Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 6 Next Last
Full Screen
49 articles on this page
Advertising

The Cambria Daily I Leader" gives later news than any paper published in this dis- trict.

Advertising

AW.Ã.ZJ ..4; The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader. is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor), where ad ver- tisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel. 2276 Central.

GREAT AIR RAID

GREAT AIR RAID Over 4i Tons of Bombs on Mauser Factory. SIX DEFENDING AIRCRAFT BROUGHT DOWN. I I British Gains on Somme. TO-DAY'S BRITISH OFFICIAL., The following telegraphic dispatcn was issued by the British General Headquarters in France at 11.20 a.m.:— In yesterday's operations south of the Ancre, we advanced our front between Gueudecourt and Les Boeufs, and also north-west of Gueudecourt. We took about 150 prisoners. During the night, the enemy at- tacked our line north of Stuff Re- doubt, but was driven off. Xiast night 14 raiding parties entered the enemy's trenches in the Ypres and Armentieres area, taking a number of prisoners and inflicting considerable casualties. TO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. The night was rather agitated on both banks of the Somme. Skirmishes and reciprocal bombard- ments sometimes reached great violence in the sectors of Morval, Bouch, Avesnes, Ablaincourt and Chaulney. There is nothing to report on the rest of the front. GREAT RAID. I A Franco-British group of 40 aero- planes bombarded the Mauser fortress at Obendorn (on the Nector). 4,340 kilogrammes (over 92cwt.) of projectiles were dropped, and they were observed to reach their mark. Six German aeroplanes were brought down in the course of the action engaged in by the latter for the purpose of defending the factories. ———— ———— TO-DAY'S BRITISH SALONIKA j OFFICIAL. I The General Officer Commanding the British Forces in Salonika re- ports :— On the Struma front we have pushed forward patrols from Prosenik and Topolva to the east of the railway. Our armoured cars have reconnoi- tred to the junction of the Seres- Dean-His&ar and Eere-s-Salonika roads. The enemy holding the railway was found to be entrenched about Nihor. On the Doiran front, to the north of Ooldel-Ooldstli, hostile trenches were raided, and after strong re- sistance, the enemy fled, leaving 20 dead. TO-DAY'S RUSSIAN OFFICIAL. Western Front.—During the mght of Oct 12 the Germans opened an artillery fire on our trench on the western bank of the River Shara, in the region of the village of Tol- boitchi. This was followed by an attack, which resulted in the temporary capture of a section of our trench. The enemy, however, was soon driven out by our counter-attack, and repelled with heavy losses. Caucasian Front.—On the whole front an exchange of fire and scouting operations are taking place. In Dobrudja the position on our front remains unchanged.

IF HUGHES HAD BEEN PRESIDENT

IF HUGHES HAD BEEN PRESIDENT THE LUSITANIA WOULD NEVER' HAVE BEEN SUNK." I I Louisville, Friday.—Judge Hughes, the Republican candidate for the Presidency, replying to a heckler who asked what he would have done if he had been President when the Lusitunia was sunk, said he would have had the State Department at the beginning so equipped that it would have commanded the respect of the world. And when he said Strict account- ability every nation would have known what it meant. If that had been done the Lusitania would never have been sunk. (Loud applause.)

HIS EXCUSESI

HIS EXCUSES. I A young fitter was summoned before the London Munitions Tribunal on Thursday, for losing time on many occasions, and some of his excuses for his various absences were— Went to see a wrecked Zeppelin. Just before the holiday period. Went to seq a doctor in the evening, because he was ill in the morning. Tie had sore feet. He was ordered to pay X,2 at once. U I cannot do it," he excbimoo. U The last time I nearly got into debt over the blessed thing."

440 FOR A DONKEYI

£ 440 FOR A DONKEY. I The donkey. Love, whif'h has already been sold at Oswestry, Ellesmere, Dudies- ton, and Llanfyllin, realising- £ 140, added .650 more at a farmers' sale at Llangollen on Thursday. It was in charge of Mr. Grcon Da vies. Go bo wen. A Cheshire cheese, weighing 501 b., was disposed of for 50 Treasury notes: a mountain pony, qrven by Ladv S torey, Wantyr, £ 2Q: fat bullock, by Ciptain Best, and other kinds of stock and produce sold at exceptionally high prices. Meanwhile an effort made by the ladies of the town, which took the form of a whist drive, realised J670 for the Red Cross Society.

