Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 6 Next Last
Full Screen
38 articles on this page
Advertising

I I The Cambria Daily Leader gives later news than any paper published in this dis- trict. i

Advertising

The London Office of th. "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor), where adver- tisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel. 2276 Central.

ilON TO STANISLAU

il ON TO STANISLAU AUSTRIANS BLOW UP BRIDGES IN THEIR RETREAT I ENEMY'S ADMISSIONS The Russians are two miles from Stan- islau, and arc now probably on the eve of the decisive battle for that place. Only the course of the Bystrzyca separates the two armies, and the enemy has taken up his position along the western bank for 2u miles south of Stanislau in preparation for the coming battle. stanislau occupies the same position in the south in relation to Lemberg as Kovel does in the north, being the chief strate- gical centre on this part of the front. Fif- teen miles beyond it is the big bridge over the Dniester at llalicz, which gives access to the rear of Hot Timer's army, and which the Austrians destroyed two years ago in their retreat before the first Russian on- slaught. Already the Austrians have iJ- —up all tho hl j tne Bystrzyca in anti- cipation of the Russian attack, and Gen- eral Lechitsky's troops have taken posses- sion of the subsidiary junction of Chry- plin, just outside Stanislau, which con- trols all the three railways approaching it from the east. In order to conform to the retreat south of the Dniester the enemy has had to fall back five miles on the north to the Zlota Lipa, a strong line of defence, on which the Russians made a stand against the Galician advance last year. RUSSIA'S GAS SHELLS. ENEMY TASTES HIS OWN MEDICINE. Petrograd, Wednesday.—As the official reports show, a bombardment with chemi- cal shells preceded the assaults of General Lechitsky's infantry in the move on Stan- islau. The application of these diabolical contrivances by the Russians is only an- other example of the enemy's being hoist -with his own petard. Since his employ- ment of these shells in last year's offen- sive, the Russians have studied the pro- cess of manufacture, in which they were greatly helped by General Dymsha, who perished last winter in a railway accident while returning from the inspection of a factory. Fortunately, his work had al- ready been accomplished, and the Austro- Germans have now had a foretaste of its quality, for which they were evidently wholly unprepared. All accounts te-stify; tÆ the terrific effect of these shells, w hose I mephitic emanations speedily over- whelmed the enemy's gunners and enor- mously facilitated the subsequent task of the infantry. It is still, of course, early to speak of the complete envelopment ? Ho tinner's right flank, since the Dniester continiits, to afford his army a strong natural point d appui. Nevertheless, the further exten- sion of our advantage in conjunction with the advance south of Brody must intensify the enemy's anxiety for the safety of Leni- j berg, and counsel a further retirement. Apparently the Austriars regarded the forcing of the Sereth line by General Sakharoff as an impossible feat: hut they made no allowance for the quality of the Russian soldier. GERMANY'S ADMISSION. Thursday.—Hindenburg's Front.—South of Smorgon there was vigorous firing and patrol activity. Repeated Russian attacks were bloodily repulsed at the Struma, near Dubezycze, on the Stokhod, near Lubies- zow Berezycze, at SmoJavy Czareeze, and near Witoniez. At Czarecze by a counter- attack we captured two officers and 340 men. Enterprises of small cn my detach- ments, and a surprise attempt in the Stokhod bend, east of Kovel, were unsuc- cessful. South of Zalocze early this morning fresh lighting developed on the front of Arch- duke Karl Franz Josef. South of Selos- niow strong Russian attacks were partly repulsed by our counter-attacks. Hers and also south of the Dniester new posi- tions have been occupied by our troops according to plail.-Prf.,ss Association. j THE AUSTRIAN REPORT. Amsterdam, Thursday received Friday). —The following communique was issued in Vienna to-day:-The front of the Arch- duke Charles Joseph's Austro-Hungarian l troops repulsed a Russian attack on the heights south of Zubic with heavy enemy losses- The army of General Koivess was in touch with the enemy yesterday in the region of Delatyn, north of Nizpiom. The Russians again made vain attacks, and were everywhere after hand-to-hand fight- ing repulsed. Hindenburg Front.—South of Zalocze new battles have began since early morn- ing. West and north-west of Lutzk the enemy was less active after his heavy failures of 8th August, but he attacked day and night north of the railway to Kovel over the Stokhod. His storming columns for the most part collapsed in front of our en- tanglements, and lie suffered generally heavy defeats. The Russian losses were again very great.—Press Association. j ——————————

