Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 10 Next Last
Full Screen
41 articles on this page
Advertising

0 mmo -Ringo- ft.I I TRY | I SOUTH WALES I NEW SEASON MARMALADE. | South Wales Jam and it Marmaade Co., CARO?FF. i I _m?. ?,??.n???.? ?

Advertising

I i1 10 1 PAGES TO-DAY I;

AERIAL WARSHIPS i i

  AERIAL WARSHIPS[ — .■i ■- — | ZEPPELIN'S VISIT TO CALAIS DESCRIPTION OF THE SCEHE WHEN THE BOMBS FElL i —— I AIRMEN OVER OSIEND | The second Zeppelin raid on Calais! wa.t mado ye.sterday at About a dozen bombs vcre droppe i in! different parts oi the town. The Central i 4tild Maritime Railway stations obviously tlie objects aimed at, all t]L- bombs fell round them. j The Zeppelin hovered over the town; for nearly a quarter of an hour, and wasi tittacked from all quarters hy guns aud I yuiek-fixert.. It suceecded. however, in pelting away, although it is very likely that eome damage was caused to tt. ? ? At half-past twelve (.writes a Daily I At t-ialf-I)ast ?wl-ites it 1)-,iil awakened by a waiter at my ;¡otd, whu? rushed into my bedroom crying, "J1 y Un Zeppelin; descended vile dans caves (a Zeppelin is here: come ijjiicklj downstairs to the cellars). At the gamei time 1 heard the booming uf g nIl" and the rattlo of quick-firers from outside. ) hurriedly slipped on a coat, and bedroom clippers and daslicd dowus-taiiv, stoppiigi on the way to awaken a friend, who by j chance had been overlooked by thai "aiter Un reaching thu bottom of the atairs 1; «avc a group of fceantily clad men ttlIG: excitedly asking where the cellars: were. In .sJite ot their warnings, 1 rushed outside in my pyjamas and coat to see what was happening. I could lWW I distinctly hear the droning of the Zeppe iiii engines overhead. Guns were, being, li red in every direction. 'Die noise wa.-j deafening. Thinking that perhaps 1 couid tee Letter from my bedroom window. I' l ushed upstairs again, accompanied by j my friend. From there we tried to see: if we could make out where the airship! was. Gradually the noise oi tli, eiigirpii grew louder. Suddenly a terrilic crashj jesounded about 100 yards awu-y. Outline in the Sky. I cried, l,et,s -,c) downstairs. ii(';¡ ¡ tie safer down there than up n;re." \V lushed along the passage, and while we' v.cre going dowii the stairs tluec terrific: crashes, which seemed to take place a most simultaneously, t'huok the whole i building. It was a dramatic moment i The noise outside was terrific. T went' o 11 aguiii. One felt, it would be bettor to:' he killed outride than indoors. The Zeppelin was at the moment just; parsing over the station. I could ju.-t tit-.ceraits dark out)?? i? the sky.  St •urchlights were playing ali" around.; ?hrapu'i?hfllswcro buj'?i.iji? in every; direction, and the rifle fire and quick-; brers were incessant. ?theZep?c'I.in? dit?'father away the Hring gradually' diminished. Not far off we paw a fire where one of, 111.. bombs were dropped. My friend and T. went off to investigate. We hurried along to the railway clearing hospital.! micro wo were informed that a little; farther aloug the lino a bomb had fallen.1 Another of the bomiis dropped quite, c\.i;.p to the Fngii-'o women's yeomanry! hospital, but beyond smashing all the1 ? ?nk'ws little dama?? was done Germails' Futile Flight. On Sunday night, between 11.'50 and; afiidnight a Zeppelin and three German; aeroplanes flew over the Doubs Valley.; Their object was to destroy the Kefrain! electric power work6 which supply alii the factories in the Montbeliard and tort districts. i French aeroplanes continue to reeon- noitre in Alsace in a must daring way.' On Monday six monoplanes flew over the region between the German front and the Ifhine. They were firpd at with guns, I machine guns, and rifles, but they con-! tinned their flight and returned 1111-; rallied to Ueliort with valuable info.rn.ia-! tion. Ostend Again Shelled. Copenhagen, iiuixlay.— I he lydsJJ; at Slnu. telegi aphs thatj liritish aviators luive again bombardedj Ostend and Knooke.

