Collection Title: Brecon & Radnor express Carmarthen and Swansea Valley gazette and Brynmawr district advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
15 articles on this page
Advertising

Prepare for Winter! Buy your Boots Ear 1 y EADIE'S, Builth, Llandrindod, Talgarth & Llanwrtyd. .y-V -U-I j

CWB Exams

C.W.B. Exams. BRECON GIRLS' COUNTY SCHOOL. The results of the annual examination of the Central W^sh Board in regard to the Brecon Girls' (Inter- mediate) School are:— Higher Certificate. Price, Stella Constance—English language and literature, ^history, French. Tyler, Olive Edith—*English language and literature, history, *French. Warner, Gwladys Emma Elizabeth—English language and literature, history, additional mathematics. Senior Certificate. Adcock, Marjorie Rutti-It-English language and litera- ture, *hi6tory, *arithmetic, mathematics, Latin, French, botany. Corbett, Constance Marion—English language and litera- ture, history, arithmetic, French, botany. Davies, Emma Hilda—English language and literature, history, mathematics, Latin, French, botany. Davies, Rachel Fortune Christina-*Engllsh language and literature, ^history, arithmetic, mathematics, Latin, *French, botany. Isaac, Mary Constance—English language and literature, arithmetic, French, botany, geography, needlework, *cookery. Jones, Muriel Blanc he-Eii gl ish language and literature, *historv. arithmetic. French, botany, geography. Lewis, Annie Mary—English language and literature, history, ^arithmetic, Welsh, botany. Morgan. Catherine May—English language and litera- ture, history, arithnietic, Latin, French, botany. Morgan, Dorothy Rebecca—English language and litera- ture. history, arithmetic, botany, geography. Morgan, Gladys May—English language and literature, history, Latin.. French, botany. Morgan, Hilda-English language and literature, arith- metic, botany, needlework, *cookery. Powell. Blanche May—English language and lite^att" history, *botany, geography, needlework *„joKery. Price. Winifred Violet—English laiu" and literature. ^arithmetic, French, bo*'»n;. Prosse?, IliabetK G-«enllian—English language and literature, *history. arithmetic, French, botany, geo- graphy. Smith, Evelyn Anne- History, arithmetic, French, botany, geography. Smith, Jean Lilian—English language and literature, history, arithmetic, mathematics. Latin. French. botany. Williams, Maggie Alice-Englbh language and literature, historv, arithmetic, botany, needlework. *cookery. Williams, Maida Florence—English language and litera- ture, arithmetic, botany, needlework, cookery. Supplementary Certificate. Price, Gladys Gwenllian—*History. Pugh, Grace Annie—Geography. Rowlands, Alwyne Elizabeth Mary—French. Junior Certificate. C'lwmbers, Gladys Matilda—^Scripture. English, his- tory. arithmetic, Latin, French. Davies, Emily Viola—Scripture, English, history, arith- metic, geography, needlework (senior stage), cookery (senior stage). Davies, Phyllis Mary—Scripture, English, history, ari- thmetic, mathematics, Latin, French, botany, geo- Evans, Lilian metic. Latin, French, botany, geography. Griffiths, Myfanwy Ntary-* Scripture, English, history, arithmetic, French, drawing. Jones, Eva Mary-Scripture, English, history, arith- metic, mathematics, Latin, French, botany. Jones, Mildred Irene—^Scripture, English, hi6tory, ari- thmetic. Latin, French, botany. Lewis, Ethel Eirene — ^Scripture, English, history, Latin, French, botany, geography. Morgan, 'ifArv-* Scripture, English, history, arithmetic, French, botany, needlework (senior stage), *cookery (senior stage). Price, Eleanor- Scripture. English, history, arithmetic, mathematics, Latin, *Welsh, botany, drawing. Price, Margaret .Jane-Scripture, English, history, arith- metic. French, botany, geography, drawing, needle- work (senior -stage), cookery (.senior stage). Price, Sarah-Scripture, English, history, arithmetic. Welsh, botany, geography, drawing, needlework (sen- ior stage), cookery (senior stage). Pritchard. Violet-*ieript tire, English, *history, *arith- metic, French, botany, geography, needlework (senior stage), *cookery (senior stage). Pugh. Annie Noella- *Scripture, English, *history, ari- thmetic, French, botany, geography, drawing, needle- work (senior stage), *cookery (senior stage). Williams. Violet Bradshaw—*Scripture, English, arith- metic, botany, needlework (senior stage), cookery (sen- ior stage). Indicates distinction.

