Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 5 of 6 Next Last
Full Screen
18 articles on this page
I RAILWAY DEADLOCKI

I RAILWAY DEADLOCK SOUTH WALES WORKMEN SUSPEND STRIKE DEGSSiON. SECTIONAL ACTION OPPOSED 1 Workmen from all parts of South Wales j attended a massed meeting of railway- men at Cardiff on Sunday afternoon, with reference to their application for an in. L-rease of IDs. per week. I Mr. J. H Thomas, M.P., assistant sec- ? retary of the ational Union of Railway- men said the railway workers within the organisation were the best judges of his action in their behalf on all occasions. It was not on the men alone that respon- sibility rested tor uninterrupted railway work. Responsibility also belonged to the other side, ituiiwaymen had no de- sire to break agreements. Their standard of honour was no less than their em- ployers, but circumstances had arisen for which employers nor the men were res- ponsible. This was a problem for the consideration oj the Government. It was necessary to maintain the standard of pthcieucy of the Vorkers, and he sub- mitted that the Tailwayman was as essen- tial in a national crisis a6 the man in the trenches. But what the railwaymen were living to-day was that they were not working under conditions which were a proper basis of efficiency. The arguments he made use of at Portsmouth he repeated at Carlisle, Newcastle, and Derby, and on c'ach and every occasion he was careful to point out what delay might mean in dealing with large numbers of men. And nothing was so undesirable as to convey the impression that their proposals were viewed with contempt. In that way bad temper was engendered. •lie-feared that in the intervening five "rt ftk* there had not been a growth of amu-abie feeling. As a general proposi- tion, it was net fair to establish differen- tial treatment between married and single men. Nothing could be more unsatis- factory than to have one man working under one set of conditions and his com- rade another. It was absurd, and could only result in troubles if applied. OPPOSED TO SECTIONAL ACTION. j He complained that certain recent negotiations in London had not found their way into the public press in an ac- curate form; but this was not attribut- able to the newspapers themselves, but to an official source. The speaker described a recent meeting with several depart- mental officials, to whom lie had pointed out that the men were not alone respon- sible for national interests, but that re- sponsibility was shared with the other side. lie asked Sir William Robertson, the Chief of the General Staff, to com- municate that observation to the general managers of the railway companies. It could not be said that the standard of living had been iiiaiiatained After entering with some details into the present rates of pav and the necessity for an immediate increase, Mr. Thomas announced that a special general meet- ing of the National Union of Railwaymen Executive was to He held on Monday, at Unity House, London, at 2.30 in the afternoon, a nth in view of this arrange- ment, he put it to the Cardiff men whether circumstances had not materi- ally changed since their meeting of Sun- day, September TOtli. Monday's meeting was to be followed by a resumption of negotiations on Tuesday. He had always been opposed to sectional action. No movement of the railwaymen should be conducted on other than national lines. Sectional action had always hampered and eripnled. and had never advanced I-ny cause. SUPPORT THE SOLDIERS. Replying to an interruption, he declared ¡ it Wile: not his fault that conscription was • tfie "frvw to-day. He had never been afraid to take up an unpopular cause when his conscience told him that his action was right. We could not blind ourselves to the fact that we were at war, and, this being so, all employers and employes should strain every nerve to see that our fighting men were given the fullest riipto?rt,. We Mult not lose sight of the fact that there were grave dangers in division. He saw- plenty of evidence of the determination of South Wales men to insist on attention to their claims. They did not withdraw those claims; but the executive that day had pronounced for negotiation, and he asked that mass meeting to endorse their action. (Cheers, i If they did, all his energies would he directed to seeing that the general body of the men did not suffer. (Renewed cheers.) Some questions were then asked, and in the course of a discussion it was stated that at a sitting of the local executive earlier in the dav one branch had dis- sented from the decision reached by the majority. A resolution was moved and seconded: "Th%t this adjourned conference, and in view of the developments which have taken place since our last meeting, and seeing that a special general meeting of the executive has been convened for Mon- day next, decides to suspend the decision to cease work to-night to enable the repre- sentatives to the special general meeting to deal with the situation. We further reaffirm our declaration that nothing loss than the full conceion of 10s. per weeir increase will be accepted by us as a satis- factory settlement, this to take effect from August 4. 1916, and we call upon the special general meeting to insist upon our just claims being met, or a national strike declared, "ife further decide to adjourn this conference to Sunday next, to hear the result of the action of the conference, and tA decide then v.hat steps shall be taken." THE DECISION. I The recommendation was submited to the mass meeting in the form of a resolu- tion- by Mr. E. A. Charles and seconded by Mr Carpenter. An .irnendnient was moved to the effect that the meeting act in accordance with tho resolution carried on September 10 and ceasc-'work at midnight that night, and that the men pledge themselves to remain out until their demands had been suc- cessively complied with. On being put to the meeting the amend- ment was defeated by an overwhelming majority, and the resolution carried amid loud cheers. ATTITUDE AT NEWPORT. On Sunday night a crowded mass meet- ing of railway workers was held at the Temperance Hall, Newport, when a report of the conference held at Cardiff was pre- sented Mr. J. H. Thomas, M.P.. urged the men to defer any drastic action until their National Executive had had a further op- portunity of negotiating with the general managers of the railway companies. They had a strong case. but by sectional action they would be committing suicide, and a purely Welsh strike would, in his opinion, end in disaster. He appealed for a national and not a South Wales movement. A resolution similar in terms to that adopted at the Cardiff meeting was then submitted. An amendment was proposed that the resolution passed at the meeting held a week ago in favour of immediate strike be adhered to. On being put to the meeting, only about 20 voted for the amendment, and the resolution was carried. I HE SWANSEA MEETING. I for the purpose of receiving the de- c.t?ion of the Cardiff conference a meet- ?g of Swansea railwaymen was held at the Workin?m?n? Club, Swansea, on Sunday evening. The proceedings were (Cout-in?d &t bottom of next column), A

