Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 6 Next Last
Full Screen
25 articles on this page
Advertising

AMUSEMENTS. I Walter Bird's West End Compy. Entirely 1\ New Sensational Dramatic Burlesque. ERNIE LOTINGA In SUPPERS," by Norman H. Lee. NIXON GREY, Comedian. Mdlle. OLGA MORSELLI, Accomplished Talented Violinist, accom- Tpanwl at Piano by Mdlle. Yvonne Feuchc. HARRY FORD, The Logical Comedian. DAISY TAYLOR, Svotland's Premier Comedienne. Latest News and War Films. WOOD AND WELSH, Balancing and Comedy Eoeentrica. » FLORA CROMER, The Popular and Brilliant Entertainer, in her Latest Success, II Private Rubenstein." GRAND THEATRE SWANSEA. MONDAY, OCTOBER 16th, 1916, I Six Nights at 7.30, and MATINEE on SATURDAY at 2.30 p.m. Mr. Percy Hutchison presents Miss Lilias Earle in the Great Success, ¡ CAROLINE. Preceded by "HER DEAREST FRIEND." Next Week— "Once a Thief," or KICK-IN." THE PICTURE HOUSEs High Stress. Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, Robert Warwick and Aiec B. Francis in SINS OF SOCIETY A Masterpiece by the World Film Co. Charlie Murray in A GAME OLD KNIGHT, A Triangle-Keystone Comedy of Olden Times. Monday Next.-THE IMPOSTER. CASTLE CINEMA (Adjoining Leader Oifiee). Thurs., Fri. and Sat., 2.30 to 10.30. MARCELLA, A Powerful Four-Part adaptation of Sardou's Popular Novel, featuring Mdmc. Hesperia. A GAME OLD KNIGHT, A Fanny and Tb rilling Triangle-Keystone. WIVES OF THE RICH, A Splendid Blue Diamond Society Drama in Three Parts. Monday Next- HIS PICTURE IN THE PAPERS, A Five-Part Triangle Fine Arts Play. CARLTON GINEMA DE LUXE, Oxford Street, Swansea. OPEN DAILY from 2.30 tlii 10.30. Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, Tyrone Powers in THE DREAM OF EUGENE ARAM. From Thomas Hood's Famous Poem. THE CORSICAN BROTHERS, A Masterly Photo Version of the World's Most Famous Sensational Romance by Alexandra Dumas, featuring Kir.g Baggott. Mcnday.-Ul TUS & THE GREY LADY. IK I- YSTO m. High Street, Swansea. Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, The Xordisk Co. present, in 4 Acts, the Sensational Drama, EVELYN the BEAUTIFUL Snapshots from the Zoo.—Gaumont Gra- phic.—Peg o' the Ring.—Airr.ost a Widow. Monday Next, and during the wc-ck- Special Engagement of Mr. David Harry (late Llanelly), Tenor of the Royal Aca- demy and Queen's Hall, London. SAILINGS. CUNARD LINE to UNITED STATES AND CANADA. DIRECT PAESESGER AND FREIGHT SEBVICES Connecting with the Caiiaditn Northern Railway System. IKOM B ob. WINTER SERVj.CE 'to EW NORK via Halifax .FELTRIA (New York direct)..Thurs. Nov. 9 FOL1-. .Tueg. isov. 14 Sailing from Avonmouth Dock. Cabin Passengers ilOj and Cargo. LONDON 'HJ CANADA. ANSONIA .Thurs., Nov. 2 » Cabin (£10) and Third-Class ( £ 6 10s.) lJas9en$c £ £ Ansonia has Accommodation for Refrigera- tor Cargo. Apply Cunard Line, Liverpool; 51, Bishops- London, E. C 6t Baidwir, gate, London, E'.C. it Baldwin-street, Bristol; 18a, High-street, Cardiff; 141, Cor. poration-street. Birmingham. EDUCATIONAL. \X TCUNG MEN, aged 16 to 25, Wanted to JL take up Postal Tuition Courses in the -following I:)ubjects :-Mining; Telephony, Ordinary and Advanced; Telegraphy. lrl- land, Ordinary and Advanced: Wireless Tele- .graphy Ordinary and Advanced; Submarine -.Cable Working and Testing; Elementary ?Electrical Engineering, Magnetism, and Electricity, and Engineering -N?athematies.- Write for Prospectus and Terns? to:— ,igECRETARY, W.A. 3 DEPT. SHAW S COL- LEGE. 65, ALEXANDRA-ROAD, LONOPORT. STAFFS. C-TO STUDENTS SucoessfuHy Prepared for Pro- 'tJ ficiency in PITMAN'S 8hhand. Local MARINE BOARD, and Civil Service. LES- SONS given in Arithmetic, English, Book- keeping, etc. Satisfaction guaranteed.