Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
31 articles on this page
Advertising

"P"IIP a PAGES ? TO-DAY  PAGES I 

Advertising

I TRY SOUTH WALES NEW SEASON Strawberry Jam You will be pleaded. Guaranteed Pure. South Wales Jam & Marmalade Cc.. Cardiff. HWWHL,l, M. Ill I ■IJflMIU'JJAJLJW.'lJIIMM M. 'J. V>.qili* ■» — in

RETIREMENT OFi RUSSIANS

RETIREMENT OF RUSSIANS. ————?.————- ADVANCE. AUSIR)AM ADVAME. CZERHOWITZ OCCUPIED BY COMBINED TEUTONIC FORCES. BIG BATTLE PROCEEDING. 8UB EASTERN ALLIES CONFRONTED WITH GIGANTIC TASK. Some'little time ago the Russian Head- quarters Staff announced that the course of brents would lead' to developments "wh ich would necessitate the greatest fcwrecy on their part, and That, as a ire~ fcult, the oSicial communiques would be fcrief. All through, the war our Eastern Allies have shown a. determination not to be I drawn from their plan of campaign by any outside consideration, and they have revealed the most extraordinary tenacity of purpose, never hesitating to withdraw tbMr forces, and evacuate positions pained, if it seemed desirable from a J strategical standpoint. Hence their action during the pazz, few days in removing their forces from Ea.st Prussia a.nd from Bukovina must not be misunderstood. Austrians Occupy Czernowitz. A Bucharest message to the Times announces the occupation of Czernowitz by the Austrians, and that the Russians have vacua ted the whole of Bukovina. That. they have not, done this without Quaking the numerically superior Auetro- German armies fight very hard for every inch of territory gained is indicated in the following official Austrian com- munique issued in Vienna yesterday, and received, via Amsterdam!:— On the Carpathian front, from the 1)ukla Riss to the vicinity of Wyszkow, the situation is generally unchanged. Yesterday there was almost everywhere heavy fighting. Numerous attempted attacks by the Rus- Rj&ns on the allied positions were repulsed with heavy losses to the enemy, from "whom we also captured 320 prisoners. By our occupation of Kolcmla, the Bus* ian5 lost an important vantage poirrt in Ea%t Galicia. South of the Dnejster. from the direc- tion of Stomslan, an action with hostile reinforcements has led to (Somewhat im- portant fighting north of Nadworna a.nd the north-west of Kelomla- The battle is still procooding. In Bukovina the enemy has been driven beyond the Pruth. Czernowitz was occiij>ied by our troop. yesterday afternoon. The Russians de- I parted in the direction of Nowosieiiea, in Russian Pola.nd, and in West Galicia there have, only been artillery duels and some unimportant skirmishes A Thrilling Episode. A journalist with the Russian Army, writing from Marmornitza (Rumania)., on Wednesday say«: I spent yesterday in! < toemovitz, where I received from a high officer of the Russian General Staff details and photograph? of the Russian with- drawal from the Southern Bukovina, which forms one of tho most thrilling episodes in military history. The Austro-German forces were in a vast superiority, but the retirement was effected with comparatively little loss. The mountain paths were followed and also the tracks which are used only by summer tourists. The men often had to march in four feet of snow. The Austrian Tyrolean troops harassed the marching troops from j he mountain sides by their fire. arid. when possible loosing pieces of rock on to them. One detachment of Russian hubsars was caught wi a narrow ledge between a precipice and a mountain side. They refused to surrender, and managed to escape, only losing eighteen men. Trees had been felled by the Austrians across "-many of the defdes in the moun- j ai and enormous difficulties created, but all these were overcome. The Russian f offk-er acknowledged-that they were under a great debt to Rumanian sympathisers ir. the district through which they passed. The Russians destroyed all the bridges in their retreat.

RHEIMS CATHEDRAL STRUCK

RHEIMS CATHEDRAL STRUCK. Paris. Thursday.—The Germans have again bombarded Rheims. One shell struck the north tower of the Cathedral.