TRADE OF SWANSEA I I

TRADE OF SWANSEA. Last Month's Returns. The trade of Swansea port has been fairly satisfactory during the last month. According to the Harbour Trust figures, the total imports and exports amounted to 517,607 tons in July, against 497,375 the corresponding month of last year. The imports were 73,945 against 86;899 and the exports 443,662 against 410,476 in July of last year. Grain imports increased 2,994 tone, and there were increases in zinc ore and alloys, pitwood. Iron ore decreased 3,277 tons, and iron, steel and pig-iron and i castings decreased 3,780 tons. The export of coal increased 25,214 tons, patent fuel 4,555 tons, tin, terne and black plates, 5,997 tons. The revenue for the past six months was 9162.7,26 against E151,730 during the same period last year, and the expendi- ture 2179,756 against 9170,7M.

BLIND HEROS MARRIAGE I

BLIND HERO'S MARRIAGE. I A romantic wedding took place at II Grimsby on Thursday, the bridegroom j] being Sergeant John Fred Leeman, D.C.M., il Lincolnshire Regiment, and the bride Miss ] Miriam Moody, only daughter of the Rev. |4 -Atiriam -"qo 11 I Joseph Moody, missioner of the Welcome HAJI.  Leeman was a member of the Original i Expeditionary Force. He ha? been thrice 1 wounded and six times mentioned in di,, j patches. He w? awarded the D.C.M. for |{ gaUantiy holding a trench for nearly four j hours against a superior force of Germans t until help arrived. 1 A German bullet which entered t-hoside g of his head destroyed the sight of both I eyes. He has been trained at St. Dun- i stan's. and he and his wife are to com- mence their career unon a uoultry farm. j

GAlr ON THE SOMrE I

GAlr. ON THE SOMrE I 'ALLIES' OPERATIONS HINDERED I BY BAD WEATHER BRI fiSH OFFICIAL. Thursday, 9.40 p.m. The position is unchanged along the whole British front. Some parties of the enemy, advancing against our lines south of Martmpuioii, were effectively dealt with by our trench mortars and machine-guns, and no hostile attack developed. Oul- aeroplanes continued bombing operations against the enemy's billets and other points of military importance. In the course of many aerial combats yester- day several enemy machines were driven j down in hostile territory, and three of jours have not returned. I FRENCH OFFICIAL. PARIS, Thursday, 11.0 p.m. 1o the north of the Somine and in the region of Thiaumont W ork thi day bu t- ho"'n -aim over the whole front. Bad weather continues to handicap operations. THE BRITISH METHOD. Paris, Thursday (received Friday)—The export French commentator, writing to- night, Fays :-Calm prevails on our front. The pause noted in the operations would be sufficiently explained after the great days of effort, but another cause is the state of the weather, which is very un- favourable for observing the effects of [shots. Only unimportant operations have therefore been reported on the Somme since yesterday. The Britsh continued to extend their slow and prudent advance on the Pozieres plateau, and now hold all the positions necessary for their further progress, but it is first necessary for them to consoli- date their conquests before preparing new attacks. On their side, in their sector, the French troops continued their methodical pro- gress north of Hem Wood, and repulsed south of the river a hostile detachment, which, using liquid flames, was attempt- ing to approach our lines near Verman- dovillers. Before Verdun there was no infantry action. On the rest of the front the guns were busy, and showed particular activity on I the Somme, and on the right bank of the M,e,uee.-Pre,ss Association War Special. BELGIAN OFFICIAL. Havre, Thursday (received Friday).— This evening's Belgian communique says: The German artillery has been active at several points. Our batteries carried out a. successful destructive fire in the Ste-en-I. straet sector and further south.

MORE SHIPS SUNK I

MORE SHIPS SUNK. Lloyds Dembris telegram says the Spt.n- j ish steamer Dalkodorta was torpedoed ye&' terday. An unconfirmed report s

CHANNEL TRADER SUNK

CHANNEL TRADER SUNK. The British steamer Sphere, bound from Ilontleur for Newport, Mon., is stated to have been sunk by a German submarine on August 3. The Sphere was of 740 ton?. built in 1902, and owned by Air. Wo, Rob-j erteon. According to an unconfirmed report. the Spanish steamer Gane Kogorta Mendi ha,s been sunk. She is a vessel of 3,061 tons, built in 1908, and managed by the Sota y Aznar.

