Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 6 of 6
Full Screen
34 articles on this page
wmRSAIl

wmRSAIl ] Havoc of a Fierce Storm in I London. I An unueuaily violent thunderstorm broke over London cn Sunday. Several buildings wem str-uck by lightning, but happily no loes of life or injuries to indi- viduals have been reported. I The first drops of rain fell in the City just before noon, and for two hours Lon- don was right in the madst of the storm. Yivid flashes of lightning were followed by an equally quick succession of torren- tial rains, and the final crash woun-d up with a hailstorm. There were three distinct thunderstorms, the last one more violent than 4he other two, and after each the clouds rolled away and. the sun shone brilliantly. The full violence of the storms shook th-- City building's to their foundations. The streets ran river,- of hail. The heavy •stone coping and chimney- stack at the top of the Nurses' Pension Fund ofifces were struck, and about a ton of material hurled into the street, cover- ing the roadway for many yards. It wa = subsequently ascertained that soQjfe of the masonry fell through the roof of the adjoining premiees into the top floor, but, being Sunday, no one was occupying the rooms. Empire House, at the corner of Ald- wyeh and King-sway, was also struck. Just previously (here was a heavy fall of hailstones. The hail lav pikxl up over the drain gratings, which became choked, and the road was ii floootd. In the midst of the downpour a vivid flash of lightning struck the chimney-si-ack on the east side of Empire Hcmse. From a height of about 60 feet large pieces cf stonework were pre- cipitated into the rtreet. and fell with a. loud craeh. Fortunately, no one was near.

CAPITALISTIC BLOOD I ft I

"CAPITALISTIC BLOOD." I ft- Llandilo Rural Councillor and Colliery Owners. At the meeting of the Rural Comi.rll at Ldandiio on Saturday Mr. Jacob Davjes torn- plained of the starts cf Margaret-roa

IneHAT BRITAIN is DOINGI

IneHAT BRITAIN is DOING I Allaying SVIisapprehensions in Russia. I Petrog-Had, Sunday.—An excellent im- pre^ion has been produced here by the .statement made by Sir George Buchanan to a li-ussian journalist on the part which Great Britain has played, and is playing, I in the conduct of the war. With regard to the action of the Fleet, the Ambassador confined himself to a recapitulation of the seven paints enumerated by Mr. Balfour in his recent communication, to a New York paper, and the facta he marshalled in respect to our Army and industry arc familiar to English readers; but the fol- lowing passage from his remarks throws fresh light on an episode of the campaign ■which has been much debated, especially ia this country:— U When Turkey declared war, Russia turned to Great Britain v<*itn a request tliat she would divert a portion of the Turkish troop's from the Caucasus by means of a at some t other point. The operations in the Dar- danelles were undertaken with a double object-on the one hand, of reducing the pressure of the Turks in the Caucasus, and, on the other, of opening the Straits and so making it pos

ABERAVON RED CROSS PARADE I

ABERAVON RED CROSS PARADE. I On Sunday morning the & beravon-Port Talbot and District British Red Cross Voluntary Aid Society held their first church parade. Headed by th9 St. Mary's Military Band, the members, numbering nearly a hundred, under the command of Commandant Clifford Jacob and Quarter- master Tom Davies (Cwmavos) marched through the principal streets to St. Mary's P-ari«h Church, where an appropriate sermon was preached hy the vicar, the Rev. Edward Davie?. A movement is on foot to arrange a street collection for the purpose of providing the members of the society with uniforms.

No title

CoTporal Frank Warner, Llanelly, 9th Royal Fusiliers, has been appointed clerk p at the headquarters of the 2nd Army ? Corps. I Six hundredweight of prize vegetables ? which were exhibited at the local vege- t *able sh