A BOGUS HEROI

A BOGUS HERO. I A bogus hero received sentences totalling Fix m-onths' imprisonment from the Man- chester Citv Stipendiary on Thursday for obtaining food and lodgings by false pre- tences. unlawfully wearing two gold "wounded stripes and giving false reristration particulars. Tlif man was Robert Edward Hall, of Salford, who was discharged after 32 days* army service without having been out of the country. According to Detective-Sergeant Walsh the man had posed as a wounded V.C. and D.C.M., and had lived at two places under one nam. He seemed to leave one place in the morning as though to go to and then proceed to tho other lodgings. From hia davtime landlady he borrowed i ?s. 6d.. giving her his photo sTLpn?, Ser- ) Mat P. Hall. V.C. anq D.C.M."

RUSSIAN SUCCESS

RUSSIAN SUCCESS. Important Gain on Read. to Lemberg. Paris, Friday.—M. Paul Erio, correspon- dent of U Le Journal at Petrograd says: South of Brzezany, General Tcherbach- eff has just obtained a success which ? of considerable importance, as several lines in this region run towards Lemberg, and the Roliacyn flows to it. The Russians are driving the enemy successfully from the railway line and the neighbouring station. They have taken possession of the vil- lage of Poutoutore, and are now not more than two kilometres from Brzezany.

VATICAN PROTEST

VATICAN PROTEST. Reply to Allegations of Espionage. Rome, Thursday.—The special office for prisoners of war established at the Vati- can issues the following communication: In order to avoid misinterpretation of the charitable tranamismon of letters to war prisoners, and particularly to avoid the spread of the calumnius charge that espionage is exercised or favoured by the Holy See brought forward by certain newspapers, the Holy See has reluctantly decided to suspend such tranisinission." This decision has caused painful sur- prise, especially in Catholic circles.— Times."

BOMBS ON CONSTANZA

BOMBS ON CONSTANZA. Amsterdam. Friday.—According to a special telegram from Berlin, German sea- planes on the 9th inst. and on the night of the same day successfully 'bombed Rus- sian transport steamers at Constanza.

PEACEFUL PERSUASION

PEACEFUL PERSUASION? Why don't you choke down these Pacifiists?" was Mr. Stanton's pertinent question in the House of Commons on Thursday afternoon, and there was general sympathy with the little outburst from the stalwart Labour leader.

ON RUMANIAS FRONT

ON RUMANIA'S FRONT. Bucharest, Saturday (delayed).-The enemy is congregating large numbers of troops on the northern front. Enemy aviators continue to attack the villages surrounding Bucharest. To-day they new over Bucharest, and throw several bombs without any appreciable efffot.

MP BREAKS HIS LEG

M.P. BREAKS HIS LEG. While the Right Hon. Laurence Hardy, Unionist M.P. for the A 6 ft ford Division of Kent, was waiting for a train at Lyminge Station, he stumbled against some pipes and fell, with the result that his leg was fractured in two places. He was taken to his country residence at Sandling Park, near Hytlie. Mr. Hardy, who became a Privy Ccun- in 1911, is 62 years of age,,