WELSH PITHEAD FIREI

WELSH PITHEAD FIRE. A fire occurred at the Treharris pithead on Thursday, and as a consequence the winding-rope snapped and a cage of coal fell to the bottom of the shaft. Three; hundred and fifty minNs on the night shift were below when the fire occurred, but all were safely brought up. Three thousand miners were idle on Thursday owing to the interruption to the winding gear. The damage by fire is considerable. I

MR GINNELLS APPEAL I

MR. GINNELLS APPEAL. Mr. Ginnell's appeal against the fine of £ 100 imposed upon him for obtaininf entry to Knutsford Military Detention Barracks hy false representation, was again men- tioned at Bow-street, on Friday. Sir John Dickinson ordered Mr. Ginnell' to enter into his own recognisances in 5:80 and to find two sureties in t40 to prosecute: the appeal and comply with any order as to costs. The sureties were forthcoming.

MINERS AND SOLDIERS I

MINERS AND SOLDIERS. Scottish miners met in conference in Edinburgh on Thursday, under the presi- dencyof jJr. Robert Smillie, who, review- ing the position, said it was a scandal that grandparents of ooldiers should be starv- ing on inadequate old-age pensions. He described the employment of soldiers in civil industry as industrial compulsion, and announced that the miners would never submit to soldiers working in the mines as soldiers.

AUSTRIAS PEACE CALL I

AUSTRIA'S PEACE CALL. I Amsterdam, Thursday.—The news of the fall of Gorizia produced in Vienna a feel- ing less of panic than of indignation. De- spite the papers' very guarded comments, the public quickly discovered that the town had fallen, leaving an enormous quantity of booty in the hands of the Italians. The Archduke Joseph, in command, will in all probability be recalled shortly. Austro-Hungarians are now starting- an agitation, which is secretly encouraged by the Government, in favour of a separate peace.— Exchange.

MR FREDERIC VILLIERS I

MR. FREDERIC VILLIERS. I Mr. Frederic Villiers, who has just lost tiis wife, began his career as a war artist in the Balkans forty years ago. He was tvith Skobelefr (for whom his admiration is unbounded) at Plevna; had a narrow escape in the broken square at Tamai; saw the fall of Port Arthur; and experi- j mented with a cinematograph camera in :he Turco-Greek war. A quaint little sil- rer bell that goes with him everywhere as i mascot is one of the Bells of Manda. ay." A pair of field-glasses, a pencil, and! i pad that fit-, in the palm of his hand are lis tools." He snatches away the cur-j, ;ain or the blod of turf that covers the' oophole, takes a hurried but careful fiance, makes half-a-dozen strokes on his Jad, and crushes the used scrap of paper j nto his pocket. When. he has leisure he ?otrks up from thirty or forty of thete j n

BRITISH MONEY I Pnpro

BRITISH MONEY Pnpro mr. Mc?mCWES IVHi. ';Cd:\L.iï" LDV Wu?E?L FIGURES- i -? t OUR CREDIT UNSHAKEN In the House of Commons on Thursday Mr. McKeuna gave a highly interesting and encouraging account of our financial position after two years of war. He went further, and submitted a balance-sheet for the end of the financial year on the assumption that the war continued until March 31 next. His estimate worked out as follows:— £ Total Indebtedness 3,44-0,000,000 a to -Allies and 800,000,000 jet 2,(540,000,000 National Income, aljout 2,500,000,000 Or, perhaps 2,600,000,000 Capital Wealth 15,000,000,000 Mr. MLeKenna gave a batch of other figures to show how the war had been financed during the first fotir months of the financial year. They may be sum- marised as follows:— £ Treasury Bills, increased by 275,000,000 Exchequer Bonds 154,000,000 War Expenditure Certificates 16,000,000 War Savings Certificates 13,750,000 Paid Off 46,000,000 of 3 mos. securities. Received in Actual Revenue. 100,000,000 THE NEXT LOAN. The Chancellor of the Exchequer claimed that, with a true appreciation of the facts of the case, we had been financ- ing ourselves almost exclusively out of yearly bilLs. If he had not asked the public to subscribe to a large loan for over a year, there were public reasons for it; He was unable to say when he was likely to issue another loan, but whenever the opportunity was favourable he would do so without hesitation. In an illuminating passage on the task of financing our foreign supplies, Mr. McKenna stated that we had to pay day by day sums abroad which were certainly more than £ 1,000,000, and probably nearer £ 2,000,000. As to the raising of the Bank rate to 6 per cent., the Governor of the Bank of England spoke to him about it in advance, and he approved of his action. The Government had felt it necessary to secure itself partly against inflation, but much more against the drain upon its dollar fund abroad. Members were obviously gratified to hear that this country Was in the fortunate position of being able to borrow abroad at a cheaper rate than any of the other belligerent Powers. FIVE TIMES MORE TO SPEND. After submitting his estimates of national income and indebtedness, IVJr. McKenna observed that they would be just about equal at the end of March. "That," he added, is not a burden intolerable to contemplate." He calculated that our national indebetedness would he less than one-sixth of the total national wealth. Tiley would collect revenue in one year equal to 20 per cent. of the whole debt. Further, tbey would be able to ,pay out of existing taxation the interest on the debt and a considerable sinking fund. and they would still have left a large margin for reduction of taxation. Mr. McKenna ended his speech by declaring that there was every reason to he proud of the manner in which British credit had stood the strain, and that he had not the least doubt that we should be able to maintain our credit to the end of the war, no matter how long it might last.

