Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 6 Next Last
Full Screen
33 articles on this page
Advertising

The Cambria Daily Leader gives later news than any paper published in this dis- trict.

Advertising

The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader)) is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor), where adver- tisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel. 2276 Central.

IGREAT BRITISH ADVANCE

GREAT BRITISH ADVANCE. Two Lines of Trenches I I Captured. NEW FRENCH POSITIONS ATTACKED. Germans Sustain Heavy Losses I TO-DAY'S BRITISH OFFICIAL. ] South of the Ancre during tne mgnt we advanced on a front of about one mile, capturing two lines of hostile trenches approximately between Flers and Martinpuich. Our front now runs in an approxi- mately direct line north of Flers and Martinpuich. The enemy trenches were success- fully entered south of Arras, pris- oners being taken and many casu- alties being inflicted. North of Neuville St. Vaast a mine r was blown up by us and the crater occupied. TO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. To the north of the Sonune the Ger- r mans launched a strong attack this morning on our new positions I between Priez Farm and Ran- court. Our curtain fire stopped dead the wave of assault, and the enemy were compelled to return to their d- trenches, having sustained heavy losses. 3* Everywhere else the morning was Li jcalm. J ARMY OF THE EAST. t. On the Struma front and in the re- L5, gion of Lake Doiran there has been a fierce artillery duel. In- Between the Vardar and the Cerna I a violent Bulgarian attack on Borsko met with a sanguinary repulse. I In the region of Brod, the Serbian troops pursued their forward march and reached the neighbour- hood of Vrbeni. About 100 pris- oners remain in our hands. To the north of Fiorina the enemy attack was broken by French in- fantry fire. Our troops have swept clear all the ground north-west of Armenoko, and have progressed, after some heavy fighting, to the heights which dominate the road from Florina to Popli. ikist has interfered with operations on the whole front. I SHELLED FROM THE SEA. I The Secretary of the War Office makes the following announcement: The General Officer Commanding the Forces at Salonika reports:— On our Struma front, ships of the Royal Navy shelled the enemy in the neighbourhood of Naohori with satisfactory results. On the Doiran front there has been increased artillery activity on both sides.

u CENTRE OF GRAVITY I t

u. « CENTRE OF GRAVITY. I t, f. Tribute to Achievements of I Russian Army. Amsterdam, Thursday.—The military — expert of the Vossische Zeituijg (Capt. von Saltzmann), considers that the centre of gravity at present is in the south-east- ern point, and the Balkans. He adds a long description of the situation in Russia, and says:—" Regarding the Rus- sian Army, we must admit that this army, since its collapse in 1915, has achieved something extraordinary. A new system, systematically, has been hammered into) it. It has plenty of patriotism, and to deny the armies which, since June 1st, have been fighting against us, faithfulness to dvrtv and bravery, is not characteristic M of us."

r ALL GOES WELL I

r ■—- ALL GOES WELL. I Lord Derby Says War News is Satisfactory. There is no doubt whatever at the pre- ln8 sent moment that we are rapidly gaining d the ascendancy over our enemies," declared Lord Derby, Under Secretary for War, in a speech at St. Dunstan's Hostel for Blind Soldiers on Thursday. All the news that comes is satisfactory, and although the end has not yet come there is no doubt that it will come, and \J in a way for which all of you have fought." (Cheers.) It has been a revelation to him, said his lordship, to see the cheerfulness of the .blind inmates of the hostel, and it was an inspiration to the nation at large to know en that the spirit of the men who had suffered so much still remained the same. d Mr. Frank Allen presented to Sir Arthur Pearson a cheque for £ 11.326 19s. IGd., the amount which was raised by the I L) variety profession on Blinded Heroes t Day." The highest individual collection came from Miss Ada Reeve, who obtained JSS25.

