Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
22 articles on this page
Advertising

2 TRY £ r SOUTH 17ALES I NEW SEASON MARMALADE. | South Wales Jam and J j 1 Co., g \| CARDIFF. I j

Advertising

5.30 Edition. .1, ••

TWO FORTS LEFT jLr

TWO FORTS LEFT. [jLr!. ALLIED FLEET'S STEADY PROGRESS. REPORTED FLIGHT OF SULTAN OF TITO. REVOLUTION FEARED. Admiralty announces tha.t the (Dardanelles attac, was continued on Tuesday, but no report of the result cbtaiaed in the straits lias yet been re- ceived. Outside the straitf; H.M.S. Dublin de- molished an observation Station. H.M.S. Sapphire bombarded guns and troops. The total number oi guns demolished now l-eache-s 40. A I renc-h battleship bombarded Buk- &rat, and wrecked the jfavoit Bridge. Only Two Forts Remain. Athens, Thursday.—Part of the com- bined fleet is still bombarding the coast in the Gulf of Saros and the remainder of the forts up the straits. A British officer reports thut only two important forts remain to be passed. Landing partis, from the Allied Fleet who have examined the silenced forts in the Dardanelles report having found many funeral pyres, containing the re- mains of cremated Turks killed during the bombardment. There are said to lie more than 100,000 Turks on the isthmus of Gallipcii, com- manded hy Essad Pasha, the defender of Janioa.—Renter.. Towns Evacuated. Three destroyers which passed near the Narrows ot the Dardanelles reported that the towns of Kalid Eahr and Kale Sul- fcanieh (European and Asiatic shores of the >>arrows) have been evaluated by the inhabitants. Atter the destruction of Dardanus (four miles from the narrowest part of the Straits) the Allied fleet on Monday bom- tmrded the inner CXarrowfi) forts Hami- dieh and Yildiz Tabie. At the same time a naval division bom-j barded Fort Bukale. on the European side from Xiros (Gulf of Saros, over the Peninsula), causing serious damage. The village of Yeniehehr was spt on fire. •-Renter. [The fort of Bukale is on the European ndp the inner >iarrows, cn>po«3+e Nagrara. To bit Bukale from the Gulf; of Saros the gunp intist. havefiioo over; the Peninsula where it is five miles wide.] The Most Dangerous Ground. Sir Eflwin pp rs, v.-ho with forty fears' close experience of the Turks »P~a £ s Tjt!:1 unrivalled authority, writes: For 8 (or Fort E), mentioned in' IVedn^sday night's Admiralty dispatch, is Bt Kephez Point, the Whl te Cliff bat- teries. also attacked, are two miles below this point; and Fort. Xc. 9 (or. Fort F) is; .PpDlt Cape £ ephiz, on the European tide. Unofficial telegrams from Athens yes-1 kerday report that" only two of the Turkish forts rem'ain intact." The state-1 a?n? may well be doubted, though it is' iat?d Thursday." I The n"xt hve ;Üle of adyan<,p are íJYf>l' th'? mo?t dang?roup g-rounc]. From? Kephez Point nntU Cape X a gar a is I loubled; any ship attempting to pass' sou Id he attacked by seven powerful bat- teries, the strongest the Turks potest?. This area, too. is the most thickly strewn rit.h miues. One must not, therefore, be too expectant of speedy results. But the greatest fight which has ever teken place between ships and land hat- leries is now fairly begun. Let us hope that it will be as successful and as lecisive of the fat-- of all the country tround the Marmora and both Straits as ras that almost equally important naval, tattle which in 324 decided in the same raters whether the rule of the world was o be Christian or Pagan, and, according; to Gibbon, whether Constantinople was to ie the capital of a world emplire. Greek Ministerial Council. Athens, f'dne.sday.- FollOwing a Minir- ief ial Council held yesterday, at which M. iomanos, the Greek Minister at F'aris,: rti-z present, the Government, acting in iccord with the King, convened a Crown Touncil for this afternoon at the Palace. Besides M. Venizelos, the Prime Minister, a i's predecessors in office were invited to attend in order to present to his Majesty in its full light the situation created by. Jfce action of the Allied Fleet in the Dar- lanelles and the position of Greece in fclation to the new situation. Effect in Balkan Circles. I Reuter's Agency states that the pro- jress of the operations in the Dardanelles 15 being followed with the closest interest r Balkan circles. There are welcome signs that BtJgariac- Rumanian relations are improving. The important arrangement reached a few lays "ago between Sofia and Bucharest for: jeciprocal treatment of good s by railway1 6 evidence of this. With reference to renewed report of rrlitary activity in Rumania, the fact is hat. further classes of reserves are being ailed out for training. As a result of, hese movements, jrhich have bwn in pro- irps:i since last October, the Rumanian I trmy can be mobilised when necessary in t few hours. Sultan's Flight. Reported. Athens, Wednesday (8.30 p.m.).—A re-I tort has reached here to the effect that he Sultan has already left Constant! lople. Panic reigns among the Young !urks. and. according to one version, the paders are preparing to leave before it, jecomes too dangerous for them to remain. t. is supposed that the journey of Enverj 'at'ha in returning to his command in the laucasus, and of Djemal Pasha in going t Berlin, are intended to cover their imely disappearanc from the common I iorin. Great unrest seems to prevail ini lamboul among the lower classes of the opuiation- Fears of Revolution. Bucharest, Wednesday.—Travellers ar. fving from Constantinople describe the ituation there as being serious. A num- n of Ministers are desirous of conclud- ? peace, as, public opinion being over- ccited,- they fear a revolution. C&;tenhag?D. Thursday.—From Berlin is reported thai; German oiBRers -vhol ave arrived at Constantinople- from rria confirm the statement that distiirl)- ooes, which may at- any moment turn tto insurrection, hare broken out in the I h-xondretta district, in which no Tur-j ibh trOlJ 1>6 remain. I