—Mr. "Harris. 56. Oxford-street, Swansea. Day or Evening Tuition. CTO v ===^ WANTED, at GROVESEND STEEL WORKS, GORSEINON, GOOD NAVVIES. Good Wages and War Bonus and Train Fares paid. ALTERS & JOHNS, Contractors. TEETH. From 17/6 per Set. Painless Extractions, 1s. ? Repairs in 2 Hours. ERNEST'S Dental Surgery, 18, High Street, Swansea (Opposite Bush Hotel). HOURS: 9-8. A scheme is now under consideration for the mutual repatriation of invalid eivilians in this country and Germany. Missing their way in the darkness, two workhorse nurses fell into the canal at Fedmorden and wexe drowned. PUBLIC NOTICES. CAPEL GOMER, CYRDDAU BLYNYDDOL Yr Eglwys uchod, SUL a LLUN, HYDREF 22 a'r 23, 1916. Presethir gaa y Parchedigion GEO. GRIFFITHS (Rhymni), a W. CEINFRYN THOMAS (Dowlais). Trefn yr oedfaon: Sul am 11, 2.43, a 6.30. Nos Lun am 7. gWANSEA GENERAL HOSPITAL. DISPENSER (Non-Resident) W ANTED- Ladj or Gentleman. Candidates must pos- sess the Major or Minor qitalifljati JTIS. Applications, stating age, ciualification. et periencc, and oalary required, to be deliv- ered to the undersigned not later than Tuesday, October 24th. 1916. Two testimo- nials. W. D. HUGHES, Secretary. C10-21 SALES BY AUCTION. TIMBER FOR SALE. TO TIMBER MERCHANTS, COLLIERY PROPRIETORS, AND OTHERS. Mr. John Evans, F.A.i., HAS received instructions to offer for SALE by TENDER the following Standing Timber, the great majority of which are of good girth: 2,100 Oak, 500 L arc la, 55 Ash, 20 Elms, 150 Beech, 50 Sycamore, 3 Scotch Firs. Th? highest or any tender not necessarily accepted. The timber can be shipped in small boat* at Newport, fem., about a mile distant. To view apply to the Auctioneer, who will arrange for inspec- tion Tenders to be sent to the above by the 18th of November, 1916. Auction and Estate Offices, Cardigan, October 17th, 1916. ALBERT HALL, SWANSEA. Special Sale of a Manufacturer's Stock of Hsgii-class English Carpets, Bordered Squares, in Fine Blended Colours and Latest Designs, suitable for Drawing and Diair.gr Rooms, Breakfast and Reception Rooms, Bedrooms, etc., which ftll r. Joseph Harris TS instructed to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, at the above Hall, on WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1916. Sale to Commence at 11.30 a.m. precisely. AX MINSTER, WILTON PILE, BRUS- SELS, TAPESTRY, etc., also REAL TURKEY, MIRZAPORE, and other Oriental Carpets. Stair and Landing Carpets, Corridor and Hearth Rugs, Door Mats, etc. Good* on View Morning of Sale from 9 o'clock. Auctioneer's Offices: 1, George-street, Swansea. Telephone: -163 Docks. Catalogues may lie obtained post free from thp Auctioneer.  RACTT-, DU?- BEVEXE FACH, DUNVANT, GLAMOR- GANSHIRE (Distant 11 miles from Dunvant Railway Station, and about the same distance from Gowerton). Highly Important Unreserved Clear-Out Sale of 23 Head of Beautiful Cross-bred Cattle, 6 Horses, 13 Sheep, Pigs, Poultry, Implements, Hay, Corn and Root Crops, etc. Messrs. James and James F.A.I., A RE favoured with instructions from Messrs. Evans Bros. to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION (consequently upon the senior brother, Mr. David Evans, hav- ing been called to join the Army) on the Farm, a6 above, on TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24th, 1916, the whole of their Valuable Live Stock, Crops and Implements, && viz.: CATTLE.—5 Dairy Cows, 4 In-Calf Heifers, 9 Store Cattle, 5 Calves. 6 HORSES. 13 SHEEP.—12 Cross-bred Breeding Ewes and 1 Two-year-old Shropshire Ram. PIGS.-2 Porktms. POULTRY. 7 Geese, 100 Barndoor Fowls. IMPLEMENTS.—Including a 5 Horee- Power Petter Oil Engine, Shafting and Belting. HARNESS, efc. HA Y, CORN and ROOT CROPS.