Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 4 of 6 Next Last
Full Screen
8 articles on this page
Advertising

AMUSEMENTS. j E M p"FT ?E EMPIRE -L. I Monday, Sept. 14th, and Twice Nightty; at 6.51 and 3.0 during the week. JACK PLEASANTS, The Bashful Limit. HERBERT BROOKS, The King of Mystiiiers. Freddie Hackin in a Xew Protean Revue, "All Change. -Donald McDougal, Scotch Comedian.—Mason & Bart, Comedy Gym- na-st.s.-Marie Santoi and her Merry Japs. in a Musical Playlet, "A Night in Japan." -BARTON & ASHLEY, in New Sketch, Money Talks."— Latest War News and Actual Films Direct from the Front,: shown on the Bioscope. GRAND THEATRE; SWANSEA. MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 14th, 1914, For Six Nights, and MATINEE ON SATURDAY AT 2.30. Important Return Visit of the Play which is Thrilling all London. Louis Meyer's Principal Company, in-j chiding Lewin Mannering and Miss Gwvnne Warhen, in "MR. W U. NEXT WEEK- Return Visit of the London Criterion j Farce Co., including Frederic Bentley, in., "OH: I SAY." r THE PICTURE HOUSE, HIGH STREET, SWANSEA. NON-STOP RUN from 2.30 till 10.30. Still the Most Popular House in Swansea, where Delicious fees or Teas are pro- vided Free of Charge Every Afternoon, TO-DAY'S PROGRAM ME- THE HUNCHBACK A Drama by Kalem showing the Exploits of a Daring Imposter. TROLLHATTON FALLS (Welt). The Chicken Inspector I One of the Liveliest Vita graph. Comedies MORALISING WILLIE (Eclair) THE TEST | A very pathetic story of a desperate man, and his sacrifice to prove his affection. j Entire Change of Programme Thursday. ( = CASTLE CINEMA i({ Ad joining "Leader" Omom. fj WORCESTER PLACE, SWANSEA. Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, Cant inuous Performance 2.30 to 10. ,A QUEEN'S LOVE iq i Exclusive to this Cinema), > U A Tlireg Reel Patheoolor Master- U piece. This Thrilling Production Reveals: l(i a Poignant Story of Court Life. < A Fine and Gripping Photo-Play, Beau- tif uLIly Coloured. I A Tragedy in I nk. j A Very Amueing Comic. Cigar Butts. i A Custom Officer's Fight Against ) Diamond Smugglers. Special War Topicals. j ? ■! j j The World and the Woman An Absorbing Biograph" Drama. )' And Other Interesting Pictures. I ORCHESTRAL MUStC. I| POPULAR PRICES:— j ( CIRCLE, Is.; STALLS, 6d. & 3d. j CARLTON Cinema de Luxe, Oxford St., Swansea. 2.30 COHTIHUOUSLY. 1D.30 | Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. TENTH SERIES OF j LUCILLE LOVE THE GIRL OF MYSTERY. Defenders of the Empire The Boy Scout in War Time j ■1 The Legend of the Castle j And Other Interesting Subjects. ) Full Carlton Orohestra Plays Daily (5 till 7 excepted). PRICES: 14., Id. M. and 1.. j Children: 3d. and 6d. | ELYSIUM HIGH STREET, SWANSEA. Twice Nightly, 6.15 & 8.30. MATINEE SATURDAY ONLY at 2.30. L HUB IJ ■—*» 205th YEAR OF THE X€? & I ?J f 1iM ?L OFFICE SUN JSSk\ THE OLDEST INSURANCE OFFICE IN THE WORLD. j Insurances effected on the following risks: FIRE DAMAGE, Bwnltant Loss of Kent and Profits. ( EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY. PERSONAL ACCIDENT. SICKNESS AND DISEASE. FIDELITY GUARANTEE, BURGLARY. PLATE GLAS8. S-wansea VICTORIA CH AMBERS. TOM Â DA VIES. District Inspector, and 3. OXFOlW STREET. i t PUBLIC NOTICES. 