No title

Several Welsh naval officers are mentioned in the "Gazette" as recipients of decorations, from the Allied Powers, for distinguished -ertices rendered during the war. Rear-admiral (acting Vice-Admiral) Sir Hugh Evan-Thomas, K.C.B., M.V.O., who is a native of Neath, reoeives the Second Class decoration of the Order of the Rising Sun from the Emperor of Japan, whilst a similar honour is conferred upon Rear-admiral George P. W. Hope, C.B.. who ha< family associations with Cardigan- shire. Sir Hugh Evan-Thomas, who has had a dis- tinguished naval career, and has received several dis- tinctions during the course of the present war, is the fifth, son of the late Mr Chajles Evan-Thomas, of the Gnoll, Neath, and brother of Mr Charles Henry Evan- Thomas, J.P., of Cae'rwnon, Builth, Breconshire.

Theft of Pony

Theft of Pony. Soldier Committed for Trial. HEARING AT BUILTH. RAX INTO THE RIVER IRFON. At a special police court (Builth) on Wednesday, be- fore Mr C. W. Woosnam (chairman), Mr C. G. Inglis, Dr. W. Black Jones and Ir John Duggan, Abel Thomas John, 3rd Batt., Welsh Regiment, native of Glanaman. Carmarthenshire, was brought up on remand, charge(;'I with stealing a pony, value k3O, and a faddk, vain £ 3 10s, the property of Mr Walter Meredith, butcher Builth Wells, and a bridle, value 10/ property of M Tom Jones, farm-bailitf, on the 23rd inst. Prisoner pleaded "guilty." Mr Walter Meredith, Garth Road. Builth Wells, butcher, stated he kept the pony in the field, adjoining the cricket field. He last saw the horse there on the night of the 22nd, and missed it on the following even- ing. The gate was locked on Wednesday evening, but. on Thursday, he found the lock gone and the gate loose. He next saw the pony at Llanwrtyd the follow- ing Saturday, and then it was in the possession of Sergt. D. T. Lewjs. A bridle and saddle were also missing from the building. The saddle belonged to witness, and the bridle to Mr Tom Jones. He next saw the bridle and saddle also in the possession of Sergt. Lewis. He valued the horse at £30. The straps of the saddle had been out shorter than they were when he left them in the building, and the saddle, itself, was worth 93 10s. Prisoner said that what witness had stated was quite true, and hoped he would forgive him for the sake of his wife and children. Mr Thomas Jones, farm-bailift. identified the bridle as his property. Prisoner said he had no questions to ask. The evi- dence was quite right-he took the things. Mrs Wr j. Park Road, Builth Wells, stated that on fl" iji^vious evening prisoner ,stayed at her place, and .eft about 11 o'clock the following morning. He told her he was hard up, but paid her what he owed her. Richard Hughes, Garth Lodge, stated he was a farm- bailiff, and that he saw prisoner on Garth Bridge about 1.30 the previous Thursday. He was coming along the road on a pony, and was going in the direction of Llan- wrtvd. They had a few word", about the weather. He said to prisoner, "that is Mr Walter Meredith's pony," meaning the one he was. riding, and he said "no." Wit- ness then said the animal was very much like it. and asked the age of the pony, when prisoner remarked, "four or five." He asked him where he came from and he said "above." Prisoner then proceeded on his way to Beulah. P.s. D. T. Lewis, Llanwrtyd Wells, deposed, in conse- quence of information received from P. George Davies (Builth Wells), he found a horse on the previous Satur- day. answering to the description given, tied to a tele- graph post on the road leading to Llandovery and about quarter-of-a-mile outside Llanwrtyd. Previous to that he had seen prisoner on the Square in Llanwrtyd with three other soldiers. He suspected he was the man, and went to speak to him, when he ran away across the fields in the direction of Dol-coed. Witness noticed he was looking rather excited. Prisoner crossed Dolcoed road in the direction of the river Irfon. P.c. Richards joined witness, and they chased him. Prisoner now jumped in- to the river, and P.c. Richards got him out. The river was very high. He handed over prisoner and the horse to P. George Davies that night. P.c. J. Richards, Llangammarch Wells, said that company with Sergt. Lewis on the Square, Llanwrtyd, I and saw prisoner with three soldiers, and, as the ser- geant went up to them, prisoner ran away through some fields and he (witness) ran down the road and saw prisoner come out through a gate and go down the road, entering another field through a gate, and then jump intobthe river. He also saw him being carried down the river in a strong current for about 20 yards, and was brought into deep water on the side. Witness then went to his rescue, and got him out. He was uncon- scious. and he brought him to the bank with the help of another soldier. He used artificial respiration and was assisted by Llanwrtyd'* district nurse. Thev then conveyed him in a hand-cart to the Police Station, where he was attended by a doctor and the nurse. About 7..30 that evening, in the presence of Sergt. Davies and Sergt. Lewis, witness cautioned and charged him with stealing a pony, saddle and bridle, and he replied, "I know I took it. I was only goipg for a ride. I am in- nocent of stealing. I was going to take it. back. I am sorry I took it." Prisoner said the reason he took the pony was that he wanted to go home to Glanaman to see his wife and children. His wife had been ill. If thev would release him he would willingly go back to his regiment. He had been grieving about his wife and children, and that was why he was away from his regiment. Prisoner said he had done his duty to his country in the past, and he was prepared to do it again, if they would release him. He was sorry for what he had done, and hoped he would be* forgiven. The war had ruined him. Prisoner was committed to take his trial at the next Breconshire Quarter Sessions.