-Hay: Two Lights of Clover and Meadow Hay, about 25 Tone in Hay Shed; Corn: 32 Sale Mows of Black Tartarian Oats, 8 do. of White Waverley do; Potatoes: Half an Acre of Potatoes, in lota to suit purchasers. Refreshments at 12 noon. Sale imme- diately after. Six Months' Credit on Conditions. Auctioneers' Offices: 7, Goat-street, Swansea. Telephone: 172 Docks. BAYSWATER HOUSE, BLACKPlLL, Near Mumbles-road Station. Messrs. James and James, F.A.I. A RE instructed to SELL by AUCTION on the Premises as above, on SATURDAY AFTERNOON, OCT. 21st, 1916, the following Live Stock, Crops, imple- ments, Etc. 2 HORSES .-Poadetc,,r Mare, 15.2 h.h., in foal; Pony Mare, 13 h.h. 45 HEAD OF POULTRY.—30 Young Fowls and 15 Ducks. IMPLEMENTS, etc.-3 Tip Carte, Mar- ket Lorry, Four-wheeled Lorry, 5 Sets of Harness, Chaffeutter, New Plough, New Harrow, Double Tom, Horse Hoe, Wheelbarrow, Garden Tools. 50 Rolls of New Wire Netting, etc. Also a quantity of Well-grown Cabbages and other Green Crops, in Lots to 6uit purchasers. Sale promptly a.t 4 o'clock p.m. Credit on Conditiond. Auctioneers' Offices, 7, Goat-etreet, Swansea. Telephone, Docks 172. MONEY. TVONT s0aRowyou OWN TOWN. whTere yon and the lender are known. Reputation without blemish beata bounce. £10 to Lio.000 lent privately by the old- wtablished B.F.O.. who are approved and recommended by the Press Mo Loan 193 Monthly f.100 Loan 1:2 Monthly £ 50 Loan 22 Kouthly £600 Loan £4 Monthly Prospectus and Press Opinions free. P* vacy guaranteed.—THE BRITISH FINANCE (XV. 20. Bridsc-etreet, Bristol. Tel.1675. IF you wieh tolteep your affairs private, do not apply to strangers, for no stranger will lend you money without mak- ing in(luirie. How woull 'these terms suit you? £]0 repay .£10 10s. Z50 repay £ 52 lft. £ 20 repay £21 £100 repay E106 Reputation without blemish is the reason Mc. Gash trades under his own name Apply to ALBERT E. GASH, 6, U-plands CretteaV Swansea. PUBLIC NOTICES. ST. PAUL'S QONGEEGATIONAL CHUBCm ANNIVERSARY SUNDAY, OCT. 22nd, 1916. Preacher: Morning at 11. Evening at 6.30, REV. J. LLOYD WILLIAMS, B.A.(Tenby). AFTERNOON, at 2.45, GRAND MUSICAL SERVICE. Chairman-W. A. JENKINS, Esq. ARTISTES—Soprano, Miss Sarah Kneath: Sorrano, Miss Maggie Cox; Tenor. Mr. W. Tanner; Baritone. Mr A, Pring. Elocutionist, Mr. Luke Thomas; Organist, Miss Edith Ferrer, B.A.M. SILOAM, PENTRE. A SACRED CONCERT SUNDAY EVENING, OCT. 22nd. Rendering of SACRED CANTATA- "THE CHILDREN'S SAVIOUR." by BAND OF HOPE CHOIR. Oorductres3, Miss Mary Thomas; Accom- panist. Miss Abigail Thomas, OM.A.M. ORGAN RECITAL by MR. IVOR OmN". L.R.A.M. Soloists—Miss Beatrice Hughes (Manselton), Mr Robert Hughes (Manselton), Winner at National Eisteddfod, Mr. Emrys Griffiths (Manselton). Chairman-DR. HUBERT THOMAS. Oommence at 7-45. Silver Collection in aid of Chri-stmas Presents to "Our Boys" wfio have joined the Forces. TENDERS WANTED. WANTF,D, Tenders for DRIVING TWO HARD HEADINGS for the S.R. An. thracite Collieries. Crosshands, from the Greei Vein to'the Pimpqnart. Distance: 450 yards or thereabouts. Measurements: 10 feet at base; 9 feet at top; 6 feet higih. All measurements inside timber. Power Drills will be supplied. Tenders to be sent to the Manager S.R. Anthracite Collieries, Ltd., Crosshands, Llanelly. Sun Rises 6.34, Sun Sets 4.66. Lighting-up Time, 5.26. Subdue Lights visible from the sea- Swansea 5.41, Llanelly 5.42 2-3, Aberavon 5.41, Pembroke 5.4. Subdue other Lights- Swansea 7.11, Llanelly 7.12 2-3, Amman- ford 7.12, Aberavon 7.11, Neath 7.11, Carmarthen 7.15, Pembroke 7.15J. High Water To-day, 0.16 p.m. King's Dock-Si)ft. 6in. p.m. To-morrow, 1.2 a.m., 1.35 p.m.