1st Welsh (Howitzer) I Brigade, R.F.A. RECRUITS WANTED I FOR SERVICE IN THE ABOVE BRIGADE. Men of good character, between the ages of 119 and 35, who wish to serve their I Country in the present emergency, can obtain full particulars as to -terms of ser- vice, pay, etc., on application to- The Officer Commanding Depot, 1st Welsh (Howitzer) Brigade, R.F.A., or-ill Hall, Swans-ea. MAYORESS WAR GARMENT SHILLING I FUND. Will you Help by Contributing your mite towards the Garment* for the Sick ana Wounded Soldiers who are hshting s?o bravely for a? at the front. Ftmd? are urgntly needed for thie. and to provide employment for the needlewomen who are thrown out ol work owing to the war. Contributions, however am ail, will be gratefully, received by the Mayoress, and may be sent to the Guildhall. A box for small donation* is placed at. 41, Alexandra- road. All sums received will be aclinow- ledged weekly through the Press. The following sums bare been received.— Shillings Subscription's already acknowledged 916 Mrs. Owen 1 Mrs. W. C. Jenkins (weekly) 1 I A 8eM'ant GirL .?.?. 10 Sta? Royal Hotel ZH II Mrs. D. Treharne .?.—21 Mr. Roger Beck 20 ¡: "Mr*. Bradford 20 Mrs. My!es.?.?..? 10 Mrs. M. A. Roderick 10 Hiss Llewelyn v.„ 20 Miss Jones 2 Mrs. Arthur Andrews 42 Patrol-leader Chas. Lowe (collected) 13 Mrs. M. G. Gibson lDi Mrs. J. Harris .— 5 At rt, George H. Bev an mm. R-oper Wright "p' 105 Mrs. David Jamw .?. 10? Mrs. John GiMbrook .— 100 Mrs. Charles Eden 21 Mrs. Ganz 104 Two theatre tickets 3 Fmnd 2 Miss Waters. 1 Total Ia8t> A SEP ABATE BUILDJN-G. 4u!? ..rtified A for Religious Worship. named U1TED METHODIST CHURCH, situated at junction of WINDSOR And LONDON ROADS. NEATH. in the Civil Parish of Neath in the County of Glamorgan in Neath Registration District, wa,s on the Iflth day of September. 1514, reerwrtered for solemnizing Marriages there- in. pursuant to 6th and 7th Wm. IV.. c 85, being substituted for the Building named Hope Chapel, situated at Melincrythan. Neath, now disused. Dated the 12th day of September, 1914. JAMES GANDY. Superintendent BegiMrar. ■' 1 gWANSEA |JNION.  (A) Porter and Superintendent of Male i Labour. j (B) Superintendent of Female Labour. The Guardians of the Poor of the above Union iNVITE APPLICATIONS from Mar- ried Couples (without children preferable) for the above appointments at their Insti- tntion at Mount Pleasant. Swansea. Salaries—(a) £ 35 and (b) £25 per annum. with allowances, which for the purposes of the Poor Law Officers' Superannuation Act. 1896, are valued at £46 per annum in each instance. Form of application and list of duties, etc.. may be obtained from the undersigned by whom applk.atbns must be received by not later than Tuesday, 29th instant. LJÆWN. JENKINS (Clerks Union Offices, Alexandrarroad. Swansea, 11th fceptember. 1914. NATURALISATION. Foreign Reeident? in Swansea and DistMct de&irou? of becoming British Subjects sh.li immediately mil-or communicate with i-ur, BRITISH NATURALISATION SOCIETY, 26, WORCESTKR-PLuVOE, SWANSEA. Moderate and Inclusive Fee. CASAJJL\S NO&THL.BS s SPECIAL NOTICE TO PASSENGERS. ALTERATION OF SAILING DATE, R.M.S. ROYAL EDWARD SOHliiDUIjED TO LKAVE BRISTOL (A VOX- MOUTH), ON SEPTEMBER 2Z-d, WILL SAIL ON SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19th. EXCELLENT ACCOMMODATION AVAIL- j A Bi, IN ALL CLAiiSES. A Special Express Boat Train will lmvo Temple Meads Station, Bristol, at "'L'O a.m. oa do- of sailing, and convey passengers ajtd their baggage direct alongside the Steamer. Sailing Date Subject to Al'eratkm or Can. cellation at Short Notice. Apply 18a, HI