I RAILWAY DEADLOCKI

private, and the gathering was adjourned I till Sunday evening next. IN CAMERA, I On Sundav night Neath railway men of all grades met at the Town Hall to hear the report of the local delegate at the London conference. The proceedings were private, the chairman requesting the exit of all non-unionists and the Press representatives immediately upon talcing the chair-

NEW TERROR FOR HUNS

NEW TERROR FOR HUNS WHAT THE TANKS" DID A MARVELLOUS AID TO OUR FIGHTING MEN The new armoured car is the talk of the front. It is, from all accounts, a huge structure built of steel and mounted on caterpillar wheels, which enable it to climb over shell craters and trenches, whilst its ram-like front carries it through wire entanglements as if they were thistle- down. Impervious to shrapnel or even direct rifle bullets, or, indeed, to anything short of a direct hit by a high-explosive shell, its business is to advance to the enemy's trenches and to blow his machine- guns and gunners out of their positions, so clearing the way for our infantry to move I forward. "LIKE PREHISTORIC MONSTERS." Air. Philip Gibbs says that the secret of the cars was kept for months jealously and nobly. It was only a few days ago that it was whispered to Mr. Gibbs. Like prehistoric monsters. You know the old Ichthyosaurus said an officer. I told 'him (says' the correspondent) he was pulling my leg. But it's a fact, man:" He breathed hard, and laughed in a queer way at some enormous comicality. They cut up houses and put the refuse under their bellies. Walk right over 'em! I knew this man was a truthful and simple soul, and yet could not believe. They knock down trees like match- sticks," he said, staring at me with shin- ing eyes. They go clean through a wood! "And anything else?" I asked, enjoy- ing what I thought was a new sense of humour. Everything else," he said, earnestly. They taks ditches like kangaroos. They simply love shedi-craters! Laugh at 'em! It appeared, also, that they were proof against rifle bullets, machine-gun bullets, bombs, shell-splinters. Just shrugged their shoulders and passed on. Nothing but a direct hit from a fair-sized shell would do them any harm. MYSTERY OF THE "TANKS." H But what's the name of these mythical monsters:- I asked, not believing a word of it. He said Ilush! Other people said Hush! Hush! when the subject was alluded to in a remote way. But since then I have heard that one name for them is the Hush-hush." But their great name is Tanks. For they are real, and I have seen them, and walked round them, and got inside their bodies and looked at their mysterious organs, and watched their monstrous movements. I came across a herd of them in a field, and, .like the countryman who first saw a giraffe, said, Hell! I don't believe it." Then I sat down on the grass and laughed until tears came into my eyes. (In war one has a funny sense of humour.) For they were monstrously comical, like toads of vast size emerging froyi the primeval slime in the twilight of the world's dawn. HER FI RST HOUSE." The skipper of them introduced me to tht,iii. I felt awfully bucked," said the young officer (who is about 5ft. high), when my beauty ate up her first house. But 1 was sorry for the house, which was quite a good one." "And how about trees?" I asked. They simply love trees," he answered. When our soldiers first saw these strange creatures lolloping along the roads and over old battlefields, taking trenches on the way, they shouted and cheered wildly, and laughed for a day afterwards. And yesterday the troops got out of their trenches laughing and shouting and cheer- ing again because the Tanks had gone oa ahead and. were scaring the Germans dreadfully, while they moved over the enemy's trenches, and poured out fire on every side." WHAT THE GERMANS SAY. I These engines, according to Mr. Beach I Thomas, forced men into the dug-outs, raked trenches, and knocked out strong posts. They had various fortunes. One strayed and was lost hereabouts and one oil the road captured a number of pri- soners as well as the now notorious lieu. tenant-colonel, wlio was carried in the stomach of the monster through half the fighting. A captured German said of this form of warfare that "it was butchery and not fair." Tanks did equal if not greater service in High Wood, where they knocked out nests and warrens of machiaie-guns. A CLASSIC REPORT. One of the incidents of the day was as follows:—On the right of the troops at Martinpuich the attack was swinging up to Flers across a wide stretch of difficult and perilous ground strongly defended. The enemy were flinging over storms of shrapnel and high explosives, and many of our men fell; but the wounded shouted on the others, if they were nct too badly hit, and others went forward grimly and steadily. These soldiers of ours were superb in courage and stoic endurance, and pressed forward steadily in broken waves. The first news of success came through from an airman's wireless, which said:- A Tank is walking up the high street of Flers with the British Army cheering behind. It was an actual fact. One of the motor monsters was there, enjoying itself tho- roughly, and keeping down the heads of the eu-emy. "SPESHUL!" Tt. hung out a big piece of paper, on which were the words: Great Hun Defeat. Special. The aeoplane flew low over its carcase machine-gunning the scared Germans, who new before the monstrous apparition. Later in the day it seemed to have been in need of a rest before coming home, and two humans got out of its inside and walked back to our lines. But, by that time, Flers and many pri- soners were in our hands, and our troops had gone beyond to further fields.