WOMEN WORKERS AT SWANSEA i w

WOMEN WORKERS AT SWANSEA, i w We, understand that a number oft women have registered at the Swansea' Labour Exchange flor work in factories; or elsewhere under Ill" Government'a i aew scheme.

THE NEW BUDGET THE NEW BUDGET I

THE NEW BUDGET. THE NEW BUDGET. I At Lloyd's a considerable business has been done recently covering against j increases of taxes in the forthcoming i Uudget. It is ominous that, no underwriter eared: to quote a rate against an increase in the j income-tax. Indeed, it is stated that: BO guineas per cent. would not have, tempted them- On tea, business was done at a premium ()< 2.) guinea per cent, to pay ,,)uss h a))v addition is made tel nIP presellt rate per pound). Un other commodities such as sugar cocoa, and coffee the premium quoted was gO to 2 b guineas per cent.

GERMAN SOCIALISTS ANGRYI

GERMAN SOCIALISTS ANGRY. I Coj»enhagen. Thursday.- Her-r Haa«e.! the chairman ot the German Socialist! group in the Keiehstag, recently said;1 The Socialists have done their duh., We have sent twenty army corps toO the! front: Theret. it. is irritating that! th<\re is not equality at home 'or all; :Germans. must ask for liberation! ail round, and should the Government decide to evade tho request, then aitor the soldiers return from the front, when the war is over, thoy will. it; co-opera- tion with their comrades at home, make Iln uproarious demand for il)eii- Herr Baa-e then proved that fho' censors were making it praerieally im- po^sibla ftj-f the paper* to publish. hi, jlreslau the censor even prohibited th-! publication of a .speech made in PurJia-! ment. The German Socialist meetings inI Berlin have been prohibited.—ifxckarige.l

KARLSRUHE SUNK I

->- KARLSRUHE SUNK I ) WRECKAGE Fourm. ON ISLAND IN WEST I INDIES. WAS SHE BLOWN UP ? l The wh?abouts of Ih? Karlsruhe, which alone of the Carman light cruisers on Foreign 8tation has escaped destruction l at the hand" oi the British Navy, is a ¡ complete mystery. The Jvarlsiuhe is a vessel of 1,80!) tons, launched in 191:2, carrying a crew of 1173. and armed with ten iin, guns. She I was last officially reported in October, and since then nothing has been heard of, her by the British 'nablic nor has shE, I attempted t-' molest Jn't-di shippimr. Deal cf Wreckage. j According to one lepori from a neutral source she returned to the Llhe some weeks ago, after running the gauntlet or the liritish patrols in the North Sea. Another report alleges that she has been destroyed, either by an explosion or by j shipwreck in the Wc4 J.ndie?>. A letter ha" h?e? recently received Irom a young Englishwoman who is j>t present staying in St. Lucia, West sta3,iug the following statement:— Between here and Grenada (a neigh-j) houring island) a great deal of wreckage has been found on the beach. There are helmets, oars, etc., all I he 'Karlsruhe': cnthpm.a?d i)o(,t, ill them j have been washed r.p.Shcmay Iavi bfen blown up by her own magazine." Brcken in Two. am in a posi- j tion to state that. certain official depart-1 merits in Scandinavia a fortnight ago re- ceivod information according to which the Karlsruhe was sunk on December 18.— Exchange.

i DAWNING ON GERMANY I

DAWNING ON GERMANY I Realising'That Fleet Has < Been Swsot Off The Seas. Rotterdam, Thursday.—The full force. of the fact that the German Navy has been swept oil the open seas is dawning on Germany. In deploring the loss of the Dresden the "Deutsche Tageszeituns" says: The past. six months have proved it was a Utopian idea that the German fleet woujd bo able to conduct a successful war on the aceacs. It is impossible with- out strong points of support on land. That our cruisers were able to remain on the oceans so long was simply due to indi- vidual qualities, but the final results have proved that it H impossible to have power on the ocean without points of sup- port on land. Th" only real success would have been if the sea lr;tue et the enemy had been damaged so as to cut off his supplies. We ought to Lave known this before- hanrl. For ocean fleet peace conditions were at the fame time war conditions, and could not possibly have been sufficient. The lesson we have learned from what has happened we must remember for the future."