r DISSATISFIED MirdERS

r DISSATISFIED MirdERS ) Resolution of Protest by Mid. I Rhtmdda Men. I Much dissatisfaction existed in the i Mid-xthondda at the delay in arriving at a final settlement of the new wage agree- ment, and this was evidenced at a mass meeting at the Skating Rink, Tonypandy, on Sunday afternoon. The following was the official report supplied to the press at the close. A strongly representative meeting oi the workmen engaged at the Cambrian, Glamorgan House Coal, Glamorgan Steam Coal, Naval, Penygraig, and Blaen- clydach Collieries, was held an Sunday, Mr. Brinley Price (Cambrian) presiding. An exhaustive report of the negotia- tions upon the new wage agreement was given by Messrs. Noah Rees, Noah Ablett, and Tom Smith, the three -execu- tive members, who attributed the delay to the action of the ccalowners in the interpretation they sought to put to the new agreement. Extreme dissatisfaction was expred at the delay, and the follow- resolution was proposed by Mr. David John Jto.ne-s (Cambrian), seconded by Mr. George Burton (Glamorgan House Coal), and supported by Mr. John Hughes, chair- man of the Glamorgan Ste-am Coal Lodge, and was carried without a single dissent- ing voice:— The Resolution. H That this meeting representing the Cambrian Combine lodges in the Mid- Rhondda area declares its greatest dis- satisfaction with the conduct and progress made in the terms of the new wage agree- ment for the coalfield, that we regret the evident .attitude of I evasion of the terms of settle- ment taken up by the owners, together with their refusal to set up the necessary administrative machinery, that we urge upon all those responsible for the further- ance of the negotiations the extreme neces- sity for bringing them to a '/eedy and satisfactory end; failing which we demand that a conference of the coalfidd be called not luMr than Monday, Auguet 23, in f order to consider what ateps shall be 'I taken to secure that the agreement shall he brought into immediate operation. We finally declare our determination to adopt every possible means to enforce the terms as explained at our conferences, and that 'whatever dislocation eind stop- page may result therefrom will be neces- sitated hvthe attitude of the coalowners, and they aloce will be responsible." It was also, resolved that this resolution be forwarded to the executive council.

THE GIRL AND 19THE SILDIERS i

THE GIRL AND .19 THE SILDIERS TeSsgrapli Operator Performs a Kindly Act. Paris. Aug. 15.—I witnessed a comfort- ing scene this morning in the Rue do Gmitel'le, close to the Central Telegraph Office. The chief parts were played by a girl telegraph operator and by two du&t- stained French soldiesrs who had come to Paiis ati four days' leave i1:-fter passing eight unonths in the Argon ne region. Mademoiselle X. was lea-ving the Central f Tal?j-f?h buiidio? for a h-a?y and frugal lunch wben she notice& the two Phldier8'1 w? n?i evidently l?t their bcn-rin? in the maze o'f P?u-is streets. She spoke to l thel]) ajad l?ea?nod t.h? th?y had no rela- tive or friends in the ?pitajL They also admitted that th&ir gmaJl funds were alread;y exliausfed. The Soldiers and the Gift. I "Wait a minute! exclaimed the tele- graph girl, and s-he rfventened the court- yard of the .great Gwerament building and ikcldressed her comrades as they also werp hurrying to lunch. The result was that in a few minutes she had collected 15Q francs (d £ 6) in a small siwhel, which sho to the I wo soldiers. To her gieat disappointment, however, they refused tho gift, one remarking, No, wo don't need that. Besides, some other fsllowB in our regiaient are much. worse off than we are." Thk; statenieJit afforded Mademoieelle X. (whose friesads have niclcnamed heT Mome Moineau (Little Sparrow), on account of her alertness and dimimxtivft- nees, an -opportunity to force the two -poilug to accept the money s he had collected for l,hcm. Well," she said, you will take those fellows some little tifeful presents you must buy for them with any-thi-ng in this satchel you do not need yourselves." And, pressing the sa.tehel-*ft/r&p over the wrist of one of the soldiers, she ruehed away for her belated lunch.