I SWANSEA WOMANS DEATHI

SWANSEA WOMAN'S DEATH. The death occurred at 38, Approach- road. Manselton. Swansea, on Sundav morning, under distressing circumstances, of Mrs. Mary Ann Jones (76). It appears that one of the deceased's relatives asked her to go to church, and as she was pre- paring to do so, she suddenly expired.

RESCUES FROM DROWNINGI

RESCUES FROM DROWNING. On Saturday afternoon whilst George Jones, aged 9, was playing on'the North Dock side, Swansea, he fell into the water, but was rescued by a man whose name is unknown.—Henry Daglishe (46), a talyman, of De Breos-etreet, Brynmill, fell into the river near the South Dock at 12.25 on Sunday morning, and was rescued by a soldier.

SWANSEA TRIMMERS I I

SWANSEA TRIMMERS. 0- 75% of Men's Claims Conceded. After several sittings of the Swansea Trimming Board and the men's representa- tives, the dispute between the employers and the coal trimmers has now been aiiiie- ably settled. It will be recalled that ati the outset-the dispute dates back to the, early days of August, when the men dropped tools, or rather shovels—trouble arose regarding the loading of certain vessels, the men claiming higher rates, which, they said, was a custom of the port. On the other hand, the employers repu- diated the men's demand, urging that what the trimmers were now receiving were not pre-war rates, but only extras granted for the .time-being. The whole of the questions in dispute were relegated to the Conciliation Board at Cardiff, of which Mr. Thomas Evans is President. After sitting for two days an agreement was como to whereby the questions in dis- pute were again transferred to the local Trimming Board to deal with, all the money claimed as extras being handed over to Mr. Thomas Evans to hold until the dispute was finally settled. The amount in hand amounts to nearly JJ300, and the number of vessels for which extras were claimed for loading exceeded a hun- dred. It is now gratifying to learn that after much deliberation on both sides the men have been conceded about 75 per cent. of their claims, that the disbursement of same will take effect forthwith, and the whole of the at one time troublous outlook has given way to a clear and satisfactory understanding between the men and their employers.

ANGLOFRENCH ADVANCE

ANGLO-FRENCH ADVANCE. Glowing Tribute to British Infantry, i aris, Monday.—The Echo de Paris, speaking of the British advance, says the British Staff has for some time been doing wonders. Not the least of our Allies' titles to glory is that after inevitable gropings of the first months, they have in so short a spa-ce of time collected together a staff which has big ideas, and has largely contributed to the success of the opera- tions in progress. M. Poly be, writing; in the Figaro," says he has received a letter from a French general saying: The British are attacking on a wide front with their new war machines, but I place still greater confidence in the gallantry of their fine infantry. M. Polybe adds: "This is quite true. v However powerful their in- vention may be, the British infantry is more powerful still, not only on account of the fine robustness of their race, used to every kind of physical exercise and con- stant daily training from youth up, but also on account of the keenness with which they have set about learning the trade of war, which is new to them, their good- natured ambition not to be surpassed by us in anything, and the hatred of the Hun H

AMMANFORD RACES

AMMANFORD RACES. Tho last reace meeting of the season was helJ Oil the Ammanford Recreation Grounds on Saturday afternoon, when, before a large attendance, some capital horse and foot events were run. The meeting proved, an entire succeed, and the crowd were given th3ir full money's worth. An old soldier in T. O. Askew, of Lee near London, proved an easy winner in the sprint. In the trot- ting handicap Queenie showed fine form, and got home i nher heat twice in fine style, but lost in the finals. The judge was Mr. P. F. J. Basisto; handicappers (horse events) Mr. Jack Price and (foot events) Mr. Ted Lewis; and the secretary, Mr. Geo. T. Davies. Results: 120 yards flat handicap.—First heat, W. Thcmae. Burryport (18yds): 2nd heat. D. J. Thomas. Llanelly (21); rd heat, W. F. Hall. Tl:i

