Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
37 articles on this page
Advertising

DRINK I   P I I 6 A I ,iI I 1F1  w? I tU" 6 l 'UI J anid j

Advertising

TRY SOUTH WALES NEW SEASON Strawberry Jam Yon will be pleased. Guaranteed Pure. South Wales Jam & Marmalade I Co., Cardiff. I

RUSSIANS RETIRE

RUSSIANS RETIRE EAST PRUSSIAN SITUATION TO HEW CERMfu ARMY CORPS SUDDENLY APPEAR. VAST BATTLE PENDING Th" Min-ation in East Prussi a has undergone a sudden and dramatic change. An official intimation was issue^?. yo.s*?r- day, and received here this morning, of the failing back of the Russian i otees on to their own territory, in order to cope with the desperate onslaughts of the virongly reinforced German troops, and to effect a greater concentration for the purpose of meeting the fresh forces which are now bring hurried to the EOHern fror-i by the enemy. The official con/urn unique gives a warn- ing that future official statements wili be brief and vague, as they aro on the eve oi a battle which will be on a va-ster scale and of more, far-reaching experience than myth; rig yet experienced. Too lUuch must not ht- read into this decision on the part of the Russian Head- quarters Stafi. Our A11 ies fully realise the enormity and importance of the im- pending struggle, and they are taking no chances. If victory can be assured by caution and foresight, the Russians will 1w certain of it, Official Statement. The official statement it. as follows: It was recently definitely ascertained thst f«:r new Army Corps had appeared in East Prussia, formed partly from Prus- sian troops from the Western front, partly from new recruits, and partly from reserve forces. This radically changed the situation, and necessitates the falling back of our troops in order to assure the possibility of re-arranging them and effecting greater concentration. Such an cbjact can best be attained on our own territory in the shelter of our fortresses. It must be presumed that we are on ths eve of a great and long opera- tion which ought definitely to decide the struggle in Eastern Prussia. I This circumstance win render necessary some brevity in the communique of future fighting. Afcer twenty-two ineffectual attempts, the! Germans succeeded in occupying, with large forces and a sanguinary attack, the heights of Koziomoka, but they were dislodged after a fierce bayonet fight and lport four hundred dead on the field. The Przemysl garrison is exhausting itself in vain sorties and keeps up an irregliiar fire on cur investing troops. "n the Black Sea the Russians have sunk ( a Turkish transport loaded with £ 50,898 and about 900 tons of provisions.

ANOTHER GERMAN LOAN

ANOTHER GERMAN LOAN? Am.terdam, Thu-rsday.-German finan- ciers have been summoned to a secret conference at Berlin by the Finance Ministry. The view is held that the launching of a new loan of j £ 25(),090,c00 is TtC"dod for the continuance of the war. Jt is hoped that a large portion of the loan wili be subscribed by Krupps and other emiyil-nt firms in exchange for new army con tract.s.-Exch auge.

GERMAN EMPEROR STUPEFIED

GERMAN EMPEROR STUPEFIED. Copenhagen, Thursday.—I learn from Berlin that the Kaiser secretly returned early on Tuesday morning from the east front, says a "Daily MaH" correspondent. Newspapers are forbidden to mention the Kaiser's sudden return, on aceount of the fact that it was generally believed that the troops would carry out some great events in the presence of their War Ijord. My informant states that tbe Ger- man situation in Poland has "stupefied"] the Emperor. The German military authorities at Stuttgart have now begun to publish a newspaper, "La Huerre' wtlich is printed in French and is distributed free among French prisoners, so that they may be able to learn the "truth" about the war And the German?' progrpas.