FRANCE AND ITALY

£ FRANCE AND ITALY. Commercial and Transport Agree- ments. t, Paris, Friday.—The "Matin" states that the Italian Ministers of Commerce and Transport left Paris yesterday even- 1. ing. Important agreements have been reached between them and the French Z). Ministers. Their last, day was spent in | a visit to the Allied troops on the Somme, 1 where General Foch received them at his headquarters. On their return to Paris, Signori Denava and Arlotta expressed 'their admiration of all they had seen.

RHONDDA TRAGEDY RHONDDA TRAGEDY

 >! RHONDDA TRAGEDY. RHONDDA TRAGEDY. 6E The body' of Gladys Williams (16), the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Williams, of 12, Library-road, Penygradg, was recovered from the reservoir of the Nantgwyn Pit (Naval Collieries) on Thursday. Attracted by the girl's cries, Owen Owen, of Thomas- street, Penygraig, threw her a coat which he found on the bank. Owen, being unable to swim, shouted for I elp, but the girl sank before helD arrived The following note, apparently in the girlV handwriting, was found on he bank: "My name is Gladys Williams. I live at 12, Library-road, Pertyerais." i I

GIANT RECRUIT1

GIANT RECRUIT. 1 Innkeeper Over 8ft. H igh- and Still Growing! The military authorities in Wiltshire are faced by a problem of unusual dimen- sions in the shape of a young innkeeper who is said to be 8ft. 2^ins. in height and still growing. The youth, who is 22 years of4 age, turns the scale at considerably over 20 stone. His boots are marked Size 22, H and a penny can be dropped through his ring. lie was born in Bayswater, and now lives near Devizes. When he travels by train he goes in the guard's van, the available space in an ordinary coach being too restricted for comfort. As the military authorities do not know what they could possibly do with him if they had him in the Army, he remains, for the time being, peacefully at home in his village inn.

DCM FOR SOLDIERI

D.C.M. FOR SOLDIER. I Swansea Man Rewarded. I The Mayor of Swansea on Friday re- ceived a letter from Corporal Arthur Pun- chard, of Swansea, who is in a machine- gun section attached to a Welsh Regiment, in which he thanks the Mayor for good things sent him by the Comforts P d He also mentions that he has an* awarded the D.C.M. for gallant conduct.

I THE BELGIAN FRONT I

THE BELGIAN FRONT. Havre, Thursday.—To-day's Belgian communique states that there is nothing of importance to report on the Belgian front.—" Daily Mail."

I DISCREDITED STORYI

I DISCREDITED STORY. The authorities attach no importance to the confession of John Fitzpatrick, who gave himself up to the Liverpool police on Monday for the murder of Willie Starch. field in a North London train on January 8th, 1914. Fitzpattick's statement is said to be at I variance with the known facts. He alleges that he murdered the boy with his hand- kerchief, whereas a piece of cord was used.

I 980 MILITARY MEDALS I

I 980 MILITARY MEDALS. Over 980 awards of the Military Medal to non-commissioned officers and men for- bravery in the field are announced in a supplement to the London Gazette." The figures include 212 to members of the Australian Military Force, 15 to the Canadian, 16 to the New Zealand, 19 to the South African, and 1 to the New- foundland Contingents. There are also four bars awarded to the medal pre- viously awarded.

I RAILWAY SETTLEMENT

I RAILWAY SETTLEMENT. Meetings of railwaymen will be held over the week-end, at which various mem- bers of the Executive of the National Union of Railwaymen will explain the settlement arrived at in regard to the in- crease in the war bonus. Mr J, H. Thomas, M.P., will visit Yorkshire, and in Cardiff, where last Sunday mass meetings were held to consider the situation, the meeting will g attended and addressed by Mr. Morkfi and Mr. Qukelea.