EXPORT OF TiH PROHIBITEDI

EXPORT OF TiH PROHIBITED. I The Board ot Trade announce that the export of tin, chloride of tin. and tin ore to forMS? destinations has been pr&h?ted b? Order of Council issued yesterday. Application e addressed to the War Trade Department, at i, Centrnl- bni 1 dings. We.s! m insier.

WINNiNG WITHOUT GREAT LOSS j I

"WINNiNG WITHOUT GREAT LOSS.' Major Moraht, referring to Ncuve Chapelle, explains that Sir John French prefers to win without great loss": a fact which the major appears to regaxd as somehow proving British cowardice. Of course, if the German idea of courage is really to lose as many men as possible, one can understand the major's indigna- tion.

WAITING FOS THE RAIDERI

WAITING FOS THE RAIDER. I Copenhagen. W edeesda.v. —" Politiken has recei ved a ine»H.?e from Berlin stat- ing that. the German Admiralty has been informed from New Yurt that British warships are concentrated at Cape Henry, on the Virginian c-oasf, with the object of catching the Trinz Eitel Fried rich if, I, after slie has beeu repaired, she proceeds to sea.—Exchange.

j I HEAVY FIGHTING ON YSER FRONT I

j HEAVY FIGHTING ON YSER FRONT. Rotterdam. riiiir.,clay.-It that the heavy battle on the Yser front continues. The centre of the fighting I •eems to be to the north-west of Dlx- mude, from which district many German wounded are returning. Heavy cannonading continued until a I late hour last night. Early this morning it was ienunicd, and is continuing ail day.

BLOCKADE RUNNER SEIZEDI

BLOCKADE RUNNER SEIZED. I The '?wedi? il steamer Gehel-and C>, laden with ?acon and provisions, has ?fn brought into t?P Tees in Uw c'u.?ody o,t'n?!'m'?P"t''? boat. 'JI'l)(, wl seized under the provisions oi the British, blockade of the German coast and is the iii-t to come within our cordon. It is understood that the Gehe.laiid's cargo ?a-? d?sti'?d for ?l German nort, 'rh ,teiiiiiel. jiii-c seized off the Shetland 1-les. The cargo will most probably be unshipped and sold under the terms of the liritish declaration.

IMPORTANT WAR COiiNGil I i

IMPORTANT WAR COiiNGil. Copenhagen, Thmfda5,It is under- stood from Berlin that a most imp0rtaD War Co?uci) ?ill ?;ak? pi?ce at the end of ¡ the ?ecK at the German Army Head- quarters near Lille. The Kaiser and General -on J'alkenliayn (Chief of the j General Stab) and his taff have already arrived, and conferences with Prince I Rupprecht of Bavaria and the German Crown r'tince have already begun. I he King oi Saxony left Dresden last night for the German headquarter5!. It is also expected that the King of j Wui^wnberg will take part.