WELSH CASUALTIES I

WELSH CASUALTIES. I The following- casualties in the Expedi- tionary Force arc reported under mrious dat-M-— Died of Wounds. I Welsh Eegt, 1st Balt.-Ifarris, 10475 J. H.; Thomas. 22533 R. G. Welsh Iteg-z., 2nd Bafct.—O'Brien, 1928 J.; I Perrin, 11473 E. G.; Williams, 2044 R. Welsh Best., 3rd Batt— Francis, 36293 G. H. Died. Welsh Regt., 1st Batt.-Williams, 19447 H. Welsh fiegt., 3rd Batt.—ftweeney, 2280 J. Wounded. Royal Weiph Fusiliers, 1st Eatt.-Ada.ms, 5105 E.; Owens. 3385 J. Welsh Rept., 2nd B'ttt.-Boswell, 8989 W. S-; Brans, 22961 J. Harris, S573 H.; Jones, 24502 C.; Joseph 27123 H. Morgan, 1489 W.; Rutter, 6261 J.; Stemle. 11138 T. The following casualties are reported from the Base under date July 3flth: OFFICERS. Wounded. Moetyn, U. P. G. J., 2nd Royal Welsh Fueilicra MEN. Killed. R. Welsh Fusiliers, 4th Batt. (T.F.).-Ham- naby, 7713 A.; Jones, 7705 J. J.; Rathbone, 6084 I<-Opl. W. A.; Roberta, 3894 Co. Sgt.-Maj. J. H. S. Wales Borderere, 1st Batt.—Hunt, 10940 A. Died of Wounds. R. Welah Fusiliers, 1st Br-itt.-Evane. 6137 Cpl. S. C. Wounded. R. Welsh Fusiliers, 1st BeAt.-Roibmd, 11443 J. F.; Hurgiaa, 19131 E.; WilHams, 17796 R. J. R. Wehui Fusiliers, att. (T.F.).—Jones. 7653 L; Jjoraas 6322 Cpl. KMC.; T311, 4558 Coy. 8et.-l £ aj. H. S. Wales Borderers, 1st Batt;-Beeohy, 14133 W.; Cullinane, 7791 D.; beakin. 11690 T.; Penhale, 122n L.-OpL W. Wounded. Welsh Regt.. 2riif Batt.-Buckley, 1747 J.; Daviea, 8829 CpL J.; Wathan. 19353 W Previously reported Wounded and Missing, now reported Not Missing. Welsh Regt., 2nd Bitt.—Hunt, 9957 L.-Cpl., H. The foHcvring casualties among oocere in the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force are reported under various datea, Wounded. Bickford-Smith, Lt. W. N. V.. 4th South Wales Borderers; Jenkins, Sec. Lt. T. M., 4th South Wales Borderers. Previously officially reported Missing, now unofficially reported Killed, Cudogan, Lt.-Ool. H. O. 8.. R. Wetah Fusiliers. I

No title

Thf War Office telegram or letter of permission now takes the place of a p&ss- port for relatives who visit sick and) wounded officers and men in France.

SWANSEA OFFICER BROTHERS

SWANSEA OFFICER BROTHERS Laptain Clarence Hamilton Shaw (6th Welsh). Captain W. D. H. Hamilton Shaw (25th London Cyclists' Batt.). Lieut. J H. Hamilton Shaw (6th Welsh). Lieut. J. Hamilton Shaw (Royal Engineers). Tile Iour sons of Mr. C. Hamilton Shaw, th.) well-known Swansea stockbroker b, eve commissions in the Army, and two or three of their number are at present at tho iront. Captain Clarence is well- known in Swansea swimming circles.

MGRRISTON FAMILYS RECORD

MGRRISTON FAMILY'S RECORD Another excelk-at example of patriotism is shown by rhe fa.mily of 3Irs Ann Powell, 5, Tyrpenry-sfcreet, Morrison. Of her four sons three .have joined the Colour, whilst a grandson who she has brought up is also with tho Colours Jack Powell is a sergeant with the 1st Welsh Howitzer Brigade, R.F.A., at Cambridge- Ivor Powell and Morgan PoweU are attaühed to the Roval Nayal Division; whilst the grandson is a private with the 3rd Welsh. Not yet 18 years of age, he has already done his little bit. He participated in the fightin at Hill 60, where he received a bullet wound in the right hand. He returned home in the early bou1"6 of Saturday fTvm Lincoln, where he has  for some Dlont,hs recuperat- j hours ot Saturday from Lincoln, where he has oeen for some months recuperat- I Morgan Powell, R.N. Division. Ivor Powell, R.N. Division. ——-—_i IL Pte. Evan Powell, 3rd Welsh (wounded), Sergt. John Powell, 1st Welsh.

