Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 4 of 4
Full Screen
27 articles on this page
Advertising

Gorseinon PouStry Keepers! Are you pouring your profits down your birds' throats or using I LIFO POULTRY MEAL and putting them in your pocket? lafo Poultry Meal is 25% cheaper than Juscuit meal and gives better results. Can be used Wet or Dry Mash. Use Lifo and make your poultry pay. Lifo costs 1/5 per 71b. bag, or 18/- per cwt. Sold by Swansea Corn Dealers and J. H. EVANS, High Street, Gorseinon. for EGG PRODUCTION use MOLASSINE I LAYING MEAL.

IOur Short Story

I Our Short Story. ONLY A CHORUS GIRL. BY j EMERIC HULME BEAMAN. 1 1,?i (Continued.) They both paused in the middle of the roonws the front door bell rang again. Miss JDelamere stepped quickly to the win- dow and drawing back the fringe of the curtain peeped out. My goodnees! she exclaimed, stepp- ing back, It's—it's my cousin! What on earth—" "Your cousin?" echoed Clarence. "I didn't know you had a cousin! A-a girl cousin ? No, oh no-a man. I haven't seen him for ages—Clarence, he--he had better not find you here—in my rooms—whatever are we to do? She glanced helplessly at him, then round the room, and made a gesture of despair. Say you're out—send him away! suggested the young man. I can't. It's too late, and the servant is already at the door. Besides—Oh, you must just hide somewhere—" Well, if you like, I'll—" he threw a swift glance round—" I'll go in there—" and he stepped towards the folding doors. Oh, good heavens, no! cried the girl, catching hie arm. That's my-my —You, mustn't go in there—Ah, the piano! Get behind the piano, and I'll move the screen a little so that you can't be seen—" With some difficulty Mr. Clarence de Courcy-Smith, who was tall and broad- shouldered, squeezed himself behind the screen and crouched down between the baok of the piano and the wall. I'm doing this to please you, remem- ber," he protested. It's beastly un- comfortably. Hang your confounded rousin-I believe you expected him all the time! Grace—did you expect the fel- low? Is that why you were so anxious to get rid of mh ?" he demanded with sudden suspicion. Don't be so stupid! Of course not. I never dreamt he was coming, I didn't even know he was in London—do put your head down! He is in the hall." "All right," grumbled Mr. Clarence, as his head disappeared beneath the top of the piano. Only for heaven's sake pack him off as quickly as possible. As quickly as possible, Grace!" I'll do my best," whispered back the girl, as the door opened, and the maid- servant in a voice of almost reverent awe, announced: "Lord Clareville,to see you, Miss!" Oh-show him in," said Miss Dela, mere,, with studied carelessness. A short, good-looking man of about 30 entered on the servant's heels, stood a moment till the door had closed on her, then turned to Miss Delamere with a shrug and a smile. "Well, Grace, what mad escapade is this ?" be began in a genial tone. We've been scouring the country for you. I only discovered yesterday that you had been singing in the chorus of the Frivolity for the last three weeks Of course we im- agined you still at Eastbourne. My father is very angry, I can assure you." I'm awfully sorry, Cvril," replied Miss Delamere, penitently. "But I got so sick De l amere, peni of the finishing school tha.t I and another girl ran off and came to London to try and get on the stage--jugt for fun, you know. You see if I've got to get a living somehow I thought I might as well get it on the stage as any other way-and I simply love acting Preposterous!" commented Lord Clare- rille. There's no occasion for you to earn your own living. And as for singing in a musical-comedy chorus—really Grace you should give a thought to your family sometimes!" Oh, it's all right, Cyril," she re- reassured him. Nobody knows in the least who I am-and as to that, there are lots of well-bred and quite nice girls in choruses. However, I—I think I shall probably give it up soon—" I Give it up! Of course you will-at once!" declared his Lordship. Your poor mother is staying with us now, and she is simply distracted about you. You must come back with me immediately to Glastonwick—" I don't think I can do that," objected Grace, considering. You see I must give them a fortnight's notice at the theatre or forfeit my salary-" Don't talk rubbish, my dear girl!" re- monstrated her cousin. How long will it take you to pack up? I'll wait," and he seated hipiself resolutely on the sofa. ) H Oh, no, no—you mustn't!" exclaimed Grace apprehensively. I shall take days to pack—days! Look here, Cyril, old boy, I'm awfully busy this afternoon—I've a new score to look through, and-and all sorts of other things, so if you don't mind going and looking in again to-morrow morning, I—" Certainly not," announced Lord Clare- vilte. I shan't stir from here without you. But," expostulated the girl, H that's M^iculous! I really. can't have you in here, Cyril. Supposing somebody were to come and find you in my rooms like this, "Khatever would they think? 0They would have no opportunity of linking anything," he informed her. They would learn the fact. Besides. I presume you are not expecting—callers ? No—oh, no. no. Not in the least. But I can't pack now and I'm not going to-b-o there. I'm frightfully busy." So am I," remarked Lord Clareville, leaning back. But I can wait. I pro- mised to bring you home with me and I intend to do so." You're too absurd," retorted Miss Delamere. You can't wait here all night, and I tell you I'm not coming home with you-at any rate till to-morrow." Lord Clareville eyed her resignedly. Why can't you be reasonable? he com- plained. You know perfectly well this must end—and the sooner the better." It's going to end," she declared, with sudden resolution. You may as well be told now as .any other time, Cyril. I'm engaged Engaged! Good Lord! ejaculated her cousin. What—to some wretched I out-at-elbow actor fellow, I suppose, who-great Heavens. who's that?" He stopped short to stare in utter b'-wil-dernsent