ICLOSING OF WELSH SCHOOLS I

CLOSING OF WELSH SCHOOLS Writing upon the cluing of the Wern and MAraesmarchog Schools in the current issue of The Schoolmaster," a Glamor- gan teacher, dealing with the dispute points out that the Executive of the Nat- lonal Union of Teachers is desirous of finding some way of settlement, has united its action strictly to the schools concerned, and is still ready to meet the Authority in a frank discussion of the VDsition, with a frank desire to end the difficulty. The Glamorganshire teachers are showing fine examples, Iwtli of unionism and of restraint," he says. and are r ready to do their share in the struggle. The Executive's Glamorgansire Sub-Com- mittee has reported its action to the Exe- cutivs at every stage, and will continue its wo^k till the difficulty is ended. TTicre are stul no bars on our side of the door of peace."

NEATH WIFES MAINTENANCE I

NEATH WIFE'S MAINTENANCE. I Married in February, 1914, Emily Kate Bush appeared before the Neath magis- trates on Monday in support of an appli- cation for a maintenance order against her husband, Robert Henry Douglas Bush, Ciir la-road, on the grounds of ^insistent cruel ty. Mr. W. Davies, Llanelly, appearedv for the applicant, and Mr. Edward Powell for the defendant. Applicant said she was now living at Stepnev-place, Llanelly, with her two childreai. She left her husband because he had been persistently cruel. Mr. Davies mentioned that they had mutually agreed upon the application. and fixed the maintenance order at 25s. a week, the wife to have the custody of the children. Tho Magistrates' Clerk: Then you will need a separation order. Mr. Davies: I did not want that if it oould be avoided. I am thinking of other proceedings, but I see the difficulty and will take a separation order. The Clerk: Does Mrj, Powell agree P Mr. Davies: I think my friend will agree to anything to-day rather than have the case thrashed out. The applicantion was granted.

No title

For taking four matches into a shell fac- tory, a munitions worker named Bacon was on Saturday fined £10. High Mass, attended" by many officers and men of the East Surrey Regiment, was yesterday celebrated at the Church of St. Thomas of Canterbury, Fulham, for the repose of the soul of Corporal Edward Dwyer, V.C. After nearly four months of farm work, Lady Mabel Smith, Lord Fitzwilliam's sister, applied to the Wortley Rural Coun- cil for a post as road labourer, but has re- ceived a reply that the work is unsuited to a woman.

THE NATIONS COAL MERCHANTS I

THE NATION'S COAL MERCHANTS I SCHEME FOR GOVERNMENT I CONTROL OF PITS (Passed by the Censor.) Fullest confirmation is now forthcoming] as to the proposal of the Government to; take over full control of the coal trade, both for home consumption and for export. The details were given on Saturday at the Executive Council meeting of the South Wales Miners' Federation by the South Wales members of the Executive Commit- tee of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain, who had had an interview with Lord Milner on Thursday. These mem- bers reported that Lord Milner had stated; that the Government were desirous that the whole of the control of the coal trade 6hould he.in the hands of the Government, who were consulting the various bodies in- terested. THE NATION'S COAL MERCHANTS. According to the statements made at the Council meeting the Government were desirous of becoming the nation's cotl merchants, and that the whole of the dis- tribution of the coal should be undertaken by the Government. The suggestion was that during the war all profits of the owners and men's wages should remain at their present figure. The South Wales miners did not altogether feel inclined to accept, as they thought in that district they were entitled to a higher percentage of wages than was being paid them. The report of the members of the Executive Committee was received, and it was under- stood that a further report would be sub- mitted after another interview with Lord j Milner. I MINERS AND MILITARY. I Complaints Sent to South Wales Federation. A meeting of the Executive Council of the South Wales Miners' Federation was held at Cardiff on Saturday, Mr. James Winstone presiding. Mr. Thos. Richards, M.P the general secretary, was also present. A deputation placed before the Federa- tion the objects of the War Savings move- ment, and it was resolved that a further interview be granted to Mr. Black, the local representative, in order that details of the scheme should be further con- sidered. Seyeral resolutions had been received re- specting the income charges made upon workmen, and it was resolved that a con- ference he called at an early date to consider the matter. Complaints were received; especially from the Western and Anthracite districts, respecting the arbitrary manner the mili- tary authorities had been dealing with certain colliery workmen. It was re- solved that the general secretary should write to Sir Richard Redmayne calling his attention to this matter, and asking that the issue of exemption certificates should be made at once. The secretary was also instructed to call the attention of workmen already in pos- session of certificates of exemption to the importance of having their eertificaten with them when they are away from the mine. Mr. W. L. Cooke wais-appointod to inves- tigate the stoppage of a colliery through alleged unsafe conditions in the Blaenavon district.

