchmen ? (Laughter). Mr Tudor: They are not all Scotchmen, some are Welshmen. Mr G. C. James (to appellant): You have added 500 acres to your acreage within the last two years ?-:My late father might have, I have not. Altogether there are about 14 farms in your taking now?—I cannot exactly count 14. What has become of all the tenant farmers? 14 farms and the tenant farmers are gone. Mr McTurk: There are no houses on them. Mr James: There was at one time. Mr McTurk: No, they belonged to the Crown at one time, and there were no houses on them. Mr James: Having regard to the fact that there were 14 farms at one time with tenant farmers on, I think you should be as generous as possible in allowing sub- stitutes to be provided and not ask, so to speak, for your pound of flesh in these cases. The Chairman: If you had a F itable substitute for Evan Davies you would be satisfied. Mr McTurk If he is suitable and efficient. After retirement, the chairman announced the de- cision as follow: Evan Jones, conditional exemption; David Evan Jones, exemption until substitution; John Wm. Davies, conditional exemption; Wm. Ferguson, con- ditional exemption, and Evan Davies, appeal dismissed. Mr Owen Price appealed in respect to James Griffiths (27), married, shepherd and cowman. The local tri- bunal refused exemption subject to substitution. Mr Price said the man lived at Craigu in a house adjoin. ing the hill. Two of his men having left he brought this man down there and he now went up the hill on a pony to see to the sheep. This man was married with a wife and children, and it would be very awkward if he were sent away because he (Mr Price) could not get an empty house. The Chairman We quite realise the position with re- gard to these shepherds. We do not think these mar- ried men shepherd-s can be properly substituted, so we give you conditional exemption. Mr W. S. Miller appealed in respect to four men, and asked chairman as to the difference in the number of his staff now to what it was before the war, Mr Miller said it was nearly the same except in regard to the auxiliary labour. He used to employ from three to four men extra during the summer and a similar number in winter, but everyone of these had gone to the Armv. His permanent staff was not much differ- ent to what it waEi before the war, because he was try- ing to work it at a minimum then. The tribunal gave conditional exemption in respect to two men, exemption until substitution in respect to another, and deferred the other case for three months.

Advertising

J. E. NOTT & Co., Ltd., HIGH STREET & SHIP STREET, BRECON. AGENTS FOR- PETTERS' NEW ^VERSAL 5 H P" U OiL ENGINE. A perfect engir.e for the and requires no lamp. or stationary, Excellent results. J. E. NOTT & Co., LTD., can give immediate delivery. They also hold a large Stock of Mills, Chaffcutters, Threshers, Turnip Cutters, and all requisites in food preparing machinery, at very moderate prices. Please call upon us and see our Engines at work. Estimates free Satisfaction guaranteed. J. E. Nott & Co., Ltd., Brecon, also at LLANDRINDOD WELLS.

No title

A Llandovery resident is the proud possessor of some potatoes, weighing one pound eleven ounces each, of his' own growing. Sec.-Lieut. F. W. Jenkins (South Wales Borderers). who was slightly wounded in the last advance on the Somme, is now in London. In peace times he was in the office of Mr H. F. W. Harries, solicitor, Brecon (clerk to the Breconshire County Council). He is well- known at Merthyr, where his home is.

Advertising

ALL KINDS OF INSURANCES EFFECTED. CLAIMS PROMPTLY SETTLED. AUDIT for several FIRST CLASS COMPANIES, W. WILLIAMS, Accountant, Insurance, and General Agent, SENNYBRIDGE, A 6, BULWARK. BRECON. b724 jggggs 'i i ggggaaii———a

Knighton Red Cress Society

Knighton Red Cress Society. ENTHUSIASTIC SUPPORT. A very successful concert was given in the Drill Hall. Knighton, on the 8th inst., in aid of the Knigh- ton Branch of the British Red Cross Society. The sale of tickets had been brisk, and, at the time an- nounced for commencing the concert, a large and ap' preciative audience had assembled. Sir Francis Edwards, M.P., presided, and, in his opening remarks, he thanked all who had assisted in producing such a successful concert, but especially Mr Penry Jones's concert party (Llandrindod Wells), who were responsible for the programme. It appeared that the committee had offered a prize of 10/- to the person who succeeded in selling the greatest number of tickets, and, during the concert, Sir Francis announced that the winner was the Rev. W. Williams, who had sold tickets to the value of C6 17s. When the chairman handed over the prize to him, the Rev. W. Williams said that, while it had given him great pleasure to help the society by selling tickets, it gave him equal pleasure to hand hack the prize, in order to augment the funds of a society which was doing so much good. The announcement called forth much applause from the audience, as did Mr J. L. Allcock's statement that all the expenses of the concert, including the war ta, were being defrayed by Sir Francis Edwards. The programme was given in excellent style, the part- singing of the party being particularly bright and tune- ful in the glees, "Tossed by the winds" and "Good night, beloved." Duets were given by Madame Morgan and Madame Pugh, and, also one by Madame Morgan and Mr T. L. James. Songs were given by Miss A. Colley, and Messrs. Griff Jones, A. Edwards and T. 1* James. Miss Grace Howell opened the concert with pianoforte solo, and most of the items received ap- plause, which was generally responded to with an "en- core" song. The humorous features of the evening were the funny stories and impromptu rhymes of  Penry Jones, which caused a good deal of mirth and formed the bright side of a brief programme. The proceedings closed with the singing of the National Anthem. The proceeds of the evening amount- ed to £ 30.

IThe Lighting Order

The Lighting Order. A BRECON PROSECUTION. At the borough police court, on "the 11th inst., before the Mayor (Councillor W. Williams), Messrs. David Powell, James Morgan and G. T. Jones, Me SiHS. ,J. E. fNott.& Co. were summoned for not subduing the lights of seven sky lights, according to the Lighting Order. Mr Geo. Nott., on behalf of the firm, admitted the otfence. JI.e. Prosser said the electric light had been left full on in one of the store-rooms. As there was no one in the shop. he called at Mr Geo. Nott's private residence at 11 p.m. and informed him of it. Mr David Powell: Had the lights been left on by ac- cident? Mr Nott: Yes, the lady in charge omitted to turn on the switch in the store-room. Mr David Powell: If you were paying for gas roll would not have left them on. (Laughter.) Mr Nott: We have to pay for electric light.. (Re- newed laughter.) P.s. Evans said the firm had been cautioned five times- Mr Nott: Never with regard to this particular light- P.s. Evans: But with regard to different lights al' over the premises. The Mayor: We have decided to fine you lOj-. Ill- eluding costs, and we hope that you. being one of the leading tradesmen in the town, will help us to carry out this Order.

Advertising

HSF ——————————— t USE 'Keep your liver active and the small every-day wof- ries and disappointments will not trouble you. It is the mind that makes us happy not our condition of life, and when you keep your stomach healthy, your bowels active, your blood pure by the regular use of Beecham's Pills your mind will always be clear and cheerful Most of the hardships of life are directly due to disordered digestion. The health of the whole body is affected by the condition of the liver. BEECHAM S By their gentle purifying action Beecham's Pills accomplish wonder- ful mental and physical changes. They aid digestion and assimilation and enable you to enjoy the great benefit of the full nutriment in your food. They will keep you free from illness and help you to attain success by giving the mind energy, vigour and determination. They have a direct influence upon your bodily comfort and material welfare, and make living easy. N Sold in —pyffg