I BRIBING ITALY i I

BRIBING ITALY, i ——— PRINCE VON BULOW'Si OFFER | ——; i AUSTRIAN EMPEROR ADVISED TO MAKE CONCESSIONS i I "OR WA? IS INEVfTABlE" I "OR WAR IS INEVITABLE" 11 Paris, Friday.—The "Echo k- i'arie> it: learn*, from what a1 a.rs "1. ;,0 I)c von iiulow ha* offered to Jfalv: (1) The upi>er valley of the Adige | with Meran and Elsack Valley as tar as the neighbourhood of Frenzcnfeste, a few kilometres north of (2) The di-t rid (If Isonzo on the eastern bank of the river with inted out. in Vienna, ,_Hy_ the telegram, that without in an!! way wshin? to insult Ua!y. and without douhtin?h?r?oodiaith. it is natnrall Austria ?hmifd wish that the sacrifices -hf is prepared to ?ak? in order to enMirc Italian neutraJ'ty shouid Dot be made ulltilJtly hft,; ftJÙil]pd Iwr f'n¡,p1gf'J1JI"'Ut&¡ of n?nt'aiity. and that .u.p?r!- H? more! 1'Úinnal hi Austrian circles since the! ceding of Trentino is involved, which j would mean the wea-kening of Austria as compared with Italy. I As regards Germany, the telegram con- tinues, it is a mistake to think her pomti of view is different from that of Vienna. Both are entirely .similar, and in Berlin it was never supposed that Italy couldIi raise objections to such rewrTafions. I Italy's View. The Trihuna comments at consider-j able length on its correspondent's message, and after comparing the Italian view, which claims the Irridentist terri-j tories as a national patrimony with the I Austrian view, which seeks to make tbol question of compensation into a game of c-iiance. the journal declares that the Austro-German reservations a rL, inacceptablo to Italy, and that persistence! iu them would C'nt short ail attempts at a1 friendly settlement, ior, it says, thwe is; not in Italy a single man in the Govern-! ment so devoid of the sense of reality asi to present, himself before Parliament, and j the country holding in his hands an 1.4-) .1_ payable at the end of the war. Such a i display of witle«sness woul d be met hy I a wave of popular indignation, not to! slwak of the menace of complications to; which the Powers participating in the! agreement, could not remain indifferent.!

BRITISH GOODS IN FRANCE j I

BRITISH GOODS IN FRANCE. Mr. W. H. Collins, the Swansea Valley journalist, now with the R.A.M.C. on the Continent, sends Professor Vir°o, ot High-street, a typical English postcard, with wording in English and French. He says: "The articles of British manufac- ture to he found in every shop of average importance, in the various towns in FraIH'ChQw that ET)?)?h c,OJlJmercial! men and Fr?ncK tradespeople have n

I SENTRY Dons SAGACITY i

I SENTRY Don's. SAGACITY. An officer. rent"ly hofne from i-raiiee.1 has given Major Richardson an account) of the work done by one of the sentry! dogs which the major .-applied to the second battalia., of n regiment at the front. I One dark night," the officer states, "r took out the sentry dog on patrol duty. AVe moved along for some time and saw n Suddenly the dog stopped! dead, minted, and gave a low grow l. immediately lay motionl&ss on the "ground.I Two Germans rose up as if out of the' ground in front of us, and they wer f immediately bayoneted by our men. The dog had discovered two German sentries in a new sap of which we knew I nothing, HCd. except i >r lite dog. well would never have known the Germans ] were there,'

THE OTHER MANS WFE I

THE OTHER MAN"S WFE¡ —-— I SEQUEL TO A HOLIDAY AT I CLACTOIi. 1 j REMARKABLE LETTER In the Divorce Corut to-day, Mr. Artlur Simmons Davis, an artist and phOro-; grapher, of Maida Vale, petitioned l'oi a divorce from Mrs. Ada Davis, alleging cae j had commit ted adultery with Mr. Sidn. Mortimer Knight, from whom damans, Wfre claimed. Counsel for petitioner at the out-ti "Ianed that the suit wa, -undeiended, an.1 had been 'gr In the result the jury gave a ver^ictfo? this amount, and a decr«»e nisi was graited with costs against co-re.s|x)nd(:nt, which, J by agreement were fixed at noo, the (1,11, ages to be paid into court in fourteen Counsel aid petitioner and iespojuL>nt met in 1901. They became very much at-j tached to each ot her, and decided to lYe j together and had two children. In btio j they married and lived happily until tlry made the acquaintance of co-respondeit. Petitioner saw re.sjxrndent: and co-t- spondent holding each other's hands )n the beach at Clacton dunng a holidiy there. Petitioner spoke to tluMU'aboiir. t. j Eventually he got a defective to his wife, and discovered she was mectiig co-respontlent at, a house at If ammo i 6inith, wiic-re they passed as Mr. and Mis. j Mortimer. On June 8th the husband received ij letter from co-respondent in which It wrote: For God's sake go and see your wit;, if only for a little time. She is broker- j hearted. You cannot realise what he-1 feelings are for you. i was wit h lie- i ye-sterday trying to keep her feeling, j up, but jshe was crying all day lor lie. husband. My (rod, man, you dOll" know what you are going uwav from, t j thought your wife cared for me a lit tho but I knew her yesterday for the firt time. There is one man she loves, aat that is her husband. Evidence was given supporting counsels! statentent..