TURKEY APOLOGISES

TURKEY APOLOGISES. The Director-General of Police in Con- stantinople has visited the Greek Lega- tion, and in the presence of all tie mem- lvers oj the staff formally expressed his regret at the insult offered to the Greek Naval Attache. He further promised that an official communique to that effect should be pub- lished in the Press. The incident may thus be regarded as closed.—Reuter. fit may be recalled that Turkey .showed dilaterineEt3 in acceding to the (Ireek de- mand, and the Greek Ambassador there- upon left Constantinople.]

GERMAN PASTOR IMPRISONED

GERMAN PASTOR IMPRISONED. Amsterdam, Thursdar.-A Strassbarg telegram to the" Ymnlåurter Zeitung n states that a Protestant clergyman oiamed Kerr Geroid has been sentenced by court- Biartial to one inoftth's imprisonment for (fiving expression to aati-G«rman ceaiti- UIM4A-. The paper adds that the leniency of the sentence is dive to the accused's advanced 3-ge. The clergyman was alleged to Itare c'ri as-tan tly Def ected German wounded, to ^hvp presents fo French wonnded of the Catholic religion, and, finally, in "hro s^rnirms to have condemned the attitude the Genaiaa people towards the war.—

i A REBELS BOAST 11

i A REBEL'S BOAST. SOUTH AFRICAN MAGISTRATE'S EVIDENCE I AGAINST BE WET. I SOFT-NOSED BULLETS SEIZED. Bloemfontein, Thursday.-At the re- sumed examination of De Wet and other defendants, charged with treason, evid- ence was given that prior to the battle in Mushroom Valley, De Wet said that as the rebels had been treacherously fired on at Doornberg, he now intended to de- part from his original intention Dot to shoot, and to fight, in the event of resist- ance being olfered on ihia occasion. De Wet's secretary, Oost. said the intention j was to attack General Botha to the bitter j end. The same individual subsequently remarked that if it were left to him would shoot every Red Cross man. Mr. Colin Eraser, magistrate at Vrede, ex-President Steyn's brother-in-law, re- counted that he was forcibly dragged be- fore De Wet when the latter delivered his, remarkable speech about going to Pre- toria, pulling down the Brit.ish flag, and proclaiming a Republic. The rising was dubbed, "The Five Shilling Rebellion." Referring to the contemplated invasion of German South-west Africa, De Wet de- clared that the Afrikanders would stand up to a man to crush the unholy scandal. Some of his friends advised him to wait, but he said he could not do sû. because it was not in the nature of an Afrikander to kick a dead dog. A storekeeper in the Lindley district gave evidence that Oost commandeered 2,500 soft-nosed bullets from his store in spite of a protest by -witness. The bullets could not be used in civilised warfare. I The Court adjourned. ——————————— )

ITORPEDOED STEAMER I

I TORPEDOED. STEAMER. I «> German Submarine Fails in I its Task. Renter's Paris message says:— A Dieppe telegram to the Echo de Paris soys :— [ A German submarine yesterday tor- pedoed the French steamer Dinorah, proceeding from Havre to Dunkirk. The ship was able to keep afloat, aud entered the docks at Diappe.

SWANSEA FLYING MAM j r SWANSEA YING MAN

SWANSEA FLYING MAM. j r SWANSEA YING MAN. i Promoted to Squadron- jI Commander. We are pleased to note the following promotion in the Gazette ";— Royal Flying Corps, Military Wing. Squadron-Commander, and to be tern-i porary major—Feb. 8th, Captain B. R. j W. Beor, Royal Artillery, from Flight! Commander. Squadron Commander Beor is a son of! Mr.. R. W. Beor, Casw ell Hall, a eoli- citor. His second son is also in theIi Army. ii, also in l