Advertising

   A "S U BSTITUTIO.N 1 |f The matter of substitution is one of interest and importance in these stirring days. Among various special meanings attached to the term, we may consider one or two bearing upon the question of health. An ailing person will welcome as a pleasing proposition the idea of Good Health being substituted for Ill-health. As a matter of fact this is the kind of substitution which has been taking place for many years past. Thanks to the wide and increasing use of Beecham's Pills, conditions of Ill-health are constantly being removed; conditions of Good Health are constantly taking their place. This is a fact-an actual experience to which thousands of men and women, all over the world, will bear glad and willing testimony. A satisfactorr "substitution scheme" so far as matters of health are concerned is the adoption of Beecham's Pills as a Family Medicine. All who are ailing and anxious to be well will certainly derive considerable benifit from a course of B (3HAjvl Plbbg i 1 Sold everywhere la boxes, price JIIi (56 pills) < £ 2/9 (168 pills.) f_ Jfj

Brecon Cases i

Brecon Cases At Appeai Tribunal. WAR AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE AS SUGAR D ISTR I BUTORS. LOCAL TRIBUNAL DECISIONS VARIED. There were three appeals at the Breconshire Tribunal on Thursday against decisions of the Brecon Urban Local -Tribunal. In two out of the three the decisions of the latter were varied. County War Executive Clerfc. An appeal was made by the sub-employers (the War Agricultural Executive Committee) for the exemption of William Evans (35), described as chief clerk, Land Valuation Department, married, Class Bl, on the grounds of national interest. The Brecon local tribunal had re- fused exemption. Mr Best (military representative) asked for the ruling of the court on a technical point. There was no appeal, he said, by the man's employers in this case. The ques- tion was whether the Chairman of the Executive Com- mittee was to be considered as the "aggrieved person" under Sec. 19 of the Military Service Act, Part II. lie pointed out when the case came before the local tribunal the application was made by the man himself. This ap- peal was not by the employer, and it was a question whether the Chairman of the Executive Committee was the person aggrieved within the meaning of the Act. The Chairman (Mr D. T. Jeffreys): Who is the em- ployer? Mr Best: The employer, I am informed, is the Land Valuation Department of the Board of Inland Revenue. The Chairman Is not the staff of the Land Valuation Office transferred to the Agricultural Committee? Mr Best: That did not come out in evidence. We had it in evidence that the Inland Revenue Authorities would not appeal for this man. The Chairman If the staff is transferred to the Agri- l cultural Committee, the employers for the time being are the Chairman and members of the committee, arid they are the pert-ons aggrieved. I Mr Best: Then this appeal, I take it, is by the Execu- tive Committee? The Chairman: Yes, Mr Miller being a member of the committee will not sit on this case. Mr Best: Are you not a member, too, sir? The Chairman No, I'm a member of a district com- mittee of that committee. Mr Best: Isn't Mr Harries? (Laughter.) Mr Harries: I am their legal adviser. Mr David Jones, chairman of the Executive Committee, was then examined at some length by Mr Best as to who were the emptoyers.of Mr Evans. ntimately, the Chairman interposing said they had better proceed with the merits of the case. Mr David Jones then went on to .say that the committee had a tremendous lot of work. They were there the previous night until ten o'clock, and they were working on Saturdays and Sun- days in order to cope with the business. The staff com- prised Mr Prosser (executive officer), Mr Evans, a lad and a typist. They had done everything to obtain assist- ance but ifithout avail. Mr Evans, in reply to the chairman, said he had been twice previously rejected, but came up under the new Act, of May last and was. placed in Class Bl. Answering Mr Best, Mr Evans said he had been em- ployed in his present office for four months. Mr David Jones further stated that the work of the committee was increasing so rapidly that they could not cope with it. One Tuesday they had a telegram asking them to undertake the distribution of 15 tons of sugar for the county. He wired on behalf of the committee undertaking this work, and this morning he had received four sheets of instructions as to how it had got to he