RAIN AND THE I I ADVANCE I

RAIN AND THE I ADVANCE. Rain fell heavily all the morn- I ing is the first sentence in the dis- patch forwarded by Sir Douglas ¡ Haig on Thursday evening. The weather during the course of the operations revieved has been. con- sistently unfavourable for aircraft. Heavy rains and strong south- westerly winds have lowered the visibility and have rendered their work most difficult. So the General states in the interesting review of the operations engaged in this month. .The weather has been a very serious handicap to the ad- vance. A few weeks at best remain for operations on a large scale, although we are scarcely likely to sit down on the Somme and allow the enemy to dig himself into security. The French will fight hard in this period for Peronne. They have, between Biaches and La Maisonette, pushed the Germans nearer to the river, and they have now command of a slope leading down to the town. The conquest of Sailly Saillisel, said to be a regu- lar nest of machine-guns," will facilitate the move on Le Transloy, which is now closely invested on three sides. In the eastern theatre of war the position is vague, but promising. In Bucharest it is be- lieved that the Germans and their allies are playing now what is their last card, for if after being checked on other fronts they are repulsed in the south-east the whole game can probably be considered lost. Col. Eepington makes a pic- turesque confession in the course of an article he contributes to the new London Magazine." A war more rich with intelligence and more abounding in all the energies was never fought, he says; yet never surely were the results so dispro- portionate to t"e, effort. And then he adds: Everybody has been wrong about everything, and all the time. There has been no policy worth discussing, and there have been no strategy and no tactics. Ji nothing comes from nothing, how can anything distinguished emerge from such a Nihilistic war?" Cer- tainly, tlie war experts have all been wrong, possibly sharing the same fate as the army commanders. The experts who expounded the waning number, of the enemy; the experts who explained the strategy of the war and the significance and expected results of their new moves —they have all been wrong. As a matter of fact, staff men, generals and writers have been dealing with situations in which the unknown factors counted for every- thing. Neuve Chapelle, Loos, were grave experiments. They showed us that a clean break through in the old style, manceuvres by which] whole armies could be destroyed or surrounded, are net to impossible ] under modern conditions when a' vast extent of ground is held and strongly fortified. If Napoleon and the Grande Armee arrived in France to-morrow, says Col. Repington in a striking sentence, no one would par- ticularly notice the fact, except some billeting officers who would jot down a few ellipses on a m ap, and tell Berthier to carry on. Sedans on a large scale will not be seen in this war. A visit-or who has just returned from the front, with some impres- sions he has written on his experi- ences, says tha.t the eternal question that one hears is: Are we going to break through the line? The answer is that we have broken through the line; that we have passed the main defences and are now attack- ing makeshift defences Breaking through the line is not the immedi- ate object of our attack, but rather to strike the enemy such a blow as to destroy his moral and impose our will upon him. This we are doing. The best way of conveying to the lay mind the true significance of the Somme is to say that the French and ourselves have captured several fortresses as strong as Liege, Namur, Metz, or any other first- class modern work. If the names of such places as Thiepval, Fri- c-ourt, Courcelette, Guillemont, Rancourt denote on the map a few small villages, they are none the less strong fortresses of enormous resisting power, fortified, dug out, and rendered, in the eyes of the Ger- mans, quite impregnable. We have taken all these at great cost to our- selves and our Allies, but at a greater cost still- to our enemies. At the meeting of the Swansea- Council on Wednesday, Mr. David Richards suggested that the Press II had declined to publish letters of complaint with regard to the local tramways service. We can answer for ourselves that no properly authenticated letters, free from such personalities as ought not to be pub- lished under the cover of an as- sumed name—'and this is in accord- ance with the universal newspaper rule—have been refused publica- tion upon this question. On the contrary, our files for the past few years will reveal a large number of letters complaining of the defi- ciencies of the service, notably that running between the town and Sketty; and also comment, of our own regarding the desirability of "jacks" being obtainable at short notice in case of sudden emergency. There is no doubt that there is a general feeling in the town that the tramway service requires improve- ment; that the tracks should be re- layed on some sections; and that more cars should be available at certain hours of the day. The latter matter has often been ventilated in our columns, more particularly re- garding the mid-day service to Sketty; as to the former we sup- pose it is a large order to ask to-day, when in every branch of industry labour is hard to obtain, for a com- plete relaying of the track. Morris- ton councillors have complained for many months of the Morriston ser- vice, which certainly is noisy and bumpy at the present time. Mr. Pretyman's statement that a contract price of Is. 4d. per gallon for milk is not justified outside the large towns—where railway costs I enter largely into the matter—is of interest to Swansea; for it prompts the query whether the dairy-farmers of West Glamorgan, particularly those with farms in the immediate neighbourhood of Swansea, are en-I titled to demand that price. An official of the Farmers' Association refused to discuss the increase with one of our representatives, which is a rather unfortunate decision of his, since in the absence of any justifica- tion of the association's decision to a.sk Is 4d. the public will cling to the belief that the advance is not warranted by the circumstances. At the presentation gathering held at Ebenezer on Thursday when the choir and members of he church showed their appreciation of the excellent services of their veteran conductor, Mr. J. D. Thomas upon his retirement, some of the more interesting points of his career were brought to memory. Mr. Thomas had led his choir to success after success. He conducted the Cymrodorion Male Voice Choir, during their victorious career through the eisteddfodau of Wales, and he twice took his choirs before Royalty. He was made the re- cipient of a handsome present, but the highest appreciation the church can pay is tc carry out his wish:; That the young men will continue! to push on with the work." He has done his day's work, but his ad- vice will always be at the service of the choir.

iiI GOWER SHOESJVSITHI

GOWER SHOESJVSITH. Question Raised in House ofi Commons. In the House of Commons on Thursday, Mr. Snowden asked the President of the Local Government Board if he would have a special inquiry made into the action of the Gower Rural Tribunal in respect of the case of H. V. Watters, an applicant foi exemption from the Military Service Tribunal, on the ground of being em- ployed upon essential national work ,wus ob- jection, seeing that the chaiman of the tribunal, a local land agent, l ba(1 a ?udge against I..h ? family-of Wattere and ha threatened that he would have his re- venge; and another member of the tri- bunal had, nine days before the Jeering of the case, been compelled to sign a withdrawal of certain charges which he had made against Watters; and also in view of the fact that Watters was the only agricultural mechanic and shoeing i 6mith in that district, doing the work for ever 50 farmers who had petitioned the local tribunal, the Appeal Tribunal, the Minister of Agriculture and the War Minister on his behalf, and would he a is.) inquire into the conduct of Colonel Pear- son who. at the hearing, told Watters that h* was a traitor, and only fit to be on the point of a German bayonet or in a lunatic asylum ? Mr. Hayes Fisher: My right hon. fiiend is having inquiries made.

