Collection Title: Brecon & Radnor express Carmarthen and Swansea Valley gazette and Brynmawr district advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 6 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
17 articles on this page
Advertising

Is the Raleigh a good bicycle for this district? You know that amongst the world's bicycles the Rigid, Rapid, Reliabfe RALEIGH THE flLL-cSTEEL BKYSLE Stands fripat-here Is evidopeo of the Mrvic* It ietwes to lo"i ndeve f" j 8. Janet street, Rhydfedan. = "I have ridden the Raleigh 16,000 miles on ?-? ?'?S?? ?? tough Welsh hill roads, and it is 3ô true now S. —_ = &S when mew," ?S?? =? ? ? ?a °0W (Signed) E. H. MARTIN. ?S BRECOIeredith & Sons, High St. e ? ;—— CRICKHOWELL-Perey Wilks, High St.  ? ?? HAV-T. J. Ma?gan. S== 'i B '?? LLAMDOVERY—T. Roberts & Sons. U '? a 8ENNYBR)DOE—ThomM Tboma?. S SENNYBRIDGE—Thomas Thomas. ggf T??'.? ?TALC?TH-F.T.M?n. S& /S?/? '? ? ? d for r0!? <7?:? ?WithOunIopty?MdSturmey.Arahef?? (j/0?'?? ?? 3-tp

CYCLING

CYCLING. An Absent-Mtaded Artitt. There is a well-known exhibitor at the Royal Academy who is. culled -with intense absent-mindedness. He went out chopping awheel. At the first shop he left his bicycle outside and, coming out. walked on to his other calls. Coming out of the last shop he 63W 80 bicycle .-wbich was not his own, rushed back to the tradesman, insisted that someone had stolen his bicycle and upon the police being sent for. Then he walked home to lunch Returning from this he met a local tradesman in a state of wild fury. This tradesman had been prac- tically arreted on a charge of stealing his own bicycle! "But you have taken mine and left yours," said tha artist. "Not at all," replied the tradesman, "your old crock is still standing outside so-an«J «o's." And then reoruninations and apologies ensued and the well-known artist ha.s come to the conclusion that in future he will have his bicycle tied to him by a piece of string: cont's for Cydlstt. The London Safety First Council has issued a series of "Dont's for Cyclists," which deserve a wider application. The most important of them are Don't Hold on to other Vehicle. (a legal offence); Don't Turn into Main Road at High Speed (always keep the machine under control and ring the bell); Don't Neglect to Practice Emergency Dismounts; Don't pass Overtaken Traffic (ex- cepting tramcar.*) -on the near &ide 

MOTORCYCLING

MOTOR-CYCLING. The Way to Reseat a Valve. To make a lasting job of reseating a valve it should be vulcanised, but this is not always possible. An ex- cellent temporary repair can be done as followb:-Un- screw all parta of the valve to enable you to ascertain the amount of damage, but do not withdraw the valve stem from the tube. If no tears can be seen, try wh-ether screwing up the valve seating nut does the trick. If it doei not, or if the valve seating is badly torn, even then I do not advise fitting the valve in a fresh place. Take the largest patch in your repair out- fit, clean it thoroughly; cut a small circular hole in its extreme centre (about half the size of the valve stem), and, by stretching it. work it over and part way down the valve stem. Thoroughly clean the face of the old seating, give both patch and old seating two coats of old solution, with an interval for drying between the two. When the second coat appears dry work the patch to the bottom of the stem, press it into position iwithout creasing it, and then replace washer and nut. U.S. Motor Statistict. j It is very interesting to learn that during 1917. Ameri- ca^ first year of war, the number of motorists and motor-cyclists increased by nearly one and a half mil- lions. On January 1st last there were over 5,060,000 cars and motor-cycles registered in the United States, which gxwan3 that there is one motor vehicle to every twenty people in the country. In one State there is one to every ten people; in another one to every thirteen. Such figures are truly astounding. Two years ago in tha States there was one motor vehicle to every 40 I people; the pre-war ratio in the United Kingdomu va.; I one to every 120 people. Certainly America is the land of the motorist.