i I Abb AjnLunLbO

 i $, I ?A)b?b ?AjnLun?LbO.? i VMS LORD'S IMPIOUS REFERENCES IN SPEECH. I v. I I I j A PEACE lOViNG PEOPLE. Amsterdam, Thursday.—The Damziger Zcitung" publishes the following address by the Kaiser which was delivered in the pa.rk of the Castle of N ivbowo, in Ras- sian Poland, after Divine service., and was taken down in shorthand by an offic&r:— Soldiers, it is to me a great; joy to participate in this sample Divine service under God's free heaven and before His altar. I thank you for your achievement. and everywhere at home and among the troops who are fighting in the West your expJodts are regarded with pride and gTati- i tude. A hard task is laid before us. We have to prove again to the entire world Germany's rl-zit to existence Tharc should be no over-estimation of iJ¡; enemy nor under-eecLm&fcion oi our j own scrcngth. We Prussians are aireadv accustomed to fight a«-adnat and overcome a superior enemy. We should trust firmiv in our great allies up abovp, who will help our just cause to victory. We knr.v from childhood and in our study of his- 1 tory when grown np we have leairned that God is only on the sick" of believing armies. i"Thu.s it was under the great Elector and j under o1d Fritz and i'a the LIme of mv great-grwidf-a??er an?d gmnd.father, and so it k now under me. As a great Scotsman and as my friend Luther declared. a man with God f' always in the minority.' One atlvantage we have over our enemies is that they have no watchword. They know not for h a-t t h f?.,v fl,-Lt- what thev fight nor for what they gat killed. They carry the heavy knapsack of an evil conscience, having f-j.llen upcn a peace-loving people. however, move against the enemy with the attacking kit sturmgepaeck of an my conscience. Fur success, however, it ie necessary for every rran to do his duty. and I expect and require from you that everyone should give his very la-pt in health aad strength until \ictory is ours.—Benter.