done. Temporary exemption was granted until 31st December. College Gardener. An appeal was etntered against the decision of the local' tribunal who refused exemption to John Llewellyn Jen- kins (40), caretaker, groundsman and gardener, of the Memorial College, Brecon. Principal Lewis said Jenkins was the only male em- ployed by the College Committee which he (Principal Lewis) represented. He had sole charge of the College grounds which were between three and four acres. He had the College garden to look after. as well as various duties connected with the building, such as the heating apparatus. The man was rejected first, then he was passed Army Reserve Class W, and now he was placed in B2. Replying to Mr Best, Principal Lewis said they would be able to know by September how many students they would have next term. At the end of last June they had eight. They would all be of military age. One had been totally rejected. Two had been seriously wounded they might come back. Four intended coming to the College next session. On what ground they had been exempted he could not tell. Mr Best: At all events some of these may be onen to review. You ask that this man ought to he kept back from the Army on the ground that he is cultivat- ing a garden for the benefit of these students and his own family ?—No. that is not correct, he looks after the College garden for the sake of those residing at the College. You know there is a system in the American Colleges that certain of the students make out their fees b,7 do- :"r. -+- -i. for the Collree?—I'm not aware ?rco?- ditions in Amcnca. What is the difficulty of some of the?e men who have Iwen excused from the service in the Army doing their work? It may be possible, but unfortunately we don't know what the situation may be. Principal Lewis further said that even if there were no students, the College gardens would have to be looked after; they could not let them go wTack and ruin. Mr Best: Have you ever willingly in your official capacity sent men off to the Army from the College? Principal Lewis Yes, I have told the students from the start to do what they can, and I have helped men to get into certain battalions more than I have ever helped them to keep out of it. Seventeen of our men are in the Army at present, and I have helped them in different ways to get into the Army. Mr Best fre- quently refers to the lack of patriotism on the part of persons who make applications at these courts. If the applicant was a Class A man, one would hesitate to make such application, and one would be prepared to put up with any inconvenience. What one feels in this case is the inconvenience which would be caused as the College would not be compensated by any service the man would be able to render in the Army. The Chairman: He is Class B 2. There are lower classes than that. Mr Best: He is fit for labour abroad, and the same sort of labour he is doing to-day. The Chairman: We think the militarv interests out- weigh the grounds put forth on national interests and we dismiss the appeal. Insurance Committee's Clerk. An appeal was made by the Breconshire Insurance Committee against the refusal to exempt Jansen Davies (20), chief assistant clerk of the committee, class B3. Mr W. S. Miller (chairman of the committee) appeared on behalf of the committee, saying that the work of the committee was very great. There were 17,000 insured persons to deal with. Davies had been twice rejected by the Army. They found it impossible to fill his place, applications having been made to the Cardiff Labour Bureau, but no clerks were available. Mr Miller re- ferred to an answer given in the House of Commons to a question asked in which it was stated that since Octo- ber 1916 recruiting officers had been in receipt of in- structionis that such persons on the administrative staffs of public bodies, passed in low categories, were not to be removed from their employment without communication with the Director'of Recruit ing. Mr Best, having questioned Davies, said lie would like the Tribunal to declare that he was eligible for the Army and then leave it for the authorities to deal with as they thought fit. The Chairman Have you reported to the Director General as regards your instruction ? Mr Rest: I cannot until you have decided that he should go. The chairman said temporary exemption, conditional upon his continuing in his present work, until 30th November, would be given, but the Tribunal expres-esd the hope that the committee would be able to find a substitute.