THE CREAT RETREATI

THE CREAT RETREAT, I What would we not give for the sturdj hand of another Oliver Cromwell to describe for us the German debacle How he would have made the phrases ring With what vigour he would have told of the flying armies Of course, he would have adorned his tale with the moral. Oliver was a man whose pen betrayed his convictions, and, as he believed in the righteousness of the cause for which he fought. S-0, we may be very sure, had his been the hand which was to write of the discomfiture of another tyrant, he would have declared his views very plainly. The name of God has often been on the lips of the bully who has drenched Europe in blood. He has spoken of him- self as His scourge, meant in a mysterious providence to work His will. E em em- ber," he said to a division of soldiers on their departure for the front—" Remem- ber that the German people are the chosen of God. On me, as German Emperor, the spirit of God has descended. I ami His weapon, His s^ord, and His vice-regent. Woe to the disobedient., death to cowards ard unbelievers." Truly we can say this day that the scourges of God are not man-ordained, and that the monster who has warred on babes, who has stained the name of Germany in- delibly with s hame, who has of his own plan made many Belgian Rachels mourn for little ones, serves another than the God whose name he blasphemes. "Why did you burn Lonvain at all? the special correspondent of the New York World" and Daily Chronicle" asked General von Boehn, commanding the Ninth Imperial Field A-rmy. because," he answered, the towns- people fired on our troops*. We actually found mac hine-guns in some* of the houses; and," smashing his 'fist down upon the table, wh(-neN-er civilians fin- upon our troops we will teach them a lasting lesson. H the women and chil- dren insist oh getting in the way of bullets, so much the worse for women and children." Well, more than bis words convey is ex- pressed by the attitude of this German, So mLch the worse for women and chil- dren! We think of the woman whose body The correspondent saw, with the hands and feet cut off; of the little girl, two years old, shot while in her mother's arms by a L'hlan; of the old ma.n who was hung from the rafters of his house by the hands and roasted to death by a bon- hre being built under him. "War a Social Necessity." I Let rs not hesitate in our t-erm, We believe that the Allied Armies are &ght- ing for a sublime cause They are com- batting, and we are profoundly thankful to say, crushing not only a long line of German soldiery, but a damnable doctrine which Germany would spread over the earth that war is a social necessity, and that the maintenance of peace U never can or may be thp goa.1 of a policy." God will see to it," said Treitschke- whose philosophy has been one of the deep-down causes of this war, God will see to it that war always recurs as a drastic medicine for the human race." The vigorous and frank pen of old Oliver is wanted to phrase the despatches that answer with a tale of deeds such devilish teaching. He wrote when before York, in describing his absolute victory the: We uever charged, but we routed the I enemy. The left wing which I commandni being cnr own horse, saving a few Scots I in our rear, beat all the Prince's horse. God made them as stubble to our swords." Even as He has made stubble to i our swords those who destroyed Lonvain, who outraged a.nd killed women, and slaughtered babes • Surely never in liistary has tfrere ever hren 'r",c;J,d:ï0 dramatic '1 change in the fortune-- of war. But a short time ago we were watching, with dread gripping our hearts, the steady and seemingly unbreak- able progress of the German hosts—now over-iunning Belgium, now at the French borders, the.n almost at the door of Paris, There was still confidence in our ability, ultimately, to conquer the German, and many nursed the hope that the falling back of the Allies day by day before the advancing host was but part of a plan I We know from Sir John French's long report to what causes the retirfv ment was due. and we realise in what: perilous plight, our forces stood on those j awful days w hen the British j soldier established his personal | ascendancy over the Germans. And to- I day 1 The mighty armies of the Kaiser have been rolled back, and, we hope, broken. Indeed with reverence we can say that the Scourge i-3 being used upon. those who desolated Belgium. To-day we are told that th roughollt: the whole area of the western campaign the enemy are being driven back. In the words of the Times." from every point comes the story of triumph. Throughout the line of contact the enemy have given way before the fury of the French advance, assisted on the Lower Marna by t'hp determiiiel attack of our gallant British soldiers, The Allies are still pursuing, but the I' time has come when we can safely say that the greatest battle in history has i been fought and wou And ii we turn our eyes to the campaign in the east, we have a sight, to give us still greater heart. The left wing of the Au&trian army cut off from the main body in Galicia, and in danger of armihilation: the capture of 80,000 men and tOO guns; the danger of disaster to the Austrian I centre—it is all astounding news. To the very end. Sufficient for the day is its reward The news is great and good, and hiipe surges to full tide in our hearts as we dwell upon it. But we mitst be careful to preserve the perspective. Wo must remember that this is only the first stage in the struggle. Mr. Winston Churchill speaks of going forward to the very emf"; and the end, he reminds us, is not the mere military one of crushing and humiliating our enemies, but, the political end of ridding the world of a terrorism which is fatal to the free and peaceful life of modern communities. That end (as the Westminster Gazette" remarks) we shall only achieve i by a long and stubborn effort, in which we steadily bring to bear the whole of our military resources in combination with those of our Allies, and at the me time apply the economic pressure which is our unique weapon through the action j ot our navy. Mr. F. E. Smith put it bluntly but effectively when he said that the peace must be made, either in Berlin or in London. There is no half-way house bet ween the Prussian idea, as it is revealed to its in this stniggle, and the idea for which we and our Allies are -itanding.