IGERMANY AND THE US I

GERMANY AND THE U.S. I Growing Fear of Serious I Complications. I Washington, Friday. The Gorma.n reply to the American Note has: served to increase rather than to diminish the concern felt by officials as to the possibility of complications arising, though its friendly tone gives) some hope that an understanding may be reached and protection for neutrals may yet be obtained. Officials are apprehensive over the state- ment that Germany disclaimed respon- sibility for happenings to neutrals who might venture into the danger zone.; Additional warning that mines wfli be; laid in English and Irish waters is re- garded not only as a menace to legitimate j cargo carriers, but as likely further to interfere with American commerce. Mr. Wilson and Mr. Bryan have read the copy of the Note published by the Associated Press, the official version of which has not. yet been reeeived.Neither of them commented on it, but a feeling of grave concern is manifest at the White House and at the State Department. It is intimated in official quarters that the United States hopes for the removal of some of the causes of the. present complications in the answer of Great Britain regarding the use of neutral flags. It is pointed out that if Great Britain and her Allies will assure tho 17 nited States that no-ue of their ships will ily the American flag the safety of American ships.in the war zone will be guaranteed, jind German submarines will be obliged to Search neutrals before destroying them. The suggestion that American warships should convoy American merchantmen is considered impracticable. I A POINTED WARNING. New York, Friclay-The, "New York Times" declares that tho Ger-, man Note is mobt wurteous and friendly, but wæk in argument. It does not mak? good H's a(-euations af bar- barity against Britain, as Groat Britain is justified, after the German Govern- ment's order appropriating cargoes of food in declaring food contraband. The journal add?! that Germany, in declaring a sea blockade which she can- not maintain transcends her rights. If she could belt the British Isles with warships then our ships would indeed be without any recourse if they attempted to run the blockade. We duly ivarn her that for the destruction of American ships or lives we shall hold her to strict accountability.

CAPTAIN SODEN I

CAPTAIN SODEN. I Dr. MacMamus Soden, the wen-known Swansea medico, has been appointed Captain of a battalion of the Cheshire Regiment.

SWAKStA MANS MONEYI

SWAKStA MAN'S MONEY. I Probate has been granted of; the will of Mr. Thomas Anthony, of 37, The I Grove, Uplands, Swanseal, who died on the 13th December last, leaving estate (valued at.. £ 2,046 gross, with net per- sowi* 21,87,8. I

i A L i liLL

i ,¡  A'    L   'i li,LL British In Some Hot I Engagements.  I I SIR J. FRENCH'S PRAISE. 1 r I 1- IuD. I —————— I I Trenches Lost and Brilliantly! j I Retaken. I -————— 1 ■ ■ ■■ < BRITISH. 1 PRESS BUREAU, 12.20 p.m. The Field-Marshal commanding the British Forces in France reports as fol- lows (1) The enemy has displayed considerable activity during the past few days south- east of Ypres. The fighting in this part of the line has at times been severe. At one or two points the enemy succeeded in occupying some of our trenches, but; was driven out by counter-attacks. In one place 60 German dead were left on the ground. One of his trenches was blown up, and a number of prisoners were taken. Our troops counter-attacked with great gailantry in spite of the difficulties en- tailed by the water-logged ground and trenches, and bad weather. (2) On the night of the 15th-16th an at. tack was made on our line north of the Ypres Canal, and on th3 following night a sirniiar atack was made near Meuve Chapelle. Both were easily driven off, with loss to the enemy. j All ground recently gained by us has been strengthened and held without diffi- culty. j (3) South of the River Lys our guns have j deait effectively with the enemy's artil- Continued at foot of French commu- nique.

i A L i liLL

lery, wlios,, fire has increased somewhat of iate. (4) Our aircraft has carried out valuable rtconnais^ «cs, ar.ti have also succo

No title

FRENCH. •! PARIS, Friday. J The following communique was offici- ally issued this afternoon:— There is nothing of importance to report; since the communique of last evening. The night was calm, but there were fairly lively artillery duels in the Valley of the Aisne and the sector of Rhsims. in the region of Perthes all the positions, taken by us remain in our hands. Between the Argonne and the Msuse, at the Quatre-en-Santes bridge, we have taken a mortar. In the Vosges we repulsed two infantry attacks to the north of Wissendach (region of Bohhomme). j We have, besides, organised and consoli- dated our positions, methodically pro- gresslng to the north and south of Sudelfarm. |