I MOTORING I

I MOTORING. I I Dearer Petrol. I Only a fortnight ago Mr Bonar Law stated in the House of Commons that the "powers of the Board of Trade should he sympathetically used to secure the sup- ply of petrol for the public at a price based on ascer- tained costs." So sympathetic has the Board of Trade been that it has again raised the price of petrol, thi6 ,time by 2!d a gallon, but the retailer's profit is un- changed, remaining at 5d per gallon. It is difficult to account for this further increase, since we have been assured over and over again that no advance would take place unless it could be justified by increa.sed freightage and Insurance charges. So far as I am aware, there has been no advance in either of these directions, during the last few months. I Th. Petrol Position in Norway. I [Norway, in common with most European countries, is suffering acutely from a shortage of petrol and other petroleum products. A writer in the "Irish Cyclist and Motor-Cyclist" states that the Government controls and distributes what little spirit is available for pleasure. Spirits of sulphite, made from offaJ-lye from the cellu- lose mills, is being used as a substitute. It is stated that from each ton of sulphite produced there may be extracted 50 litres of sulphite spirits from the offal-lye. Two mills have laid down plant to produce 800,000 litres of spirit per annum. Sweden, too, is using this spirit, and has In doing so since 191-i-in fact, it is stated that all motor spirit tn that country is now based on it. I THE HUB. I

Advertising

 N Uff

I Aliens at AbercraveI

I Aliens at Abercrave. I A deputation attended Saturday's meeting of the executive council of the South Wales Miners' Feder- ation from the Abercrave Colliery respecting the em- ployment of aliens, and it was resolved, that Mr J. Vi.tone should attend a meeting at Abercrave in order to investigate the matter.

Advertising

"Afraid we Should Lose Him." Splendid CUre of DISEASED HIP after undergoing three operations without success. Our portrait is of Mr. Newman, Of 26,Fontbill Road, Finsbui y Park, London, N.t whose mother writes: y ont3uffered from DISEASED R IGHT HIP, and was in and out BO bad we were AFRAID*5 was so bad we were AFRAID WE SHO'ULD LOSE HIM. After undergoin g THREE OPERA- s TIONS-wbich did him no good- $$$? 'ly&OX' we decided to try your world-famed Clarke's Blood Mixture. After j f x takingthefint bottle we noticed "A < an improvement in him, so we kept v it up. and now we are srlad to say xs ¥ HE IS QUITE CURED, but for the shortness of his leg, which in 9K^BH £ our opinion would never have been V «>■ i/s if be bad not gone through that h terrible torture in bo pital. ^11111111^' -m EVERYBODY WE MEET WL MARVELS ROW HE GOT IHKlR- flp|% WELL, and we are always glad ■■R:. to say it is your Clarke's Blood mBKBBEBsgg&gi Mixture that cured him. FROM BAD LEGS ABCESSES, ULCERS, GLANDULAR SWELLINGS, PILES, COnuffllCorlGorlo O ECZEMA, BOILS, PIMPLES, SORES, ERUPTIONS, RHEUMATISM, GOUT, or kin- dred complaints should realise that lotions, ointments, etc., can but give temporary relief. To be sure of a cure, complete and lasting, the blood must be thoroughly cleansed of the impure waste matter, the true caase of all such trouble. Clarke's Blood Mixture quickly attacks, overcomes and expels the impurities from the blood, that's^ why so many remarkable cures stand to its credit Pleasant to take an d free from in j ur- ious ingredients Of all Chemists an d Stores, 2 9 per bottle. ASK FOR AND SEE THAT YOU GET Clarke's Blood Mixture, "EVERYBODY'S BLOOD PURIFIER."