DACIA SAILS

DACIA SAILS. Neow York, February H.-The trouble amongst the Dacia's crew has been HCttb'd. She. Jrit Norfolk to-day, and her ca* "tain. McDonald, says that she will reach Rotterdam, in 18 days, if she is not inter- fered with, and the owners have pro- mised hira a large bonus if he brings her oafelv- back. While she is sailing an ordinarv course, the captain hope*; sh e may escape "the vigilenco of the British cruisers, whic11, it is alleged, have received in- structions to seize her. Sixteen men were permitted to cancel thrir contracts, but others immediately .ii,4nA on, and it is reported tkat they &:o 8 American citizens. The representative of the owners, 'with the port authorities, offered any their freedom, but there has been tto acceptance.

ENEMY SUBMARINES BATTERED

ENEMY SUBMARINES BATTERED. Copenhagen, Thursflav.I)ui-ing the heavy -orth Seagalf*; a few day! ago. it is reported that ten German submarines put into Bergen, Stavenger, Trondhjem, and other Norwegian ports in a terribly battered cond 11 i on. The crews reported that they had been many days in heavy weather, enduring privations, loss of sleep, and discomforts through the ceaseless rising and falling of the mountainous seas. The mGn were in an exhausted condition, several-of them being ill. The submarines were escorted to Norwegian waters by Norwegian patrol truisers, and informed that they must leave within 2.1. hours, according to the international rules, or be interned. They remained about 20 hours for rest, and car- Tied out some slight repairs. The men, it is stated, were only -half inclined to re- ,t;iii-n to their tank in the North Sea.

I THE LOAN EXPLAINED I

I THE LOAN EXPLAINED i BULGARIAN NEUTRAUTY TO BE STRICTLY I OBSERVED. BERLIN'S REASONS Explanations of tho German loan to Bulgaria are forthcoming from Bul- garian sources. The Premier annoyances that the neutrality of the Kingdom is to be strictly observed. In diplomatic circles the view is widely held that far too much is being made of Germany's present financial dealing* with I Bulgaria. There is no question of a war loan. All the Kaiser's Treasury has done has been to pay over to King Ferdiuand's a substantial instalment on the £ 20,000,000 loan decided upon as -r Governjac-nis -ome months beiorc iho "0"1" 1J"l"L:: '{\) LCtJ x (- '41. t;,t t; 9\d: broke out. I A German Scrap of Paper. j Germany's object in thus paying in fore the date previously settled has been at most to secure thereby a claim on Biil-, garia's absolute neutrality, and to prevent her statesmen from tearing up the German scrap of paper in order to accept financial aid from the Allies. That —comments a London correspoiidozlt-is all. King Ferdinand and a section of his Cabinpt arc pro-Germans, but his prople as a whole are not. The former will not| fight by the Allies' side, but the latter j will not a llow their rulers to fight against, Russia and Great Britain. Besides, the results of German strategy on the; Turkish and A ustrian Powers are not! exactly encouraging. King Ferdinand may rattle the Kaiser's shekels. He will i not rattle the Kaiser's sword. His neigh- bour's golden bullets will not intimidate j Rumania. I The Loan Explained. Rome. Thursday—A favourable explana- tion of the Bulgarian loan is given by the Tribune," -which says:— I ".A Bulgarian personage states that the loan issued in Berlin is a purely financial operation. After the Balkan Wars Bulgaria tried to place a loan in Paris. Bulgaria afterwards applied to Berlin, who imposed hard conditions, but, left her liberty intact. The loan will be used to pay off allj; Bulgarian creditors everywhere, in Parjs, i Vienna, London, and Berlin. Bedin: agreed to the operation so that Bulgaria; should not he helped by Germany's enemies. M. Ghenadieff confirms these explanations, and declares that Bulgaro- JRumanian relations are excellent and are becoming closer and closer."—Renter.

I CHINESE PROTEST TOCERMANY I

I CHINESE PROTEST TO-CERMANY, I Peking, Thursday.—The presentation of a protest by the Chinese Government to the German Legation complaining against thø spreading by the Germans of false rumour* r:?Hrdmg impending trouble among the nations has caused great satip- faction to tbc supporters of the Allies. It also shows a chaD?R iD the or?cial atti- j tude towards the AlHes.— Exchange.