NEITHER AfifVIS NOR HUMPS j

NEITHER AfifVIS NOR HUMPS j THE REV. THE HON. TAlROT GleE SAYS THE STRUGGLE DEPENDS UPON ThE MEN. I Addressing a men's gathering at St. Mary's Church, Swansea, on Sunday afternoon, on "Our Country's Call," the i'ev. (he Hon. W. Talbot Rice (vicar) said the call was not that merely of the iiing as a person, nor of our land, though we loved it, nor of our homes that needed J protection, but ol the whole history of our country—its services, victories, powers, literature, knowledge, of its place j in the world, its. responsibilities, its pos- sibilities, of its past and its future, Alluding to the King's message to tlii, dominions, the Vicar said the law of God for human life was progress, and we had been trying for many years to learn that law—to learn more and more what liberty and free institutions means. Honour Worth Fighting For. We had been trying to learn how to lift people up and teach them to govern by trying to get them to realise, that the Government and the Army were for the people, and not the people for them. But now came that danger of the overthrow ot the continuity ot civilisation" that was dear to us. Vie might be glad that we lived in a day like this, and the King's words, meaning that honour was worth lighting for, and that to he true and noble in our dealings was something that a nation and empire could determine to do whatever happened, must surely go down into the life and roots of our people. Little states had as much right to live as the infinitely greater ones, and the call to-day to stand by the weak was a splendid one. This light, not aggressive or for territory, but: for something high and inspiring, would live in our national life and help to j purify and sanctify it. We < ouid believe that God was leading us in this, and that therefore the issue must be blessing as weU as victory. Neither Arms nor Numbers. The scientiifc inventor, he believed, thought arms would win this war; ottrerr,, he believed, thought numbers would. He did not believe it would either. We were always forgetting that 1 he important thiug was .not the deadlines^ ot the weapon in the end—although, of course, that counted-—by a man behind the machine. It depended upon the character of the men. Jesus Christ must win. What God and the country wanted were mca who had not, merely courage and brute force, but who offered to their country—because thej had given them to God—their souls. themselves. They might well ask that such might be the men who went from Swansea. The Day" to which the Germans had had been drinking had come—the grea.test day in the history of the. British Empire, Might they not call it what the Bible called "The Day of the Lord" -thp dav for the Lord'? manifestation of His power, for the rallying of the forces of all that was noble, pure, and true?

FOOTBALL AND WAR I

FOOTBALL AND WAR. Mr, F. S. Charrington, as the result of his visit to Lord Kinnaird at Bossie Priory, in his crusade against football during the war, has secured the following: Rossie Priory, Inchtree, Perthshire, "Sept. 11, lIH. Mr. F. N. Gharrington has called on me, a-nri I have assured him that I am strongly of opinion that all professional players should be freed.from any engage- ments which they have made if they wish to join the Army or Territorial Forces ] and go to the front. j I should advise a fund being raised for the support of wives and children of the footballers who have gone to fight for their country, and who would need help. I cannot make further reply until I have met the Council of the Football Association. (Signed) KINNAIRD. 1 I