at a head and shoulders that rose slowly up from behind the piano. i cc She's ENGAGED to mE\ BIT, if you want to know! exclaimed Mr. Clarence de C,ourcy-Smi,th wi-th digii-ty. And who the deuce are you, sir? in- quired Lord Clareville &neimg from one to the other for enlightenment. Oh, that's-th.a.t'3 Mr. de Courcy-r Smith," hastily interposed the gjrl. Clarence, why did you jump up tike that and spoil it all? I thought," replied the young man coolly, it was about time for me to inter- vene Ah," observed Lord ClaTeville duffy, U I begin to understand how frightfully busy you are, Grace, this afternoon. My visit was a—little ill-timed evidently! Not at all, Lord Clare," said Clareaiee, stepping gingery from behind the piano and replacing the screen. It's just as well that you did. Grace," he turned to the girl, why did you deceive me like this? Why didn't you tell me who you were ? He swung round to the vis- count. I had no idea that your cousin was anything bu.t a chorus-girl," he added. "I knew, of course, bharf; she was a lady, and I fell in love with her and asked her to marry me. She has consented. But now- he ended with a little gesture of doubt. Now — it makes no difference, Clarence," replied Grace, coming close to I him and laying her hand on his arm. You were willing to marry me as an obscure, penniless and unknown chorus-girl—surely, surely you won't re- fuse to marry me because I-I happen to be the niece of the Earl of Clanray ? Refuse!" The young man gave a short laugh. The question is—will you refuse? Mr. de Courcy-Smith," put in Lord Clareville good naturedly. I think I can answer for it that my cousin will not refuse the hand of an honourable gentle- man. I know you by name quite well. But, pardon me, is it not a little indis- creet to visit you fiancee in her rooms, and—and hide behind the piano when her relatives calj ? I—I put him there,' broke in Grace. I didn't want you to meet him here- it was all an accident; Clarence merely called to take me out to tea when you ar- rived and—" I quite understand. I quite appre- ciate your difficulty, Mr. de Courcy Smith, you know now who this young lady is—she is my cousin, Miss Silverdale, and the daughter of Lord Ernest Silverdale, younger brother of the late Earl of Glan- ray. Lord Ernest, as you know, died two years ago. Lady Ernest Silverdale Oh, my dear Cyril," broke in the girl impatiently, don't bore Mr. do Corcy Smith with your whole genealogical tree, please! Clarence, you asked me just now why I had deceived you. Well, I wanted to make sure first that you really cared enough about me to marry me even though I might be only a chorus-girl! I should have told you the truth to-day, because I wanted your father to—'to—" 'To give his consent to our engagement: put in Mr. Clarence as the girl hesitated in sudden embarrassment. It would have made no difference, Grace. if he had'nt. I should have married you just the same. I—" His sentence was interrupted by the violent turning of a door-handle, the fold- ing doors were suddenly flung open, and General de Courcy-Smith stepped into the room Great Scot!" muttered Clarence, star- ing at his parent in amazement. The governor 1" "Good lord, here's another of them!" murmured Lord Clareville helplessly. .C Really, Grace, you-" Ha!" cried the General, glaring at his son. So I'm a fossilised mule, am I? A fossilised mule. eh? A mule, sir!" Mad!" murmured Lord Clareville Evidently mad." "Really, sir, I—I'm most frightfully aorry," stammered Clarence, colouring. But I didn't know you were in there- how could I know? And, by the bye, sir, what on earth were you doing—in there V' Don't question me, you insufferable puppy," retorted the General angrily, but apologise for your language!" I have apologised, sir," replied the young man calmly. And I really think that I—that we—are entitled to some sort of explanation, sir." Please let me give it," interposed Grace, anxious to conciliate the old officer. Perhaps," interrupted Lord Clare- ville mildly, you will introduce me?" Oh, General de Courcy-Smith, this is my cousin, Lord Clareville," said Grace hurriedly. Cyril, this is General de Courcy-Smith, Clarence's father, and-I hope—my future father-in-law too 1" she added, with a timid smile at the General, who bowed to the viscount. I am very glad to make your ac- quaintance, General de Courcy-Smith," said Lord Clareville politely,"—though the circumstances of our meeting are a little—unusual.' I believe you know my father ?" Certainly, we served in the same regiment—long ago," replied the General. I am glad to meet his son. I had no idea of course that this—this young lady was Miss Silverdale. You have played a trick on us.- Miss Silverdale," he added, re- covering his good humour, and bowing to Grace with a curtly 6mile, and there- fore I do not think you deserve any apology for anything that may have been said in the course of our—our little- conversation. Frankly, Lord Clareville, I called this afternoon to try and persuade Miss Silverdale to release my son from thair engagement. While we were talk- ing it over, Clarence happened to call. I aid not wish him to find me here and 60-" The General paused with an ex- pressive shrug, and pointed to the fold- ing doors. Yes," said Grace, and when you called, too, Cyril, I had to hide Clarence in the only available place,which chanced to be behind the piano. And now you all know all about it! I have only to add," put in the Gen- eral, that if you are still determined to marry this worthless son of mine, Miss Silverdale, and your family have no ob- jection to the match-" There could be no possible objection, General," Lord Clareville assured him, courteously. I "Then both Clarence "and myself will feel greatly honoured by the alliance! concluded the General, with old-fashioned gallantry. But believe me," said Clarence, taking Grace's hand, and turning to his father and Lord Clareville with a confident emile I should have married her all the same if she had really been only a chorus girl! (The End.)