No title

Mr. W. Martin Murphy denies the l report tha.t he will contest West Cork. J

NELSONS VISIT TO SWANSEA

NELSON'S VISIT TO SWANSEA. AN INTERESTING DIP INTO TOWN RECORDS. Tom Cleeves's Whistle. H Trafalgar Day has an additional significance for us this year, for the Mayor of Swansea has appealed to the inhabitants to observe it as a Flag Day in favour of the fund for provid- ing education for the sons of fallen eearaen. We believe our readers will be interested in the following article, in which many particulars which have not hitherto appeared in print, of the association of the Great Hero of Tra- falgar are set forth by Mr. W. H. Jo net. (By W. H. Jones.) AFTER the ever-memorable Battle of the Nile, the Corporation of Swan- sea adopted a thoroughly sensible and practical method of demonstrating their admiration for the gallant Admiral's services to his country. At the Common Hall on the 22nd October, 1798, the Port- reeve (the mayor of that day) was re- quested to subscribe, on behalf of the Corporation, ten guineas H for the relief of the widows and children of those brave men who fell in the late glorious action between His Majesty's Fleet under Admiral Nelson and the French Fleet, on the 1st day of August last"; and with the rsquest was coupled another, that the Portreeve should summon a meeting of the inhabitants to promote a eubecription for the same purpose. THE PEACE. This was the first occasion on which Nelson's name came before our Corpora- tion. In 1802 (10th June) the Corporation adopted an address to the King conveying on behalf of the burge-sses and inhabi- tants of the town, their sincere con- gratulations on the happy event of a peace, trusting, under Divine Providence, that it would shower down its usual blessings on the land"; and it was re- solved that the address be presented to the King by the Portreeve (Thomas Morgan, Esq., Barrister-at-law) and the Recorder, and that the Corporation will be obliged by the attendance of the Marquess of Worcester (eldest son of the Duke of Beaufort, the Lord of the Town) and Lord Evelyn Stuart (the Member for the Borough) at the presenting of it." NELSON AT SWANSEA. One of the by-products of this peace was the opportunity it gave to Lord Nelson to pay a round of visits in differ- ent parts of the country. In the course of his holiday, when he was, naturally, vastly lionised, he came in August 1802, to Swansea, then a place almost com- pletely given up to the entertainment of visitors who flocked here for the bathing. Our bay, beautiful now, was, without the present obtrusive girdle of-railway tracks, and with its undulating marram-carpeted Burrows stretching along for miles be- hind the margin of sand, without a build- ing upon even the Sandfields further in- land, where now there cluster streets whose names are reminiscent of Nelson's dayr&ttien our bay was particularly de- lightful and picturesque. The battered little Admiral's visit to Swansea was quite brief and unexpected-, but the Corporation rose with alacrity to the welcome emergency. A Common Hall was quickly assembled on Saturday, the 14th. August, 1802, over which the Port- reeve presided, and the minutes of its business are of much interest:— Lord Nelson," it is recorded, having honoured the town of Swansea with a visit, this Corporation, desirous of manifesting' the high sense they entertairi-,of his lord- ship's great and meritorious "services to the United Kingdom, in a, series of splendid and gallant actions scarcely eojialled, but never exceeded in the annals of tHe world, take this opportunity of enrolling nis lordship's name amongst the burgesses of t is borough, trusting it will b-j accepted by his lordship as it is in'tended. a grateful ac- knowledgment of his moat transcendent merit Resolved unanimously. That the Right Ifoueiabl ? Horatio Nelson, Viscount Nel son of the Nile and of Burnham Thorpe, in the county of Norfolk (Duke of Bronte and Sicily). Knight of the Bath, etc., etc. etc.. be admitted a Burgess of this Borough. Resolved unanimously. That the Right Honorable William Hamilton. Knight of ye Bath, be admitted a. Burgess of this Borough." "EMMA." Thig generous* extension of the compli- ment to Nelson's great personal friend who, with Lady Hamilton-the Emma who played so influential and intimate a part in the hero's life-ca-mo to Swansea with him, was uot without precedent, for when the honour of the Freedom was conferred upon the Lord of the Town, the Duke of Beaufort, upon a state visit many years previously, the whole of his suite participated in the compliment. Then, as hastily u6 the Corporation has assembled oij this August day of 1802, the Portreeve was dispatched to find out the hero of the Nile, for the honour they designed was incomplete without the proper oath having been taken by the new burgess—the oath which bound him to be obedient to the Steward and Port- reeve of the town, and to maintain the privileges and liberties with all laudable accustomed orders used or to be used within this town," etc. THE DEPUTATION. I There would be no great difficulty in finding Nelson, for where he was the vicinity would naturally be thronged by a crowd of admirers. With the Port- reeve, on his mission, the Corporation had joined Mr. Gabriel Jeffreys, the senior alderman, a past portreeve, and the head of a Swansea family famous in that day and for three-quarters of a century to come; Alderman Sir Gabriel Powell, the clever son of another more prominent Gabriel Powell, who had