BERLIN THEATRES CLOSED

BERLIN THEATRES CLOSED. Amstverdaitt, Thursday.—The A'opsische Zeirtung leams that it is intended to olose all the Beilin theatres from April 1. Protests from several nuarters have been already received.—Router.

i RUSSIAS CULT OF HATREDI

RUSSIA'S CULT OF HATRED. -I Coper, happa.Sv^n Hpdin. the SwtdisE writer, who is now with the Germany army in Ostend, has been engaged as a war correspondent by the German Government at a yearly salary of .£2,I)()ü a year. It is being snid—and many people be- lieve it—t.h;it henceforth all German pa-ss- porte for travellers to nsut.ra.l countrios are to be endorsed. etrafe England" (" God punish England! "L

I KAISERS LONELY WALKS I

KAISER'S LONELY WALKS. Copenhagen. Thursday. — Since the Kaiser returned to Bsrlin last week he has taken daily walks alone in the Tier-' garten (Berlin's Hyde Park), dressed in a field-grey military uniform and without any orders. It is said that he has been ordered by his doctors to get fresh air and to take exercise. My informant adds that it is generally understood that the Kaiser is greatly disappointed at the result of. the submarine blockade.

I HEAVY MUMS OH YSER i

-=-:=. ..=. HEAVY MUMS OH YSER. Amsterdam, Thursday.—The Slyis corre- spondent of the TedegraM" stales that fighting on the has been re.^uip.-d and heavy artillery fighting is persistent. German recruits are being industriously drilled at Bruges and Knocke. Although only the slightly wounded oome to Knocke, the large hotels there, as well as at other watering-plaoes, are pre- pared for the Red Crotss service. Work is being industriously prosecuted on the .military prepanartiens between! Ivnocke, Dninberg, and Heyst. Experts as well as ordinary workmen are employed on the artillery especially stationed at Knocke for meeting bombardment by air- craft.

LOSSES OF BRITISH REGIMENTS I

LOSSES OF BRITISH REGIMENTS. I In the following table the losses (officers' and men) of the Welsh regiments at the front as detailed in the casualty lists up to Saturday last, are contrasted with those of the British regiments that have suffered mos tseverely Killed Wounded Miesing Welsh Borderers 262 810 66 Welsh Fusiliers 217 631 424 Welsh Regiment 211 610 2311 The Monmouths 26 41. R.F. Artillery 5t)j ¡,909 :!79 Coldstreams 382 1,401 261 King's Royal Rifles 33C 1,232 131 Worceatershires 330 1.232 131 These tfere the figures up to the total for the whole Army of 80,956, but the total up to February 4th was 104,000. Details, regarding the difference have not yet been I published. I

ROYAL WARRANT FOR WELSH CUARDS I

ROYAL WARRANT FOR WELSH CUARDS. I In the Amrf Orders issued last night a Royal Warrant appears concerning the establishment of the Welsh Guards. It reads:— His Majesty the King having been graoionsly pleased to approve the for- mation of a regiment of Foot Guards, to be designated Welsh Guard4 it i61 noticed for the information of all con- cerned that, -until further orders, the establishment of .the Welsh Guards will be that authorised in War Establish- ments. Part V. 1914. for a regiment of Foot Guards, havmg one battalion and one reserve battalion, namc-ly Otlier 1 Officers ranks. Regimental headquarters 1 50 Guards depot 2 40 Battalion 29 971 Ik-servo battalion 29 073* "■Including two company-sergeant- majors (drill serjj^antei.