IT IS NOT MR IT IS MURDERI I

 IT IS NOT MR IT IS MURDERI  I STRONG WORDS. BBiTlSH SOLDIERS LETTER FROM THE II FRONT. MANY EXPERIENCES. I Private J. Atkinson, in the Duke of; Wellington's West Riding Regiment, is i now lying wounded in hospital at B;r-; mingham. and in a letter to his wife at1 Leeds he says;— j Send me packet of cigarettes as I am ill this place stranded without a half-j penny, and I have not had a cigarette. since I went to France. A nd talk about, a. time! I would not like to go through the same again for love or money. It is not war. It is murder. T," Germans are murdering our wounded as fast as they come across them. I gav,) myself up for done a week last. Sunday night., as we were in the Huek ot the light t at Mons. Our regiment started fighting i with 1.°0!)..and finished with 100 and three, officers. That made 100, so wc just lost. PiiO. It v as cruel. At one piaco we were at called Amiens, there were six streets of the tow-n where all the wom»n i were left widows, a.nd were all wearing the widow's weeds. The French regiment | that fought there was made up in thel town, and they got wiped out. j Our regiment was cut up through being; too long turning out of our billets at Amiens. The Germans had us before we had time to entrench ourselves, and gavel us it hot. Willing Captives, Private W. J. Yeend. of the 1st Cold- > stream Guards, and formerly a. member of the Guildford Borough Police Force, who has been invalided home, has given an account of his experiences at Mons. He describes the German soldiers as bullies and their officers as bigger bullies 81 ill. He sa As soon as we got into the trenches W'8 were shelled by the German artillery, j The shells came over ou-r heads at the rate of two a minute, just; like, a lot of rockets going off. and they dropped too near to be. pleasant. If it had nor been for our artillery covering us I don't know how we should have got out of it. The Germans drove refugees, women and children, in front of them. and fired over them at the Middlesex Regiment. That was why the Middlesex lost so heavily. lvhen the Germans began to get a., bit. too thick for us we got the order to retire, and reached a little vil- lage. No sooner had we got our billets than the Germans were in the town we had just evacuated. Thpre was scarcely anyone in the town, which the Germans shelled and set fire to. We got on the trot and travelled through the right and got i.nto our billets again. Here we en- countered ihe Scots Greys, who had been giving a tine account of themselves. They came into contact with some of the rhläns who had attacked the "Queen's" and gave them a good hiding. They told me that onca they found themselves within 30 yards of the German infantry and got away without a man being hit. Private Yeend corroborated the stories of tho German atrocities, and as an ex- ample of their brutality he stated that after an action the French were unable to re&cue a sergeant who had been wounded. When they found him later in the day his nose and ears had been cut j off and his eyes gouged in. And he was' still living! The German soldiers have no heart. They seem only too glad when they drop into our hands. They are ab- solutely exhausted, for they are driven along at a terrific pace, often marching 23 out of 21 hours. The Week of Marching. Mr. C. E. Colston has received, a letter from his son. Captain E. Murray Colston, of the 2nd Battalion 'Grenadier Guards, in which, speaking of the days irame- I diately fI Her the arrival.of the Guards' Biigade in France, the writer mentions that, aHertheir military duties were over the soldiers were a llowed to assist the.old men, the women, and the children (there was 'no! an able-bcdied young man left in the villages', in gathering the harvest, A fter getting in the fighting lizie., th- writer continued, the Grenadiers bad a week of practically nothing but marching 1 and fighting, with scarcely any rest or I sleep. On occasions they were done to a there was scarcely a sound foot in the battalion. The first time the men came under hea,v shell nt£' 

IT IS NOT MR IT IS MURDERI I

plane.. During that day we im-ro ? troubled by any more (iorman aeroplaj We were fortunate enough not toO ? disturbed th&t mght. and ah' dawn j again stood to arms, and we fo?nd ? j Germans close upon pur heels. I savl battery m ffont of u- put right nut J action. Thar? were '?niy about, &i? D ] lít amongst them'. and they vprp gaged in trying to get, away the gn This disaster was due to the iccl shell firing of the German artillery. their' efforts thp brave gunners were successful owing to their horses be killed. It was interesting to see officer engaged ic walking round the g< -■ and putting them out of action; or.. other words, seeing that they Would of no use to the Germans. This act required a great deal of bravery an the circumstances, because the ene I continued to keep up the heavy firi Much bravery also displayed wounded comrades of the battery help Lone another to get out of the firing lim j