FARTHING AND NO COSTSI FARTHING NO GOSTS I

FARTHING AND NO COSTS. I FARTHING NO GOSTS. I Judgment in Libjel Action I Against M.P. Mr. Justice Lush to-day heard legal arguments in respect of costs in an action brought by Mr. V. Bridgman against! Mr. AlantH. Burgovne, M.P., for libeli contained in a letter written to the! "Westminster Gazette" in connection i with a life-saving device invented by; plaintiff. The jury returned a verdict for plaintiff with one farthing dago8, 1 and the question of costs wati reserved.. Bis lordship now said he felt that tliej proper order was that each side should j pay their own costs. While acquitting plaintiff of misconduct in the course of action, he thought it was most UXL- j reasonable of him to bring it. The letter given to plaintiff was for! his own private information, and it was not given to him to use ab a medium for advertisement in the way plntift had used it. He felt he should be doing an injustice to the defendant if he allowed coets to follow the event. Judgment was then entered for plain- tiff for one farthing without costs.

DERFFLtHGERS NARROW ESCAPE

DERFFLtHGER'S NARROW ESCAPE. Geneva, Feb. 18.-Tlie Journal de Geneva publishes a telegram from its special Strassburg correspondent a6 fol- lows:— One of the chief engineers, an Alsa- tian, of the newest German Dreadnought1 cruiser Derfflinger, writing home to his parents in Alsace, states that the Der- Slinger was very seriously damaged in the Heligoland Battle. Water invaded aU the machinery. The engineers worked in water up to their knees. One British shell which pierced the hall of the cruiser, created great havoc, many being killed. The Kaiser personally decorated the engineer and other oiffcers of the Der- fflinger with the Iron Cross."

WIFES BODY EXHUMED I I

WIFE'S BODY EXHUMED. I The Press Association's Herne Bay correspondent telegraphed that at mid- night last night the body of Miss Bessie Constance Annie Williams, who was found dead in a bath at Heme Bay on July 13th, 1912, was eihtuned at the Herne Bay Cemetery. In addition to the undertaker and tho cemetery superintendent, there were present Detective Inspector Neil of Scot- land Yaxd, and other police officers. The body was removed to the town mortuary, and to-day Dr. Bernard Spilsbury is making an examination. Mrs. Williams was the wife of Mr. Hy. Williams, an art dealer. They bad been married-about two years, and came to Hernp Bay in May, 1012. On the morning of J'uly 15th of that year, the husband went for a walk, and on his return found Mrs. Williams dead in a bath at their house in High-etreet. J

SWANSEAS OWN

SWANSEA'S OWN. More Promotions in the II Battalion. (From Our Own Correspondent,) [ Further promotions in the ranks of the Swansea Battalion at RhyJ include Corporal Motley (Pontardulais), Corporall Hy. Thomas, and Corporal Jim Thomas to be sergeants, and Lanee-Corporais j Carter and Morgan to the rank of cor- i porals, whilst- Privates Bidder, }]. I)avies, J. Walsh. C. Jupp, and II. Elliott become tanc?-corporals. j Some of the boys are being inoculated again this w?k. The weatlvM?' remains changeable, but! the men's ac vance in things pertaining! to military routine and discipline keeps i up splendidly, and all-round satisfaction ¡ is expressed, j-

S TEACHER3 AND THE WAR II i I 0I

TEACHER3 AND THE WAR. II i I 0 I I Swansea N. U. T. Discuss I Alderman's Statements. I I A meeting of the local Branch of the N.U.T. was held at Swansea last night, when the arrangements for the distribu- tion of Welsh flags on March 1st were settled. The allotment of teachers' contributions ) Ito ?v?'p-muds also came under considera- ticn. Some of the teachers, we under- Istp?nd, are in favour of allocating their I ContI'ibution-s to a fund raised for the pur- p?M€ of maintaining the Miaries of en- listed teachers at the normal rate. We further understand that the -ta+e- ments of Alderman Merrels, at the last meeting of the Swansea Council, came un for consideration. Action is likely to be taken at an early date.