AFTER THE m 1

AFTER THE m 1 THE FINANCING OF OVERSEAS CONTRACTS I LAND SETTLEMENTS SCHEME ————— The report to the Board of Trade by the Committee appointed to investigate the question of the best means of meeting tlle needs of British linns after the war as re- gards nnancial facilities for trade, parti- cularly with reference to the nnanClng of large overseas contracts, was issued on Friday as a White Paper. The Committee state that they are led to the conclusion that there is ample room for an institu- tion which, while not interfering unduly with the ordinary business done by the British joint stock banks, by C-oloniad banks and by British foreign banks and banking houses, would be able to assist British interests in a manner that is not possible under existing conditions, i I DEVELOPMENT OF INDUSTRY. Such an institution might in many ways be beneficial to the development of British industry and manufactures, and could also take a leading part in the inception j of transactions and assist in connection with the machinery of overseas business. It would be essential in conducting busi- ness with manufacturers and merchants that the institution should draw and ac- cept bills, and it should generally be in a.. position to undertake credit operations. The institution, proceeds the report, must be equipped with an up-to-date informa- tion department, md thus will of news- sity play a large part in its usefulness and ?: financial success. This might properly be called a bureau d?tudes, independent of the commercial intelligence branch of the I Board of Trade, but in close touch there- with, and under agreement entitled to all possible facilities. The bureau would have to undertake the examination of in- dustrial projects. It was absolutely clear that the personnel of the institution would call for great discrimination. THREE DISTINCT DEPARTMENTS.! An executive committee consisting of a whole-time chairman and three managing directors would appear essential. There would probably be three distinct depart- u-tents-ifnanzial, industrial and commer- cial. They would draw good fixed salaries and would be entitled to a substantial share in the profits. There should be a general 'board of directors, composed of men with banking, financial, industrial and commercial knowledge, and in close touch with the leading industries of the country. The Committee further noint out that at the close of the war there may be a con- siderable number of educated young men who will not be willing to settle down again to the humdrum ei office, and from these it should be possible to iselect men who would be desirous of going to the Colonies and foreign countries to push business on their owniaccount. GOVERNMENT ASSISTANCE. In the case of labouring men, the Gov- ernment are oontempilating the establish- ment of land settlements, etc., at con siderable expense, and similarly it has been suggested that qovernmenrt assistance might be given to the class above men- tioned, who would probably require the advance of some capital to enable them to make a start. The institution suggest that the Committee might act as agent for the Government in this connection. EMIGRATION. The reluctance on the pari: of young men to go abroad in recent years has been brought to the Committee's notice, and they thing it is very desirable that the spirit, of enterprise should be encouraged and that an incentive should be given io them to set up in business in foreign countries. In the case of young men with some means of the.ir own, the institution should be willing, after careful examina- tion of credentials, to gracjfc larger and longer credits than have been customary with existing banks. SPECIAL PARTNERS. The principle of becoming special part- ners in a business for a period of years will be well worth the consideration of the management when the institution is formed. The Committee also point out that it is desirable that the institution, without coming under Government con- trol, should receive as much official recog- nition as possible. Our Foreign Office. [should be asked to instruct British Em- bassies and Legations abroad to put thf institution's representatives in contax with ail commercial attaches, consuls, etc with clear instructions that the institi tion is a commercial concern enjoying 11 full confidence and approval of the Go' eminent, and similar instructions shoul be given by the Board of Trade to the trade commissioners in the Dominion The Committee also recommend the form; tion of a new bank to fill :the gap betweq the home banks and the Colonial d.I1 British foreign banks and bankinghouoe, and to develop facilities not provided 1 the present systems. The bank should ] called the British Trade Rank, and shou < be constituted under Royal Charter. ] FINANCIAL ASPECT. Its chieff features should be as follovj A capital of £ 10,000,000. The first isjj should be from .22,500,000 to = £ 5,000,Qj upon which in the first instance only small amount should be paid up, which should all be called up within ij sonable time. A further issue should] made afterwards, if possible at a ri mium. It should not accept deposits: oall or short notice. It should only o]; current accounts for parties who are Ii posing to make use of the overseas facj ties which it would afford. It should deavour not to interf-ere in, any busirj far which existing banks and bank houses now provide facilities, and should try to promote working tram tioas on joint account with other bar and should invite other banks to sub to it new transactions which, owing to length of time, magnitude, or other sons, they are not prepared to undel.ii alone. W-here desirable it should j operate with the merchant and manu turer, and possibly accept risks upon joint account. Finally, the Comm1 state they are of opinion that there' strong reasons why the bank should formed without delay, so that liminaries may be completed before war is over. I EXPLOITING NEW MARKET? Our enemies are sure to make aiD earliest moment strenuous efforts f- gain their position in the world of 1" merce and finance, and it may well bit when peace comes unemployment nie rife at home unless new markets ac ploited. (Continued at the foot of next 00\)1