tTALYS mORY I

tTALY'S mORY. I A FURTHER 1,771 PRISONERS TAKEN ITALIAN OFFICIAL. I Rome, Thursday.—In the Adige Valley our artillery shelled the military stores in Rovereto and the Calliano railway sta- tion. An attempt on the part of the enemy to attack our positions in the Val Arsa was promptly checked. On the northern slopes of Mount Pas- ubio renewed counter-attacks were dirven loff by our troops, and we inflicted heavy looses on the enemy, capuring a gun and; large quantities of arms and ammunition. On the Asiago plateau raiding parties entered the hostile trenches at Casera Zcbio and broke them down, returning suhsequenly to our lines in safety. On the evening of October 10, at the head o; Vanoi Valley, after intense artil- lery preparation, the enemy launched four successive attacks against our posi- tions at Busa Alta. The Bersaglieri and Alpini troops successively broke down tht enemy's offensive and counter-attacked with the bayonet, taking 37 prisoners. Un the Julian front mist obscured artil- lery observation during the morning. Fresh troops attacked .again and again the most important positions of the line we had captured east of Vertoibizza and on the Carso. The attackers were caught by our artillery fire and driven off with very severe loss. During the afternoon our infantry increased their occupation of captured positions, especially near Sober (south-east of Gorizia) and at Points 3443 and 144, as well as east of Nova Villa (Nova Vas). On the Carso we captured a further 1,771 prisoners, including 35 officers. Since 6th August we have taken in all 30,881 prisoners, including 728 officers, on the Julian front alone. The number of prisoners captured on Wednesday was 6,425, so that the total ap- proaches 8,200. 150 SHELLS A MINUTE. I Rome, Thursday.—The Seecolo "states that the intensity of the Italian bombard- ment reached 150 shells per minute. Pri- soners of Rumanian origin, who have surrendered, declare that' the Austrian trenches had more dead bodies that com- batants in them, so terrific was the Italian artillery fire. On seceral occasions the Austrians, observing the approach of large Italian patrols sent out for observa- tion purposes, supposed it was the begin- ning of a general attack by the Italian infantry, and came out of their trenches to repel the attack, whereupon the Italian artillery opened on them with wonderful effect. The battle has now extended to Plava, Tolmino, and Monte Duino, and con- tinues to rage furiously over a front of 70 kilometres (431 miles). AUSTRÏÃNSCLArMTOHAVE STOOD THEIR GROUND. Amsterdam, Thursday (received Friday). —To-day's Vienna official communique says:— Eastern Theatre.—On the Vulkan Pass, Rumanian attacks failed. In the region of Brasso the enemy were obliged to retire in the direction of the frontier passes. During the last two days eighteen officers, 639 men, one heavy guns, five machine- guns and much war material have been brought in. In the Goergeny Mountains, and on both sides of the Upper Maros, Rumanian resistance has been broken, and our troops are pursuing north of Zolatvina. In Eastern Galicia a Russian attack was repulsed, Italian Theatre.—Yesterday was the third day of big infantry fighting on the southern wing of the Littoral front. Our troops stood their ground against enemy assaults. North of Wippach and south- ward to the region of Lokvica, all attacks by the Italians were repulsed. East and south of Oppacchiasella, the enemy gained gtound, and Novavas fell into his hands. Further south to the sea, the enemy re- peatedly penetrated some parts of our ) front, but was always ejected. Our Alpine troops again distinguished themselves. The number of captured Italians has in- creased to 2,700. In some portions of the Corinthian and Tyrolean front, weak enemy detachments took part in attempts to attack on tke Pasubio, where our posi- tion was withdrawn from Cosmagon to Boite Ridge. The day and night passed more calmly. South-Eastern.—Nothing to report.

KEEP HATE FIRES BURNINGi

KEEP HATE FIRES BURNING. The note of the Foreign Affairs debate in the Reichstag was the perfervid denun- ciation of Great Britain. England is the main enemy," declared Herr Ba?aprmann. Englan

ICARMARTHEN LIGHTING

I CARMARTHEN LIGHTING. I Replying to Mr. Llewelyn Williams' question regarding the refusal of the Car- marthen Electric Lighting Committee to give any rebate for 200 lamps not lit, Mr. Walter Long in the House of Com- mons on Thuawiay said: I am making in- quiries into the matter, as I am not In possession of all the facts. My view is that in cases of this kind there ought to he eome equitable arrangement between the parties, and I will consider what is the best course to adopt.

I18 YEARS HARD WORKI

I 18 YEARS' HARD WORK. I Alfred Lewis, aged 39, a fancy leather goods manufacturer, asking at Shore.diteh yesterday for exemption, said he began 18 years ago with a capital of ?85, and now had a turnover of ?50,000, with a stock wort-h £ 10,000. Year in and year j out he worked from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. He was trying, he said, to capture ais; much as possible of the German fancy- II goods trade and had a military and naval embroidery business. He was granted six months' exemption.