MERTHYR FATAL FIRE1

MERTHYR FATAL FIRE 1 Women of Three Generations Perish at Pentrebach. Three women lost their lives in an extra- ordinary fire mishap near Merthyr on Sun- d?y. A arching feature of the tragedy was the heroic devotion of an elderly woman, who apparently gave her life in an endeavour to save the others. While a young man named Thomas Thpmas. of the Triangle, Pentrebach, was cleaning his motor-cycle, he dropped a. lighted mRtch, which fell upon a petrol- soaked mat This, as well as the maehine, took fire. The father, Thomas Thomas, a collier, rushed downstairs irom his bed, and an at- tmupl; was made to remove the machine but it stuck fast in the doorway. The flames immediately spread to the furniture Í11 the groand-floor room. Neighbours tried to rescue the other occupants, who were up- stairs in bed at the time. They weiv George Thomas, another 'son of Thomas Thomas; Mrs Mary Thomas, aged 50, wife of the latter; Agnes Thomas, her daughter, and Mrs. Grunter, 80, of Neath, mother of Mrs. Thomas. George Thomas jumped from the back bedroom window end eacaped with slight injury, but the three women were suffocated. The body of Mrs. Thomas was stretched on the landiDg at the top of the stairs.Rhe had previously come downstairs, and it is inferred that she went back to try and save her mother and daughter.

A MISERABLE lOT I

A MISERABLE lOT. I Northern France, Sunday.—Nearly 200 German prisoners passed through here on- Saturday en route to Not since the war began has such a miserable, mixed lot been, seen in this sector. The majority could not have been nineteen years of age, and they looked tired and pitiful, in contrast with the hard faces of the older men, who ranged in age from fifty to fifty-five.

HYSTEkY OF DEATH AT STATION I

HYSTEkY OF DEATH AT STATION. I The death of a Norwegian, Alex Nord- serom, at the King Edward VII. Hospitad, Cardiff, on Sunday night, as the result of injuries sustained through falling in front of a train at Marshfield Station, near Newport, is lilkly to have a sensa- tional sequel, there being allegations that his death, was other than accidental. Inquiries elicited the iaformaiion that No wiserom was talking with friends on the platform wfcile awaking the arrival of the 9.40 train from Cardiff when, it is aJisged, a person struck him a blow, causing him to topple over in front of the incoming train.

CRtlTOR OF WELSH LANGUAGE I

CRtlTOR OF WELSH LANGUAGE. I The thirteenth annual summer sobool, whoch lasted 14 days, ended at Pwllhp-li on Saturday. During a lecture on modern Welsh poetry Professor J. Morris Jones, of the TJitiverity College of North Wales, stated that Wales was' indebted to Dolfydd Ap Gwilym, wfw lived in the fourteenth cen- tury, for its modem literature, and that he was the creastor of the WelEsh language in its present form. In those tlmieg poetry was confined to the aristocratic classes, and a bcMif-e had to be obtained before a poet wouW be recognised, as payment had to be made for their services. The bards became in course of time a heavy burden on the families. The num- ber of bards increased to such a degree that a bardic t-hroiie was established in Hie year 1451 to select the best anT? 1:0 eliminate the lesser bards. This was the origin of the present National Eisteddfod, which, therefore, was not quite of the antique origin supposed. The prese&t object of the eisteddfod was to create and encourage poetry 'and literature, but the old eisteddfod had for its object the reduc- tion of the number of hands.

I SMITHS WIDOW I

I SMITH'S WIDOW Married to a Soldier After Musband's Execution. On a special license taken out on the day that Smith, the baths murderer, was hanged, his widow, Caroline Beatrice Love, whose maiden name was Thomhill, was married again at Leiceerter on Satur- day. The bridegroom was Thomas John Davies, of New Westminster, British Columbia, who cama from Canada to enlist in the army- and is now a sapper in the Royal Engineers. The marriage ceremony took place at Christ Church, Leicester, and was of a very quiet character. She wished to get married at St. Matfhew's Church, where the ceremony with Smith took place, but this could not be done, as she was not living in that parish. Only relatives of the parties were present, including the father and mother of the bridegroom, who came from Canada to see their son's marriage. The officiating minister was the Rev. S. H. Shakespear, curate in charge of Christ Church. The best: man was Private E. W. -Thornhill, brother of the bride, whose parents live at 20, George-street, Leicester. The bride, who was dressed in white, was attended by three bridesmaid-Niiss Zoe Thornhill (sister), and the Missee Minnie and Lizzie Ptarse, of Leicester.