been the splendid genius of the town, the promoter of its copper industry and the director of all local affairs; Alderman Thomas Powell, his brother; Alderman Charles Collins, the principal surgeon of the town, and one of the first Harbour trustees; John Morris, Esq., a copper magnate of his day; and John Jones, Esq., of St. Helen's Castle, whose name is on the rolls of Portreeves and Harbour Trustees. The Portreeve was Alderman Thomas Morgan, of Penderry, an erudite barrie- ter-at-law, who was also steward and re- corder to the Duke of Beaufort for Swan- sea and the seignory of Gower. In this double capacity he was all pawerlul in the town. He was the embodiment of the Court Leet, and appointed the Port- reeve and admitted and swore the bur- gesses, giving the latter the oath, part of which has just been reeited. There need be no doubt that, with bosoms swell- ing with proper pride upon so auspicious an occasion, the functions of a leet jury would be dispensed with, and the oath administered with not a little pompous formality to the redoubtable Nelson and his familiar friend. THE NEW BURGESSES. Nelson was not unaccustomed to these sudden demonstrations of municipal en. vhusiasm, and he was already Freemas of many boroughs. The story is told that, at Great Yarmouth, the Town Clerk flustered and Hurried in the rush of the ceremony of 'Swearing the new bur- ges-s before a multitude of shouting and jostling townsmen, when Nelson took the Testament in his left hand, called officiously upon him for the right hand please, ill' Lord," to which the gallant little sea-Lord replied Ah, I left that at Teiteriffe, 1" Here at Swansea, we may well suppose that the incident was not allowed to close without regard being paid to the fes- j '■ tivity which, to such an event, must surely be the natural concomitant! And then the new burgesses went around the town to gratify the curiosity of the populace. I TOM CLEAVES'S WHISTLE. And it was at this juncture that an incident occurred whilst, although it has already been told by me elsewhere, and has been sometime-s repeated, should be retold here. It was witnessed by my father's grandfather, who lived at the time in one of the old houses in Wind- street close to where the railway bridge now rests on the Strand side. Opposite lived old Tom Cleaves, one of the St. Mary's bell-ringers, and the keeper of the livery stable at the Plume of Feathers." Tom had been bos'un on one of the vessels in Nelson's command, and was well remembered. As the Admiral now passed in his open carriage with his friends, and surrounded by an excited crowd, Cleaves snatched up his bos'un's pipe, got in among the crowd, and blew three loud and peculiar blasts. On hear- ing the familiar notes, Nelson sprang from his seat and, facing the crowd be- hind, exclaimed: "Tom Cleaves's whistle. by Nor was he satisfied until he had wrung the old seaman heartily by the hand. It is interesting to note that the Cor- poration looked upon Nelson's burgess- ehip as involving a practical interest in the affairs of the town, for when, in the following year, they petitioned the Lords of the Treasury that Swansea might be named as one of the Free Ports intended to be established by an Act of Parlia- ment, a. copy of the memorial was sent to Lord Nelson with a request that he would promote the measure with his interest." 11 PAID THE RINGERS." It goes without saying that, the people of Swansea were deeply moved when they found the joyful news of the victory of Trafalgar chastened by the intelligence of the death of Nelson. The events took place on the 21st October, 1805, but three weeks elapeed ere the news arrived in Swansea! In just the same way the martyrdom of King Charles I was un- known here for more than a month after the axe had fallen in Whitehall, and all the local documents were dated during that period in the reign of that monarch instead of in the 1st Charles II. The Swansea Common Attorneys' accounts for 1805 contain the following entries:— 11 Nov.-Paid the ringers tor 2111 0 -El 11 Nelson's victory.fo. r 0 Paid Dr. Thomas for hoisting colours 0 1 0 To the Patriotic Fund at 'Lloyds' Coffee House for Widows and Or- phans of those slain at the Battle of Trafalgar 21 0 0 24 Doo.-The Portreeve's order for wine and cake, etc. for the thanksgiving day. 1 17 0 NELSON'S THANKS. It is interesting to read a handbill which was circulated throughout the town of Swansea in 1802, immediately after Nelson had concluded his visit here. It was apparently taken from a letter which the Admiral had written to I the Portreeve. It ran as follows: "TO THE CORPORATION AND INHABI- TANTS OF SWANSEA AND DISTRICT. "At the Particular Instance and Request of Lord Nelson. I have the honour to communicate to you his Lordship's moat grateful, and sincere thanks for his flattering reception .amongst you, and to assure you that the favours you have conferred upon him will never be eifaoed from his memory—that the remem- brance of them will descend with him to his grave. That he feels the distinguis, hed marks. of regard and applause not so much on his own account as for what the example of their being so bestowed on him might afford to the rising generation. "That their endeavours to aerve their country and probably succeed in it. as he had .been flattered, had fallen to his lot. would be as amply encouraged and re- warded, and their iiam€& recorded with posterity amongst those who had deserved well of it. "TTIOTJAS MORGAN. Portreeve." AugTisrt 17th, 1802.