ILLANDOVERY COUNCIL I

LLANDOVERY COUNCIL. An Outbreak of Diphtheria. Mr. Isaac Williams, Llandre, presided Over the monthly meeting of this body. A letter was read from Messrs. J. Davies and Co., Cowel House, Llanelly, contrac- tors, stating that they bS^W acccpt liability for the damage done to the roads between Llandre and Dgofau in the parish of Caio. The matter was referred to the Clerk to report at the next meeting. With reference to the payment through the Medical Officer of Health of a moiety of his salary, Mr. J. W. Nicholas, Clerk to the County Council, wrote to say that he had not been authorised by that body to pay it to this Council.-Resolved that the CJerk write to the Local GovermMnt Board to enquire into the matter.  The Medical OfR.-fr of Health reported an outbreak of diphtheria at Llanwrda. precaution had been taken to check its spread. Mr. E. Williams, Surveyor No. 1 Dis- trict, reported that it was necessary to construct a new footbridge at Pentrety- gwyn, and as it was so difficult to get anyone to do the work by contract, he sug- gested it should be done by day work. The estimated cost was £ 7. He also reported that the footbridge over the Dolthau River, which forms the bound-arv between Cilycwm and Llandewi-Brefi, was in a dilapidated state and dangerous for use by the public. He estimated the cost of the necessary work at X9, which should be apportioned between this Council and Tregaron. It was resolved that the Tregaron Coun- cil be asked to join in the repairs. It was also decided that a culvert, on Llwynricket- road, Mothvey, be repaired- Mr. Tudor Lewis, Surveyor No. 2 Dis- trict, reported that the Llanelly contractor had a number of men repairing and level- ling the pipe track over that portion of the road over which their traffic was carried, but that the pipes were continually burst- ing and did considerable damage. It was resolved that the Clerk communi- cate with the Llanelly Council on the sub- ject.

GUESTS OF THE BOWLERSI

GUESTS OF THE BOWLERS. I The Swansea Bowling Club entertained the wounded soldiers from the Pare Wern Hospital at thftir green in Brvn-road on Saturday afternoon, and the maimed warriors spent a thoroughly happy and enjoyable time. About 150 soldiers were present, and the programme included U nutting the bowl." drawing a pig blind- folded, and a large sketch of a tail-lqss donkey, to which the competitors had to attack the tail with closed eves.. Other events were egg and spoon race, a bowls match between Pare Wern and the Y.M.C.A. (which was won by the latter), and a hat-trimming competition. A sub- stantial tea provided by Mrs. Atkinson (wife of the captain) and a number of ladies, was partaken of, and prizes to the successful competitors were prented. The arrangements were carried out by a committee, which included the captain and vice-captain (Messrs. Atkinson and Frank Taylor 'respectively').

GOSPEL TEMPERANCE MEETING I

GOSPEL TEMPERANCE MEETING. I There was a fair attendance at the usual weekly Gospel Temperance meeting held at the Rasrged School, Swansea, on Saturday last. Mr. Joseph Brook (Hafod) was the chairman, and Mrs. Grounds gave an admirable addre&s. The following con- tributed to an excellent musical pro- amme :-Mis.s Amy James (solo pianist). Miss Irene Summers (soprano), Miss Elsie Yoe (elocutionist), Miss Muriel James (child soloist). Miss Gertrude Williamsl (contralto), and Mr. Hopkins (tenor). Miss Gfertie Thomas was the accompanist.

No title

Mr. E. J. Hartston, Down-Eitret. Clydach, writes urging that every tram- car should parry jacks and other ap- pliances, in case of accidents. Miss Annie B. Williams, of Llansam- let, has achieved a noteworthy feat in passing the L.T.C.L. (organ) examination of the Trinity College of Music at the early age of 17.