CROWN PRINCES SECRET VISIT j CROWN PRIHUES SILCET VISITi

CROWN PRINCE'S SECRET VISIT. j CROWN PRIH'U'E'S SIL:C,?ET VISIT.i Amsterdam, Thursday.—Two 

X uu HMG FOR EAD

X _uu- ?' HMG FOR ?EAD. Venic", T hur-rlay. — The Vienn« j Arbeiter Zoihmg" says that tie re- j fights occurred at some large store.- in tin 1 city on Monday and Tuesday last becau.^j only first-comers were supplied with breac j and others were forced to return hom

HOHENZOLLERN PRiHOE KILLED j HOHHZOLlERN PRr KilLED I

HOHENZOLLERN PRiHOE KILLED. j HOH£HZOLlERN PR¡r.£- KilLED. I Prince Leopold oi Hohc nzolle.rn. refcrredj to in E::0-ïttH">s" dtnpateh. is pre-j stimably Prince 1 rederiok orl Ilohenr.ollern, the. grandson grand-uncle. tie was bom in was Colonel-Genrral of the 15th rhlan Keoriment. attached to the First Regiment of Foot Guards, and to the Firt Regiment; of Hu.-sars of the Royal Life Guards. He was married to Princess Louisa Sophia of Sehlesv.-ig-HoIstein.

I LOCAL CASUALTIESI

LOCAL CASUALTIES. I The following casualties appeared in the list publifched in last nig'it's Gazette :— Welsh Regiment. Wounded.—baker (10007) W.. Bruns- (](,n Bizticp G., (10355) T. W., Cooper (2395^ C. Y., Gough n. E., .Teues (10570) E. A.. Mace (18573), W., Pioeser ilOH,), E., Smith (lOOlti I). J., Warner (10575) B., Wills (10938) F. Previously rej»>rt

I RUIN IN EAST PRUSSIA

I RUIN IN EAST PRUSSIA. Copenhagen, Thursday.—Official evi- dence now appears showing to what ex- tent Germany has been invaded by the hostile troops, arid Lac suffered under the terrors of war. The Chief President of the Province of East Prussia, according to a private re- port from Berlin, in a .sjieech in Berlin said that$0,i>00 Ionises had been en- tirely destroyed in East Prussia. The state of agriculture there was ab- solutely desperate. Of over 100,000 horsed, scarcely G, 1)00 were left. At least 300,000 refugees had le.ft the province, unable to return, as tlie!-e %va& no possibility of making a living.

CERMAfl OFFICERS WiVES

CERMAfl OFFICERS' WiVES. In thf, Beriine.r Tit,gobl;.ft a >peeial worresrKAident, ivurt fvuechler, who tmvaliing in (he liartz Mountains, gives a strange description of German officers' wives who are talcing cures there, lie notes the many briiliaaits and matMcuivd hands" and -the ix>nversa!ion, which con- sists for the most part of criticism of Reinbaixlt's latest production at the Deutsches Theatre, the newest film, ad the state, of the iohoggan rues. Inter-j jected are regrets that one cannot very well be in St. Moritz thi« year." Much champagne is drunk to celefcr:ite ITiridcn-1 burg's latest victory, and post-cai>ds are written to the front. An officer goe» through the hall. He| w-allw slowly, aided by a stick and drag- • ging his right, foot. In his buttonhole is j the black and n hit-2 ribbon of the lion Cross. Your husband will surely also bring the Iron 'loss with b;Lu" onc- lady. 'Ob, ye,'a:s thf' otht'r, wto s('aj, a letter to the front wit.h a little pocket sealing apparatus. 110t I do ho-pr he will the first class. It looks so well aft prward" on a dinner jacket.' 1 froze a little." says tS* n- de ut, wbicli is hardly stifnaog.