IMAN DESERTERS i

I (MAN DESERTERS. —— « Amsterdam, 'rhursdaY.The Tele-1 graaf learns from Bergen-op-Zoom that! considerable excitement, was aroused in Antwerp ou Tuesday night owing to 200 German soldiers having failed to attend: the roll-call. The houses of a number of citizens were at once thoroughly searched. I The military clothes belonging to the deserters were found in Rome of these I houses, and the civilian owners of these were arrested.—Press Association.

IHUNGER PANIC IN BEQUN

I HUNGER PANIC IN BEQUN. Copenhagen, Thursday.—A Berlin j met,sage says: Hundreds of people are in front of grocers' shops asking Where can we get Dotatoes- In many shops | there is figh ting between women and shopkeepers. The Berlin Central Market Hall had no potatoes yesterday. Forty per cent. of the bakers are faced with ruiji. Three hundred. and ten in Berlin alone have closed their premises. The situation is much the same everywhere. The spirit of the people is one of I anxiety and worry.-

WiLHELMIHAS CARGO

WiLHELMIHAS CARGO. We are.officially informed that it is not, quite correct to say that the Wilheimi-na has been detained, or that her cargo has been seized. As to detention, the vessel put into Falmouth owing to strass of weather, and thus the q xestion of seizure was, by purely fortuitous circumstances, avoided. As to the cargo, the correct version of the present situation is that the vessel is remaining" at Falmouth pending investigation. The. question el what will he done with her cargo is a Cabinet matter, and it is not possible at present to say that the Wilhelmina will not be permitted to convey her cargo to Germany. Indica- tions at present favour the assumption that she will not be permitted to do so. The Wilhelmina has received orders for a Bristol Channel port. It is not known when she will sail.

I PUBLIC AND THr PRIMES FUNDI

I PUBLIC AND THr. PRIME'S FUND One hears a good deal of speculation as to the position of the Prinoe of Wales's Fund (says a London corres- pondont). and there are claims that with so immense a oiiini iti question there ought to be some effective control by the nation through Pa^iament or other- wise. It is being asked what is being I done, and what is going to be done, with the money. When it was started on a wave (,f charitable feeling the idea was that it should go mainly to redress want in civil life. But there is very "little r.epous want compared with peace figures, and unemployment was never lower. The writer thinks that the time has coiVKi for a detailed statement from the committee as to the use to which the money has been put, and one would like v) see a small committee, including Sir George Murray (the present chairman;, Lord Derby, the Duke of Devonshire, Mr. Asquith, Mr. Bonar Law. Mr. Lloyd George, and Mr. Chamberlain charged with the mapping out of a future policy. No suggestion is being made against the intentions of the present committee. It is a question of policy, and in that tho subscribers—the public—through their c?ect?d i-epresentativw should have a voic?