Family Notices

BERTHS, MARRIAGES AND DEATHS. MARRIAGES. POAV ELD—THOMAS.—At Pantygwydr Bap-1 ti-st Chapel, on the 10th inst. by Rev. A. Bt' non Phillips, William Frederick Powell, second son of Mr and Mrs. J. Powell, Bristol, to Clara Blanche Thomas, youngest daughter of Mrs. W. D. Thomas and the late W. D Thomas, 30, Malverm terrace. Swansea. 114A9-18 DEATHS. JENKINS.-On Saturday, 16th inst., at Beachmont, Mumbles, Annie wife of T. Alfred Jenkins. Funeral private. No ,flowers, by request. A9-18 JOHN.—On September ISch, 1916. in France, d'ed of wounds received in action, Pte. Chris. Clifford John, Welsh Regiment (formerly of Glamorgan Yeomanry/t the beloved second son of Mr. T. Edgar Joha, The Promenade, Swansea. Sorrowfully mourned. 114A9-20 T\v E?. EY.—At 14, Dynevor-place, Swansea, on 15th inst.. William Charles Twcney, in his 75th year. No flowers, by request. Private funeral 114A.9-19 .TiloAtAS.-Loii the 15th September.. 1916, at 23,. Queen-sireet, Keai.h. Elizabeth Thomas, widow of Tho's. Thomas, draper, and aat?hter of the late Kev* John Matthews, of Zoar. Neath. Funeral Tuesday, 19th Sel Umber, at 12 noon, forLJantwit Old Cemetery. Gentlemen only. 09-18 THANKS FOR SYMPATHY. LOCK—Mrs. Lock, Mr. and Mns. Parker and Family desire to tender their heartfelt thanks for the kind sympathy extended to them in their recent sad bereavement. Alin for the many beautiful floral tri- butes 114A9-1S IN MEMORIAM. BAYNARD.—In loving memory of my dear Husband, John Maynard, who died Sep- tercber 13th, 1915. Twelve months have passed since that sad I da? When one I loved was called away." —Ironi his sorrowing Wife and Children. 114A9-18