0 4 nO EXPRESS WRECKED I i iI

-0 _4-' nO EXPRESS WRECKED I i i I RAILWAY COLLISION IN I SNOWSTORM I I — I TWO PASSENGERS KILLED AHD TWENTY i INJURED. i I ENGINE OVER EMBANKMENT i i j The Press AssociativaRochdale cor-, respondent telegraphs: A serious railway j l'oi, 'sion occurred laic last night at; Smithy Brid&c. near Rochdale, iL« \ork- • shire to iianchesxer antt Fleet v. ood boat J t\\pr'?.sC('lHdin?vitha?tt?i?!!a:'y(?npty ?oodstram. l Two pussengeis were known to be killed| and about 2'-> injured, but ir is feared the j number NNill be increased viun the whole i 01 t!)? wreckage has been explored. T(, u of the iujured were conveyed to the Roeii- dalE' Inhr\naiy, eight of ,,1Hdu were de-j tained. They include j Walter Taylor, Barlow-read. I-ev+ns- lud:ttr. Manchester, acxiooa ixtjuiies to ] ti:e head j Stanley Cliadw ick, Ri-chuaie-rotid, iMilurow, compoui.il iiucture of the leg; j Ja-. Noim, iieltoo — feet. FxcetwtK'd, Tracfure of both h^gs, l;oth arms, aud ia- juries to head.—Condition critical. Tho spot where tiie accident Happened | is iu a bleak and desolate part of the! ■ ilie. "When the collision occurred the jngine and tender of the. pa-senger train were hurled liver an tmbank mcut into a deep snowiii iit, and the first coach, forced on top of the tender of tiie train, i was full of passengers and indescribable scenes tollowyd the smash. Breakdown gangs armed. but their work wa> rendered difficult aad arduous by t.ite fact that a blinding bli/.zard waS raging all tho time. Five men worked tor two hours to free a JJwn w¡"¡ 1\'as alin", but pinned beneath ihe wreckage, but | without success.

AUSTRIANS REmE THE AHACK I

AUSTRIANS REm"E THE AHACK. | I ¡ Buckarest. 'I'li iiig to news received this morning, the Austrians having received reinforcements, have, rc- sumed a strong otfensive on They tried U> cro> the Pruth, but failaii. j being repulsed with loss. The combat is developing.— Times telegram. j

04 GENERAL DAMALIE SATISHED

04 GENERAL D'AMALIE SATISHED. T'n i. Thursviay.—The speceial c.orrespo-n- drat of tiie Petit i'arisien tek^vapb^ I Tenedos o». the iiist.: — j I ha. reiurneil a'roni .dudros. where I tvac receiveil by General IKAniade. The (general, without unde.r-rafing the diffi- culties of the undertaking, express! hi^ c^nfidcnee in iht- reJ t, and liis satisfiu- ti n with the spirit and vigour of his t- nips.