LINERS ESCAPEi i001

 LINER'S ESCAPE i-.00.1 GERrAN SUBMARINE DEFIED. PIRATICAL CRAFFS ATTEMPT TO TORPEDO STEAMER.  TY I RACE FOR SAFETY Ymuiden, Thursday.—The master of the B.itif Il !leI" Laertes, which arrived hero morning from Java, reports that about half-past four yesterday 4afternoon, when his ship was between the 3iLiUS Lightship and the Schouwen Bank. she was shelled by the German submarine U21. Tho shells struck the ship's funnol. compass and beats on the upper deck. Afterwards the submarine tried to fiio a torpedo, but the Laertes; escaped by clever inancEuwring and putting on full speed. It appears that the Laertes, heforo being challenged by the submarine, was sHering without colours. When asked to stop, the captain, it is stated, showed the Dutch flag in order to save the lives of the crew, who are neutral subjects, most of them being Norwegians and Chinese. He then went full speed ahead for a distance of 1C miles, and finally | reached Ymuiden in safety. ■ It is stated that the gun used by the submarine was a machine gun.Ilress Association. Torofdo Misses. The Exchange Telegraph Co. states:— A torpedo discharged by the submarine passed alongside the ship. A Plucky Escape. The British liner Laertes is now lying 06 Amsterdam after a plucky and ?,,c,k. escape in the North Sc-a, from a German submarine, said to be the U2 (writes Mr. C. E. Tripp in tho Daily Chronicle;" On Wednesday afternoon she bightod a submarine in the neighbourhood of the Maas lightship. Sho was ordered to hpave to, but Captain Probert was not going to give in. Putting on every pound of steam, the Laertes went ahead, cioseiy beget by the bubmarine, ior about an hour. It is said that a torpedo discharged from the submarine just missed the pur- sued vessel. Then the submarine opened fire with a small gun, said to be a mi trailleuse, and peppered the Laertes. I am informed that the vessel was hit, and bears many ballet marks on the funnel and the small boats, but nobody on board was hit. Under Dutch Flaq. The Laertes reached Ai-nsterdam this I afternoon having run into the Ymuiden early in the morning. Unofficial!}- it is stated that she came in tinder the Dutch &g. Since her arrival here she has J;>n strictly guarded, no one bpmg al- ?lev?e,d on board. one of her company i save the captain have come ashore. ) 1 had a brief glimpse of the ship, and I noticed that tho word Liverpool, wLich is in large letters under her name, has been blacked out. The Dutch official representing the Navy Department lias been on board and has had a long confcren-ce with the cap- tain. A conference has also taken place be- tween the captain and the British consul here. The s.s. Laertes. The Laertes, of 4,511 tons, was built in I 1M4. at Newcastle, for the Ocean Steam- ship Company, or the so-called Blue Funnel Line (A. Holt and Co. managers'. Her part of registry is Liverpool, and master. Mr. W. it. Pro pert. The Blue Funnel liners used to call at, Fishguard. The F21 was the craft which appeared I recently in the Irish Sea. I nquiry by Holland. I Amsterdam, Feb. 11.—It is reported from The Hague that the Dutch authori- ties will make an inquiry into the at- tack by a German submarine on the British liner Laertes off the Dutch coast. The object of the inquiry will presumably bi to ascertain whether the attack was made in Dutch territorial waters. The Laertes has passed into the canal from the Ymuiden on her way to Amsterdam. j —Renter. Neutrals Not To Be Touched. Copenhagen, Thursday.—The New Hamburger Zeitung" in an officially in- spired article, says that the German Ad- mi raity has issued orders that neutral ships shall not be interefered with if they are not carrying contraband. Every British ship, whether a war vessel or mer- chant vessel, will unconditionally be sent to the bottom. The German papers are using wild lan- guage towards neutrals. The "Hornbur- j ger Nachricten, for instance, says:— From February 18 everyone must take the consequences. No menace will keep the German fleet back. The whole world's lmto and envy con- cerns us not at all. If the neutrals will not protect their flag against England, they have no right to be held in esteem by Germany. We will put hard against hard.- Exchange _n- __n

STRENGTH OF BELGIAN ARMY I

STRENGTH OF BELGIAN ARMY. I Amsterdam, Feb. lL-Acoording to let- ters from the Belgian front the Belgian Army is now estimated to be 100,000 ¿;trong. Reu hr.

n I EXCHANGE OF PRISONERS I

-n_ I EXCHANGE OF PRISONERS. I Amsterdam, Thursday.—The follow- ing telegram from official sources in Ber- lin has been received here. "As from to-morrow French prisoners of war who come into the category of F-evorely wounded prisoners who are to be ex- changed for German prisoners of war will be gathered together at Constance for eventual discharge. The date of ex- change has not yet been settled, as the French Government has not answered the German inquiries. "Regarding the exchange of British prisoners, tiuse will be assembled at Lingen on the Dutoh frontier, and at Liege until the 14th inst. The 15th or 16th inst. has been proposed to the British Government through tho Netherlands Government as the date for ,change. "-Be u tcw.