AFTER THE m 1

1 I ft seems to the Committee desirable to Jertain in advance the requirements of teign countries and the whereabouts of v material for our industries. The Conir ttee believe that the bank suggested )uld not only be a great boon to British jdc, but should prove a commercial suc- Us. Lord Faringdon was the chairman of the jiuimittee, who express their regret that fair colleague Mr. Gaspard Farrer had kt seen his way to sign tihe report. South Wales Case Presented. On Wednesday there was an important quel to the congress on housing and wn planning and other home problems ter the war which, was held in the ixton Hall, London, in April last. At hat congress there were present 400 dele- gates, representing local authorities in zlngland, Scotland, and Wales, profes^ ional associations, building trades em- ployers, building trades workmen, Trade Unions, and many societies interested in the question of social welfare, and an im- jportant deputation, selected by that con- gress, visited on Wednesday last the Local Grovernment Board, and were received by the President (Mr. Long) and the members of the Board. The various speakers urged the Govern- ment to allocate, at the ckfeo of the war, a sum of at least Y2,0,000,000 for the pur- pose of making advances to local authori- ties and other approved agencies for the provision of houses for the working classes to let at reasonable rents, and for other purposes Connected with housing generally and the satisfactory planning of areas, urban and rural. CLAI MS OF SOUTH WALES. I The special claims of South Wales, with ) its crowded industrial areas and difficult geographical conditions, were put forward I by Mr. C. T. Ruthen, architect, of Swan- sea, who in the course of his address to the President and members of the Board, eat out the urgent need for housing in this area, and pointed out that it is estimated jthat at the present moment there is a shortage of at least 4-0,000 houses in South Wales. Further, that the application of jthe principles of town planning is more urgently needed in South Wales than per- haps any other area in the British Isles. He stated that the deep narrow valleys in the mining districts, with their crowded and disorderly built towns and villages teeming with population, are ter- rible examples of the old-time Haphazard methods of town planning, and are more in need of broad and firm treatment than most industrial centres. Mr. Long, who had granted an interview lasting nearly two hours, in a very fine speech, informed the deputation that he was in fullest sympathy with their recom- mendations, and felt that if the Govern- ment came to the aid of local authorities it must be on liberal lines, and he was not sure that 920,000,000 was even an index of what might be required. Mr. Long, in thanking the members of the deptuation, said it would be a black crime to let. our soldiers come back from water-logged and horrible trenches to something better than a pig-sty."

DEEDS OF DARING I

DEEDS OF DARING. I Fighting Qualities of the I British Guardsman. In an sccount of the Guards' part in the great thst of Friday and Saturday last the Pres Association correspondent at the British leadquarters writes:—In the early morningof the 15th the Guards were in a positid forward. Bvl-30 p.m. the Guards had accom- Ðlisbl what they had been bidden to do, havi? covered more than 3,000 yards of gro-.ii. BATALIONS CHARGE TOGETHER. On fact of particular interest in connec- tion "ith this advance is that for the first timin the history of the Coldstream Cilitis three battalions which form a regi- men went forward together. Ti loss of so much territory was no oneo which the enemy could be expected to sbmit tamely, and during the night a heaf bombardment was followed by a c,oitr--r-attack. Then it was that the Ger- manhad a good taste of the quality of the Brith Guarsdmen at close quarters. This wasoo little to their liking to be long sustned. B, shortlived as was the Anf"tr.v stride, it was marked by several acts of eha-cteristic daring. One man, having fireoff all his ammunition, recovered a Le gun from a wounded man and pro- ceed deliberately to empty several dnts, whistling all the while as hard as heHild. i Irish Guardsman, who was with a pay which helped to drive back the eoiter-attack, came. upon a machine-gun an its crew. He shot two of these, bfOhetted a third, struck the officer in thface with his clenched fist, and last sn him scudding away. Then, remarking tit his corps would be glad of as many ii-iiin&giins as it could get, actually Illiød the weighty weapon and carried it bk to his trench under his arm.