Peeps into the Past I

Peeps into the Past. I AN EMINENT ACTOR-AUTHOR. I PRICHARD OF TRALLONG. I A most interesting paper was read last session to The Brecon Welsh Society by Mr E. K. Morgan (the ■well-known compiler of the Trefecca diaries) on T. J. Llewellyn Priehanl, widely known as the author at "Twm Shon Catti," and who was a native of Krecon- ishire, being born in the parish of Trallong. Through the courtesy of Mr Morgan we propose publishing the paper from time to time and in this issue appears the .second instalment. Before the curtain drops upon the stage where Prichard trod I will quote some notes which Mr Ifaiao Jones, the Welsh Librarian at Cardiff, has with great kindness given to me. He says: That Prichard was for many years an actor, hut not of any renown, is correct, because in 4 Bye Goiftes for 1882-3 a writer named 'Ceredig Cyfeiliog' writes that his performances in the capacity of an actor in the Assembly Rooms at Aberystwyth are well remem- bered by many of the inhabitants.' These perfor- mances date back, for a certainty, to 1824, because in Prichard's Aberystwyth in. Miniature (printed in Carmarthen in 1824), lie entreats the Aberystwytliians —in a Poem entitled 'The Drama's Petition'—to build there a new theatre worthy of the drama, instead of the miserable place in Bridge Street in which he and his fellow-actor had to appear." Performed at Brecon. Again: "In 'Byegoneii' for 1830-1 a writer under the letters 'F.S.A. Brecon' writes 'I saw Prichard per- form at the Brecon Theatre in 1841.' This statement, which was probably by the late Mr Joseph, of Brecon, is, no doubt, the authority for Poole's mention of the matter in his History. Again: "In the 'Weekly MaIF for November 23rd, 1899. the late Charles Wilkins, of Merthyr, eays, 'My earliest recollection of Llewellyn Pritchard was in finding him sitting near me in a dramatic entertain- ment at Merthyr, and listening to a long story of his remembrances of old players and old authors, etc.' This points, says Mr Ifano J ones, to the pronnuilitjT that Pritchard had had considerable experience as an actor, and had played in. places other than Abery- stwyth and Brecon. The Charles Wilkins' quotation is not dated, but we may infer from it that at that time Prichard had, himself retired from the stage, though he retained his interest in theatrical matters. There is some evidence, I think, in one of his works—" Welsh Minstrelsy "— that he toured with (that is, as a member of) a com- pany through the counties of South Wales in the early Eighteen-twenties, but the foregoing is practically all that I, at present, know of his stage career. As Author. There is no doubt that Prichard the author was a I more considerable figure than Prichard the actor. He 1 was connected, as author and editor, with the publica- tion of, at least, 7 works, the first three of which appeared in 1824, 1 in 1825, 2 in 1828 and 1 in 1854. I am not able, at this point, to eay which was the fmt that appeared in 1824, but (without having had tho opportunity, so far, of examining two of them) I would suggest the following order:— 1. Aberystwyth in Miniature, in anous FOCMR." This was printed at Carmarthen, and was a book- let of 48 pages. 