rNEWS IN BRIEF I L

NEWS IN BRIEF. I L MESSAGES fropil ALL POINTS. • I I Prince Aihert, t An Aberdeen telegram states that I Royal Highness Prince Albert contin to make uninterrupted progress. Rain as a War Asset. f uT t" voti put the e&ect of the rain I ultimately a mouth's food for a d(1j mark," said one farmer, with referCj to the bountiful ram of the week-end.. The" Slim" One The "African World" says mail < patches received from Cape Town Jr. tion a movement to offer a corps of pic1 British and Dutch Afrikander ,r:r under General Da Wet for use in the Prince of Wales. I- It was reported in London on Saturr (says "The People"), that arording present plans the Prince of Wales will to the front within the next few da and will join Sir .John French's staff. Pretoria Sovereigns. I General Smuts, the South AfrÙ Minister of Finance, announced in Home of Assembly, says Keuter-, that there was a danger of a shortage of « it had been decided to re-establish old mint in Pretoria and to turn < gold coins of local design for pur local circulation. Captain Grenfc.Ts Progress. 11 Captain r. O. Grenlell. of th" f Lancers, who gallantly rescued Brit guns though badly wounded during retreat from Mons, is recuperating in Midlands, having left the hospital London over a week ago. He is confii to his bedroom, but is making g( progress. Amha55ariors of Truth. I S'ir T. M. HaFle and Mr. A.. E. Mason, accompanied by Mr. T. L. ( mour, barrister, left England on Sat day on an unofficial mission to United States with the object of eripur: that- the case for Great Britain shall presented effectively to the judgment the American people. Mr. Gordon Bennett's Bride. I The Baron ess do Reuter. whosc m I riage is announced to Mr.Gordon "Benin proprietor of the "New YOTk Herali was a Miss Potter, of Philadelphia, a founder of the news agency. 13ai r,?e de P (,iiter. George de .Renter. who lived principa in Paris, was a cosmopolitan ifgure. died in 1!)<19. Baroness de lieu tor, wh he married in 1801. was a noted be a u Mr. Gordon Bennett is seyenty-th years of age. An Unfounded Rumour, I The ar Press Bureau issued the lowing last: night. In view of certain rumour? which h; become prevalent, wliich are with, foundation, it may be said that on the September the various units of the A:r Service Corps in which the Yorfoti AN-a,oner-b Reserve have beeu int pointed, were inspected, and it found that ont of 750 men only one missing, and that lour were in hospi but none of these were seriously ill. Man Who Enlisted Himself, I Sergeant C- Jones, custodian of Masonic Hall, Lincoln, who has joined the Army Ordnance Corps, wri "I expect 1 am the only man who ei enlisted himself. I made out my o doenIDents marched myself to It J. and got myself sworn, in, made ont own warrant, and despatched myself M Aldcrshot. I joined as a private, bu got my own rank back tli(, &irnf, day, a got appointed colour-sergeant -major ? v, drill instructor. I liare ioto attend parades—nine a day." Popeand King George, I Turin, Saturday.—The newsrta "Stampa" says Cardinal Bourne is hearer of a Papal letter to King Geor j His Holiness expressed his great si path,r for the British nation. which describes as the guardian of peace < the rnastf-r of justice. The same paper adds that the p, asked the Austrian Ambassador and Prussian Minister for safe conduct I Cardinal Mercier, aerc'ibishop of Malir to return to Belgium. Both* refus 1 whereupon the Pontiff calmly answe 1 that he would consider this unpleaa refusal.—Router. Hanging of Culprits. I The proof whieli is obtainable of G man treachery at the opening of < Landrecies engagement, and at the c stant reception of narratives as to -1 j placing of women, children. and ot i non-combatants in the firing line, t ocrupying the serious attention of th < in authority. One of the suggcstic comillg from an influential quarter., i tbat an international. court-martial si- he formed without delay, before wh all Germans caught in the cojnmittai < such acts shall he tried, ami made suffer the full penalty. "In those cases where proof i! for coming the offenders should not he ¡:;h,. that would be too honourable a fate j them but hanged as common m | derera." German Chivalrv. I Paris. Sunday.—-A British Dragoon 1 i a Belgium village saw the yet WA. eorpsp of a peasant, woman who had hi strnrk 1 hrough th( breast by a Uhla lance. The UhLms were riding rmt nf the f|M lage as the British rode in, and \i brute who kiUcd ?hf vrm?an' did so !■ can?p she ch?d not or would not g:p him some broad. Once on patrol duty h rn.zne aro: stationary motor car. In it were th French officers and a lady, all dead, sitting in the position in which they w when they died- A vollev had h. j poured into the car. The 'lady's h1 hung carelessly over the side of the r and the fingers showed marks of n | which had hpn roughly stripped off Press A^oci'ation War Special.

No title

While patrolling the Park Mile Brar of the Great Western Railway, betwt Newport. Mon., and Basseleg, R, H. H j cock and his a?n. -who b?Ibnc?d to Fowj C?rnwaU, was kiU?d by a railwav cQ?