Advertising

WREATHS, BOUQUETS, &c., by "KITLEY'S," THE SPECIALISTS IN ALL TLORAL DESIGNS. CHEAPEST- AND BEST HOUSE FOR GLASS WREATHS. OPPOSITE NATIONAL SCHOOLS, OXFORD STREET. SWANSEA. (Tel., 21y Central.) A LEXANDER JOHNSTON, The Most Up- -n. to- date Florist in Swansea. WREATHS, BOUQUETS, ;nj other FLORAL DESIGNS, arranged in the Latest London Style. 27, OXFORD-STREET, SWANSEA Tc-lepbone: 667 Central. 1 LEADER CLASSIFIED ADVTS. PREPAID RATES. SITUATIONS VACANT AND WANTED, HOUSES WANTED AND TO LET. Twenty words and under, threeineertions, I one shilling; 3d. for every additional five words. Six insertions, one shilling and sixpence; Gd. for every additional five words. LOST AND FOUND. Three insertions, one shilling and sixpence for twenty words, and 4d. for every additional five words. BIRTH, MARRIAGE, DEATH, IN MEMORIAM, &c., NOTICES. One insertion, one shilling for twenty words, and 4d. for every additional five words. Verses: 6d. per line. TRADE ANNOUNCEMENTS. Twenty words, three insertions, two shil- lings; 6d. for every additional five words. Six insertions, two shillings and six- pence; Is. for every additional seven f words. The foregoing are nett prepaid rates. No account will be booked under 2s., and $d. will be added for booking to every six insertions. Less than five additional words to count as five. FINANCIAL ADVERTISEMENTS. Fcurpence per line first insertion; 3d. per line per insertion afterwards. This scale does not apply to Advertise- ments from Corporate or Public Bodies, Bankruptcy or Liquidation Notices, Sales and Let by Tender Announcements. DEFENCE OF THE REALM ACT. Advertisements in the Situations Vacant column from Firms Whose business consists wholly or mainly in engineering or ship- building or the production, of arms, amu. nition. or explosives, or of substances re- quired for the production thereof, are, in order to comply with Regulation 8 (b) of the above Act, subject to the following con- ditions di No person resident more than 10 miles away or already engaged on Government work will be engaged. MISCELLANEOUS SITUATIONS VACANT. THr3 SWANSEA BUSINESS COLLEGE is JL Training- Youths and Girls for the Best Business Appointments. Subiects: Arithme- tic, English, Business Corrtc- Shorthand (Pitman s or Script), Typewrit ing. Book-keeping. Ollic) Routine, Model Office Practice, etc. Day and Evening Classes. For Prospectus and full Particu- lars apply the Principal. 31, Alexan(fl;a road: Swansea. 'Phone: Central 1259. Cll-29 -A-C .E:Ni;Wai1ted'- either sex, by largest A Manufacturera of Private Xmas Cards: big pronts are bein? made with our maf- nincent Patriotic Designs; samples and full i equipment free, post paid.—Write lmpserial Co.. Box 30, Roper Buildings, Hull. 113A9-21 Men and Youths. \\f ANTED, good Navvies at Munition Works, Port Talbot; good wages and bonus to suitable ineii.-Apply Topha.m, Jones, and Railton, Ltd.. 5, Ootton-row, Port Talbot. C9-1S BRICKWORKS Foreman—Wanted, a B thoroughly practical Working Fore- man, accustomed to wire cut bricks and continuous kilns; output about 20,000 per day.—" Box M 6, Leader Office, Swansea. _■ 113A9-21 Electrician (working) Wanted for E Sheet Works in South Wales; con- trolled establishment.—Wrjte X. Y.Z., Leader Office, Swansea. 113A9-21 TO TAILORS.-Wanted, a good Coat Hand: Tweekiy wage.-Apply Idwal Griffiths, Ladies' Tailor, 11, Cradock-street. 113A9-21 XT ANTF:D-apable Clerk (ineligible): W thn'ouhly used to routine of Col- liery Sales Office.-Rcply "Colliery," leader, Swansea. 113A9-21 ll/fASONS Wanted; top wages paid.—Apply Al Cambria Tinplate Works, Pont:udu- lais. 112A9-20 IGiIl'õtQr-Van Driver Wanted.— ii Davie? and Co., Boro' Stores, Swansea. 112A9-20 T^STANTED, good all-round Slaughtermen; c'iigible for military service; must be sobe, and respoerable; good wages to good men.—Apply W. Weeks, Cattle and Meat Salesman. Brynmawi\112A9-20 GOOD Class Tailoring Firm Requires GAg,enar, Pentrechwyth or Bonymaen. —Write "Tailoring," Leader Office. 111A9-16 W ANTED, Clerk, with knowledge of gen- ff eral routine of Solicitor s OfficA (in- eligible—Apply Everett, Solicitor. Ponty- pool.  C9-19 Tt?AKTED, a. Young Man to Deliver 'V Mineral W?tera. used to horses.—Betta Mineral Water Works, Northampton-lane, I Swansea. 311A9-19 FURNITURE Trade.-Wanted, at  once, a J' Youn? Man; one used to touchin?-up Furniture, and to make himself generally useful; ineligible.—Cash Furnishers, 21, Wind-street, Swansea. 111A9-19 GENT'H Mercery. — Smart Assistant GWanted (Welsh speaking) also Junioi-T. J. Llewellyn, 3. Wind-Street, Swansea. ■ 110A9-18- N YV IËS-1;Vact-PiP;:tra.ck- at Mar- g-am, near Port Talbot; good pay.- Apply on  job? 110A10-8 R-t:T{i'lERs,- Wanted. Slaughterer ?inelig. Bib?(,-?, willing to make himself generally useful.-Apply "William John Harris, But- che", etc Hendy, Pontardulais. C9-18 a good all-round Baker; wdge, » » 42s.: day work; or trustworthy Van Salesman fii- Motor Delivery.-Gater, Cly dach. 111A9-18 VATANTED, Several Strong Youths as Tt. Perters.-David -Evan, Drapers, (loat. street. 1IIA9-18 tllANTED, A YOUNG MAN TO I" DELIVER MINERAL WATERS, MUST BE WELL USED TO HORSES. —APPLY BOWEN, SARSO WORKS, MORRISTON. ADVERT.—"Sunny Spain'' Revue All I vacancies tilled except Tenor and Bari- tone.—Apply Musical Director, Carlton, Car- diff, or Mackworth Hotel, Swansea. Men and Youths. WANTED, immediately, First-claee Motor I t Mechanic (inel1gible): only good men need apply.