2. The New Aberystwyth Guide with a map. Printed by J. Cox at Aberystwyth. 3. 44 Welsh Minstrelsy, or Cantrev of Gwnelod, a Poem in three Cantos, with various other poems." 4. "The Cambrian Balnea A Guide to the Watering Places of Wales, Marine and Inland." London. (Printed at Abergavenny) 1825. 5. 44 The Adventures and Vagaries of Twm Shon Catti, descriptive of Life in Wales; interspersed with Poems." Printed, and also published, I suppose, by J. Cox, at Aberystwyth, in 1828. 6. 44 The Cambrian Wreath, a selection of English Poems on Welsh Subj ects, original aod translated." This, too, was issued by J. Cox, Aberystwyth, in 1828. Prichard is described as the Editor of the work, though it is very probable that he contribu- ted to the contents. It was a book of 200 pages with a preface of 8 pages. 7. What appears to have been Pritchard's last work is entitled, The Heroines of Welsh History, comprising Memoirs and Biographical Notices of the Celebrated Women of Wales, especially the Eminent for Talent, the Exemplary in Conduct, the Eccentric in Character, and the Curious by Position, or otherwise." This was puWished in 1854. It will be seen that Prichard's career as an author extended over about 30 years, but the period of his greatest activity was that of the first 4 or 5 years. I think that copies of his works are to be found in the Welsh National Library, and in the Libraries of Car- diff and Swansea, but owing to the circumstances of the present times, I have not been able to visit any of these institutions for the pnrpose of examining them, but I hope that, later, it will be possible for me to do so. I have, however, a copy of his "Welsh Minstrelsy," of 1824, and of his "Heroines of Welsh History," of 1854, and also copies of 3 editions of his 44 Twin Shon Catti." These may, I think, be regarded as his most important works, and they contain sufficient material to enable us to estimate his status as a literary man. His Aberystwyth in Miniature" and Welsh Minstrelsy" were written in verse, and The New Aberystwyth Guide also contained some metrical compositions, so that we may say that his earliest literary claim was to be regarded a poet. The "Welsh Minstrelsy" appears to be the most important of the three, and as it contains some matter that seems to be biographical in character, it may be worth while, perhaps, to examine it to some extent. It was pub- lished by subscription, and the book contains a list of more than 900 subscribers' names. One of the Brecon- shire subscribers was a Rev Jeffrey Llewelyn, of Llewel," whose name suggests relationship. Another subscriber was "Mr David Price, of Park," which is, probably, the farm-house situated near to Llwynnyth, and Bryndu, in Trallong. Other subscribers were connected with the Theatre Royal, Covcnt Garden, London; the Cobourg Theatre, London; the Theatre Royal, Brighton; the Theatro Royal, Bristol; and the Theatre, Carmarthen, and these may, no doubt, be identified as his theatrical acquaintances. There is also a probable suggestion of relationship in the name of Mr Richard Pritchard, of Regents' Circus, London, who took six copies of the book, which number was only equalled by two other subscribei-, -the Countess of Cardigan, and a Mrs Warde, of London. (To be continued.)