No title

Six months after receiving official noti- fication of the death of his son, Mr. W. Scott, Old Dover-road, Canterbury, has had a letter from him saying he is a prisoner and in good health. Charged with murdering Bobt. Preston, a IC,-yc-.ars-old bugler in his regiment, Fredk. Bur., a Scottish soldier, y&H s^nt for trial at Richmond (Yorks). Atldressingi a large meeting of nurses at GJaóow under the auspic44 if the College of Nursing, the Hon. Arthur Stanley, M.P., eai-1 they sought to promote the State re- gistration of nurses.

Advertising

STUD E BAKER] 15 CWT. ItFXrVEgY VAN 11 I PRtCE f-270 COMPLETE. STVOEBAKER, LTD., I 117-1X3, Croat Portland Street, London, W j

I SWANSEAI

I SWANSEA. I A visitor to Oxwich on Monday caught 90 large roach in thirty-five minutes. Private Percy Freedman, who was re- cently wounded in the thigh, is now at his home in Carmarthen-road, Swansea, on sick leave. Private Tom Morgan, who was in- valided home from France and who spent some time in a Devonport Hospital, is new at his home in Lewin's Hill, Mumbles, recuperating. Pte. Morgan was formerly a member of the foundry staff of the "Cambria Daily Leader." Several hundred lads of the Mount Pleasant district joined the Colours when war broke out, and of late large numbers have been granted short leave to visit their homes. The latest arrival is Seaman William Ace, of Norfolk- street. He has been on active service in the North Sea. A social was hold at the Rhyddings Congregational Sunday School on Thurs- day. The promoters were Miss Annie Davies and Miss Smith. Mrs. Syraons and Mrs. Rhys (the pastor's wife) were guests. A large number of the senior scholars were present. After tea games were indulged in, and a very enjoyable time was spent. At a meeting of the Swansea and Dis- trict Co-operative Society, Ltd., the fol- lowing resolution was passed:—" That this meeting of Swansea and District co- operators, representing 3,000 members, enters its emphatic protest against the continued exploitation of the people in the high prices of food, and calls upon the Government to expedite the work of the Royal Commission on Food Prices."