NO PASSPORTS AT PRESENT

NO PASSPORTS AT PRESENT. In the House of Commons on Thursday, Mr. Ponsonby asked on what grounds the Hon. Bertrand Russell, lecturer on phil- osophy at Harvard, had been refused a passport to enable him to return to the United States. Lord R. Cecil said the Government did not consider it was in the public intereet to grant Mr. Russell a passport at the present time. No application had been received by him. He saw no prospect of the Government reversing their decision. (Cheers.)

CADORNAS BATTLE CRY I

CADORNA'S BATTLE CRY. I "You must march like an impetuous, overwhelming avalanche; nothing ought to stop you. "You must pass the first, second, and third line of the enemy's lines. .nv' l i np,,q. "You must traverse the whole field of battle and rush upon the last, hostile re- serves, and there, to the shout of ( Avanti Iblia" there, even in the last struggle, decisive victory will smile upon you, joy- ful at having accomplished your duty to your King and Country."—Gen. Cadorna's order to his troops before the advance on Gorizia.

OFF TO ELEPHANT ISLAND I

OFF TO ELEPHANT ISLAND. Having been thoroughly overhauled at Yonport Dockyard the Antarctic relief ship Discovery left Ply mouth on Thurs- day evening for Port Stanley, Falkland Islands, where she will pick up Sir Er- nest Shackleton and partv. and then pro- ceed to Elephant Island to make the fourth attempt to rescue the twenty-two members of the ShaekJefcni Expedition marooned there. The Discovery is the vessel in which Sir Ernest accompanied Captain Scott on his first Antarctic ex- pedition. She was specially built for that expedition. Her captain, Lieuten-. ant-Commander James Fairwpather. has every confidence in the Discovery's suc- cess in combating the pack ice about Elephant Island-

KITCHENERS FAVOURITES I

KITCHENER'S FAVOURITES. I A correspondent writes to a South Afri- can newspaper, the East London Dis- patch It may he of interest to clergymen who are arranging memorial services for the late Lord Kitchener to know that a South African lady with whom he was on very friendly terms during the Anglo-Boer War (she was then a. girl) managed to persuade him to fill up a page in her c Book of Confsion8: One of the questions was, What arc your favourite hymns P' Opposite this he wrote as follows (and I give his answer exactly as he wrote jt) :-( 27 Abide with me; 373 God moves in a mysterious way; 428, The Saints of God, their conflicts past; 437, For all the saints who from their labours rest.' The numbers, of course refer to Hymns, Ancient and Modern: and it is perhaps typical of his unfailing grasp of detail that he should remember thein," Y

IRAILWAY SMASH I

I RAILWAY SMASH. I One Death Reported. A Bletchley correspondent telegraphing at 1.30 p.m. on Friday says:- When the whole of the 11.40 local train from Bletchley to the north was standing in Bletchley Station this morning, it was! run into by the 10.40 express from Euston to Liverpool. All four lines were blocked. One death is reported. [Bletchley is a railway junction in Buck- I inghamsliire, 47 miles north-west of Lon-. don. j