IWARCHIEFS QUARREL I II I

WAR-CHIEFS QUARREL GERMAN GENERAL STAFF DIVIDED A M ri ii-GST ITSELF. I POSITION III BERLIN Paris, Friday.—Writing in the I I" Figaro" to-day, M. Hanotaux, tho former French Foreign Minister, 3ays he has received news from Borlin, accord- ing to which the German General Staff is divided, and the chiefs are upraiding eacii other bitterly, sometimes furiously, on account of disappointment.s and the slowness of the campaign. The professional and bourgeons world a loue and iolent. Une aspect of Barlin, says 3L Halao- taux's informant, is almost its usual one, but impressions of eadness begin to pre- j vail in families. The people are asking otio another, VÇha" is the good of this' war?" This question is being put every- • where in Germany, and among neutrals. The adversaries of Germany, says M. Hanotaux known why they aro- lighting. It is to assure their national independ- ence, liberate their brothers, avenge humiliating affronts, loyally carry our solemn treaties, and finally ensure for the world a long. sure, equitable and; weil-thougljt-out peace. A Brilliant Echo. Referring to the recent exchange of telegrams between Sir Edward Grey and M Delcasse, the Journal" to-day says: It sounds like a brilliant echo of the Durna demonstration. Nothing could show better than this happy encounter tho community of inspiration animating;: the thoughts and actions of all the Allies, j The diplomacy of the Allies has a lot to; do to foil the machinations of Buelow and Ghenadieff in Rome."

ITALYS LITTLE WAR1

ITALY'S LITTLE WAR. -1 Rome, Thursday —An official message from Tripoli states the enemy were re- pulsed with very serious losses near I Bungcim. Th^i Italiajis lost 31 killed. I

COMPENSATING CIVIL VICTIMSI

COMPENSATING CIVIL VICTIMS. I Paris, Thursday, Feb. 11.—The Chamber has passed a Bill according to families of civil victims of the war the same allow- ances as the families of soldiers.—Reuter.

AMMUNITION EXPLOSIONI

AMMUNITION EXPLOSION I Stockholm, Thursday.—Seven persons were killed in an explosion of ammuni- tion at the military laboratory here to-day.

SOLDIERS KILLED BY BRITISH BOMB I

SOLDIERS KILLED BY BRITISH BOMB. Rotterdam, Thur-,(Iaf.-kiy Antwerp I correspondent says that thirty-five t f.oldiers were killed /in Fort No. 4 on Friday by a jjomb dropped by a British airman. ————————————

GERMAN FAMILIES LEAVE STRASSBUROI

GERMAN FAMILIES LEAVE STRASSBURO I Geneva, Feb. n.-The mo violent ar- tillery duel in Alsace since the beginning of the war took place yesterday, and there has since been a big exodus of German families from Mulhouse, Colmar and Strassburg.

AMERICAN PASSENGERS REQUESTI

AMERICAN PASSENGERS' REQUEST. I The Cunard Company have been ap- pealed to by Americans to fly the Stars and Stripes on the Lusitania during the next trip for the protection of United States passengers, the flag indicating to German submarines that American citi- zens were on board.

MEDAL FOR SWANSEA SOLDIERI

MEDAL FOR SWANSEA SOLDIER I The Royal Humane Society has awarded its bronze medal to Private Gomer Evans, &th Reserve Battalion the Welsh Regi- ment, for saving a Russian sailor who fell into the Prince of Wales Dock Basin, Swansea.