Canadian Pacific Ocean Services

Canadian Pacific Ocean Services. ALLAN LINE TAKEN OVER. The Canadian Pacific Ocean Services, Ltd., 8, Water- loo Place, London, S.W. 1, announce that they have taken qver the management, operation and control of the Allan Line steamers and the offices of the Allan Line at 14, Cockspur Street, London, S.W.I. 103, Leadenhill Street, London, E.C.3, 25, Bothwell Street, Glasgow, 88, Commercial Street, Dundee, 50, Foyle Street, Londonderry, etc. The Allan Line Office at 19. James Street, Liverpool, has been closed and transferred to the Canadian Pacific Ocean Services, Ltd., Royal Liver Building, Liverpool, where all operations of the joint Allan-Canadian Pacific Ser- Yioes from that port will henceforth be conducted. The number and combined tonnage of Canadian Paci- fic and Allan Line vessels on the Atlantic and Pacific, for which the C.P.O.S., Ltd., act as managers and agents, is 39 vessels of approximately 400,000 tons (in- eluding 7 vessels now building). Passenger and freight services will be maintained between Liverpool, Lon- don, Glasgow, Bristol and Havre to Canada and the United States, and between Vancouver and Japan, Manila and China. The Canadian Pacific Railway Co. acts as traffic agents for the Canadian Pacific Ocean Ser- vices, Ltd.

Advertising

Every box of ENGLAND'S GLORY" Matches used meajos MORE WORK for British Work-people.-Morel", Gloucester. 615 Li tw L f Little Men? Outfits. J  The young people are as keen as their ?Ssy  eDiors in the choice of their clothes. ? \? ? Place your boys beyond criticism by E S allowing us to cater for their tailoring. t V 'it |j S We treat their clothes with the same IS ) 01; care as we devote to yours. fet f« IS ^1 ? ????? ???? An excellent assortment in all necessities ?. ? | jj 11 for Boys and Youths. ,nf j B! ? !NBf ?M jjrC | OTI 33) ?N 

LLYSWEN SOLDIER I

LLYSWEN SOLDIER I DIES FOR HIS COUNTRY. I It was with deep regret we learned of the death. in action on July 31st. of Pte. Jack Jones, S.W.B., eldest son of the late Mr David Jones, Post Office, Llyswen. Pte. Jones had, previous to the outbreak of war, serv- ed with the Breconshire Territorials. Soon after war was declared he offered his services voluntarily, was accepted and joined the S.W.B. He had done two years' service in France, and had witnessed many ex- experiences until July 31st, when a comrade wrote later saying he was killed instantly by a shell. The new, cast quite a gloom in the vicinity, that was, when it became known officially. Deceased, by his winning dis- position, had a very large circle of friends at Llyswen. i LATE Pte. JACK JONES, S.W.B. I He also evinced the same qualities in France as ias. evid- ent by the letter to his sisters from his captain. It reads as follows [COPY]. "August 12th, 1917.—Dear Miss Jones.-I am exceeding- ly sorry to say that your dear brother was killed in action on the 31st ult. I desire to express to you my deepest sympathy in your sad bereavement. It will con- sole you to know that he died doing his duty nobly and well, as he always did. He was always a splendid ,ol(licr-hal)py and clieerfuj-and never failed in his duty at any time. He was loved by all officers and men alike, and I assure you that we all mourn his loss very much. Kindly accept the heartfelt sympathy of all officers and men.—Yours very truly, J. A. Morgan, captain." Much sympathy is felt for his sisters and only bro- ther. who is lying in hospital suffering from wounds in acti in France, previous to which he had also seen sern i in the Dardanelles. Tw brothers-in-law of deceased are aLso serving.