ITWO KILLED IN PIT ACCIDENT I

TWO KILLED IN PIT ACCIDENT. I A Bolton message says an accident resulting in two colliers being killed occurred this morning at a pit belonging to the West Houghton Coal Company. As the night men were leaving, the cages collided, and two men were thrown out of one and precipitated to the bottom of the shaft. Ten other men had narrow escapes.

ILONDON DOCKERS WAGESI

LONDON DOCKERS' WAGES. I The men employed in the deck and ware- house departments of the Port ot London Authority will from Monday next reoeive an increass of va?ee till the end ot the war. The increase i« given beœuæ of the in- ere,m cost of living, and viU work out: 3s. a week war bonus to permanent I labourers. 6d. a day and 3d. a half-day to extra labourers, including corn porters and deal porters. The staff mmittee oS the Authority are considering petitions from other employes, and iu view of the granted war bonus the schedule of rates and charges on shipping and goods ia being revised.

ir ISEmifl 0 hi I Pi I 11 U

ir ISE-mifl 0 h,i I Pi 'I 11 U KAISER'S LATEST. EMPEROR VISITS HELIOOLAIffl TO PERSONALLY DIRECT BLOCKADE. BERU EXGITEE So far as is known the fateful 18th passed without loss to the Allies. A Norwegian steamer struck a mine, and a Spanish vessel was wrecked, how, it is not known. The latest German scheme is indicated in the following message— The Kaiser, with his brother, Prince Henry of Prussia, and Admiral von Tirpitz, and their respective staffs, left Berlin yesterday for Wilhelmshaven, Heligoland, and other naval stations TO direct the arrangements for the blockade of England. It is reported that the Germans have built 120 big mine-laying submarines for this purpose during the last six months. Every submarine is able to carry more than a hundred mines, wlii-.h are placed on the deck, so that they be dtecharged quickly. The weight of each mine is believed to be about 1.2001b.—" Daily Mail." Steamers Wrecked. The Norwegian steamer Nordoap (a steamer of 822 tons) struck a ixerruan mine in the Baltic and foundered. All the crew were drowned. At Aarhus the crews of one Danish and three Nor- wegian steamers declined to fail to Eng- land and left their ships.—Exchange. Early this morning a lifeboat was picked up off the Goodwin bands belong- ing to the ss. Koracio of Bilbao. The Horacio. which belonged to Spanish owners, has not been heard of since she left Bilboa a week ago for West Hartle- pool, and she is there-lore overdue. It is feared that she is the victim of a Ger- man mine or torpedo. The vessel is of 2,318 tons gross register, built in 1888- She carried a crew ot thirty. She has a non-contraband cargo or iron ore. Stop at Sight. The Dutch Govornmint have advised the principal shipping companies here to stop their ships as soon as they see a submarine and hold themselves in readi- itess to give every information about the ship and its cargo. Thoy have further recommended the companies in han: t-ilher?-; made c tK-ir ehr,, for general distribution. It has been decided not to dye. con- voys to a number of ships because to make distinctions would be to put those without convoy in greater danger. Berlin Excited. .ly Stated f l? ai- C It is authoritatively stated that Ger- many intends carrying on her threatened blockade" by combined Zeppelin and submarine action. Great airship activity continues in the Nerth Sea. According to the latest information from Berlin, the Unber den Linden cafes and reeturanis have been filled with excited crowds reading special bulletins entitled Dor Tug. All Bluff. Rome, Thursday. The Giornale d'ltalia remaiks that the Berlin state- ment that a hundred German submarines have been built lately is another piece of bluff. It does not require more than a superficial knowledge of the construction of submarines to know it it impossible to build so in so short a time. The German Note" to America shows despair between the lines, and in Germany 's mind justifies any reprisals. Advice to Spanish Ships. Madrid, Thursday.—Spanish ships are officially recommended to slop on seeing a submarine, whatevor nationality, and hand their papers for examination.