—C. K. Andrews, Uplands Garage. C9-23 EXTRA Assistant Cutter (ineligible) re- E quired; splendid opportunity for pro- motion for first cutter.—Apply, stating ex- perience, a&e. and wage. u South Wales Argus," Newport. C9-23 ,X7TED at once. Smart Youth as W? Clcanei-; good opportunity to learn Moto" traxie.—Ap?y 0. K. Andrew? Up- lands Garage. C9-23 '?Tt?AKTED, at once, a good Driver for li i Ford Taxis, ineligible and abstainer. —Apply 0. K Andrews, Uplands Garage. C9-23 PROGRESSIVE House Purchace and Life P Insurance Compan? are prepared to Appoint Additional Representatives as fcpare Time Agents, Swansea and Distriots. —BQx" M 7," Leader Office. 114A9-23 "OTTANTED, for Neath, experienced Out- T ¥ station Ohargeman.—Apply, at once, with full particulars, to the North Central Wagon Co., Ltd., Swansea. CS-23 Grocery and Provi- f ? sion Stores Manager (ineligible) for duration of war; work under leakage sys- tem.—Apply Co-operative Stores, Llanelly. 114A9-19 ~TANTED, Two Ostlers, to take charge of » » underground horses.—Apply person- ally, Manager, Caeduke Colliery. Lcughor. 113A9-21 T/'LRNITURE Salesman, experienced, able Fto speak Welsh: give full particulars, references, and salary required.—Be van and Company. LttL. Furnishers. Cardiff. 113A9-2 WANTED, capable Man (ineligible) for W Warehouse; accustomed to Whole&?,le Grocery; good packer and organiser.—Wal- i ters. Jones and Co., Ltd., Strand, Swansca. 113A9-21 Boys, Girls, and Apprentices. ANTED, Strong Errand Boy, able to W ride bicycle.—Apply J. A. Morris, Grocer. Dillwyn-street. 111A9-19 FFICE Boy Wanted.—Apply, by letter 0 only, to the Secretary. Baldwins Ltd.. 45, Wind-strect, Swansea. 114A9-20 Women and Girls. \7"ANTED. at once, Reliable Girls Apply > » Manageress, Swansea Baths Laundrv. J14A9-28 JADY Clerks.—Wanted, immediately, for J larga Steel Works, near Swansea, a thoiougbly efficient Shorthand Typist; only those with previous experience in this Lianca of work need apply.—Write, giving age, particfclars of experience, wages, etc., Box 15, Daily Leader. Swansea. C9-20 X\rANTED, Reliable Packer and Sortei (experienced). Permanency.—Apply Manageress, Swansea Baths Laundry. 11IA9-19 Y\7AJ«TED, smart Young Lady for Fancy t' an 1 Blouses; also Apprentices foi- Milhnery Workroom.—Elwyn James. King Edward-road. Swansea. 111A9-19 WANTED, Experienced Cafe Manageress; » first-class references required.—Apply Messrs. Woolworths, Swansea. 09-18 Domestic Servants. ~7' ANTED a kind. homely person as Working Housekeeper for small fam ily in Quiet country diet?-ict.—Apply Reli- able. Box .M 8,'? Leader Office. A9-20 A GOOD General Wanted; able to Assist  m Bar when required—Apply Lord I kelson Hotel? 114A9-23 ?G ENERAL.-Wanted. Respectable Girl for ?< small family: &ood home for suitable S'ul; Sunday and Thursday af?eruoons ?-lir,we,cL-Apply Mrs. Grey, Cwmdonkiii Driv, Uplands, Swansea. H4A9-22 WANTED, good General Servant.-ADPY v Mrs. Thomas, Snowden Villa, Gorsei- no I. U3A9-21 GENERAL Required, 20-25, for family two: Gone able to cook and do all general ho'spwork; no washing; high wage offered to one suitable; references required.-Apply 4, Dyr.evor-avenue, Neath 111A9-26 W A NTED, immediately] good Cools- General and Housemaid; three iI, family.-Apply, with references, at 45 Bryn-road (after 6 pjn.). mA9-i9 ARTISTES WANTED. WANTED, Artistes to ÅSi't CoIwert  f" ? to Soldiers in West Wales Camps and t.A. ? A. Huts; Young Lady who can Dance a littJE, included; expenses and a little fee will be paid.-Write Concerts." Leader Omca, S, wansea. C9-18 HOUSES AND SHOPS FOR SALE AND TO LET. HOUSE to Let, Ffynono-terrace. 8 Rooms, L i- Bath h. and c., cellar; pleasant spot.— Apply Gwydr Stores, Uplands, Swansea. 114A9-20 TT01JSE to Let. or for Sale, 53. Walter- -?-?- mad, nicely decorated; electric light. —Apply M. aoobs aud Co., Furnishers. Port- land j?uldings, Swansea. !14A9-Z3 G-ÖODw:lit.and- Dry Warehouse, or GW-6rkshop, to Let, about 2?t. by 50ft" Picton-lane—Apply Ivor L Roberts 223. Oxiord-street? Swansea. TO J. Pugh Willilims' Anrouncements. iAl UMBLES. To Let, excellent -Villa on 1. ï. Lai:gland-road; 9 rooms, bath, etc.; £ 35 and rates. nOCKE.Pl'For Sale, Six Houses, well -A tenanted; a bargain for a quick sale. n CRSEINON.For Sale, at a very low T figure, Seven compact Six-roomed Houses: an excellent investment; £ 509 down; balance can remain. u SRETTY.—For Sale. desirable Vill? in kJ ha?elmere-road; very moderate price: own3r called up; also Several other Villas and House-, for Sale, and one- Villa to Lee on Gcwer-road. 'u_- FOR Further Particulars of the above and J- otho Houses for Sale in Swansea and Suburbs, apply to J. Pugh Williams. ÅU. 14tit-,urbs. ap Valuer, 12, College-street, Swan- i ca. C9-20 LODGINGS & APARTMENTS TO LET AND WANTED. DO You Wish to Let Your Apartments? If so. advertise in our five old-estab- lished London Suburban Newspapers; '2 words 6d.. 3 insertions ls., 6 insertions Is 6d 13 insertions 2s. 3d.-Lewisham Newspaper Co.. Ltd., 392. High-road. Lee. S.E. CTO FOR SALE. FOR SALE, Bedroom Suite, E5 10s.; Piano, ±'. ?6 10s.; Sideboard, £ 4 158.; Sitting- room Suite. 59s.; Organ, 55s.; Kitchen Dres- ser. Chest of Drayvers. Tables; cheap, to make room.—Apply 13, Nelson-street. 114A9-19 GAL VANiSED-CorrugRt;;¡- Sheets.-&) GTons of Galvanised Ccrrugatcd Sheets in stock; price, a