IlOTTEFPl L f frlTSCRE W

lOTTEFPl L f frlTSCRE W Names in Latest German Casualty List. msterdam, Thursday.—The latest Ger- nt casualty list contains the names of Ctain Wilhelm Schramm and 15 other ntibers of the Army Airship Service, all dd. hese are presumably the captain and eff of the airship brought down by Iut. Robinson, V.C., at Cuffley. It is ^resting to note that London is given f Schramm's addrese. Times Tele- fm, per Press Association.

CHECKMATED I

CHECKMATED I VON MAGKENSEN MEETS HiS MASTER. VICTORY WON BY CLEVER STRATEGY < Bucharest, Thursday -An official com- munique issued this evening says that on the north and north-western fronts there have been actions in the Caliman and Ghurgill mountains, whert we took an officer and 136 rank and file prisoners, and captured machine-guns. A detachment ha6 entered Orderhei (Szekly Udvarhely). In the Jiu Valley we repulsed an enemy attack on the southern frc.,il. There was an artillery aao) hetWoen the Zininecea and Sistor batteries in the Dobrudja. The battle which began on September 16 and which increased in in- tensity until the evening of September 19, ended on September 20 in the defeat of the enemy, consisting of German, Bul- garian and Turkish troops, who retreated southwards. The enemy burned their vil- lages during their retreat. I Reuter's Agency states that the news of the enemy's retreat before the Rumanian arms in the Dobrudja, has caused the highest satisfaction in Rumanian diplo- matic and military quarters. It, however, gives rise to no surprise, and as the Russo-Rumanian concentration is still de- veloping, events in the immediate future cannot be forecasted. I MATCH FOR MACKENSEN. It is declared, however, that General Averescu has fully realised all that was expected of him, and will prove a match for Mackensen. The Ru- manian Commander-in-Chief on the Dobrudja is well known both in England and Russia. He was responsible for the campaign against the Bulgarians in 1913, and as War Minister, quelled the peasant resolution in 1907. He rOBl from the ranks. He was only transferred from the Transylvania command on the evidence of Bulgaria's treachery in the south. The latter, it is declared, will now realise the mistake they have made in following their national instincts and being unable to keep their word. I BROKEN ENEMY PLAN. A Rumanian Staff Officer said to-day to Reuter's representative that the enemy plan in the Dobrudja has failed, and their aims in capturing the great bridge and also the town of Constanza has also failed completely. The Bulgarians will not be able to send further reinforconents to the Dobrudja owing to the distance of the railways and the lateness of the season, while the Rus- sians and ourselves can pour troops into there if necessary. The movement in the Vulcan Pass is probably only a local enter- prise to got possession of the mines. It is not strategical, because the pass is 30 ffiometrsf tloi«L for the eremy to attack. It would entail for him ti.oo great sacrifices.