Farming Returns I

Farming Returns. I 80,000 MORE ACRES OF POTATOES. I The preliminary statement of the agricultural re- turns for England and Wales, collected in June, shows that abont 190,000 acres of permanent grass have been brought under the plough since June, 1916, the arable area being 195,000 acres more than a year ago. The 1,918,6,50 acres under wheat compare with 1,912,210 a year ago. Barley shows an increase of 128,500 acres, and oats one of 173,000 acres, the area under oats, 2,257,480 acres, being the largest since 1904. Beans have been reduced by 25,000 acres, and peas increased by 18,000. The acreage under potatoes, 508,190, has been in- creased by 80,000' acres, or nearly one-lifth, and is about 10 per cent. greater than the highest previously recorded. Turnips and swedes account for an ad- ditional 34,000 acres, and mangolds nearly 11,000. The hay area is down by nearly 108,000. The number of hoi sea on farms increased by 13,000, those used for agricultural purposes showing an' in- crease by 23,000. There are, however, 5,000 less foals than in 1916. The total number of cattle, 6,227,150, has again been increased, and is the largest ever recorded. The numbers of cows in milk on the 4th of June was 24,000 less than a year ago. Sheep, 17,169,860, show a considerable reduction, the number of ewes kept for breeding declining by 170,000 and lambs by 570,000. Both sows and other pigs were being kept in smaller numbers, and the total number of pigs, 1,918,540, was 250 less than last vear. v GLOOMY HARVEST REPORTS. I Repoits on the harvest outlook by representatives of the Food Production Department are not very en- couraging so far as the corn crops are concerned. Con- tinuous rain has damaged the hay still out in some late districts, and harvesting operations have been in- terfered with seriously. Root crops, however, as a rnle are very good, and in many districts exceptionally fine, and green food for cattle is plentiful.

Advertising

HAYE CURED WILL CURE YOU. Robt. Eades, of Weybridge, writes:—"I bought a box yesterday, and after I had taken the Mcond two I felt better than I had done for over four years. The pain in my back was entirely gone." Mrs King, Runwell Road, Wickford, .tates :Daty compels me to tell all who suffer that your pills cured me after years of pain." HOLDROYD'9 GRAVEL PILLS, a positive cure for Oravel, Pains in the Back, Dropsy, Bright's Disease of the Kidneys, Gout, Sciatica. 1/11, all Chemists. Post free, 12 stamps.-HOLDROYD'S MIDICAL HALL. Gleakheatas.

FROM THE FOWL RUN

FROM THE FOWL RUN. BY "ROOSTER." The reason has thus far advanced that many of the January and February hatched pullets are laying and some have been doing so for several weeks. While eggs are making now 2d to 3d each, it seems a pity to stop them laying to get them through the moult, and yet, if this is not done, they may keep on laying till the cold weather comes and then stop all at once and begin to moult, which will not be a good one, owing to the cold weather. Eggs will be very dear round about Christmas time, and it will pay well now to try and get all the early hatched pullets to moult, so that they come on to lay again before October has gone. A pullet should be about seven weeks in moulting, so that, if they drop their feathers now, the new plumage will have grown before the cold winds arrive, and then they soon begin to lay again. Any pullets which you wish to moult should be taken out of their old house and put into a roomy, airy shed or barn, free from draughts, and yet well ven- tilated. Drop the food supply to half and allow plenty of green stuff, while a mild dose of salts will assist in moving the old feathers. A fat bird cannot moult suc- cessfully, so remember you must reduce the condition before the feathers will come out, and then, when near- ly bare, you must begin to be more liberal in the. diet, and let it be better in quality of a more oily nature, which will promote feather growth and soon put them into full plumage. When they have got all their new feathers they soon begin to lay again, and then the supply should continue right up till the spring, with hardly any rest in between. There are plenty of pullets now which are on the point of laying, but don't be in too great a hurry, for some of the lazy ones may begin now, go on for a month or two, and then stop all the winter, which is not a very paying prospect. All birds which are nearly grown can be moved into fresh quarters, where they may stop all the winter. If meant for intensive work. leave them for another few weeks, because they should not be put into these houses till just on laying, and then they will con- tinue right along. But where the pullets must be kept, say, in a small house and run, sort them out in flocks of a dozen or less, and get them into a new place with fresh grass run and large enough so that the stock cannot foul the ground. When birds are kept on an open range, they naturally cannot receive the same treatment as when in smaller runs always under the eye. Where thousands of birds are kept there is a difficulty in hav- ing uit-ni all in .~nraii rnn-i, and t.hpn thev are put in flocks of, perhaps, a hundred, with an open field and plenty of houses, but this often means that they crowd together into the one or two places and the air soon lie- comes foul. Certainly they never seem to grow so well on the field as when in a run, because then there is more individual attention. On the field they may get enough food, and the man who feeds looks round always to see that all is well. But on such a flock he cannot be sure that they are all there, and half-a-dozen may be gone before no- tice is taken. If the situation is exposed in any way, the weak ones soon go to the wall, and I have heard owners argue that this is all-right. Possibly, this is cor- rect to a point, but not for all circumstances, because most of them could have been saved if taken in time and watched from the first. I know there are many opinions about the free range, but, after years of ex- perience, I cannot alter my opinion that the birds grow best when kept on small runs in flocks of ten or twelve. All the pullets which are growing now push along and make bone and frame before you think of eggs. When once a pullet starts laying she stops growing for the time, and this is why a fancier will not hurry his stock on to lay. Where egg., alone are required, then the birds can be forced, and, when they have filled their mi'si-ion, then kill off to make room for fresh stock.