FROM THE FRONT P

 FROM THE FRONT P By OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. [THIRD ARTICLE]. Watching Gunfire Effects. iL SHELL-FIRE AND SUNSHINE. i. t Life in the Dug-Outs. GLIMPSES AT "OVER THERE." Army The Family of France. (This Article is Copyright, mystnit be quoted.) Amiens. To-day our little party has walked through the woods near Ribecourt in the Compiegne district, visited the stump of a farm house on the outer line, and watched the effect, of the French gun-fire over our heads on the German trenches at the edge of a wood. We then marched many miles through a wooded valley, tJie east side of which was held by the Germans, a half mile dividing the posi- I tions. At the end of the valley we visited a great limestone quarry which was; used as a field hospital and for rest shelters. Thence we walked over ground which we had seen shelled by the Germans a quarter of an hour before. The fields were pocked with holes, a man w^s killed, and another we saw in a dug-out hospital, with his hands mutilated. That was all the result of scores of German 77 and fî9 centimetre shells. \Ve were then guided through woods and trenches to near our starting place, where the cars were waiting to tai. us hack to Amiens. This experience was particularly interesting, showing a new kind of trench that can be made in wooded districts, with the parapets of legs arranged to form loop holes, "and full use taken of runnels and drains. A | considerable part in the forest was not I trenched, but was guarded by wire hung with preserved pea cans and sardine tins filled with things that rattled when touched; by wire netting and other de- vices, and by skilfully arranged outposts, Jul twined -m tch k?, crows'-nests in the trees. French Ingenuity. It was an interesting glimpse of the ingenuity with which the French had met the problem of their long line. We 6aw the most extraordinary dwellings dug ill the woods, like the fastnesses of aborigines, funnier ajid more whimsical, with the daft chimneys at all angles ap- yearing out of tne earth at your led, tnan any fantasy by Hans Christian Andersen, but grimly serviceable and dty inside, with their armories of rifles and scientific weapons. Some were field hospitals for summary operations, and dressing shelters, all art- fully hidden so that they could not. be seen five yards away. One noted also the French neatness and finish which made the wildest of these dwellings into a real numan habitation. Some of these quarters were like little cabins at sea with swinging lamps; lockers, shelves and sleeping bunks. There was much pride among the inhabitants of these Goblin towns. Chess, bottles of wine and books were among the fittings. One man had made a little rockery outside his viiia-made it of shells, fuses, and fragments presented to him from a dis- tance by the German artillerymen. I French Colonial Infantry. This day we saw the French Colonial Infantry, who are usually taken for marines, as they wear the anchor sign on the collar, and Alegrian tirailleurs and Chasseurs d'Afrique, with their h ng sabres, sitting high on their handy little horses. In happier days the whole thing would have seemed the most joyful page of romance that the modern world could show, this gathering ol races of all hue. yellow and black and brown, in these French woods in spring. They appeared suddenly out I of the ground like the warriors of I Roderick Dhu in Scott's poems. I Then there was the quarry scene, with its hard square blocks cf stone, tall as the first storey of St. Paul's Cathedral, jutting over one another, and opening out in vistas or Pyrenesian granduer with grey halt lights and terrible glooms. This wild place teemed with bearded soldiers bending over camp tires, loading mules with great leather cans or wine and water < and quarter-carcasses of ox?n and with wounded men. But all that Salvator Rosa and Roderick Dhu romance belongs now to something very alie-n and different. One's thoughts j were on the practicability and use oi all that one saw against the men over there across the valley that were squatting so jl horribly on the back of France. It was I always over there." We passed a beautiful chateau among. trees uninjured except for its estate wall broken at intervals and loop-holed. I said to the distinguished ollicer with-us, himself the lord of a chateau, that the chateau here were happily intact. Yes," he said, but over there—only a mile f away the chateaux are rums-and so to Belgium." "Over There." r. It was always over there." The well kept railway lines suddenly end in torn embankments, the neat French blue direction posts point to famous French towns, and to once happy: villages where no Frenchmen may go. i Over there, unseen but active, sending its I malignant messages through the skies is- le Boc-he! No pen can express the oon-t centrated finger that is on Fn"nc.hme.n'sJ and especially Frenchwomen's, tonguesg when they spe&k of that blind and malign