THE KAiSERS UNOESSTUSiES I THE KAISERS UNDERSTUOIES i

THE KAiSER'S UNOESSTUSiES. THE KAISER?S UNDER-STUOIES. ?i Paris, Thursday.—The "Figaro" aJ5 that dtiring a visit of the German 1-;llpercr to Luxemburg two officers, wbo nrp abotit the sti uic height and appearance ¡ the Emperor, were ordered to atlire tiiemselvc^s and to make themselves tip like his Imperial MajeMv. They there-: fore donned the cloak (»; biue and the Imperial cap, and adopted the Imperial j raous'tache. They then drove about in grey moior wirs, carrv-ing the Iniperia.1 Crown, and thus I)Pitlwtiia!i threw tbe curious, and possible assassins, off' the track of tho Emperor. In this way it was possible to meet Ei)i i)(,! f,r William | in three different phves at one time. j

1 48000 MILES C HASE j

48,000 MILES C HASE. j Freemantle, Thursday.—Htokers from the battle cruiser Australia relate that j the vessel chased the German Pacific Squadron for 48,000 miles, using 6,000 tons of coal and .5.f" 0f 0il. The pursuit, they say, started tt Rahaul, and front there to Samoa, Fiji, » Fanning Island, and Mexico, the German Flee! being finally driven into Admiral) ^Hardee's guns. The stokers state that Admiral Yon Spee I said at liaibaul he would fight anything i but the Australia. The crew were feted in Peru, and at ( I: "T iloits of call.

I i COLLIERS EASTER HOLIDAYS iI Ii

I COLLIERS' EASTER HOLIDAYS. iI j After considering a circular from Sir R Redmayne, chief inspector of ruln(. the executive committee of the Miner*' Federation yesterday decided to recom- mend all districts, to limit their Easter- l tide holidays. Sir Richard Eedmayne saw the i officials of ihe Federation later at the direc t request of Lord Kitchener, who miners to limit their holidays at the present time. Lord Kitchener wished him to say that li knew the men were now working very Lard, and doubtless they ro<|uired some holiday, but he lepearod the hope that • they would limit any cassation ot work only. 1)rts(,nt t i iyl, one at the )>resent time to one or two dav-s

MANY GERMAN DESERTERSi

MANY GERMAN DESERTERS. Petrograd. March 17—It is sein i-oiffc.ially sfav. rd that tit", enemy's battcri-fts in the last few days have been .showing less [energy. j I The statement adds tua' th? snow in th(: region where li?'?? J?? taken place h?s malted in FGme Rlacohing the Russians for the purpose of iear;end-fring. What is most peculiar is! that some of these men belong to the best iheld regiments and to the .1 ha t- tali«ius. D is confirmed thnt new German 1or- illation* are iiMtig old l'itJ; è:rrl guns 0: ;the ic the year and the;r, shooting is jireci-e lacking in i confidence.—Exeltaiige Telegraph Co.

SERCEANT HCPPER I

 SERCEANT HCPPER ? I | i CONDEMNED MAN VISITED BY HIS WIFE AND A FRIEN3. I I REPRIEVE WIDELY SIGNED The results obtained date ill conne<- Liull with the petition for Sergeant Hopper's reprieve art, very gratifying 10: the promoters. B, this morning bet 1,OUIJ and 5,000 signature* bed been re- turned, but this iepiC;Cu'> only a small | proportion 01 the number of people wlu- J are expected, to hay", signal the laigt j i\uniDer of copies Afost of the jarge wovk » have taken 11 nainber <• si^natnrfs is c-s.pv.ed liojii: ,-ovict. -No stone is feeing lei; umurnea iu secure a fully re- preseniative petition. ;.nd~to-day and t<-r-; mission tor a biund at the ijockera' Hail in High-sireot. Notice oi the appeal, we are informed by Messrs. Andrew and Thompson, has been definitely hxlged iind acknowledged. but the date of hearing h*s net yet bcea li:\ed. Hopper Bearing Up Well. ihe condemned man. w<- ore informeO, i is bearing up wall tinder his ving ordeal. Within ii day or two o:' his committal to. Swansea sentence at Gardift, he was vi-i'a-d by his wife at; a friend. TV:w< at.ifeeting scene, j Hopper i- vi-;r<->d doily by the eiiapiain of the jail (the Rev. Jones) or one of his assistants.