FOOD PRICES DEBATEI

FOOD PRICES DEBATE. I So many members wanted to speak on Mr. Ferens's motion that it became evi- dent early last evening that the discus- sion could not be confined to one sitting. It has been arranged to resume it on Wednesday in next week—the date pro- visionally fixed for the dpbate on the aliens question. This latter will probably not be entered on till the week after next. ———————————

I AMERICAS TWO NOTS I j

AMERICA'S TWO NOTS. I ? Washington, Feb. 1 I.-The Government has now sent its Note to Great Britain making friendly use of neutral flags, and has also communicated with Germany asking what steps her naval oiffcers will take to verify the character of ships flying neutral flags in their enforcement of the German proclamation of a war zone around Great Britain. In the Note to Great Britain it M pointed out that the frequent use of a neutral flag as a stratagem might cast doubt on the charicter of and endanger the safoty of vessels entitled to fly the American flag- As regards the Note to Germany, while it is recognised that the regulation of submarine operations is not entirely covered by international law, it is under- stood that the Government has made it' clear to the German Government that any attack on a veesej flying the American flag without definite ascertainment that such use of the flag is fictitious, will be vie,veil as a grave matter and will result in I serious complications. The Government, however, has not fully expressed itself on the German proclama- tion, confining i tseli for tho prent in i asking fcr more information, on which further representations may or mav not be t based. Both Notes are brief, and are couched |' in friendly terms. Neither makes any protest. They will be presented by then "United States Ambassadors in London and Berlin respectively.R-euter. J:

IN SOOTH AFRiCA

IN SOOTH AFRiCA GERMAN TOWNS O"GUPID u I r UNION FDRGES ENTER THE ENEMY'S TERRITORY. KAXAfilAS FIOHTiMQ. KAKAMAS HGHTHiG. Luderitzbucht, German South-West l Africa, \i"Ted.nesday.-A !oree of mounted men has just completed an import-ant patrol to Pomona and Bogenfels, 50 and 70 miles respectively to the w>uth of this place. Large stores are believed to havoi been accumulated there by the Germans, who are constantly in touch with them, i This is the first time our troops have j penetrated so far in this direction. The I main body stopped at Pomona, while the ^mailer force pushed on to Bogenfels. I At the former place a German oiffcer' and four men surprised and captured a I sergeant, WHO had become detached from hib troop, but he subsequently escaped and rejoined. Town in Flames. Borgenfels was found in fiaruf-s on our, arrival, which synchronised with the hur- ried departure of the Germans. One store was well alight and another was smoulder- ing". Our troopb came under rifle fire as; they advanced, hut we completed the work of destruction commenced by the enemy, after bringing away t'.uch stores as we use- fully could. The came policy was followed at Pomona. Kaksmas Attack. Kakamas, South Africa, Thursday.—It appears that the enemy responsible for the recent attack on Kakamas were all Germans, who apparently followed the rcboL; when intelligence react ad them of their intended surrender. They arrived, however, ten hours late, and here, they determined to have a smack at Kaka- mas—a 6mack which, however, cost them: dear, as they suffered sixteen casualties, including four oiffcers, who were taken prisoners. In their h urried retreat the Germans several horses and m ne h hlggage be-, hind. Tho attack was badly conceived and developed It is considered that Maritz and Kemp 1 would undoubtedly hare taken the north part of the settlement, seeing it was impossible to throw pontoons across the river. The enemy, moreover. directed their artillery atack on De Wet Drift,; making it impossible to launch pontoon' boats, but leaving Kakamas Drift, lower down, almost unmolested, and giving Major Bronkhorst a chance to send rein- forèprnent6 to the pickets on the opposite side of the river as fast as the crowded boats could carry them. A single gun would have rendered thB f passage next to impassable, but as it was, the defenders were able to gain a firm footing on the north bank. It was only: late in the day that the Germans severely: bombarded these positions, and then moro with a view to extricating themselves from difficult position. The only defence casnalty was Lieut. (V.tllling, died of wounds. Tie was a son of Legislator Neethling, who is in charge of the advance hospital at Kakamas, and went to the firing line with the ambulance to bring out his son.