I ENDY

I ENDY. I Great indignation prevails here over certain cases of exemption, and there is talk of holding protest meetings.

I GROVESEND I

GROVESEND. A mining class has been successfully in- augurated in the village. The teacher is Mr. David Mainwaring, M.E., under manager of the Grovesend pits.

ILLANELLYI

I LLANELLY. I A labourer named John u uea, against whom six previous convictions were re- ported, was fined 15s. at Llaelly Police Court on Thursday for drunkenness.

I PEMBROKE I

PEMBROKE. Whether Pembroke fair will be held or not is still undecided. The Market Com- mittee decided to hold the fair, but a communication has since been received from the Chief Constable of the county, strongly deprecating the holding of the fair, and stating that all lights would have to be out by 6 p.m. The Market Committee have now decided to commu- nicate with the showmen on the matter, and to hold another meeting when the replies have been received.

I GORSEINOF5 I

I GORSEINOF5. A concert recital was given at the Primitive Methodist Church, Gwali-or- street. Gorseinon, on Thursday evening by Miss Hetta Richards, assisted by Miss Woodman. The programme presented proved that as an elocutionist, contralto vocalist and pianist she was equally effi- cient. The pastor, the Rev. W. H. Tay- lor, presided, and there can be no doubt that the success of the cause in Gorseinon is due to his initiative and enterprise on the social side of Christianity. The pro- ceeds were in aid of the chapel funds.

I MUMBLES I

I MUMBLES. A large number of wounded soldiers from the various w^r hospitals in the dis- trict were among the visitors to Caswell Bay on Thursday. They were conveyed thither by motor-cyclists, and all thoroughly enjoyed the outing. The consecration. services in connection with the re-opening of Oystermouth Parish Church were continued on 'Thursday, when Canon Watkins Jones, M.A., Vicar of Christ Church, Swansea, preached to a 4arge congregation. In the afternoon an organ recital was given by Mr. Milton Bill, formerly organist at Trinity Church, Swansea, but now a well-known organist I in London.

IPEMBROKE DOCK I

I PEMBROKE DOCK. The question of the unsatisfactory terry service between Pembroke Dock and Ney- land was discussed at some length at the monthly meeting of the Pembroke Town Council. The matter was raised by Coun- cillor W. G. Lloyd, who thought that the County Council should be urged to take up the matter with a view to getting the ferry municipalised, and proposed the ap-, pointment of a sijiall committee to go into the question. A committee was appointed, consisting of the local County Councillors and representatives of the Town Council, who were asked to go fully into the pos- sibilities of municipalising the ferry and to co-operate with the Neyland Urban Council in the matter.

I I I 1

I I ? -1 A pleasant social garnering was neici a-u the Welsh Weslevan Church, to welcome the Rev, H. R. Owen, the new resident minister, and Mrs. Owens, to their new sphere of work. The Rev. gentleman hails from Llandvssul. Following tea, Aid. W. N. Jones presided over an interesting meeting, in wh-c-a speeches of welcome were given by several members and solos and appropriate peniUion and duets were rendered, Tn our report, of the case of Richard Petit, charged with being a military ab- sentee, a printer's error made it appear that the young man's employed stated he was "not an apprentice." What Mr. Evans stated was that he did not appeal, as the young man was an apprentice and. he thought, not liable to service.