BELGRADE BOMBARDED

BELGRADE BOMBARDED. Sir Thomas Upton's Narrow Escape. Belgrade was fiercely bombarded on Wednesday afternoon, many buildings being destroyed and a number of people killed and wounded. I was talking to Prince Paul, King Peter's nephew (writes Mr. W. G. f ish, in the Daily Mail ") at the palace just as a shell landed a hundred yards awav, wrecking the building and killing two- persons. The Serbians replied by bombarding Semlin, which is opposite the River Save. For the first time I was permitted to witness an engagement. From a fort I saw the buildings in Semlin destroyed, the Austrian guns silenced, and an Austrian monitor in the Danube driven off. Sir Thomas Lipton had a narrow escape. While he was driving through Belgrade a shell fell within twenty yards of him. One of Sir Tnoxnas's Serbian hosts was killed while driving to the hotel to dinner.

KAISERS JOY DIMINISHED

KAISER'S JOY DIMINISHED. Amsterdam, Thursday.—An official tele- gram from Berlin states that the Kaiser has sent a telegram to the Imperial Chancellor about the Masurian Lake battle. The Kaiser points out how, under his own eyes, the new levies proved equal in excellence to the old troops, and con- cludes; My joy over this glorious success is diminished by tie sight of the district, once so flourishing, whieh for weeks has been in the enemy's hand. Void of all human feeling, he has in his senseless rage during his flight burnt or destroyed almost the last house and the last barn. Our beautiful Masurian land is waste. Irrecoverable has been the loss, but I know I am in agreement with every Ger- man when I vow that everything in human power will he done to mnrve new and fresh life to rise from the ruins. Reuter.

THE MEN WHO1 THP OUGHT TO GOI I j

THE MEN, WHO1 T H P., OUGHT TO GO. I I j H Tortured b y Suspense. | I i I Those ?? va?Ti the ''hangin? mi• li■ -Ij t.an K??tJon cl'?s?ly will by this time j I have r&ali??d that it M in th?.?P?'nj' the decisive bar.t?? ?the ^r^iilbwj 1 Nougat, that, in the ''?r?T iu'? '?? taf ctrug'?lo h, m,e.h ar '1!'fec{"d. of i Russia. To-day'? D??s Jrom the enemy j country shows that th^ Austria us ha.H' one again gathered their foross toi ?Gthpr; and, although th? report i« 'j?- confirmed, it i? claimed t)n t th? j Bukovina has been evacuated by thf Ku?siaDs. The Ru&xian Armies are scattered O"eT various areas. They are in the Caucasus. Ji in Galicia. in Poland, on the Prussian (border, and, contrary to what is; usually believed, the Russian deficiency at. present is in numbers. It is esfi- j ■ mated by those who ought to know that; Russia has yet only three million men j ir-thf field, although day by day the S-ussians are refreshed from the re- j ¿er.e8 I The issue Still indeterminate. The great- issues of the war will bo l b.:? d"- i settled in the West., aud thef will be de-t eided by the strepgh of the new forces I Great Britain can put into the field. Sir | i W. Robertson Nicoll says in the! ? "Britih W eekh" that t? may 'h?pe that the triumph of ihe Alli'?s i& ¿eTtai.1 jB?t R?'pn now it is cert?m only if Wê! 'p?t forth oar full strength—the fhr, thirds of It for the one-third we "have j put forth already- No one has a right j to calculate on paying a smaller price for la happy decision. The worst of the storm is not over, and in a sense the isgnf still remain ir'det?rmiBate. j Men are uhll vantpd—aH the men who) can be obtained. As? unl?.s the all is answered as the circumstances of the c r; demands, there is only the alter-; native of a compulsory service which few! invii in our laaid desire, but which all! would agree to if necessity arose. I Distressed Souls. 8i W. Robertson J?icoll d?l? t.hi- j w^ek trenchantly with the meo who j j ought to go, and in tnjr'hrts knov !t. I hi? -ire the mo?t nj?r&b? oi men. j Everyone kT:ow?, he <>ay?. that ?Tec in (this rlread Vrar the Shirkers are tr. he! i found all over the country. They are 's i ofteon honourable men, they shrink! from tho great sacrifice. There is j mud) to detain them. There aro F, luanv ties to break. There arc. so many I plausible reasons for remaining, 90 many j j .Ufcf-sable excuses, that they ptrrsihade ( themselves that their place is at home, j |But. they have no peace day nor night, If they were to tcU the truth th?T wouH j 6ay! j :4ir. it my heart there was a kind (If fighting That would not lei, me sleep." How to End Suspense, < But perhaps, quite possibly, no one I says anything to them. They are the subject, of incessant conversation Of>- hind their backs, but t,hev are not- I directly appealed to. They can read, ho-vever. the faces of their friends and j neighbour, and they know what these. are thinking. Sometimes they get a j gleam of comfort, and shelter under such pretext as thif> «Lord Kitchener is weH satisfied with the supply of re- c7-uitr. But there is BO rest for tVm. They are in suspense, ceaselessly urged by the new calls of each day, and their i suspense can he ended rightly only in one manner. !——. i