IA BRICKLAYERS EXPERIENCE

I A BRICKLAYER'S EXPERIENCE. I. STILL WORKING AT 73-THANKS TO I BAKER'S BACKACHE PELLETS. Air Williiam *Poulter, 9, Mil-ton Avenue, Croy- don, sends tan inlteresting letter. He says "I have suffered 

Rhayader Fair

Rhayader Fair. Rhayader fair on Wednesday was well attended and there was a good supply of both fat and store istock. Quotations were: Barreners from £ 18 to .£28; heifers, to .£20; cows and calves, £ 35 to 938: steers, £16 to X24. Sheep (good supply), couples fetching from £3 to R4. Cart pigs (average supply), £4 10s. to R5 apiece. One store sow realised 10 guineas. Eggs were 4 for 1/

Advertising

c Fop HCMF"MX?rMS?? ■ Economical CAKES. PUDDINGS and PIES,  1 the Beisst t BAKING POWDER in the Wo?d :6 B  W.B0I4ff0It'§:

Young Farm Hands I

Young Farm Hands. I Breconshira Tribunals Attitude. I Onus For Providing Substitution Thrown on N.S. Representatives. STATEMENT BY EXECUTIVES' CHAIRMAN. I The Breconshire Appeal Tribunal sat at Brecon on Thursday when a very large number of cases respecting young farm hands affected by the recent Proclamation were considered. The members present were Messrs David T. Jeffreys (chairman), W. S. Miller. Hy. Evan Thomas, Ed. Butler and J. D. Morgan. Capt. Wilson was the National Service representative, and Mr Owen Price represented the Board of Agriculture. Before proceeding with the cases Captain Wilson asked permission to refer to the Army's needs. He wanted farmers to understand that they must, like others have already done, put up with some amount of inconvenience. They must try and get soldier and women labour as much as possible and having got it they must try and put up with it. They had had cases where soldiers were returned from farms as useless," but he never would believe that a soldier having been to France and having done what he had done there was of no use at farm work. The War Agricultural Committee and the Tribunal and everyone must help towards carrying on the work of the farms without these strong young fellows who were so badly wanted for the winuing of the war. Mr Owen Price assured Captain Wilson that the War Agricultural Committee had done as much as possible in utilising soldier labour, but for the past two months there had not been a single soldier avail- able for the work at the Barracks. He fully appreci- ated the situation and the need of men for the Army but at the same time they were told last year by Mr Prothero (President of the Board of Agriculture) that the war was to be won on the cornfields of England. (Hear hear.) A large amount of additional land was now being cultivated under the Orders, and unless the produce could be gathered it would materially affect the food production of the country; unless men were retained for gathering the crops the labours of the Agricultural Executive Committee would be entirely wasted and it would be useless for them to consider the question further. He hoped the Tribunal would allow a sufficient number of men to be retained for the in-gathering of the crops. Executive Committee's Chairman. I Mr David Jones (Chairman of the Breconshire War Agricultural Executivo Committee) asked permission to lay before the Tribunal some facts and figures con- cerning the situation. In 1915, he said, the area of land under cultivation for grain and root crops was 21,452 acres. During the war the necessity for in- creased cultivation, especially in gram production had arisen. In 1917 the county was able to provide an additional corn growing area of 2,920 acres. For the harvest of 1918 they were pressed to increase this area to 43,000 acres. The Executive Committee repeatedly pointed out to the Board of Agriculture that Brecon- shire was not a grain producing county, and that in very large areas of the County grain sown could not be grown or harvested for food production purposes. In the hill districts it could only be harvested so as to be utilised for the feeding of stock. The Board did not accept the well-considered advice of the Executive Committee, who were composed of practical agricul- turists fully acquainted with the extent of present cultivation, and the possibility of increased cultivation in the county. Their advice was not accepted and the County had been required to provide 43,000 acres under plough. It had been impossible to provide this area during the present year. The County had, under Orders issued by the Executive Committee, arranged for the cultivation under grain and root crops of 39,642 acres. The Committee were now making arrangements for the ploughing up in the autumn of the additional 3,500 acres required by the Board of Agriculture. The orders for this cultivation had been only issued under the distinct understanding that they were only to be enforced if the present necessary labour on the farms was retained. The Proclamation of the 20th April called up all men engaged in agriculture bora in the years 1895-1897 inclusive, unless they were shown to be in grades 2 or 3 if in their case they were at the date of the Proclamation whple time employed on a farm in farm work and were duly registered pur- euant to the National Registration Acts 1915 and 1918, as being occupied in agricultural work. The Executive Committee, proceeded Mr Jones, had enquired into every individual case. They had had the farmers before them and had not only considered the necessities of labour on the individual farms, but, in order that the Tribunal might have all the facts before them had inquired into and obtained information on outside cir- cumstances. In each case the available labour on the farm had been most carefully ascertained and con- sidered. In some cases where the necessity of the existing labour had seemed doubtful in view of the possibility of substituted labour, the Committee had thought it advisable to refer the case to the Tribunal for decision, but in considering the question of substi- tution and its possibility the Committee drew attention to the difficulties existing in the County of Brecon. Unlike English counties there wae no cottage accomo- dation for farm labourers. They had, therefore, to live in and must necessarily be single men. In very many farms the housing conditions