I FFORESTFACH

I FFORESTFACH- One of the best reception meetings ur-w data to local heroes was held at Calfaria. Ravenhill. when Mr. W. Morgan. Forest Hall, presided over a crowded gatherinc. The herofts honoured were Corpl Owen Ed- wards, 14th Welsh; Lce.-Cpl. Jos. Thomas, 14th Welsh: Pte. Johnny Davios, 14th Welsh: Pte. John Thomas, R.W.F.; and Pte. Trevor Williams, 14th Welsh. Mr. Grrifif Qiarles (Manselton) rendered sol-os of a hieh stan- dard, and was loudly applauded. Miss Edith Thomas (Gendros), Miss Charles (Cwm- bwrla;, and Miss George (Wannarlwyd6. ocn'tributed solos which were much appre- ciated. Mr. Jack Thoma.s (Cwmbwria) gave humorous orations. blrs. L. B. Thomas. Tstrac', accompanied. Addresses were do lhered by the chairman (who also gave a handsome contribution to the funds), Rev. E. J. Hughes (Calfaria), Coun. Jas. Jones. and Mr. Robt. Charles. A vote of sympathy with the families of Ptos Daniel Davie3 ana Idrie Morris was moved by the Rev. D. Jen. kin Jonea (Saron), and seconded by Mr. J. Davies (Bleak House), the assembly stand ing in silence. On behalf of the Reception Committee and local inhabitants, Mrs. Lucy Williams presented the heroes with suitably inscribed Bibles and wallets. A vwte OJ thanks to the chairm.an and artistes was. proposed by Mr. T. T. Thomas? and secon- ded by Mr. Tom Andrews. ■

Advertising

Don't Pay Fancy Prices for Your RAINCOATS. SPECIAL DELIVERY THIS WEEK. MANUFACTURER'S STOCK OF 500 Ladies' and Gent.'s NEW TAN I ,RAINCOATS (Guarantmd Relitble) 1 Our > Worth Price, 45/. I These Coats have the appearance of i, 3 Guinea Coats, and will wear equally | as well. I This Lot is probably the last that | Messrs. Penhale will be able to offer 1 at above price for some time. The delivery also includes 150 BOYS' |I and GIRLS' RAINCOATS, to be I| Cleared at 10/11. Worth 16/11. 50 BLACK WATERPROOFS (Boys || and Girls), 12/11. We have also received this week -50 WARM KINGSCOATS This  Worth Week, ??/- 45/- i These 50 have been marked nearly | Cost Price, as we want to Advertise our i Kingscoat early so as to secure cus- 1 tomers for the heavy preparations we I have made for the WINTER TRADE. I PEWIALE, I Coat Specialist, 8 232, High Street, Swansea.

PONTARDULAfS I

PONTARDULAfS. I The brass band ehampionsnip contests o i Saturday promise to eclipse all records Eleven bands, including the champion bands of West Wales have entered for the march competition, and 13 for other contests. Given fine weather the funds of the Sailors and Soldiers" will benefit as it has never done before.

j SKEWENII

j SKEWEN. I The iirst of a series of serjoces in con- nection with the Church of England Har- vest Festival in the parish was held at St. Mary's on Thursday evening. This was conducted in Welsh throughout. The offi- ciating clergyman was the Rev. Isaac Ed. wards, B.A., St. Matthew's Church, Swan- sea. Writing home to his parents, at 3. Tabernacle-street, Skewen, Pte. Tommy Tucker mentions how he has formed a Welsh Choir from amongst the troops stationed at Kirkee, India. Art the 1915 National Eisteddfod at Bangor, this young m-tisician; with his soldier male voice choir, secured the first prize. From his letter it is pleasing to find that all in the camp—not excepting the C.O.—are greatly cheered by the music discoursed by this combination. The invitation to attend I concerts, socials and dances keep pouring in, and the choruses, as well as the solos by individual members, are greatly ap- preciated. He adds that the officers after a concert endeavour to show their grati- tude by regaling the singers at the officers' mess with a variety of good things, not forgetting the inevitable cigs." Private Tucker is now convalescent after an at tack of dysentery.