IBOMBS ON VENICE I

BOMBS ON VE-NICE. Austria Report of 3 Tons of Explosives. I Thursday's Austrian official contains; the f-ollowing The visit to Fiume of Italian fighting aeroplanes on 1st 4u;?ust was answered last night by a s?uadrcn of 21 ??eal)lttlies? with a visit to Venice, wh?re they ]Mlted with bombs the arsenal, the railway sta-? tion, and military establishments and, manufactories Three and a half tons of explosives were dropped with destructive results. A dozen fires were caused, of which two—one at a cotton manufactory and one in the town—assumed large pro- portions, and were visible ut a distance or 25 miles. He ivy anti-aircraft fire was without effect, and all the aeroplanes re- turned undamaged.—Press Association War Special

IORDER OF FORESTERS 1 II

I ORDER OF FORESTERS. 1 Consumptive IMembsrs and I Out of Door Work. CHELTENHAM, Friday. The High Court of the Order of Foresters sat again to-day at Cheltenham. The amendments to the laws of the Order were further considered. It was proposed from Cambridge that members suffering from tuberculosis who were in receipt of benefits might,, with the consent of the Court, do such open air work as might be prescribed by a quali-1 fied medical practitioner as part of their treatment. An addition was moved by Mr. Stephens (Plymouth), providing that in suc h cases benefit a i Iowa nee with money earned as wages should not exceed the normal income of the member. It was urged that this alteration would he most Ivenefieial in the interests of patients. Some delegates, however, warned the Order that care must lie taken to pre- vent such a scheme being used for sweat-, ing purposes. The resolution with the Plymouth addi-1 tion, was carried by a large majority. A long discussion followed on a motion I from the Executive Council that the in- coming Executve be authorised to make a call in the next quarterly report upon j each district and court out of district in i Great Britain and Ireland for the pay- ment of a levy to the High Court Districts and Courts Relief Fund of 2d. per benefit member contributing to the voluntary 1 funds. I Mr. W. S. Bennett (London) moved as an amendment that the levy should be raised to 4d. Mr. W. Marlow (London), in seconding, said that in his opinion the levy of ki. should be collected in payments of '2d. each.. Mr. Allbery (Brighton) remarked that it was easy to vote money for additional expenditure, but it was not so easy to obtain it. Mr. Morgan (South-Western ) remarked that the mon<\v had got to be found from Somewhere, a?d he believed it could be got. -==-

IBADLY DAMAGED ZEPPELIN

BADLY DAMAGED ZEPPELIN.) Amsterdam, Friday.—According to a dis- patch to the" T,Ipgrai-,f from the frontier, dated Thursday, it was stated on Wednesday evening that a heavily damaged Zeppelin had descended, in Bel- gium, moving west to east.

jGOLD OUTPUTr

GOLD OUTPUT. r A cablegram from the Transvaal! Chamber of Mines, Johannesburg, states that the total gold output of the mines of the Transvaal for July amounted to 701,087 ounces, of the value of £ 3,232,891. i In the corresponding month last year the figures were 770,355 ounces, of the value of £ 3,272,25S.

NATIONAL RELIEF FUNDI

NATIONAL RELIEF FUND. I The Prince of Wales Fund has now reached a total of £ 5,942,159. Of this sum! £ 3,443,250 has been allocated to date forj distribution for relief. The latest snb-j scriptions include: Further contribution from the Local Committee of the National Itelief Fvnd, Gateshead, £ 1,227; further contribution per the Mayor of West Hartlepool, S»i,000: further contributions, per the Mayor of Lancaster, £ 562-

SUGAR SUBSTITUTEDI

SUGAR SUBSTITUTED. I Communications have reached the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries re- ferring to a statement which has appeared in the public Pres& to the effect that ben- Kote of soda may lie used to replace sugar in thA preparation of jam. The Board are advised that benzoate of soda is quite unsuitable for the purpose in question, and desire to warn the pub-: lice against its use in jam-making. I Serious results might follow an attempti h substitute this material for sugar.

THE BATTLE OF KATIAI

THE BATTLE OF KATIA. British Wounded at Cairo. Cairo, Thursday (.received Friday).- I Our troops who have been fighting beyond the Suez Canal are in excellent spirits.! All traces of desert fatigue have disap- peared. Wounded British arrived at Cairo, and the proportion of seriously wounded in not high. In the battle our monitors did enormous execution among the Turks.—Reuter.