tENORMOUS LOSSES

t ENORMOUS LOSSES. I Germans Lose 60 Per Cevit. of Their Effectives. I Paris, Thursday.—The Expert French Commentator writes to-night as follows: I The Germans, decimated yesterday by I our fire, did not renew their counter-at- tacks to-day. It is confirmed that the effort which they mnde yesterday against our new positions north of the Somme was one of the most powerful they have at- tempted since the beginning of the July offensive. The defeat which they suffered is also one of the most sanguinary which our troops have inflicted upon them since the legendary hecatombs oj the Mort Homme, Vaux, and Donaumont.. Particu- lars are already known of the attack, and how the magnificent resistance of our troops shattered them with enermous losses, which reached in certain places as much as 60 per cent. of their effectives. I THE INVESTMENT OF COMBLES. The objective of the enemy's General Staff was doubly important. It was a matter on the one hand of freeing Combles, the investment of which is methodically being continued, and on the other of getting rid of the salient at Bouchavesnes, which adjoins the famous Mont St. Quentin redoubt, the supreme de- fence of Peronne. With this object the enemy put considerable forces into action. The 18th Corps, specially taken from the Aisne front in order to take part in the counter-offensive, was reinforced by the 214th Division, which was hastily recalled to the Somme when already on the way to the Russian front. This proves that the shuttle-like movements of the troops to which the German General Staff has for a long time had recourse have become impracticable. In this there can be seen the happy effect of unity of action on unity of front. The German defea-fs yes- terday on the Somme were followed to-day by an interesting French success on the Meuee. Exactly seven months ago the German blow against Verdun was begun. On this anniversary our soldiers made an appreciable gain of ground on the out- skirts of Thiaumont Work and in the Vaux-Chapitre Wood. The enlarging of our positions is methodically going on be- fore the inviolate citadel.

I CONSCRIPTION PROBLEM

CONSCRIPTION PROBLEM. Melbourne, Thursday (received Fri- day).—Mr. Hughes, opening a referen- dum campaign here to-day, said wealthy Australians would have to bear a heavy burden. If victory went against them they would not have, to give a tithe—they would have to give all.

SUNK OFF DOGGER BANKI

SUNK OFF DOGGER BANK. Copenhagen, Thursday.—The captain of a trawler which arrived to-day at Esbjerg, states that at the Dogger Bank he saw the wreck of a large German aero- plane. The crew of the ship made several vain attempts to tender assistance. The aeroplane sank and the occupants per- ished.—" Daily Mail."

COLONIAL BUDGET

COLONIAL BUDGET. Adelaide, Thursday.—The Premier and Treasurer of South Australia in his bud- get 6h in the Assembly to-day esti- mated 'the. deficit for the past year at S470,(?00, but owing to the failure of Par- liament to pass additional taxation the! deficit had increased to ?855,000. For the coming year the estimated revenue and expenditure left a surplus of 22,000. The Government intended to reintroduce the .taxa tion rejected last year.

I TODAYS WAR RESUME

I !TO-DAY'S WAR RESUME I Leader Office, 4.50 p.m. To-day"? British communique is dis- tinctly cheerful. We have advanced on a front of abc .r a mile, and have taken two lines of trenches between Flerc .lid Martinpuich. From Salonika comes the news that the Struma front ships of the Royal Navy have shelled the enemy with sat- isfactory results. On the Doiran front artillery activity has increased. This morning a Bucharest telegram w':s iv-ceived giving details of desperate four days' fighting in the Dobrudja. The enemy, comprising German, Bulgarian, am. Turkish troops, retreated south- wards, Imnniy villages as they went. In the fighg north of the Somme the Germans have suffered enormous losses. It is estimated thai af ?ome points tlier have lost a much as ou per cent. or their effectives. Bad weather has con>c the area of British operations H' the western front into a veritable sea of muo. The Ger- mans repeated their counter-attacks without result.

j COLLIER KILLED

j COLLIER KILLED. Brother an Eye-Witness of Pit Fatality. A fatal accident oocurred at Llandebie Collier; on Thursday, the victim being a young collier named William Bees, 19 yoor of age, lodging with his brother, j Thomas Rees. at Thomas-terrace, but whooo home is at Capel Isaac, near LiaL- d: Ie. He was working with his brother, when there was a fall of roof, which struck him on the head. Death was instantaneous. 'His brother was an eye-witness of the ac- cident. The body was conveyed to Capel Isaacs, where the inquest will be held.