NO KICK IN CORK LEGS

NO KICK IN CORK LEGS. Each wearing an artificial leg in place of a limb lost in France, three young Irishmen were on Thursday charged at North London Court with assaulting a police constable at Homerton. The de- fending solicitor said that although science had made these limbs almost as good as the natural ones it was impossible for the constable to have been kicked as alleged. Two of the men were remanded and the third was bound over and dis- charged. «

I ZEPP RELIC HUNTERS

I ZEPP RELIC HUNTERS. Six men were summoned at Barnet Petty Sessions for not reporting to the military or police that they had found parts of the Zeppelin brought down at Potters Bar. Some of tho defendants said that they purchased their relics from the military, and some that they took away the parts after making inquiry and satisfying them- selves that they were doing no wrong. Defendants were ordered to pay costs, and were bound over in 40s. to come up for judgment if called upon.

MEN OF 41 TO SERVEi

MEN OF 41 TO SERVE. A new order relating to men of 41 years of age has been communicated to tri- bunals. The order states that the recruiting officers will begin to send out calling up notices to men of groups 23 and 40 and classes 23 and 46 who have attained the age of 41 years, ordering them to report for, service on November 1st and ensuing days. Men in class 23 are liable to be called up if they have not attained the age of 41 years before March 2nd, and in the case of I met in class 46, if they had not attained the age of 41 years before June 20th. AU men in groups 23 and 46 arc liable. Hitherto tribunals have acted on the supposition that if a man who has been granted temporary exemption attains the age of 41 before his certificate expires his liability for military service comes to an end. The new order accordingly nullifies a large number of tribunal decisions grant- ing absolute exemption under colour temporary exemption.

NATIONAL MOTOR VOLUNTEERS

NATIONAL MOTOR VOLUNTEERS. Glamorgan Batt., Swansea and Distrist (No. 2) Squadron. Weekly Orders.—Friday, headquarters, 7.45 p.m., squad drill with arms, and re- cruit drill. Saturday: Squadron drill in grounds of Brynymor," 3.30. Monday: Headquarters, 7.45 p.m., ambulance drill and musketry instruction and drill. Wed- nesday: Shooting practice, 8 p.m.; officer for duty, Half-Squadron Sergt. H. Sweet; next for dutv. Section-commander J. G. Gardiner. N.C.O. Appoints: Pte. J. G. Gardiner to be section-commander vice Section-Commander A. S. David, who has joined H.M. Forces; Pte. Harold Richard- I son to be section-commander.—Charles T. Ruthen, Squadron Commander.

IVTC SHOOTING

I V.T.C. SHOOTING. In connection with the Third Glamorgan V.T.C. shooting compehtwns, « A and B" companies opposed one another at the Rugby Range on Tuesday evening. Seores:— tf A" Company.—H. G. Rees. 78; E. J. Thomas, 63; G. P. Hazel, 61; F. E. Carr. 68: E. D. Rees, 61; W. Morgaq, 61; W. O. Dayson, 63; F. Feed, 49; H. f. Williams, 73; H. C. Dodd, 78; E. A. Tyler, 73; total, 732. B" Company.—R. D. G. Brunt, 45: H. Hales, 57; G. Johnston, 61; S. A. Blackall, 37; H. K. Truman, 65; T. R. Buist. 46; M. H. Clarke, 73; G. F. Durose. 67; H. G. Bailev. 64; J. H. Bateman, 41; A. J. Allen, 64; total, 620

SWANS A I

SWANS £ A. I Pound Day in the west-end of Swam sea for Pare Wern Hospital has agan been a success. Bryiimill School, as usu4 did remarkably well. A collision occurred in Hifrh-street; on Friday morning, when one of Messra Weaver's motur engines backed into th< front of a tramcar, the front of which wat damaged. Fortunately, no one was injureck At Manselton Congrega.tional Clmrch. on Wednesday night, presentations werg made to Mine-sweeper Ben Coburn and Private W. R. Jones, who are home on leave. Spooches were made by the chair- man, Mr. A. Rowe, Mr. Dd. George and Mr. E. Dunn. The presentations We..r4 made by Mr. Ernest Lovell.

ICWMLLYNFELL

I CWMLLYNFELL. Ame-seaman Jack Davies, Prospect- place, now serving in. the Navy, has beea liome on short leave, as also has R. W. l Weatherspoon, Royal Engineers, a native I of Abergavenny. Prior to enlistment both I wore employed at Cwmilynfell Colliery.

ILLANDOVERYI

LLANDOVERY. I The death has occurred of Miss Polly Jones, formerly of Landaff House, Llan- dovery, daughte-r of the late Mr. David Jones, who for many years was head gar- dener at Llanfair Grange. The funeral took place at Ebenezer Baptist Church; Llandovery, and was largely attended.

CYNGHORDY

CYNGHORDY. The death has occurred of Mrs. Jonea^ Greenfield, Tanpal. Cynghordy, mother of Mrs. Jones, Central Hotel, Liandnndod W ells, and wife of Mr. Thomas Jones, who for many years was a lengthman under the L. and JS.W. liailway. Deceased, waa interred at Bethel, Cynghordy.