I I WELLKNOWN BREWERS DEATH j

I I WELL-KNOWN BREWERS DEATH. j Newe was received in Burton this morn-' ing of the death from pneumonia of Capt. A. J. Clay, managing director of Bass.Rat- j cliff and Gretton, Deceased who was 4.5 years o! age, c iught a chill while oervmg j with his regiment in this country. He was tbe eldest son of the late Mr. 0. J. j Clay, of Holly Bush, Burton, whom he succeeded in the managing-directorship in f 1 he Bass concern and he established an important motor works at Burton. j •—

THE DAY REVISED VERSiGN1

"THE DAY": REVISED VERSiGN. 1 -Mr. Germa.n Emperor. Mr. Winkle.—Grand Admiral von Tir-I pitz. Mr. Snodgrass, in a tnly Christian spirit. and iu order that he might take no one una war ee. announced in a very loud tone that he T'Ff irT, to b?.?in, and proceeded to take off his csoat with the utmost delibera- tion." Mr. Winkle to made a terrific I onslaught on a boy who stood next him."—" Pickwick Papers."

LOYAL IRISHMENI

LOYAL IRISHMEN. I According to tlle last census returns j there wœ about S.-iOOjMO por-?on? of Iri?h birth or descent living in Great Britain, Adopting the usual metJiods of calculation. this means tbot there are atmut 450,000 ruakw of military age. The Secretary of the I N-aciona; League of Gre3:r Britain shows that 115,513 of these have joined the Colours, but this total is not complete, returns from many districts not having come in. The number includes the Tynaside Irish Brigade o: j ?,40

j ARREST AT A FUKEBALI

j ARREST AT A FUKEBAL I Buried on the day he was, to have been married, the funeral of William Quinn. the young man who died as the result of an assault as he was entering his home on Saturday night last, took place at New- townards, County Down, yesterday. There was a delay of ovsr an hour before the cortege left the house, and when the j cortege was walking slowly to the boroc?h J boundanes, where the N'lahves wpre to i nter some coaches, a police c&eer &tped up and arrp?t?d Samuel Heron, the ?p- father of Quinn. 1 On Wednesday last Heron volunteered to give evidence at the inquest. He ex- plained why the police were not nobfwd of the a?tac? until after a conéderable time i had elapsed.

Advertising

5.3D Edition. Brewery Director's Wirt. Mr. Philip Ha.wœ, of H, Morgan- street, Hafod, Swansea, a director of the Swansea TJnittfd Breweries. Ltd-, who died January I3th last- left ortate of the grogs valll of £ 1,682. Tith net personalty £ 4>549. Alto ran: Ehine 6a Shark, Bet ice. 2 to 1 Bridge IT. E UBiI\ STEIN 1, FAItbt. CR.oW- THL £ A £ E 3—Bix ran. U,'L"i. 1. SACJGLPAN 3, PTABGAXrES3 Eiffet m ZEMA 1, COOLDitEL.N 2, YAffir OFF.-5-