1 LIFEBOAT DISASTER 8

-1 LIFEBOAT DISASTER 8 Two Bridlington Men Lose i Their Lives. I Tiie Piess Association' s Bridlington correspondent telegiaphs thai a disa-ur attended the launching of the lifeboat there early this morning. The lifeboat had been called out to the assistance of a vessel (the crew of which are reported to have been drowned) and was driven past the wreck on -to the shore where she j, breaking up. The carriage remains in the w-si, where it stuck. The horses drawing the carriage were drowned and two cl the lifeboat crew b.st their lives.

WOUDEriFREtriHDEPUTY WOUM FREM SEPYj

WOUÑDEri-FREtriHDEPUTY. WOUM FREM? SEP?Y. Pari, Thursday.—M. Maginot, Deputy/ ic-r the ,d^!)vP> ho V'tis Lvidly wotiinled at } the front several months ago. took his seat j at to-day's se-vdon of the Chamber, He! loudly checred ;1", with the assistance' oi crutches, bp made his way to his seal.

I i SmWAS IREASQ I

Sm?WA?'S IREASQ? Stockholm, rigorous irapi ii-cniDesy: and h.>ss oi rightis for two years is the s.■ ■■)[ fon.od j guilty of treason.—heutoc.

A STUDENT OF GERMAN KULTUR I

A STUDENT OF GERMAN KULTUR, I 'J >•' f u r,. it | loarns from Berlin that tho Vali L,i Smyrna arrotcd French and British subjects wbon the bombardment, oj Smyrna began, ami that he threatened to place them in The 'ronr. of the grins of the French and British Fleet if the ships did not case fire.

MERELY A POLITICAL DIFFERENCE

MERELY A POLITICAL DIFFERENCE. Athens. Mare-h 10th.—Thp King, in reo ceiving in audience to-day the ex-Miniver? of ihe Cabinet of M. Venezclos. assured them of his regard for their leader. His Majesty added that the dissolution of the Chamber was due only to the dis- agreement which had arisen between him and M. Vehf-xeto- wih regard to the ex- ternal situation, a disagreement which, he said, purely political not in any way personal.

A MYSTERIOUS AEROPLANE

A MYSTERIOUS AEROPLANE. An aeroplane wa<- approaching; Oldeburgh at eight o'clock last evening. The. sound of the engine suddenly ceased, and it is believed the machine, the nationality oj which is unknown, fell into the sea. The Oldebnrvh Etfrboat was lauaehM. bnt this vessel rerorned after a three hours' Jrnitless search. A mine sweeper was spoken by the lifeboat, and she re- ported having seen the aeroplane ;):1, over their vessa?i proceeding towards land, afterwards losing sight of brr.

UNREST IN TBRKISH CAPITAL

UNREST IN TBRKISH CAPITAL. Athene, Friday.—According to advice received at Salonika from Con.st.adi!Joplt> the situation in Turkish capital is daily becoming more disquieting. The action of the Allies in t.he Dar- danelles has shaken the prestige of the Germans in tin* army tuid among the Turkish population. Discontent againtat the (}ermans is consequently increasing rapidtv, and German families and many Young Turks, includintr the iMunnehs (Jews converted to Lslamiein) are leaving Crnstantinople. bnt. ito Turk or note 1*- longing to tTie Old S< hool has If,it the capital. itany Hellenic subjects exf>elled from Constantinople ar<- arriving ai Salonika.

GlAIS RECRUITS POEM

GlAIS RECRUIT'S POEM. One of the latest recruits tu the Swan- sea, Battalion is one Jim," bailing from Gbie. His advent to the rank* of our lighting men has evoked the following effort: "Hen dderyn tough tw'r Kaiser— Mao pawb yn gwybod hyn Aiae'n c^Jiicro'r gwa^tadeddau. Am gonero ma" 150b blTn, Mae ei lengau ar y nioroedd. Mae pi jilwyr of mown trim— 1. »Tld O'nv ;1\ helpo I'i 11 hill ddau e i gwrdd j M. H. (Glais).

Advertising

 5.30 Edition. !A,: zEi: rwiff 5ATDOCK. A. later fr s Ra?Ti