71 LEAFLETS DROPPED ON ANTWERPI

 7 1 LEAFLETS DROPPED ON ANTWERP. I Amsterdam, Thursday.—The "Tele- j graaf in a message from Antwerp de-! clares that, notwithstanding the German I denial, a biplane flew over the city last Friday. The pilot distributed leaflets saying: "Keep courage, we are coming. Have shirts, stockings and oil to rub our feet with ready." T ie Germans are continually" searching for these leaRets.— Exchange. I

LAST NIGHTS CASUALTY LIST

LAST NIGHTS CASUALTY LIST. Last night's casualty lists contained I the names of 13 officers and 527 men. The following is an analysis of the li sts:— Office rs. Men. Killed 3 35 Died of wounds 1 34 Died 6 Wonnded !? 289 Missiug. — 132

JESUITS NEW GENERAL

JESUITS' NEW GENERAL. Rome, Thursday.—The election of a| new general of Jesuits hah r,uH"ed ,ti! the appointment of Father" Ledochow- sky, a German Pole. The election of Father I/edochowski, who is the nephew of the iamous car- dinal of that name, is much com- mented on, as, although the conclave for the election of the "Black Pope," as the general of the Jesuits is called, s surrounded by the deepest secrecy, it was known that strenuous efforts wore being i made to prevent the transfer of the supreme command of the powerful Company of Jesue to Latin liap-db. .Father Martin, a Spaniard, was general for many years under Popes Leo and! Pius. He was succeeded by Father; Wcrnz. a German, whose appointment! was considered a great triumph for the' German element. At the time of hi5 election it was even said the Emp'eror had expressed his satisfaction at ? hav- ing one of his countrymen Loading the Black Battalions, the followers of Loyo-la. At the present election Father Pine, a Frenc hman, was fircct favourite, and IJ.EJ was ilatui-ally opposed by ^Jrirmans and l German sympathisers. The English for the French candidate, and Italian candidates were almost equally divided. The decision rested with the Spanish, who, not seeing any probabilitv of the generalship returning to them, preferred to eo-ek a compromise, and sug- j k"Btccl the election Father Ledoc.hwski, who, being a Polo, belongs to neither: side.

No title

President Wilson, accompanied ?r mili-l ".an and navth°r distinguished Japanese who will re- dr"sr-:it Japan at the Panama Pacific Ei- aibitioa. )

MINUTE TOO LATE j

MINUTE TOO LATE — AMERICAN STORY OF BRITiSR ATTEMPT AMEMCA-;I STORY OF BPIPSfl ATTEMPT TO CAPTURE KAfSEB. IMPORTAST DOCUMENTS SECURED NEW YORK, Feb. 2. Details of the Kaiser's narrow escaped ficm capture at the hands of the lath Hussars are transmitted m a spirited cable 'Chey ar,&, tn the Pittsburgh Dispatch." They are- given on the authority of an officer ofi the regime at, who states that a.fter tbcY British troops occupied Boiseile on, Cbristmas-cve ilie Germans fell back to Bertincourt, where the Kaiser arrived thoj same evening. j At ten o'clock that night, says the, officer, we iearned that tho Kaiser and! his staff iutcnded to proceed at seven o'clock next morning to the headquarters of General von Mauben, a few miles south of Cacibrai, and would take a toad which would bring hiui to a point âlX: miles east of Boiseile. Attempt Decided On. j At this point the road lay below a; long grass ridge. If we rode out and: concealed ourselves beiuna the there wa- ii bur information was correct, a good chance of our being able to cap-; ture the Emperor. We determined to' make the attempt. j Major Blackwood, tvo ot?fT ??c.pTs. and myself, with 600 men, k'? Boiseile; at five o'clock ami., reached the ridge an: hour later, and st.,ationf-ti three men to! signal us the approach of tna Kaiser- Half an hour later a troop of Uhlans came along TL:S road, UIK; then of our men on the ridge saw signs being made irom a cottage near the roariwa occupied by a French p--aidant. We knew what wa6 meant. Cm presence behind the ridge had been communicated to the German cavairy, and OUT- lookout on; the ridge saw two of them -allcli ba<,5. while tho others went ou. There was still a chance chat, we might; capture the Kaiser at a point two uni'r.i further south, whore the road to Cambrai; lcrks east and west. We had oivirl fifteen minutes in which to cover the two I miles, and the going was very rough, hatj we tried it. j The Kaistrs C"r, j Wlit-n Iva wt,-i-a va7.c7,- of the fork, in thf grey of the morning light, we saw a motor-car rushing abmg the road from Bertincourt, and with our: glasses we could easily rroogu:se tbei Kaiser in it with three otlifr officcra. The car disappeared al^n-- the 