horror that has been driven back so far,r but still pollutes the mother land. t: Only once did I hoar it with an ordi narvl emphasis. That was during a balt in a'h town where the cry les."Bocb.es! went up in the street, and we saw a party oi ( heavy locking |iat-faced prisoners in grey till-iforil. sweepng ihe gutters. We spoke to them, and hey denied that they were Germans. Thy tere Poles, they said, from Posen. Tliiy did not love the Prussians. The French soldiers seemed well dis- posed to them,and they did not look ill- used. They stil *ore their good G errnan. high boots. jh<3" saui that they were well rvmtent t> be prisoners there, and they hoked it But it is innossibie for an Englishman to know how he French feel about their, invaders, ever not- when they know tha t the revanche has really come, and that the Gorman nactine can do no more, and Germanj is working her fingers to the blood, tc repair the wreckage. Yet the Germans are still as near Pa.ris as, Oxf^ ord, is t «>ondou, as Dundee is to Glasgow, or Jbafiy is to New York. Lille is still in ieir hands, and Rheims is still at thenercy of their cannon. j Happy hgland/' as the French folk well say wpn they think of us on our wa.ter-tightisland. Sigts on the Battlefield. I Among tl sights of that day was of a I French- bi|aa.e whose noise was very loud as itred up in the blue sky. Then we oard the heavy report, and away up < the right of it a white curly rock append against the blue, remaining stationary or nearly five minutes. The shell dicl ) harm to the aeroplane, and sent nM h to E:11,rth near us. .l¿¡;,l:;jgjt'£Ui' h'U'C or State dogs aseda the ambuscade posts in the toieste, W.l e they each have a little bed under a ittie rush-work baldocchino. Their Lat-,s wer,e 1Jlac:J." and "BaJ Rouge." They were bons hergen-lgllsll dogs, keen symbols of the Entente. The fall of Attiches ,a-, within 700 yards of ie German outposts, and here again we Joked through stone loop-holes on dead ijrmans rotting on the no man s lai," and waiting for burial, and we saw rench shells falling from a battery 1 the rear exactly on the spot .xact.ly oi-i the spot where werere told that they would f-am-i a cornerf a little wood near a road. Again saw little roads and nelds I with theu-m machinery still li-ing as if it had ha left yesterday; and the ordi- nary ootryside lying still and empty under sfng sunshine. The or sign of the enemy was a dirty patch ot-irb-wire entanglements, rather low, himie stakes and meshes of an old fashioneonetacle race. We can go and take thi when we want," said one of tne oihrs who lives in the crypt like cellars the ruined farm. The order will 00] ore day." The zcrian soldiers stroll to the loop holes j W tell the gunfire. There were squatted negroes, sallow, fine-faced Arabs id Turks, honest looking Tunisi- ans, a white men from the Moroccan coast- microscosm of the nations in Franc-Colonial Empire. They all seemed very althy and keen, and happy too, livingheir own life in French woods with ellty of food and tobacco. They had Ut paths through the woods and their 1 Jpiground and lean-to huts were! wondui in their way. Behind the line we s; some beautiful Arab horses, with Arabrrooms leading tlieii2-a strang- sight codie out of the arches of French farm-ds. Ny Varieties of French Soldiers. I In, co irse of our three days on the •line«-< s&w many varieties of French eolds; Zouaves, men from the Mediter- rant side; chasseurs Alpins, men from Briny. Normans and Territorials from ma cities. We saw them in the trenches un' fire going about their business with thiiruiliarity and seriousness fcf mecha- nian an engineering works. Their cles were stained and torn and patched, lnrlle old blue cloth coats seemed to w< well, and the boots, though less st.g than ours, were sound and not over w. loticed on the roads that the men in phing kit had nearly all a spare pair, oju each side of the knapsack, showing hy hoonaiis. The men were always Qiing and polishing their weapons, es- lally their bayonets. The mitrailleuses beautifully kept and adroitly pro- led in many ingenious ways. Their (its were notably good even in places ■re there were graves everywhere and es were constant. Several times ling round a trench one came on a singing quietly to his rihe. A Moving Scene. I Te saw two battalions of Territorials t's peres de famille-being reviewed by enefal at Lihons, when the cross of the ?ion of Honour was presented to the mg sub-lieutenant who had led the ruling party there that morning. It s on the field or battle, with the enemy y two miles away, so near that the e as well as the big guns were heard the time. The men were in full kit, h fixed bayonets, and there was ually a band to play them past the but there were no cheers, no crowd, ladies-only February. winds and the ,la;i-e of cannon. It was a moving Ie sceno, these lines of bearded men nearing forty, bearing their burdens Ltly and marching with that unsmart .Contiaued at loot of next column.)