A ROMANTIC WAR WEDDING I

A ROMANTIC WAR WEDDING I The Rev. A. S. V. Blunt, formerly curaite of Ham Common Parish Church, Suxrey, wh,), is now a chaplain at the British Embassy in Paris, has just married two young people under romantic circuaistaiices. A young lady living in Peckham some time ago met a young man, and after H walking out" they separated. When war broke out the young man. George, joined the Lincolnshire Regiment, and the young lady became a Red Cross nurse. Neither knew what the other had done. The man was wounded, and, after being in hospital some time, was drafted into the Militaiy Police in Paris. Whilst on duty in Paris he one day, quite unex- pectedly, saw the young lady, and the old acquaintance was renewed. They became engaged in 46ar days, and 29 days after the meeting they were marrie d by Mr. BLuaii. He afterwards enterta-ined the bride and bridegroom and their friends to a wedding breakfast.

GERMAN OffiCEBS ESCAPEI

GERMAN OffiCEBS ESCAPE Denbigh, Sunday.—Three more German officers have escaped from the Dyffryn Aled Concentration Camp at Denbigh, and considerable excitement prevailed in the town yesterday, when the news became known. It is understood that the fugitives dis- appeared on Friday night, but how they ra a-naged to escape is at present a mystery. Their names and descripitioris are as fol- low:— 1. Lieutenant Hans Werner von Heel- dorf, aged 29, height (j. Ilin., fair hair, light compiexior\, medium build, -with a scar on the left oheek. Dressed, it is believed, in a dark grey uniform. Spea-ks a little English. 2. Captain IleinrlcK J ulius von Hen- ning, aged 31, height 5ft. lOin., daxk hair, brown eyes, slight build. Believed to be dressed in white naval uniform -with plain buttons. Speaks no English. 3. Captain Herman Hoi ens, agecL 32, height 5ft. llin. light hair, prominent blue grey eyes. Dressed in blue naval uniform with plain buttons. Speaks Eng- lish fluently -with a German accent.

No title

Owing to the lighting restrictions the inmates of the Maidstone Workhouse are to go to bed to-day at 8 p.m.

LANCLAND BAY RESCUE

) LANCLAND BAY RESCUE Wounded Soldier's Valiant Effort to Save Boy. There was an exciting scene, lasting for a few minutes, at Langland Bay on Sat- urday evening. A lad about 12 years of a.ge, from the Mumbles, who was bathing, got into difficulties. A large crowd had gathered on the beach, and two or three persons at once jumped into the water in an attempt to save the boy. One of these was a wounded 1 soldier. But the rescuer who ultimately suc- ceeded in this quest was another bather j who, after a struggle, and with assistance, successfully landed the boy. The wounded soldier also got into difficulties, and had himself to be assisted. He received an ovation on reaching the beach. P.C. Jenkins, on his arrival, found tliat all was over, and the lad had walked home, none the worse for his perilous adventure.

IWOMAN PORTER KILLED

I WOMAN PORTER KILLED Miss Dixon, aged 19. one of the new women porters employed by the Central London Railway at Holland Park Station, was killed between the train and the plat- form late on Saturday night. It -was Miss Dixon's duty to be on the platform to meet, the midnight train for Shepherd's Bush, but according to regula- tions she should not attempt to close the sliding doors of the train, -No one saw how the accident happened. Miss Dixon had been on duty at this station for over three months.

I UEFOILAN MILK CASE DISMISSEDI

I UEFOILAN MILK CASE DISMISSED In the adjourned summons at Swansea Pplice Court, on Monday, against Howell Davies (60) and David Davies (24), farmers, Hendrefoilau. for selling adulterated milk, Mr. H. Ilield (for the Corporation) said that during the adjournment, at the request cf the defendants, he made tests at the farm and found the milk normal. On the occ.a- sion in rtspect of which the summons was issued the milk was eleven per cent. defi- cient in butter fai. For the defence Mr. Hy. ThompROn said the elder defendant had been in the busi- ness 39 years; the milk ms alwa,ys direct from the cow, and there had never been a I previous complaint, although the milk 5*ad been frequently tested. The case was dismissed on payment of I costs.