iHMIUh

\.iHM.IU h.. Swansea Firm's fvlagnifjosni Donation to Mayor's Fund. The following letter, from Messrs. L. | E. Jones, L:d., Swansea, has been received by the Mayor of Swansea:— [ Sir,—We have to give to charities, i which was voted by our company. We do! not wish i, allot this to any special fund, j and we think that if it is handed, over lo 1 you. at yonr discretion, it would he better; than gilts to one large fun d. our6 j faithfully, j For Messrs. R. E..Tones. Ltd.. Stanley B. Jones, Director."

MINERS BURIED ALiVE I

MINERS BURIED ALiVE. I Three miners were bu ,d by a fall of rock. which occurred a.t Hadbarrow Iron Ore Mine, Millom, last evening. Two L-. ",q were rescued alive, but injured, withud three hours; but the third man, IT. T.! Coward, was not reached for six hours, i and was dead when found, having been crashed to death. j

US AMBASSADOR INSULTEDI

U.S. AMBASSADOR INSULTED. I The Hague, Ihursday.—-The T-,ILitcc States Ambassador in Berlin, Mr. James- "Vi atson Gerard, was subjected to an one.ii! insult at the hands of a theatre audience during a disgraceful demonstration at a ?roioi?FMt BerEn theatre on Tuesday ni?ht. The inc:dpnt occurred as follows: Mr. Gerard, accompanied by Mrs. Gerard, Mr. Grew, bis ii?t secretary, and M)-s Grew, and other members of the Ameri- can Diplomatic Corps, aftenaea the per- formance together. Between the acts the Ambassador and his companions remained in their places conversing quietly in En?Hsh. This evidently aroused the displf?sure of the persons nearest to th?m. who suddfmly raised an outcry and began to hoot and yeU- The commotion spread throughout the house and a wildly turbulent scene ensued. Someone in the audience, -evi- dently meaning to put au end to thr threatening manifestations, ro&e and succeeded in securing attention ioxlg enough to explain that the English- speaking strangers were Americans and were in the company of the American Ambassador. Far from quieting the commotion this anrounceraoht provoked a stilf wilder' outburst. A man. rising in the st-alif. angrily declaimed that Germans n longer bad any reason to s how tolera tion for Americans. His ime.ceb wildly applauded. Mr. Gerard ant4 h party remained throughout the- deoio.' tration a^d then quieth witbdr=-?v Daily Mail."

No title

The Paris "Matin's" Havre corraspoiv ent states that tbc- In

Advertising

5.30 Edition. ItlOn. TO-DAY'S COMMUNIQUE. French Particularly Active. The communique issued in Paris this afternoon points mainly to a scries of artillery dfels. The French guns have been particularly aetiva in the sectors of Rhein.s and Solssont. Th6 cannonade in the Vloevre has been of c»nsid?rable intensity. The railway stations of Thainccurt and ArnevHle have t-cci bombarded by the French. To thc'South of La Maselle, the enemy blew up a mine at the extremity of one of our trenches, which, however, we still held. 2.30—All ran except Rhine ^a-Sharli. Betting: 7 to 3 Itav Ormee. oh—Also isa Ganblrd, Growler. STARGANTE6 1. t?J?M EVE 2, ært 3. J ■ ice.,