ILLANGADOCK

LLANGADOCK. The inhabitants have extended a hearty welcome to Mr. FFink Lloyd, brother of j the late Mr. E. P. Lloyd, J.P., (Ha?dni ) Villa, whom he succeeded as heir to tha Glansevin Estate. Mr. Lloyd, it is under- stood, will reside, pending work of restore tion at the family maD.SlOn-G laDBeVllfr I at Mandinham. n I

IPEMBROKE DOCK

PEMBROKE DOCK. The funeral took place on Thursday of Mr. John Jones, of Glaslyn House, Argyle- street, Pembroke Dock, who died very suddenly at Saundersfoot Railway Station on the previous Saturday. Mr. Jones ac 62 years of age, and was a superannuated dockyard employe.

I CARMARTHEN J

CARMARTHEN. J Ald. Jno. Lewis, Gwynfryn, has beeaf unanimously selected mayor-elect of Car- marthen for the next year. This will be. the sixth year for him to hold the ofifce. There was a large attendance at the anmHvl cymanfa ganu of the Carmar- then and District Independents, held at Lammas-street Chapel on Thursday. Tht singing was of a high order.

IBRYNADMMAN

BRYNADMMAN. The wedding was solemnised at Ebenezer Chapel, Swansea, on Thursday., of Miss S. A. Isaac, Cwmamman House, I headmistress of the Upper Council Schools, Brynamman, and Mr. Richard E„ Rees, M.E., manager of Rhosamman llit, Brynamman. The Rev. W. D. Thoma Brynamman, officiated in the presence of a large number of people from Brynamr I man and Swansea. The honeymoon is be ing spent at Tenby.

IPENTRETYGWYN

I PENTRETYGWYN. A respected old worthy of Pentrix tygwyn has passed away in the person of Mr. Robert Pearce, who for 40 years was in the employ of the Llandovery Rural Council, during which period he gained the clooorvpd ropuintiou of Wing om» or the most conscientious workmen on tha roads. Deceased had for many years been precentor and treasurer at Pentretygwyn Chapel. He was buried at Cefnarthan, the funeral being largely attended. Ile leaves a witlow and grandchildren.

I TYCFSOES

I TYCFSOES. Under the auspices of the PenybanH Soldiers' and Sailors' Reception Commit- tee, a benefit concert was given on Thurs- day night at Pisgah Chapel. The pro- ceeds were for the widow and children of the late Sergt. Dd. Thomas, 4th Battalion. Welsh Regiment. The chapel was crowded. The evening and mining classes at the Council Schools have successfully com- menced. About 70 students have been eo, rolled.

IHAVERFORDWEST

HAVERFORDWEST. At a meeting of the Haverfordwest Board of Guardians on Thursday it was decided by a majority of one to give added relief of Is. to all adnlt paupers and 6d. to all children. Messrs. Evans and Roach realised some good prices at the annual sale of shorthorn cattle bred by Mr. J. Allen Thomas, of Cashfield, which was held in Bridg. Meadow. A bull cal- i-cal-sed the highest price, being bought by Mr. Bishop for 4t guineas.

I PORT TALBOT

PORT TALBOT. The Port Talbot Literary Society opened their session at Ellis' Cafe on Thursday night, when Mr. Cyril Brett gave an enter- taining address on The Clowns of Shake- speare. At Grove Place Welsh Literary Society, the president (the Rev. J. E. IRe-&s, gave the opening lecture, taking as subject. Yt-sterda v, To-day and To-morrow." A sale of work in aid of church funds took place at the English Congregational Church, Port Talbot, on Thursday after, noon. In the absence of Mrs. Percy JacoTi (the Mayoress), Miss Jacob declared tht sale open

IMILFORD HAVEN

MILFORD HAVEN. The new organ which has been placed hI: the Wesleyan Church was opened on Thursday, when special services were held. A recital was given by Mr. H. C. Morris, organist of St. David's Cathedral, whilst the soloist was Mrs. Herbert Colo, R.A.M. The owning ceremony was con- ducted by the Rev. William Perkins, of London. Miss Evelyn M. Evans, cf Skib- bereon, Ireland, has been appointed organist. News has been received at Milford that Wm. Reynolds, cook on the smacfe Majestic, has been drowned in Ireland. He was well known in the district, and for many years drove the Dale mail cart.

IPONTARDULAIS

PONTARDULAIS. Haggar s Theatre was packed on Wed. nesday evening, when Triniti Dramatio Society, 'under the direction of Mr. Dan Matthews, gave a performance in aid of the disabled Sailors' and Soldiers' FUlld. The cast was as lows:—Jarad Jones, Mr. Dan Matthews j Die Betsi, Mr. Edward Bowen: Parch. Eifion Harris, Mr. Sydney Lewis; Morgan Hopkins, Mr. Huw Jones; If an Wyn, "Mr Alf Jones, Dafydd Elis, Mr. D. R. Wi). liams; Dr Huws, Mr S. M. Jones; Mr.. Blackwell. Mr. A. N Other; Ilarri (prea- tis), Mr. Lute Jones, Nel Davies, Marlai-ne [Gertrude Morgan; Margaret Barries, Misa B James. Stage manager, Mr. D. T. Morgan; accompanists, Miss Winnie Lewis and Mr. John Ewart Hopkins. As liuiit dreds failed to gam admission there will be a repeat performance, towards the sain* object.

No title

Married policemen in the City of Lon- don are to get an extra Is. a week for each child. Tn the Border district, two more public houses have been closed by tho Control Board