IMSS PANKHURST WILL NOT REGISTER I

I MSS PANKHURST WILL NOT REGISTER. I Miss Sylvia Pankburst is not going to register. She declared so at a crowded meeting in the Portman Rooms over which Mrs. Despard presided on Sunday. The meeting followed a street demonstra- tion organised by the East London lederation of Suffragettes. H I am not going to register. That is all I know about it," declared Miss Pank- hurst. For my part I think it is merely a ruse to get more power out of the workers. I am not a man, so they cannot take me to the war, but they will not put me in a munition factory. They know there will be trouble. They are paying 2s. 8d. a dozen for soldiers' khaki hirt.s, and we must fight for better conditions for our women."

CERMAHY S WASTED ENERGY I

CERMAHY S WASTED ENERGY. I New York, Sunday.—A remarkable series of documentary and other proofs is printed to-day by the New York World," showing how Germany from the commencement of the war laboured in the United States to shape public opinioti to block the supply of munitions to the Allies and get them for herself. The magnitude of the transactions in- volved may be guessed when it is reflected that the German Government transferred to Washington in one draft over S:200,000 for various purposed of propaganda—sub- sidising new German papers, including i U The Fatherktnd,n the chief organ of the German-Americans; nobbling American papers, so that they might print articles favourable to Germany and antagonistic to  AIlie6' and hiring lecturers and autA hors to conduct campaigns to convert American opinion to the Kaiser's side. It would appear that Germany regarded America as essential to "her cause," essential because the United States is the leading country amongst neutrals has- immense resources for maaufacturing war supplies, and could if exasperated prove a constant thorn in the side of Eng-land. German propaganda has been directed with ability, under orders from Berlin, and financed generously.

YlSH OFFICERS PROMOTEDI

YÆlSH OFFICERS PROMOTED. A special supplement to the "London Gazette," iasued w Saturday evening, con- tained the foudwirg.- War Office, August 14th. REGULAR FORCES. INFANTEY. I BoyaJ Welch Fiibiliers.-rhe under-men- tioned lieutenants to be temporary captains supernumerarw to establichment-P. G. J. Mostyn, W. W. Kirby (Special Keserve), S. Williams apd J. Cottrell. &uth Wales Bordere-m.—Captain and Brevet-major G. B. C. Ward it3 seconded for service on the Staff. Welsh Regiment.—Major G. P. Hoggan to be temporary lieutenant-colonel, Lieutenant W. Owen to be temporary captain. ARMY MEDICAL SERVICE. Royal Army Medical Corps—The notifica- tion of the Appointment of Major Robert Thomas Hughes, Welsh Di.vision.il Train, the Army Service Corps, to a temporary majority, which appeared in the "Gazette" of 8t.h June. 1915, is cancelled. INFANTRY SERVICE BATTA-LIONS. South Wales Borderers, 12th Battalion (3rd Gwent).—The undermentioned tempo- rary second-lieutenants to be temporary lieutenantsOscar D. Murris. George D. Page, and Chxrlee M. Pritchard. Local reserve, South Wales Borderers, 13th Battalion.—Temporary Major William H. Pitten. from 10th (Service) Battalion (lot Gwent), to be temporary major. TERRITORIAL FORCE. I Army Service Corps. WeLsh Divisional Tra.in.-Major Robert T. Hughes resigns hie commi,sgion; dated 29t hApril, 1915. Private John BoJlantyne McNair, from Honourable Artillery Company, to be second-lieutenant. ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS. Welsh Casualty Clearing St.ation.- Robert Thomas Hughes (late major Welsh Divi- sional Train, Army Service Corps) to be major (temporary); dated 29th April, 1915. I

No title

Telegrams to prisoners, of war in Ger-I many are not permitted.