ITHE SOLDIERS CHILDREN I

I THE SOLDIER'S CHILDREN. I In order that children of dqad or dis- abled officers and men who have served in the Forces may be as well educated as if their fathers were still alive and well, the War Pensions Statutory Committee will make yearly grants on the following scale:— Day school children over 5 and under 13, fees not exceeding t20 and £5 expenses. Day school children over 13 and under 21,. fees up to S:25, and £10 expenses. Children under 21, at boarding school or college away from home, £50. Applications should be made to the Wr Pensions Statutory Committee, 22, ?Abingdon-etreet, W tmi1}.Bt-er V

I RUMANIAS APPEAL

RUMANIA'S APPEAL KlNff SSTRIKIKO STATEMENT AND APPEAL U The Times" publioh-es an interview accorded by King Ferdinand of Rumania to its seoal correspondent with the Rumaniai Army, Mr. Stanley Washburn. Rumana, said King Ferdinand, had not been moved by more expediency. Her determintion to enter the war was based on the Iggest principle of nationality. Against Germany there was at the begin- ning of tIe war no hostility, but as the war devfbped the enemy theory of Fright- fulness lad a deep effect on Rumanian opinion. Spoakig of Rumania's choice of her time foientfring the struggle, Kyig Fer- :J uiuanu K)i; iea out that she is a small l'o -r ,-ii th a small Army but with a western Jer greater than the English and Frech fronts combined. She had waited ir a time when she could act with reaonable assurance of protecting herself ad of having the support of her great All-is, upon whom she depended for the prestation of her national life. The Illlanians, said his Majesty, will not faltein their allegiance to the cause, nor can fe enemy wean them from their faith in hgland the just, in France their Latin brcVrs. and in Russia their imme- diate neib.bour. Yet Rumanians pray that in )ite of their own deep problems the kllii will not allow the affairs of Rumani; who has staked her all in this conflict,to pass into the back of their J minds ad suffer that she meet the fete either o Belgium or of Serbia.

GEIMANYS AGENTI

GEIMANY'S AGENT. I U53 commander's Visit in I Mufti. New --)rk, Thursday-United States officials ..sve discovered that Germanv has a wnan agent in Newport. to whom Captain-Jose of the 1753 paid a hurried visit imufti before proceeding to sea to hold upJritish and neutral vessels. The wornan'ih usband admits that she is in constant communication by mail with German The inian apparentlv keeps a little general t ore in Newport, and the hus- band e¡)illS Captain Rose's call by the fact thi" «he is related to Bualow and is well >owii in Germany." He also ex- plains tt his wife is German, and has 42 nephewhking part'in the war.—" Daily Chronic"

OVRCROWDED TRAINSI

OVRCROWDED TRAINS. I Mr. I cirnan, replying to Mr. Stanton I in thetaise of Commons on Thursday, I said hw as afraid it was impossible to preven t ercrowding on railways, and it might fieceseary still further to reduce j the patiger train service. r

THETTAM HABIT

THETTAM HABIT. Thi convictg serving terms of penal service in Mecklenburg-Strelitz are to be tr for committing a burglarly in priso They broke into the prison food I storeaid stole £25 worth of bacon andI hain,.rhich they concealed in their cells i ate at their leisure.

REARMS IN IRELAND

REARMS IN IRELAND. Geal Sir John Maxwel, Command- ing Ireland, has prohibited all mantture, sale, transfer, or dealings of 8 kind in firearms or explosives, and :horised the Customs and police to se all such articles brought into Irela.

Vn SAVINGS FACILITY

Vn SAVINGS FACILITY. Waavings certificates of any amount' fromi to JE500 may in future be had on applion to the Comptroller and Ac- count-General, General Post Office, Lond Forms of application may be hadtJOBt offices and banks at which Warrings certificates are sold. Si1 21 for 15s. 6d. certificates and certites of S12 and S25 will be sold at 1 locaht offices and most banks.