LOCAL WILLI

LOCAL WILL. I Mrs. Ann Thomas, 110. Hamilton-ter- race, Swansea, who died on December 11th last, and whose will, dated January 15th. 1907. is proved by E. John Guy Thomas, of 5, Richmond-terrace, Swansea, and Henry Joseph Spiers Thomas, of 110, Hamilton- terrace, engineers, the .sens. has left estate of the gross value of tl,101 ]Ss. 5d., with net personalty of £ 1,007 8s. The testatrix gives the fiiriiitiir- an(I domestic effects to her daughter, and the residue of the property between her children, E. John Guy Thomas, Henry Joseph Spiers Thomas, and Annie Maud Thomas, and her granddaughter, Gwendoline M. Davis.

HOW GORIZIA FELL

HOW GORIZIA FELL VICTORS FiND THOUSANDS OF SOLDIERS HiDiNii iN CAVtS AUSTRIA'S EXPLANATIONS Further details of the capture of Gorizia show that, the iirst troops to enter the town oa Wednesday morning crossed, the Isonzo by means of a ford, the bridges having 1-een blown up, awl marched tnrough the streets with the water dripping from their uniforms. Thousands of the inhabitants, who for weeks past had been hidden in underground rooms and cellars, came out to meet the troops, waving flags, and hand- kerchiefs and covering the men with flowers. Thousands of enemy soldiers were found hidden in caves and made prisoners. Depots of provisions and mu- nitions have been found almost intact, and several batteries of heavy guns have been captured. The bombardment of Gorizia caused the collapse of two palaces in which were quartered the staffs of two Austrian divi- sional commands. The bodies of a divi- sional commander and the members of his staii have been found under the ruins of one of the buildings. AUSTRIA EXPLAINS." Thursday's Austrian report says:—In view of the situation after the evacua- tion of the bridgehead of Gorizia, the town was abandoned. The change of our positions made necessary after the bloody repulse of new Italian attacks on the Doberdo plateau, was executed without in- terference by the enemy. In this region our troops have captured during the last few days 4,100 Italians. In the capture by the enemy of tho bridgehead of Gorizia six of our guns could not be saved. The strongest efforts of the Italians yes- terday were directed against the Plava section. After twelve hours' massed ar- tillery fire, the enemy infantry four times attacked Zagora and the heights east of Plava. Thrice all these assaults were broken by the strong resistance of our t'.ocpa, including detachments of infantry regiments 22 and 52, which again distin- guished themselves. On the Tvrolian front several hostile at- tacks failed, and on the Dolomites three attacks on our positions in the region of Pasubio were repulsed.—Press Associa- tion. DEMONSTRATION IN ROME. Rome, Thursday (received Friday).—A great procession, composed of thousands of citizens, including soldiers and Gari- baldian associations, assembled in the Prazza Colonna to-nighf and marched through the town singing and cheering for the King, the Army, General Cadorna, the Due D' Aosta, and the Italian victories. The first, call was made at Quirinal Palace, where a demonstration in honour of the King and Queen, Due D'Aosta and the House of Savoy was made. The C-on-sulta and the War Office were next visited, and cheers raised for the Minister. Finally, the procession halted at Margheiita Palace. The Queen Dowager appeared on the balcony.—Press Association. i_ OVER 15,000 PRISONERS. THE ITALIAN HAUL AT GORIZIA. Korne, J.hursday.—A telegram from the zone of war to the" Tribuna states that the number of prisoners counted at Gorizia already exceeds 15,000. Cavalry and cyclists are clearing the valley or retreating Aus- trians.

BAVARIA AND SUBMARINES I

BAVARIA AND SUBMARINES. I Amsterdam, Thursday—The Bavarian Parliamentary Catholic Party explains ital attitude regarding submarine warfare, stating that England in the arch enemy of Germany In Bavaria the tendency in favour of ruthless submarine war against England is very strong.—Reuter.

DANISH WEST INDIES I

DANISH WEST INDIES. Copenhagen, Thursday.—It is now understood that a majority of the parties oi the Left are opposed to the sa le of the Danish West Indies to the United States, and the Congervatives are also not in favour of the measure. The Government it is suggested, may po&sibly dissolve the Rigsdag and hold new elections. Many Press organs of all shades of opinion are protesting against the sale.

GALLANT FRENCH VETERAN I

GALLANT FRENCH VETERAN. I Paris, Thursday.—Sergt.-Major Cesar Michel, of the Military Train, has just been mentioned in Army Orders for gal- lant conduct under fire and saving the greater portion of his wagons under a heavy bombardment. He has been awar- ded v the Military Medal and Military Cross. He already wears the Commemo- rative Medal of the 1870 War, in which he fought, for Sergt.-Major Michel is 71. He enlisted at 69 as a private at the outbreak of the war, and won his stripes at tho front.