Advertising

r This Week's Attraction The Australian Nightingale. Come and Hear it Sing. THE EXCHANGE, Tuesday and Friday, 4 to 6 p.m. CARLTON CAFE, Every Afternoon and Evening (With the above exception). —————————————

INATIONAL SERVICE

NATIONAL SERVICE Manifesto Issued to the People. Not intended to embarrass the Govern- ment, but. entirely as an appeal to the country, a manifesto, signed by prominent men of all parties, has been issueu The proposal is to hold public meetings throughout the country where resolutions affirming readiness to make any sacrifice in order to carry the war to a successful conclusion, will be put and then to sub- mit these resolutions to the members of the cabinet, as an evidence of the resolute determination of the people, by means of an equality of sacrifice and a concentra- ¡ tion of national effort to make victory not merely certain, but to bring it nearer. The Manifesto. I The manifesto is as follows: I We believe that the need is now ex- tremely urgent for a complete and or- ganised national effort to carry on the war. We are of opinion that every fit man, whatever his position in life, must be made available, as and when his country calls for him, for the fighting line, or, if specially qualified, for national service at home We are convinced that the people are only waiting an opportu- nity to affinn their willingness to serve. We suggest that throughout the whole country there should be held public meet- ings in every town and village, and resolu- tions submitted calling upon the Govern- ment to place the nation under orders. our view, both men and women, to form our view ,both men and women, to form local committees and arrange for public meetings and demonstrations. They should, at the same time, communicate their readiness to help to: The Hon. Sec- retaries, National Service, 3, Hare Court, Temple, London, E.C." The signatures of the following have so far been received: Sir F. G. Banbury, M.P. Major-General Sir George Barker. Sir J. Wolfe Barry. Mr. Henry Birchenough. Sir Henry Arthur Blake. Admiral Lord Charles Bereefopd, M.P. Bishop of Birmingham. Sir Cavendish Boyle. Surgeon-Major-General A. F. Bradshaw. Sir Lauder Brunton. Dr. Alfred J. Butler. Mr. Neville Chamberlain. Admiral F. A. Close. Sir Henry Craik, M.P. Sir Henry Homewood Crawford, Sir Savile Crossley. Prof. W. Boyd Dawkins. Lord Den man. Lord Ebury. Sir Edward Elgar. Mr. George D. Faber, M.P. Mr. J. S. Fletcher, M.P. Mr. Ellis Griffith, M.P. Sir H. Rider Haggard. Mr. R. H. Horton-Smith. Major-General Sir Ivor Herbert, M.P. Mr. C. J. Cutcliffe Hyne. Mr. Austin Harrison. Sir Starr Jameson. Mr. William Kenrick. Sir John Kirk. Bishop of Landaff. Earl of Lonsdale. General Sir George Luck. Sir Claude Macdonald. Earl of Mexborcugh. Sir Frederick Milner. Sir Alfred Mond. M.P. Sir Leo Chiozza Money, M.P. lord Northcliffe. Mr. Basil F. Peto, M.P. Sir Arthur Pinero. Sir William Ramsay. Sir Alfred Scott-Gatty. Sir Cecil Clementi-Smith. Sir William Treloar. Mr. Josiah S. Wedgwood, M.P. Bishop Welldon. Colonel W. Cornwallis West. L«rd Willoughby de Broke. Mr. Robert Yerburgh, M.P.

CUN FACTORY AT JAFFA DESTROYED I

CUN FACTORY AT JAFFA DESTROYED. Paris, Saturday.—A communique from the Ministry of Marine says: On Thursday, after having given the Turkish Governor adequate notice, so that the neighbourhood might he evacuated, a French cruiser destroyed by gunfire the principal buildiug of a German factory at Jaffa which was turning out arms and munitions, and also boats destined for an I attack on the Suez Canal. The adjoining houses were unijured.—Iieuter.

PORTKCAWL BATHERS ESCAPE I

PORTKCAWL BATHER'S ESCAPE. I Miss E. M. Jones, of Llwynhelig, IJin- shen, near Cardiff, who has been staying I for a holiday at Caerleon Cottage, New- ,road, Porthcawl, had a narrow escape from drowning oa Saturday. Whilst bathing near the Black Rocks, Miss Jones got into difficulties, owing to the strong current. She, however, managed to keep herself afloat and shouted for assistance. A gentleman who was also bathing near by went to her aid, and he, assisted by several others, managed, after great difficultv, to bring her ashore. After receiving first aid she rallied and was able to walk home.