I THE DREADED TANKS I

THE DREADED TANKS. I Land Dreadnoughts Designed by Admiralty Officers. I The Ministry of Munitions issues the i following: In view of the statements, more or less erroneous, which Have appeared in the Press, the Ministry of Munitions desire to deprecate the circulation of statements re- garding the organisation and construction of the new armoured cars commonly de- signated tanks." In due course an official statement will be issued giving the history and develop- ment of these machines, when credit will be given to whom credit is due. It is only fair, however, to state that th3 design and construction of the first tank f: due to oiffcers working under the Admuraity. The Ministry of Muni- tions subsequently undertook to provide I. facilities for furth-er--Pxlw-.i-nw tati<)n and for the construction and supply >f these machines.

I SCOURING BELGIUM

I SCOURING BELGIUM. Amsterdam, Friday.—The Telegraaf" learns from the frontier that Germans are again scouting Belgium for young men of military age. All those who are found are put in gaol for some days.

I NEW YORK STRIKES

I NEW YORK STRIKES. I New York, Thursday (received Fri- day).—Labour leaders announce they will call a sympathetic strike to-morrow I owing to the failure of the city authori- ties to settle the street car difficulty.

I A WOOD MYSTERY

I A WOOD MYSTERY. While some children were blackberry- ing in woods fortr miles from Chatham Ion Thursday they were horrified to find the decomposed body of a young woman. The police were informed. and inquiries indicate foul play. The body is believed II to be that of a young Rochaster servant who disappeared mysteriously in August last-

I NO INVOICE BOOK

I NO INVOICE BOOK. I George Henry Mogford, an off-licensee, School-road, Melincrythan, was sum- moned at Neath on Friday for an offence under the Liquor Control Board Order. Mr. Clarke, Swansea, pleaded guilty to a technical offence, and P.C. Lisk spoke to seeing defendant's errand boy deliver- ing flagons of beer at a house in Melin- crythan without invoice or book. Defendant was fined 40s.

20 MILES AN HOUR I

20 MILES AN HOUR. t Godfrey Price, Merthyr, charged at lneath on Friday with driving a motor lear at a speed dangerous to the public, 'said he knew nothing about it. P.S. Morgan, Glyn-Neath, estimated the 'speed of the car at 20 miles an hour. It dashed round the Rock Corner at Glyn- Neath, and the passengers had a good j laugh when his order to stop the car was ignored. A fine of Z3 was imposed.

I GERMAN EXTORTIONS I I

I GERMAN EXTORTIONS. I I More Taxes to Raise the Wind. I Amsterdam, Thursday (received Friday). —The Maastricht newspaper Less Nou- velles" learns from Belgium that. the Get- mans have introduced a tax on bank notes, and forced subse iption to the War Loan. All bank notes in the possession of banks, commercial houses, and private persons must bear a stamp afExed by the German authorities, and will not be legal currency without it. Further, the German authori- ties have announced that 50 per cent. of the Ge i man bank notes in Belgium wiU be seized in exchange for War Loan certifi- cates.

SPAIN AND NEUTRALITY I

SPAIN AND NEUTRALITY. I Bitter Comment on Submarine I Outrages. Madrid, Friday.—The Heraldo De Madrid" publishes an interview with Senor Alvarez, the well-known statesman. Senor Alvarez supports the declarationsof the Reformist party regarding Spain's neutrality. The idea of armed interven- tion, he declared, is mad. He believed in benevolent neutrality. He then went on to blame the policy' of a country which, drunk with present power, permitted the torpedoing of Spanish ships in defiance of I the Hague Convention, in return for the noble conduct cf Spain towards Germans deported from the Cameroon*

Advertising

C9AL EXPORTS. A meeting of coal exporU i. if. Is our l/ondon corre-pondent) ben» £ th?aitprn