IMILITARY SPORTSI

MILITARY SPORTS. I A large crowd witnessed the Royal Gar- rison Artillery sports on Barrack Hill. Pembroke Dock, on Wednesday. The band of the 3rd K.S.L.I, was in attendance and the judges were Col. Lyster Smythe and Captain Moore, while at the close the prizes were' distributed by Mrs. Vereker, wife of Major Vereker. Re- sults Quarter mile flat race (open to R.G.A.): 1, Gunner Oliver; 2, Gunner Fossey; 3, Gunner Crawley. V.C. race: 1, Gunner Shimer; 2, Gunner Climer; 3, Gunner Whitton. Bun race: 1, Gunner Crawley; 2, Gun- ner Powell; 3, Gunner Kerr. 100 yards flat race: 1, Gunner Fossey; 2, Gunner Oliver; 3, Gunner Clarke. Obstacle race: 1, Gunnez Clarke; 2, Gun- ner Herman; 3, Gunner Nicholl. Half-mile fiat race (open to Army and Navy): 1, Signaller Oliver; 2, Sergt. Bur- don 3, Gunner Snowden. Boot race: 1, Gunner Whitton; 2, Gun- ner Herman 3, P.O. Evans. Mounted combat: 1, 219th Battery; 2, Signallers. Tug of war: 1, 219th Siege Battery; 2, Dockyard Police.

No title

Scottish salmon net fishing, which closed on Thursday, has been a dismal failure For permitting Chinese seamen to land at Hull without a licence, Wm. Yorke, a Londol ekipper. was fined C20 Mersey tiour mil's deadlock continues; the masters say they are willing to deal wit-I the men, but not their union. Repeatedly taunted with being a German, 'I an Erglishman named SohomDerg, of Ham- mersmith, committed suicide.

Advertising

| FOR SOUPS AND STEWS, THICKENING AND NOURISHING FA WCETT'S Home-Grown Unbleached PEARL BARLEY British and Best. Per 12 oz. Sealed Packet, 4d. Sold only in Puci.cts. | I

TOLD AT POLICE COURTS I

TOLD AT POLICE COURTS SWANSEA. I Friday.—Before Messrs. Gwilym Morgan j (in the chair), Dr. Nelson Jones, Aid. Joseph Devonald, and Councillor Dd. I Grifiitlis. FILTHY REMARKS. John Nolan, seaman, was fined 6d. or seven days for being drunk and dit' orderly on the Strand on Thursday night. P.C. (89) Edwards said that defendant was shouting filthy remarks and creating a disturbance. LABOURER'S LAPSE. John Allen labourer, was fined 10s. or seven days for a like offence in Waterloo- street. on samo date. Defendant said he had been out of town for 18 months, and bad not been locked up during the whole of the time. A DESERTER. John Thomas Snell, labourer, was charged with deserting from the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry since August 8. On the application of Chief Inspector Hill, he was remanded to await an escort, i ALIEN ASHORE. -1 Charged with being an alien foand ashore in Swansea without the permission of the aliens' officer, Antoin Martin Thoistensen, Norwegian, was fined 206. or 11 days. P.C. (68) Davies said that de- fendant was in Fabian-street, St. Thomas, at 11.20 on Thursday night. ABERAVOM. THEFT OF A CASE OF WHISKY. William Galvin, rigger, Sandfields-road, Aberavon, pleaded guilty to stealing a case of whisky, vilue X3 6s., from the Green Meadow Hotel, Aberavon, on the 5th inst. Defendant said he was under the influence of drink at the time. Fined 40s. ABERAVON GIRLS' QUARREL. A quarrel between the girls employed at the Aberavon tin-stamping works, led to the appearance of Mary Cokely, single, of Mabel-street, Aberavon, on a summons for assaulting Mary Manley, of Water-street. Complainant said that defendant called her bad names, pulled her hair, and struck her. In cross-examination she admitted pull- ing defendant's hair in retaliation. Several witnesses were called, and the defendant was fined 10s.

WAR PENSIONS I

WAR PENSIONS. Carmarthenshire Local Committee. The first meeting of the Carmarthen- shire Local Committee appointed under the Naval and Military War Pensions Act was held at Carmarthen on Thursday. Ald. W. N. Jones, Ammanford, was ap- pointed chairman. Mrs. Gwynne Hughes (Tregeyb) was pro- posed for the vice-chair, but she was unable, owing to pressure of other duties, to aocept, and Lady Howard, Llanelly, was elected. Mr. J. W. Nicholas (clerk to the County Council) was appointed clerk, and Mr. P. Pearoe (county treasurer) trea- surer. On the question of the formation of dis- trict committees, particularly in reference to Llanelly and Carmarthen boroughs, the Chairman said it had always been his desire that Llanelly should have a com- mittee of its own. The Clerk pointed out that the effect of appointing a district committee for Llanelly would be that the whole of the county would have to be cfcvided into dis- trict committees according to the regula- tions. After a long discussion it was decided to defer the matter until next week, Llanelly and Carmarthen to be consulted in the meantime.