RHEUMATISMKIDNEY TROUBLE

RHEUMATISM-KIDNEY TROUBLE. Rheumatism is due to uric acid crystals in the joints and muscles, the result of excessive uric acid, which U also the cause of backache, lumbago, sciatica, gout, urinary trouble, stone, gravel, dropsy. Estora Tablets, a thoroughly harmless specific based on modern medical science, are the successful treatment, and have cured numberless obstinate cases, which accounts for their superseding out-of-date medicines. Women frequently suffer from ills, aches and pains, under the impression that they are the victims of ailments common to their sex, but more often than not it Is due to the kidneys, and in such cases Estora Tablets will set them right: Estora. Tablets, an honest remedy at at honest price, 1/3 per box of 40 tablets, or 6 for 6/9. All chemists or postage free from ESTORA Co., 132, Charing Croee Road, London, W.C. 2. Brecon Agent, Walter Gwillim, M.P.S., Medical Hall; Builth Wells Agent, T. A. Coltman, M.P.S., The Pharmacy. 2026p /29-11

Brecon and Radnor Horticulture

Brecon and Radnor Horticulture. liOrXTIFUL PROMISE AND PROBLEMS TO BE FACED. (iardcu plots and allotments in Breconshire and Rad- norshire give promise of a bountiful yield, although spraying has been neglected owing to the lack of pro- per organisation and co-operation on the part of the occupier. It is hoped that by next year this will be remedied. There are indications that the time is ripe for the development of a great land scheme, and the binden of responsibility rests on the shoulders of the County War Agricultural Executives and the sub-com- mittee-. Many obstacles have confronted the Sub-Com- inissioner (Mr John R. Hache) in his efforts to increase the acreage under cultivation (in Breconshire by 20,000 acres, and in Radnorshire by 14,000 acres) for 1918, for the two counties are so well adapted for stock rearing, and during the last 40 years hundreds of small farina have been submerged in larger holdings. Most of his difficulties, however, are slowly disappearing through his success in securing the support of the committees and their officials. One of the greatet problems to be faced is the supply of vehicles for conveyance of lime and manures to rural districts. Two contributing factors are the shortage of labour and the shortage of suitable horses for heavy work. Many farmers have cold their horses, owing to the great demand and tempting prices, and now they de- pend entirely on young horses which are not suitable for heavy haulage work.

Advertising

Price & Williams, Builth, HOLD THE HEAVIEST STOCK OF British & Foreign (R &) Timber in the District. Special Quotations for Truck Loads of Deals, Battens, Boards, Bricks, Slates, Cement, Aberthaw Lime, Plaster of Paris, Crests, Finials, Sinks, Socket Pipes, Spades and Shovel Handles, Dry Oak and Ash Planking. -Spokes. Felloes and Shafts. Solid British OAK GATE3. Always Good Steck Solid Brittsh OAK GATE POSTS. Seasoned 4 LLIA.NS AND lr..I k KERS Thoroughly Well-Made. Seasoned Timber for Builders and Wheelwrights kept in Drying Sheds. Agents for the Best Slate Quarries, Brick and Tile Works, and Agricultural Pipes. PLEASE WRITK FOR PRICES- PRICE & WILLIAMS, BUILTH. Telegrams: WILLIAMS, BUILTH. 'PHONK No. 2. brS43/25S THIS BUSINESS IS BEING CARRIED ON AS USUAL.