HOLLANDS ANGER I

HOLLAND'S ANGER. I A.rrdam, Friday.-Acoording to a I felep to the Rotterdamsche Cour- ant;1:S declared in authoritative naval quai m Berlin that the commander of the aarine which sank the Blom- mer jk, did not tell the captain of the Bloiradijk he had been instructed to sink ships calling at British ports, andt he could not have made any sucknark.-Pre&s Association.

ETROL COMPLAINTS I

ETROL COMPLAINTS. I Airier of a millian petrol licences werued during July and August, and aftee issue of the licences 100,000 per- soruote complaining that their allot- mei petrol was inadequate. Ttatement was made in the House of uion6 on Thursday by Mr. Runci- mal reply to a number of questions reg-kg the work of the Petrol Control j Coitee,

I E PENSIONS MINISTRY

E PENSIONS MINISTRY. Tabinet Committee on Pensions has fin. its report, and it is believed that it favour of one Central Pensions Miy. The Cabinet will decide on the rein a few days. Mr. Hogge will ask thtrne Minister for a statement on Tiy. -go number of M.P.'s of all parties tmThursday and passed the following ref^n:— 't a Central Pensions Authority be coited immediately under a Pension Mir responsible to Parliament, so as to dinate the work now being under- taiy the various authorities."

TILL MORE SHELLSI

TILL MORE SHELLS. I kmison, M.P., Parliamentary Sec- re to the Ministry of Munitions, at a orial celebration to Nurse Cavell at-edit.ch on Thursday, said the har- v< munition workers' efforts has only Ixto Be reaped during the past few m. must have these things, not for oies alone but also to assist those oi Allies, less happily circumstanced a/ith less manufacturing capacity tiurseTves. When the offensive had boing on for two months, notwith- s'lg the enormous daily expenditure, Ück-s of heavy projectilcs—tlie most \it of all t-ó make and supply—were at as they were at the beginning.. icriow that our heroic soldiers are differing their tribute of thaoks." he L*

TRICK WHICH FAILED

TRICK WHICH FAILED ——— ——— INGENIOUS ATTEMPT TO HOODWINK IHE BRITISH NAVY. RUBBER MIXED WITH COFFEE The Prize Court on Friday disposed of the case of the Norwegian steamship Lyn- genfjord, in which the condemnation of 250 bags or parcels was asked for on the ground that gross attempt had been made, in many cases no doubt successfully, said counsel, but in this case unsuccessfully to impose on the British Navy or Admiralty authorities. In their investigation of a cargo pass- ing to Scandinavia, according to the Crown statement, goods contained in 2.50 sac k s were inscribed in the bill of lading and in the manife-t, a sackS of ooffee, but on being opened it was found that mixed with the cofiirV w, qnarib'tie. of 'raw rubber. The wcigm 

BIGGER PENSIONS I

BIGGER PENSIONS. A number of old-age pensioners in Lon- don have been granted an increase in the weekly sum received. The first cases under the new provisions were reported upon to the London Pensions Committee on Thursday, and in several instances the maximum supplementary allowance, 2s. I 6d., was agreed to.

ANTWERP IN THE DARKNESS

ANTWERP IN THE DARKNESS. Amsterdam, Friday.—The Antwerp cor- respondent of the Handelsblad reports that. tlfe Germans have abolished the system of taking postages in order to pre- vent communication with enemy airmen by the giving of signals. After sunset the town still remains in darkness, and orders to enforce this have become much stricter.

EXPENSIVE FUNERALS I

EXPENSIVE FUNERALS. I Judge Cluer, at the Shoreditch City Court on Thursday, during the hearing II of an action in which a claim was made for XS, the balance of the cost of a funeral — £ 10 having already been paid, said 95 [ was enough to pay for a funeral. He added that lie, wished ]je couM -hope no o«ie would spend eighteen yen oo on his I funeral.

THE PRIS CROPS IJ

THE PRIS CROPS. I J A peculiar happening is reported from Aughagowen. The crops of oats, hay, etc., belonging to Father Flatley, the parish priest, were on Thursday found < to have been scattered all over the ( ground. iNo reaeon can be assigned, un- less it be that the priest objected to sports being held in his parish this year owing to the amount of drunkenness pre- vailing at similar events last year.