I LATE MR T OWEN JPI

LATE MR. T. OWEN, J.P. I Interment at Aberavon Cemetery. The interment took place at Aberavon Cemetery on Thursday afternoon of the late Councillor Timothy Owen, J.P., of the Ivorites Hall Hotel, Aberavon. Tho funeral was a very large and representa- tive one, and included a detachment of the local county police (under Inspector W. E. Rees), workers of every grade of rail- waymen (for whom deceased had acted as local secretary for many years), members of friendly societies, the Mayor and mem- bers and officials of the Aberavon Town Council, members of the local Licensed Victuallers' Association, magistrates, and general public. T'he chief mourners were Mrs. Owen (widow) and sons and daughters. Amongst those present were the Mayor of Aber- avon (Mr. Percy Jacob), Aldermen J. M. Smith, J.P., D. J. Jones, Dd. Williams, and Dd. Pve-es, Councillors A. James, T. S. Goslin, W. John, H. B. Jones, W. Jack- son, J.J Price, W. J. Williams, J.P., Jen- kin Morgan, Moses Thomas, J.P. (town clerk), Messrs. Edward Lowther (chairman of the Marram Council), Charles Jones, J.P., George Longden, J.P., O. Adame, J.P., F. B. Smith, Lewis M. Thomas (coro- ner), D Perkins, E. Tennant (justices' clerk). A large number of beautiful nora?I tri-,? butes were sent. The Vicar of Aberavon (Rev. Edward Davios), assis.ted by the Rev. Francis, officiated. MAGISTERIAL TRIBUTES. I Before the opening of the business at the Aberavon Police Court on Thursday morning, the chairman (Mr. Charles Jones), ieforrecl to the death of their colleague, Coun. Timothy Owen. J.P. He was. said Air. Jones, one of the most faithful, able and competent mem- bers of that Bench and the town had lost a valuable public servant. As a magis- trate, Mr. Owen was most conscientious in his judgment, and his counsel and advice was always respected by his colleagues. His great and valuable experience of human life, and his close association with the workers proved of great assistance to him in his public life, and enabled him as a magistrate to use that knowledge with judgment and decision. The town had sus- tained a great loss, and he wished to ex- press his svmnathv with the relatives. Mr W. J. Williams, J.P., and Mr. Geo. Langdon, J.P., Messrs. L. M. Thomas, and Dan Perkins, solicitors, and Supt. Ben. Eyans, also expressed their sympathy and referred to the great services rendered by Mr. Owen to the town.

PROHIBITED CATCHES I

PROHIBITED CATCHES. At Llanwrtyd Wells Police Court on Thursday a visitor, Thomas Evans, of I Swansea, was fined 50s. inclusive for hav- iug in his possession Hi salmon pink on August 11. Mr. Jones Powell, Brecon, ap- peared for the Wye Board of Conservators Water Bailiff McDougall said he eaw- de- I fendant fishing in the Irfon. He found" the salmon pink in his possession. Defen- dant had a trout licence only, and said he did not know the difference between j trout and young salmon, although he had iI been an angler since 1904. t