were such that only mem- bers of the family could be employed and housed. It had been stated that more men could be released from the land because more machinery for farm purposes would be available and German prisoners' labour would also be available. In Breconshire neither of these con- ditions applied. In the greater part of the County agricultural machinery work was impossible. The employment of German prisoner labour was unwork- able except on the few farms of a large area. He emphasised the fact that the Committee had in every case brought before them, most fully considered the individual circumstances and on this based their recom- mendations. In a few cases they made no definite recommendations and had left it to the Tribunal to deal with on the facts placed before them. (Applause) The Tribunal's Intention. j The Chairman said, as they would understand, the Tribunal was in rather a difficult position-he might say almost an invidious position. They had, on the i one hand, the Government, with full knowledge of the necessities and urgencies of the case issuing this Pro- clamation which took all men between 19 and 23 to the colours, the only exception being those engaged in agriculture and who had an opportuuity, after receiv- ing certificates from the Executive Committee of appc-aling to this Tribunal. The difficulty was en- hanced by the fact that the Board of Agriculture had taken cognisance of the great demand, and had agreed to release 30,000 agriculturists from the land, and they (the Tribunal) were given to understand that the quota of 30,000 expected from Breconshire was 325. The total number of cases before them would be 397 so that they would see there would be very few left on the land. On the other hand, as they had heatd,Breconshire had increased its arable land by something like 27,000 acres, and it was on the understanding that sufficient labour was left on the land and made available for cul- tivating it that the orders of the Executive Committee vrdre issued. Under these circumstances what had the Tribunal to do ? They had to work on some general principle. In every case where they thought the labour was necessary for the cultivation of a particular tarm and that such labour came within the categories of the terms of the exemption—that the appellant was a skilled man-they would grant exemptions subject to substitution. (Applause). They would place the onus of replacing the labour on the National Service representatives. They had been given to uuderstand from time to time that they had sufficient substitutes to place on the land instead of these young men. Very well they would throw the 'onus on them and direct that the substitute to be provided must be to the satis- isfaction of the Agricultural Executive Committee. (Applause). The Chairman (addressing Capt. Wilson) said. Mr Miller had considered some cases that would come before them as a member of the Executive Com- mittee and it might be urged that he would be sitting on his own ludgment. He would like to have it quite clear whether there was any objection to Mr Miller adjudicating. Capt. Wi'son I do not think in that case that it would be advisable for Mr Miller to sit on the tribunal Mr Owen Price Mr Miller was only present one day and part of another day. Capt. Wilson Is it known on what cases Mr Miller was present ? Mr Miller Mr Prosser could tell us. Mr Owen Price I don't think Mr Miller heard the Brecon c:ises. The Chairman We are doaling only with Brecon cases to-day.- f Mr Miller said the cases he heard at the Committee were not Brecon cases. Capt-Wilson (to the Chairman) You will take a note of my objection Sir ? The Chairman The objection does not arise, Mr Miller did not sit on these cases. The cases were then proceeded with. The Chairman intimated that in the case of those in which exemption was given they did not make it conditional that the man should join the volunteer force. In very few cases was exemption refused, the greater majority of the decisions being 44 exemption until sub- stitution, the substitute being to the satisfaction of the War Agricultural Executive Committee." In a case in which a mother (a widow) appealed for her son Mr Geo.Tudor, solicitor,appeared for appellant. It transpired that the farm was 42 acres, 14 of which were under plough, and the rent E24. The boy it was stated worked at an adjoining farm three days a week. There was another boy 17 years of age at home. The Chairman said in this case it was not proved that appellant was essential to the cultivation of the farm, since he worked threo days a week on another farm whilst there was another eon, 17 years of age, on the farm. No exemption could be given. Capt. Wilson asked an appellant why a soldier could not do the work r I tried him was the re- ply, and he could not plough or heclge. He could not do anything, I had to return him. I put him to cut briers one day. (Laughter). Capt. Wilson And that was all a soldier could do r -Yes, he was not well enough. How long did you keep him ?—Three days. Could he have done anything I should only have been too glad to keep him. Another appellant asked by the Chairman if he hnd had a soldier substitute replied in the affirmative. The Chairman Well, was he satisfactory Appellant: What he could do he was willing to do and we forgave him for what he could not do. (Loud Laughter). Capt. Wilson later in theday incidentally mentioned the fact that there was a lady present who was pre- pared to do her best to provide women labour for the land. The Chairman We much appreciate the work of women at the present time,but the substitute provided must be to the satisfaction of the Agricultural Execu- tive Committee. One farmer on being told that the decision in respect to his man was "exemption till substitution," remark- ed with some heat: Substitution is no good to me, I shall not accept him unless he brings his food with him. Capt. Wilson asked one applicant if he had tried soldier labour. "Yes," replied the farmer but I have been rather unsuccessful. When I did have a good man they took him away. took him away ? Capt. Wilson Who took him away ? Applicant: The military authorities, they called him up to serve in France.