I FARM HANDS RESPITE

I FARM HANDS' RESPITE. At Essex county appeal tribunal Mr. Dent, a Board of Agriculture representa- tive, counselled that farmers should be permitted to retain their men till Jan. 1, and to obtain discharged soldiers by ap- plying at the Labour Bureaux or re- cruiting offices. The opportunity should not be neglected, as the army would take all younger men three months hence, whether the farmers were ready to let them go or not.

OFFtCEFTS TRAGtC DEATHj

OFFtCEFTS TRAGtC DEATH. j Lieut. Alec King, of Exning, a young officer home on sick leave, while out shoot- ing at Shippen-ham, a few miles from Newmarket, on Thursday afternoon, met with terrible injuries througih the acci- dental discharge of his gun, and bled to death before medical assistance could be rendered. His right arm was almost I blown away near the shoulder. Deceased's double-barrelled gun was found close by, I and appearances pointed to its being acci- dentally fired.

A LUXURY BUSINESS J

A LUXURY BUSINESS. J An appeal was made to the House of Commons Tribunal on Thursday for the manager, aged 32, of an American tobacco and cigar cony, in which it was stated that the greater proportion of the capital —over three-quarters of a milli-on-wa6 in the hands of British shareholders. Mr. Bettesworth: This is a luxury busi- ness. It brings in a large amount of re- venue, do doubt, but it is not important, I like the production of food. This man :is ¡ I 31 and we are sending men of 40, who are: I latliers of families, into the Army. A sitort adjournment was allowed.

IFOLLOWED BY THEIR WORK

FOLLOWED BY THEIR WORK. ti U If Ministers go away -for week-ends their work follows them a.nd the only real relaxation they get is that they are free Irom the society, voluntary or involun- tary, which they cannot escape so long as they remain in town." This little confession by Mr. Asquith on Thursday aroused amusement in the House of Commons. He was defending I the arrangement under which the House of Commons will at present sit for only three days a week.

OFFICIALLY DEAD1

OFFICIALLY DEAD! .1 A time-expired Territorial of the 8th Manchester Regiment, who was granted II exemption until December 31, at Man- chester. on Thursday, had had a unique experience. While serving in the Dardanelles he was wounded and left for dead in the Turkish trenches. He was officially reported killed, and a certificate of death was sent to his parents, but as a matter of fact, after being shot he managed to crawl back to the British base. He was eventually sent to Southport, where he was reported to be mnfit for further service, and at Margate he was discharged from the Army as a time-ex- pi red man. Since then he had got mar- ried. Judge Mo]lor agreed it was a hard case and granted the exemption. )

TODAYS WAR RESUME

TO-DAYS WAR RESUME) I Leader" Office, 4.50 P-m- I The British front on the Somme has been advanced between Gueudecourt and Lea j Bcoufs, and north-west of the former place. About 150 prisoners were titkem. The British official report speaks of many 1 successful raids on German trenches between Ypres and Armentieres. A Russian report, via Paris, says an im- portant success has been gained on the road to Lemberg. Greece has submitted to the Allies' de- mand that the Greek Fleet and certain forts shall be handed over. The Italian success has been followed by fresh progress. Some 1,771 more pris- oners were taken, brincinsr thA frvtal number in two days up to about 8,200. J Sir Douglas Haig has paid a tribute to j the part of the New Zeaiandeiv ithe, licence of U-, Ire. Sir Percy Lake's report covering the J pet,iod of, and immediately preceding, the fall of Kut, has just been published.

I WOMEN WORKERSI

I WOMEN WORKERS. I As the time for training men for munition work has passed, the Higher I Education Committee for Wimbledon and i district have decided to use their new el- giiieering department at the Technical In- stitute solely for the instruction of women.

POSmON OF VOLUNTEERSI

 POSmON OF VOLUNTEERS. I .Lord Deby will make a statement on the policy of the Government towards the Volunteers at a meeting of Llle Central Association of Volunteer Regiments in the County Hall, Spring-gardens, next Thursday at three o'clock.

VENEREAL DISEASESI

VENEREAL DISEASES. I" Four beds in the Royal Hospital, Ports- mouth, are to be set aside, under the new Public Health venereal diseases regula- tions, for in-patients, and a building is to be fitted up as a temporary out-patient department. A specially trained medical officer will attend three days a week, and treatment will be free.