HEARTS OF OAK SOCIETY I

HEARTS OF OAK SOCIETY. The third session of the adjourned annual meeting of delegates of the Hearts of Oak Benefit Society was held at the Hearts of Oak Buildings. Euston-road, London, on Thursday, Mr. J. C. Tayler (Oxford) presiding over an attendance of 205 delegates and trustees. Before proceeding to thp Business of the meeting the vice-president stated he re- gietted to announce that the president of the society, Mr. J. T. Snaekman, was still I in a very critical condition. On the motion of Mr. G. Dew (Brix- ton), seconded by Mr. G. Ben6ten (B I -I tol), and supported by a number of the delegates, the board, by a large majority, decided to c-ontinue the publication of the Hearts of O..t Journal-

ITALYS TRADE WARI

ITALY'S TRADE WAR. I Rome, Thursday.—The Official Gazette" publishes a decree prohibiting Italian citizens, including those resident abroad, and all persons living in Italy or her colonies, from trading, first, with persons, institutions, or companies estab- lished in enemy territory, or territory occupied by the enemies of Italy, or the allies of enemy States; 6econd, with sub- jects of the above-mentiond States, wher- ever they may reside; third, with persons, commercial firms, or companies whose names appear on a speciaTTTst. Another decree, also appearing in to- day's Official Gazette," places under the] control of the Government for their even- tual liquidation all commercial enter- prises existing in the kingdom whose man- agers or chief shareholders are subjects of States enemies of Italy, or allies of enemy State6.-Reuter. t;

I TODAYS WAR RESUME

TO-DAYS WAR RESUME — 'Leader" Office. 4.50 p.rn The number of prisoners taken by the Italians at Gorizia exceeds 15,000. Cav- alry and cyclists are clearing the valley. An Austrian official report admits the low of Gorizia as a withdrawal "made neces. sary after the bloody fttptttee oi Italian attacks." j The Austrians claim to hava dropped .1 tons of explosives on Venice, and to have caused a dozen fires. According to Mr. McKenna, by the end of March next our national indebtedness would ty less than on-sixth of the total national wealth. The Russians are within two miles of Stanislau. General Lechitsky'g troops have taken the junction of Chryplin, just outside Stanislau. According to a Turkish report, the Romani battle was a tiefeat-for the British! Yesterday a calmer atmosphere ruled on the Somme front, though the French made some progrecs6 in the region of Hem Wood.

TODAYS HEWS IN BRIEF

TO-DAY'S HEWS IN BRIEF Field-Marshal von Hindenburg arrived at Lemberg on August -3 and left the same day. Melbourne, Friday.—The Victorian Wheat Board has raised the export price of wheat to 5s. The quotation for the East is still 4s. 9d. Petrograd, Thursday (received Friday). —The Mayor of Moscow says;—Russia holds it to be her duty to put in execution all the measures Great Britain contem- plates against Germany. According to the Amsterdam Tele- graaf," the crew of a Heyst fishing vessel which had been brought to Zeebrugge by the Germans are now interned at Senne Camp. Melbourne, Friday.—The Catholic news- paper states that Mr. Mahon, Minister of External Affairs, was authorised whea visiting Great Britain to represent thø. United Iricli League of Victoria in con- nection with the Home Rule crisis.— Reuter. The Secretary of State for India has ap- pointed Messrs. Frederick John de Souza, Abdul Rahim, and Reginald Charles Bon- naud to be assistant engineers in the Indian Public Works and State Railway Departments. A decree has been issuoo in Spain in re- gard to the recent railway strike, provid- ing for the settlement of disputes by arbi- tration and obliging the companies officially to recognise the men's trade unions and associations. The Copenhagen Extrablad an- nounces from Vadre, Jutland, that the body of a British sailor has been washed ashore on Graprnp beach. A metal name plate is inscribed H. Fromm, and th^ uni- form has a red band with a white anchor on the left arm. At a meeting of the committee of the German Federal Council for Foreign Affairs which took place on Tuesday after- noon and Wednesday morning, the Im- perial Chancellor gave an exhaustive ex- planation of the imlitical situation. The committee unanimousy approved the policy of the Chancellor. In order to promote the search for the two Polar Expeditions which sailed in 1912 under Lieutenant Brusiloff and M. Rousanoff respectively, the Archangel Society for the study of the Russian Far North is raising a fund of £3,500, which will be distributed in various sums as rewards for information procured as to the fate of the explorers. At the Chief Industrial Commissioner's offices in Old Palace Yard, Westminster, Sir George Askwith considered the claims of the London music hall employes for higher wages. The attendance numbered about 50, representing managers, atten- dants, ball-keepers, stage hands, etc., and the proceedings were private. An extraordinary Court-martial at Kiel, says a local Journal, has sentenoed a woman to a line for sending a picture postcard to her relatives in the interior of Germany showing several, warships which she described as having gone down in the battle of Jutand Bank. Another wonman was sentenced to fortnight's im- i prisonment. for having spoken of a "cer- tain incident" which occurred recently on board a warship at Kiel. The Central Control Board continue to acquire licensed premises in Carlisle, and have taken over 15 more hotels and inns, making a total of 37 taken over and six more permanently closed. The board have now purchased extensive premises for- merly used as a girls' school opposite Carlisle Cathedral for use as permanent head offices in Carlisle. As several young men exempted from military service have come before the Glasgow court recently on charges of drunkenness, the magistrates of the city have decided to instruct the Chief Con- stable to bring to the notice of the com- petent authorities all cases of oonvictions for drunkenness and other police offences by persons exempt from military service by reason of their holding badges and certificates.