FROM THE FRONT P

(Continued from preceding Column.) but very effective French swing that takes them over the ground at such a surprising pace. lu ordinary times these would have been the heavy men sitting roundly at cafes and beginning to dwell over much on the pleasures of the tables, that one sees in all French cities. Now they were six months campaigners, who had looked death often in the face, very hard, bright eyed, and deep in complexion, marching past the flag in this raw spring da" with- out a care for the enemy that was growl- ing and threatening over the bend of the hill. Sinews of War. I was told that after the first two months of the war the men were worn and thin with the incessant marching and fighting in warm weather, but since, then the era of trench life had begun, and they had grown stout again, but a stoutness that was borne by new muscles and new sinews-" sinew: of war/* How much they had given up for France ?a. be understood by the fact that none of these fathers of families have been home since the war began. It was our privilege to speak with several famous generals and commanders during these wanderings. One general, wel- coming us as representatives of the Press of the Allied nations, said of his soldiers that they did hot oare a bit—one year, two yiiaxs, three years—they were willing and eager to fight until the Germans were ) smashed back to their own land. Of tb" German gunfire he said thtt the lads did not care a sou for the German confetti." Those who were beginning their service would rather serve it in war than in bar- racks. But it was a great sacrifice especially for the fathers of families. Thev were making it willingly. The ormv was now a family—the family of Fmne

I CLEVER SEAMANSHIP I

I CLEVER SEAMANSHIP. I I FI" "HTING FIRE WIND AND SEA FOR TWO 1, DAYS OIL STEAMER ABLAZE. I A thrilling story of the sea is told by I the crew of the Norwegain tank steamer La Hebra. which has just been berthed in the Thames after fighting fire, wind, an A sea for two days When the La H?bra wirh a cargo of bcM?e was in mid-Atlantic an electric ^iie fused, there was an explosion, and,? the pump-room hatch was burst open and set on fire. In an instant the oific^i-s' quarters and the chart-room were blaz- ing. It was apparent that only the sea could save the vessel. In face of a h-eaw gale Captain P. M. Buggo turned the vessel broadside on to the waves. From two tanks on either side oi the pump room the burning spirit was being forced on decK, and the flowing oil wa« washeu uy I the great seas over the side of the ship. i Thi-s manoeuvre was repeated many times, *? and the ocean for miles to leeward was h. i sheet of flame. I A Roaring Mass of Flame. J.xuiddle of the was a roarin0 mass of flame. At the time, of the ex- piosion hall the crew were in the fore part or the ship and half aft, and with th* names and smoke between them they were almost invisible to each other. Such orders as could be heard and executed were obeyed. An order was given to lower and provision one of the iieibeats, that had escaped the fire. and tho mate i and four of the crew boarded it, but the seas overwhelmed it. and me? and boa,tIi I or over forty hours the remainder of Were lost  the crew carried on, wdh the ship afire f licm the bridge to the beak of the poop r and piii-t of its iron structure twisted aud; torn The oil in the two tanks was burnt out eventually, and the ship, prac-l tically a hull with a formless ni.ai superstructure, was carried into Fayal and later brought to the Thames with its charred es ulence of the wonderful! heroism and seamanship of her captain i and crew.

WANTED TO REJOIN REQIKENT

WANTED TO REJOIN REQIKENT. Paris, Friday.—A torpedo boat has captured four Germans and an Austrian off Sicc on a Spanish vessel bound for italv. They were on their way to rejoin Jieir eorps. The prisoners, who include an officer, have been sent to Marseilles.

PROVES STAGNAYflW IN TRADEi j

PROVES STAGNAYflW IN. TRADE. •- Amstei dam, Friday.—The "Vorwarts" states that since the outbreak of war the publication of 864 newspapers in Ger- many has been stopped' owing to the lack i of advertisements.

DAtISH CAUTIOn

DAtISH CAUTIOn. Cope n.h agen ThurEday.-The Danish Government this morning prevented the sailing of the Swedish ship Blenda with a cargo of guns for Bulgaria. The consignors, a Copeuhagen firm, proposed to send the cargo via Germany but the Danish Government demanded a guarantee that the guns were for the Bulgarian Government. It is understood that the guarantee will be forthcoming.