NEW VESSELS I

NEW VESSELS. I Vessels that are now being built for neutral owners will, Mr. Runciman says, either be sold to British owners or be chartered to the Government for the war and for some months after, at a rate about half the market rate. There need be no anxiety about the bessels not being suitable for the trade of this country.

WAR RISK RATESI

WAR RISK RATES. I The i- Telegraph" Marine Insur- ance Con pendent writes: The war risk rates from New York are easy at 4Qs. by tramps and aeaii-liners, and 20s. by fast pa ssenger steamers. Rates to and from West Indies, Brazil, and River Plate are firm, the objective of the U53 being in doubt. Brazil and some islands in the West Indies were used as bases by the big raiders in 1915, and it is feared the sub- marines may be about to play the same I ,tme. So far there are no further depre- cations to 13lace to their -r*-J +-"k 1 m,rket might have been hit far more heavily.

THE POLITE BROKERS MAN

THE POLITE BROKER'S MAN. A defendant at the Bloomsbury County Court on Thursday said that he was in fear of the brokers, and handed the Regis, trar a letter which read: If the rent is not paid to-night I shall be calling with. a friend." He is a broker's man," remarked the defendant. The Registrar: It is the most polite way. How do you know it is the broker's man ? Defendant: He has done it before on ? this estate.

INEW WAR DISEASE I

NEW WAR DISEASE. I Doctors Louis Margin and Auguete, of the Pasteur Institute, Paris, have made before the Academy of Medicine an inter- esting communication regarding a new malady, or rather one hitherto not met with in France, though known through the recent discovery of Japanese doctors of a pathogenic agent in the blood. It is a special form of jaundice pro- voked by a protozoic parasite, and now for the first time classed as oontagious. Three cases have been observed in the French, and one in the British Axmv. The latter has been studied by Dr. A. Stokes. This affection is akin to recur- rent rever, and the period of incubation is from six to eight days. From now on all cases of jaundice accompanied at the outset by high fever, should be treated -T.s infectious.—Reuter.

THE GERMAN LOSSES I

THE GERMAN LOSSES. I The German casualties are a formidable total as they stand, but there is every reason to believe that they do not repre- sent the full enemy losses (says the Pall Mall Gazette"). In fact. we m'¡U7 7".1 "õ"I.4 them as a considerable understatement. The trench Government, which has means of arriving at very accurate esti- mates, have previously exposed the mia- leading character of the German casualty lists. At the begining of the war the Ger- man lists were fairly reliable, but as the conflict progressed they became increas- ingly erratic, and now Wit may regard them as utterly untrustworthy. Even so the admitted figures for September ar very significant. They are not to be taken as representing the losses incurred during that month, but a reported total of nearly 200,000 in one month is an earnest of the effectiveness of the attrition of the enemy since the beginning of the Somme push.

ORDER OF WHITE EAGLE I

ORDER OF WHITE EAGLE. I Captain A. Evans, R.E., of 120, Lon- don-road, Peterborough, has been awar- ded the Order of the White Eagle. The gallant Captain was originally assistant Po6t Office engineer, and was commis- sioned second-lieutenant on September 4th, 1914, following the outbreak of the war, and captain in December the year following. He has been mentioned in dispatches for good services in Gallipoli (November 6th, 1915). Last month he received the coveted order of the Serbian White Eagle, 5th class. The Captain ie the husband of the treasurer of the Fletton Infant 'Welfare Centre, whose cookery and kindred lectures at the Knights' Chambers have been much valued. Captain Evans is a native of Carmarthen town. Mrs. Evans' father is Mr. E. Evans, of 60, W tburJ.-str()et, Swansea.

Advertising

HEIR TO 60,600 ACRES. Captain Viscount Clivc, heir to Earl of Powis, died of wounds in a hos- pital in London to-day. Viscount Percy Itebert Clife was not quite 2i ywitfe 6ld. He w-a ftthe eldest son of the fourth Karl of Powis, bond tbe heir to 60,600 acrai.