MAIL BOATS FATE I

MAIL BOAT'S FATE. I Austria's Version of Sinking I of Letimbro. Amsterdam. Friday-A semi-official tele- gram from Vienna states with regard to the sinking of the Italian mail steamer Letimbro in tht Mediterranean, that after the attacking submarine had fired a warn- ing shot at a distance of 8,000 metres, the Letimbro opened fire from two guns mounted in her stern, and attempted to escape by zag-zagging. The submarine pursued her, replying to her fire without hitting the steamer, which had shown no flag. Later the Letinbro lowered five boats, and after it had been ascertained no one remained on board, the steamer was sunk. On approaching the boats, the sub- marine officers ascertained that out of 30 people in one boat 20 were in khaki, which (it is added) confirmed the suspicion of the submarine commander that he had to deal with a vessel with troops on board.— Pre&s Association.

GREECE AND THE ENTENTE I

GREECE AND THE ENTENTE.! I An Athens official note denies the I ment of anti-Venezeliet newspapers that I the Entente Powers have formi-tiated fresh demand s in order to ensure freedom I for the, forthcoming elections. The note l idds: The Government is proceeding nor- ii;i!!y with carrying out the terms of the Entente note of June 21st.—Renter I

Advertising

RUSSIAN OFFICIAL. 13,000 Prisoners. To-iJay V Russian official tper Wirekia horn Petrograd) save:— Fierce fighting is continuing on the Stokhod and on the Fiver Sereth, vlit. re our troops arc advancing as the result 01 fierce fighting. The enemy is making a desperate rc-, sistance alternately between defensive a.'lion and counter-attacks. The gallant troops of General Sak- lioioff by a series of repeated attacks, hove pus'ifi tlie enemy our of the vil- lage* and woods on tlie right bank of the river, and having reached the commaod- ing tbey are fighting before fh" »'iuage of Trofianec-Nesterolxe. On-. our cavalry regiments twice av- tad..r1 the enemy's infantry, and by a second attack on the flank on the deZlIle masses of the Germans, threw them into complete disorder. Tn this way their advance was stopped. In this region the gallant, troops of General Ekk took in the battle betwveen ■1th and 10th August, 263 officers and 13.000 rank and file prisoners, In audition to over 1.000 wounded, all Germans, were taken. This number includes two staff officer*, 1:J1 lieutenants, and 1.872 rank and tile (who were taken in one, day's ba'tle— lOch August). The lessee of the enemy, including killed aDd wounded, according to the eiatement. of prisoners, are enormoua. In the region of Monaetir our troops continue to advance. One of our in- fantry regiments broke into the eouthern part of the town of Mon a stir-Ik, where the fighting i ^continuing. Thf enemy, consisting mostly of Ger- raans. bunched countor-aHacks, wbicb vere ewrrwlKTe repelled by our troops. TO-DAY S OFFICIALS. This afternoon's Paris comiauiiiqtje and to-day's British official report appear on Page Five. < t