CARRIED AWAY BY AVALANCHE

CARRIED AWAY BY AVALANCHE. Berne. Thursday -Of the flv*e pupils of !I the Gymnase here who disappeared wlide on a ski excursion on Sunday four were found this morning in an isolated chalet in the Gantersit district in a state of collapse, through fatigue, hunger, and the severity oi the weather. They star-d that on Monday they were overtaken by a terrible snowftorm and were all five carried away by an avalanche. Four of them succeeded in getting free, and, after fearful hardships, gained the sh^Jt«r the old chalet. The fifth, August Mulh- the son of an engineer, of Berne, was left buried under the snow. r The survivors were carried to the Upper Gurnigel hut. One has a broken I' leg. Doctors have gone up to them.- Reuter.

1 PfRAmTFAlE f I

1 PfRAmTFAlE? f A  1. U 8 SUNK BY BRITISHf i f j CONFIRMATION OF NEWCASTLE VESSELS i ACHIEVEMENT.. I I HOSPITAL SHIP'S ESCAPE. j Press Bureau, London, Friday. The becretary of the Admir- ahy announces the steamship iliordis has now been exam- ined in jdiy dock, and the in- juries to her keel and propel- ler confirms the evidence of Captain Bell and crew that on the 28th February the ves- sel rammed, and in all proba- Diiity sunk, a German submar- ine which had fired a torpedo at her. Yesterday afternoon the German submarine U8 was sunk in the channel off Dover by a destroyer. The officers and crew were taken pris- oners. Hospital Ship's Escape. A tew days ago a German submarine chased the Red Cross vessel St. Andrew whi on a trip across the Channel with woended. The submarine rose to the surface wiuiin 200 yards of the St. Andrew, whic-ii was travelling at a speed of 231 knots, but before the enemy could at- tack tho captain of the hospital ship in- creased his speed to 25 knots and made I good his escape, although the submarine pursued for some distance. Nothing could have saved the St. An- drew had the look-out been less vi,-ilauti or its sneed lower. TIA, St. Andrew was formerlv one oft the last 2,000-ton steamers plying be-! tween hisnguard and Ireland. j Thordis'- Claim Verified. J TTiUa'5 Thursday-Examination ofj I the Thulnl o? t the British steamer Thordis j appears to onlirm the statement of the I officers and crew that she sank a German submarine off Beachy Head. j I. The Thoidis was placed in dry dock at Ii Devonpc-n Dct-Kv.uxi this mornirg and on being surveyed was found to ha,E>; lD:"t one of the blades of her propelic-r. There were also marks on her hlel. i which is badly damaged, 6uch as would 'I b9 caused had the ?hiu been in w, col-, hSlOn.  Captain Bell, in a telegram to the! I editor of N Syr.u and Shipping," which ottered a reward of &600 to the first British merchant vessel which succeeded in sinking a German submarine, says' that Aumiral Sir George Egarton, the! Commander-in-Chief at Plymouth, is1 sau&fied that the submarine was sunk. The fact that the German craft disap- peared after the collision with the! 1110rdis is undoubted. The steamer re-1 mained for some time in the vicinity, and the captain and crew saw oil floats ing on the surface of the water. The crew of the Thorcis w:i'> therefore receive the reward of £-500, together with another similar reward of £ 500 offered bv lr, Stephen Crape, of Harrogate, and other sums, making the total up to £1,160. I

I DERELICT SEAPLANE j

-= I DERELICT SEAPLANE. j Ymuidem Thursday-The pilot steamer off Ymuiden reported to-day having towed a seaplane last night for some dis-! tance, but the tow-rope broke and the! seaplane drifted away in a north-westerly direction. It was seen this moraine' from the coast near Egmond. Torpedo-I boats were sent in search and one of them has brought it in here. The seaplane is apparently a British machine, and is fitted with a Gnome engine, and a British Propeller, com-1 pass, and manometer, and a clock, which I had stopped at 4.50.Reuter.

LEASE OF POTIT ARTHUR I

LEASE OF POTIT ARTHUR. I Peking, March 3.—At the conference be- tween -the Chinese and Japanese represen- t.atives to-day the Chinese agreed to the Japanese demand for the extension of the lease of t.he territory on Liaotung Penin- sula, including Port Arthur and Dal-ny, to 99 vrars. [Port Arthur was acquired on a lease of 25 years by Eussria on March 27, 189S. After the war between Russia and Japan the lease was transferred to Japan by "the Trefrfy of Portsmouth, which came into force on October 15, 1905. The lease of Kiaehau W% obtained from China by Ger- many on March 6, 1S9S, for a period of 99 years.]