I THE CHIR FATAlITY THE CHIRK FA7ADIY

I THE CHIR FATAlITY THE CHIRK FA7ADIY Discovery of Body Solves North Wales Mystery. The mystery surrounding the death o. Miss Lucy Knollys, the niece of Loroj Knollys, was solved on Saturday aftef noon, when a diver recovered her ho(ii from the lake ac Chirk Castle, one of tM seats of Lord Hnwa rd dA Wald"n. Tl? body had been in the water since Tuel day. Miss Knollys disappeared while hathin with two othor ladits-her sister, MrfU Noel van Raalte, a £ id a Miss Gibso Attempts to recover the body by Jllea of grappling irolis and nets from a neigh* bouring fish hatchery were ineffective, and partly, no doubt, as a result of the lengtqj of time which elapsed between the acci* dent and the finding of the body extr8: ordinary rumours gained currency as to her disappearance. The knowledge that Miss Knollys hA been working as a ch-eck-weighmaij (8t at local colliery, and the forms which heft unconventionality took, were used to len colour to these unfounded titles. Her appearance was remarkable, for shéi wore her hair cut short and parted at the; side, and a short skirt was the only toucll) of femininity in her costume, which in eluded a cap or man's straw hat, a collar and tie over a man's shirt, and a jacket and waistcoat. Deceased Lady's Career. Miss Knollys had voluntarily separated herself from the life most girls of her age and position would have chosen, and she lived on friendly terms with the vil. lagers of Chirk. For several years she had been organist at the church, receiving a salary of A:35 a year. At the services she wore a sur- plice, but no hut. On the day of her disappearance Mistf KuoHys? luggage was packed ready for hedj departure to Scotland, where she had' obtained a post as organist. She went at noon for a final bathe in the Castle lake- a large and deep sheet of water which is associated with many local legends. The spring water flfwin, irito the laka was in- tensely cold, and Miss Knollys probably was seized with heart failure off cramp, causing her suddenly to sink. When other methods to find the body failed, a diver named Low son, was brought from Liverpool to search the lake. Shortly after four o'clock on Saturday afternoon his efforts, were successful. The body, it is said, rested at the bottom of the lake by the side of the remains of Offa's Dyke —the old earth works running through tluji, lake which in former times divided Saxon territory from that of the hillmen of Wales. The inquest is arranged for to-day.

IINVISIBLE SUBMARINES

INVISIBLE SUBMARINES American Inventor's Use of Mirrors. New York.—Jules Verne and Mr. H. G. Wells have a practical rival in Mr. Patrick Keenan, of Denver, Colerado, who has recently made application for a patejit of an invention which- he believes will make submarines completely in. visible when on the surface of the water. The inventor's plan is to cover the portion of the submarine which appears above the surface with a mirror which. will reflect only the water beneath it, and at a distance of a few yards will give the appearance of virgin sea. Mr. Keeaan in one of his initial expert ments erected, in the middle ot a Colerado lake, a largo mirror, inclined to reflect I the water. From the shore, one hundred yards distant, the effect, it is stated, was that of an unbroken surface. Nothing could be seen of the mirror or what was behind it. Mr. Keenan applies his inTention to the periscope by clothing it in a. glass tube, silvered inside, forming a mirror, which, .renders the whole invisible. ] f it is de- sired the decks can be similarly clad in. silvered plate glass; and the submarine on the surface would be invisible at a far shorter distance than the range of tho modern torpedo. By giving large mirrors a downward tilt llh. Keenan believes they may be used to reflect the surface in front, of them and to conceal effectively new-made fortifica- tions behind. Unless properly tilted, however, they would reflect the sun and reveal the presence of the battery to ob, servers for miles around.

No title

Over 60 Capetown Association, foot, ibaHers have enlisted in the past week. says Renter. I Whatever mig-ht be th-3 result of the war, eaid Lord George Hamilton a Roma- gate on Saturday, it would be admitted that British women had shown tbomeelvea splendid nurses. Saturday marked the close of the herring fishing season on the north-east coa«t of Scotia ad, but ai) effort is being mode to get Admiralty permission to extend the seamen for another wk Printed and Published for the -Swanaes Pi-ess, Limited, by ARTHUR PARNEL& UlGHAM, at Leader Buildings. Swansea

Advertising

————————————————————————————— = ———— = = s .-———————  To-day, To-morrow & Wednesday, L 0 N E I N  N DO N To-day, To-morrow & Wednesday, |ALONE IN LONDON. HOUSE.