Advertising

fm SUPERIOR- BRAND; y j§f 1ri • OF 1 MAR-G ARINE ¡.t/J,J:'r :I:r, :'t:{;-t.1: itr:f:¡ir.tJ"rif' ;{;:r: '1:: .f- I 1 YOU can have nothing I. purer on your table than Pheasant Margarine. 'Pheasant' offers you the absolute j purity of the rich country milk from which it is churned. There is a distinctive daintiness about Pheasant Margarine, too, and a rare delicacy of flavour that cannot fail to please. PHEASANT MARGARINE I See the neat ;Ib. package with the rpd, white and blue riband,and Pheasant Seal í PER .r l TEL, CEN. 314. ESTB. tI5I. The Cheapest House in Wales FOR PIANOS, PLAYER PIANOS, ORGANS, GRAMOPHONES, RECORDS, AND UNIUC. EPianos from 9/- Monthly. Orgam from 6/- M"ly. RUL" OF SOILED MUSIC, SONGS. PIANOFORTE PIECES OR STUDI" 5/- WORTH FOR 1/6 POST FREE. GODFREY & CO., L6m!ted, i I 229 ST. HELEN'S ROADy SWANSEA. .e.. a&' 1 Prepare f or the Bad Weather. ',L I Prepare for the Bad Weat h er. i wit ibi ■ i■ iiiMnnrmMwarMirrnii—mmtnmmm—m——„ I TO COLLIERY OWNERS, CONTRACTORS, I I SINKERS AND MUNITION WORKERS. Jt DANN & CO. are now fully Stocked, and are < prepared to meet the requirements of all classes. We J hold the Largest Stock in Wales of < Oilskins, Mackintoshes, Raincoats, iPegarnoids, Rubber Coats, j P egamo i* d s, Rubber Coats, B d L  Boots an d Leggings. f ■o Orders Executed Same Day. é ? ————— \f  | Note Address:— i DAMN &. CO. § South Wales Clothiers and Boot Merchants and Oilskin Manufacturers, £ lij, 16 & 23, Wind St., Swansea. | ? ? 15, i6 & 23,  § Est. 1875. Tel. No. 593 Central. i ♦ • J

WElisH MINISTERS DEATH I

WElisH MINISTER'S DEATH. I Promising Career Cut Short in I France. On Thursday news was received at Carmarthen of the death in France of the Rev. David Rhys Phillips, B.A,. only &nn of the late Mr. Ken Phillips, Tha Fctory, St. Clears, and of Mrs. Phillips, Brvnmeurig, Paremain-street, Carmar- then. The deceased, who was within about a week of attaining his 26th year, was preparing to take up missionary duties, and proceeded to France three weeks ago for the final preparation at a French University, his intention being to sail a few months later for Mada- gascar to take up the work of his uncle, the Rev. D. M. Rees, a well-known missionary, at Ambalabao, Madagascar, and also to take charge of the stations at which lie Rev. Thomas Rowland.; for- merly laboured at Ambohyiandroea, in the province of Betsiles. The deceased, who had been ill for only a, few days, com- menced preaching in 1910 .at Burryport under the pastorate of his uncle, the Rev. J. II. Fees. Six years ago he entered the Presbyterian College, Carmarthen, after- wards studying for three years atl( Cheshunt College, Cambridge, and wa, ordained for the mission field at Union street Independent Chapel, Carmarthei en July 6th last. He was a fine echoic and by his untimely death a very promS- ing career has been cut short. He Iezesl I a mother and two sisters-Miss May Ims, a nurse at Cardiff Hospital, and iiss ETured Phillips, a well known tionist.

SWANSEA DOCKS SCANDAL

SWANSEA DOCKS SCANDAL. An Echo at Port Talbot. At Aberavon Police Court on Thursday Maggie Symons, a young Swansea wo man, was charged with unlawfully loiter- ing on the Port Talbot Docks, in contra- vention of the dock bye-laws. P.S. Phillips, Docks Police, said thai at midnight on September 2nd, he saw ac- cused proceeding to the dock in company with two foreigners. They all proceded tc the Norwegian steamer Dagala. At two o'clock, after receiving complaints by some people, he boarded the Dagala, ar .l I from there went on board the s.s. Ellike" (Norwegian). In the captain's cabin he fount defendant absolutely nude, with the capttin. He ordered her to drees, and in th-i iabin he charged her, and she replied, I .vas on business, and knew the captain a lIng time." 'risoner repeated this statement to the- Bench, [f The Chairman: We must put a p to' ,his business. Supt. Evans: They have driven themr )ut at Swansea, amd now they are coming nere. The Chairman: We intend to stop thijj beastly, filthy carrying on. Young girl, who have been respectably brought ir* have been ruined by people like you.. yr, ol will be fi-Ded Ci or one month. 'I: -:0, Irintod and Published for the Swa no:. Press. Limited, by ARTHUR PAR31, HIGHALI, at Leader Buildings, Swtuwe V >