Advertising

WANTED AT LONDON HOUSE, BUILTH, SCORES OF CHILDREN to wear these Summery Pinafores, Frocks, Coats, Hats, Bonnets, etc. Pinafores. Embroidered Cambric and Voiles, very choioest serviceable designs, attractive assortment. Sizes 18in. to 27in. Prices l/0f to 4/11. Frocks. Daintily Embroidered, Voile, Tussore, Jap Sflk. Fabrics that will give lots of wear, un. rivalled for value, and in shapes and shades most pleasing to all concerned. 4/11 to 12/11. Coats. Summer Coats made in Alpaca, Black and White Checks, Gabadine, Fine Goods of ideal cut and make. They are garments of cool and pleasant appearance, and are gems of grace and style-in white, fawn, saxe and rose, 9/11 to .16/11. Hata and in quaint, pleasing and stylish shapes, just Bonnets fresh from the workroom made for immediate wear. When you view them you will pro. nounce them excellent, and better in value and appearance than you expected. To suit all ages, well finished goods, 3/11 to 9/11. The above select Stocks are secured from the very best sources, and entirely confined to London House, BUILTH.

Breconshire FarmsI

Breconshire Farms. -I LORD GLANUSK TO SELL PART OF HIS ESTATE. Lord Glanusk has decided to sell some of his lire- conshire property. This decision of his lordship will be regretted by Breconshire people generally. The relationship, existing between the Glanusk family and the tenantry on the estate, as well as the inhabitants of the county, has been of the most cordial character. The late peer and the present one have been con- siderable benefactors of all local institutions. The first Sir Joseph Bailey, Bart., founded a charity of some local importance. The property to be sold comprises farms of much historic associations. They have been successively held by families of territorial influence, and were mostly acquired; by the first baronet, who amassed great wealth as the result of his family associations with great ironworks and collieries in Wales. The properties will be offered for sale by Messrs Stephenson and Alexander, of Cardiff, at the Castle Hotel, Brecon.

Advertising

Every box of "ENGLAND'S GLORY Matches used means MORE WORK for British Work-people.—Moreland, Gloucester. 616

Communal Kitchens

Communal Kitchens. BUILTH LADY'S SUGGESTIONS. Builth Women's Ins-titute met at Church Hall recNttIv. Mrs Aubrey Thomas (Skreen) presiding. Afrc, Aubrey Thomas said Builth Women's Institute, ■was the first in the county. She had been asked to start one at Gla«bury, and Brecon peopie had been anx. ious to hear about (the achievements of the Builth In. stitute. She was very anxious that it should widen its. usefulness Each member should contribute some quota to the good of the whole, and not leave it to the more energetic members. She very much wished each member would give her the benefit of her ideas, for she wa, sure many of them could make very valuable sug- gestions. Reviewing the work done by the institute dur- ing the past year, Mrs Thomas mentioned the war sav- ings association, which had been successful, owing to the eflorts of 2\lr" Telfer Smith, and the fruit-bottling, which was due to Miss Vaughan and her manv helper*. Tho work for the coming year included the formation of a rabbit club. The increase of the food supply was a great object at present of women's institutes, particular- ly meat and cheese. Speaking on "Communal Kitchens" Itis Elsie Vaughan observed that she had net heard whether communal kitchens had been established in any small town". The scheme was already very weU known in largo towns, tho object being to provide wholesome and well-cooked food at a reasonable price, and to clear expenses, without expecting a profit. In the one, in which she had been helping, the initial outlay for cooking utensils., &c had been met by an advan-ce of R50 from a loeal authority, and all the work was at first done by voluntary helpers* but, as time went on, it was found necessary to engage a professional cook and a trained .secretary to keep ac- counts. Describing the up-to-date cooking utensils and methods of preparing the dishes, Misa Vaughan stated there was not a single frying pan. The strictest econ- omy was observed, one of the rule", being that only one match per day should be used. It was remarkable how cleverly the cook managed to provide for a varying num- ber cf customers from day to day, without the slightest waste, of food. This difficulty would not be encountered: in Builth, as it would be easy to find out how many they had to provide for.

A CASE FOR HELP

A CASE FOR HELP. Why is it that stomach, liver aaid bowel troubles —indigestion, pains after eating, biliousness, acid- ity, cons'tiptaoin, land the Ilk-t--are so common in tlieso days'? Undoubtedly they arB more pre- va-lent itiliian usual, though, happily, they axe not yet of fa, serious order. The explanation is simple, and so is the remedy. Take your own case. Maybe for years you have been able to eat wlralt you fancied, with never a thought of discomfort or pain I Yes, but you c.an'j¡ eat whatt you fancy now-a-days; you've just got to oat what you can get, and that's where the trouble'' begins. Your istomaob doesn't like food substitutes any more than you do. It does best and most easily the work it fbias been accustomed to do—that'9 natural, isn't it? Give it time and the help of ifchs digestive tonic and stomacshic tremedy Mother Beigel's Syrup, and at will surely rise to the oc- casion. Disregard its sign-als of distresF5 and yon may realise wifoen too late, that for you, as for everyone else, vigour, vitality and health are de- pendent upon the efficient working of ItbB digestive organs. Remember it is not what you eat, but only that portion of it which you digest that nourishes your body and sustains your- life. It is ia simple matter to take thiz'iy drops of Mother Seigel's Syrup after meals, but by so do- ing thousands iiave prevented iand ba-nis'hed sftom- ach and liveir troubles.