INVENTIN5 BRITISH DISASTERSI

INVENTIN5 BRITISH DISASTERS I Copenhagen, Thursday.—I have dis. covered the origin of the report of the torpedoing of the English transport No. 192, with the loss of 2,000 men off Beachy Head, at 4.46 pjn. on February 22nd, which recently gladdened the Ger., man Press. An English lady living in Gothenburg received a telegram for England announc- ing that a relative, who was an officer in the RdvsI Naval Reserve, was missing, and was assumed to be dead. No date or place was given. A Gothenburg evening paper, having somehow go-t hold of the story, from a trustworthy source" (sic) had no difficulty about inventing the whole of the details. I merely mention this as a spf*amen of the stories concocted for unsuspecting neutrals and for the German public at moments when it is necessary to supply the demand far submarine successes. "The regrettable thing is that the. Danish Pretss, which is well a,wa,re of the Germ-an in- spdration of' theOe lies from Sweden, should nevertheless lend thpsm a momen- tary importance by repeating them.— -Times'' 1

Advertising

r j "1 UNHAFPY RIHEIMS. IVABIS. Friday. The following cfikial coitunuiuque I We3 issued to-day: <. To the north o fArras, n £ ar, Notre jj.'iia- do Lorette,we have re-captured .S i?'fa?r p?t?a of th? advance I .J i    -F) d 'f"r> ?rsujh wht&h ?*? l?t ?? ?Y L'?forc I y??iday, and b&?t tak?u 150 priwe!. I The od-my h86 igain laideù Cathedral. la ChampagW, to the north of Sousin or 11 a.od, Iteatreeionr, thcro i6 I p- laing eiiwe 'the M'mmtl.n.luG oi last evening. .1 Argonne, at Vau^noiJ, .e repulsed j oounter-ftttecke and made- tre~li l¡ L'b'C9, inflicting upon the -en^my C,¡¡- s,cerable Ioaeee at well, as taking many prison ers Ic-em a,5 taking man r TVo are matB of the greater part of the riilage. S'tO'Ck Exchange Business, There has been mores business pacing 1:1 the War Loans around 9f, Consols at pq;, Home R-eils have been inative, and pricee havo rather drooped f;-i-ti-ckialiy. The feature hag been the activity of ("til Shares- &ip John icilicoe's New Rank. I*. is officially announced that Vico- Adunral Sir Jehu X Jdli has be;n eppointed to "Admiral ntta eeoionty dsting íQJJ) March 5th. Turkish-Squadron "Prepared. Thurrday .-Amclr ding to the Messagg'ero, a Turkish squedran is ai::hored. at N a gar a. It comprises the i-reslau, Haiaideh, Medj/dieh, and four destroyer*. All warsfcfpt. hare$team up Eiwht and day. The Ntiadron is under the command of Admiral Souohon. Dockers' Union find War Wages, "jg.'ti'itions between Drjcirs' r!1.on .d Harlroar iTrutt have Dot rnatrrialised, bnt a dput-3ttio which to-day waited on the manager of the Swansed Tr&=-&?s will, it is antics pated, reeoaimtwl to » meeting of the men on Sunday the aeewptance of aD. oircr whieh bus been njhd- Housing Committee^ Chairman. At Swaneea Hotisinf; Committee to. day. chairman (Mr. W. H. Morris) aid it would be insi-qent for him to take « in view of his -positir-n on direct Bdministrati^m in connection with tho y Town Hill houeet, and the Council's decision. He mcvecj that Mr. Mclrneus c.l: agreed to. Acting eh; tect reported -.that -aEi erection of houses had.,oeen,. praj^ically settled he pushing forward work in Peny- graig depot witk the. object in view. He recommended G. W.R Co. be approached a; to completion of agreement regarding aiding. 1 A A. '.F BAL'v'ATIOS 1, POfi-T OF SP-UN S, STOXEBRIDGE 3.-4 ran.