Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 6 Next Last
Full Screen
43 articles on this page
Advertising

i The" Cambria Daily Leader J) gives later news than any paper published in this dis- trict.

Advertising

11 The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street ,(first floor), where adver- tisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel. 2276 Central.

TRENCHES RAIDED

TRENCHES RAIDED! BRITISH ACTIVITY SOUTH THE ANCRE. VILLAGE CAPTURED BY THE RUMANIANS FREKCH BLOW UP MUNITIONS DEPOT. I, TO-DAY'S BRITISH OFFICIAL. I Rain fell heavily during the night. Hostile artillery was again active against our front south of the Ancre. At one point of the same area we successfully raided enemy trenches. -0 I TO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. I On the Somme front there was an intermittent cannonade. Our artillery fire exploded a munition depot in the region of Denev- mont-Abtancourt. To the north of Verdun we carried out during the night local opera- tions in the sector to the west and south of Vaux Fort. We took about 100 prisoners, and made some progress in the course of these actions. The "enemy violently bombarded our position in the region of Douamont and Chennois. There is nothing to report on the fÐSt of the front. ARMY OF THE EAST. I No event of importance to report. I Bad weather continues to ham- I per operations. AVIATION. During the night of the 26th-27th, our bombing aeroplanes dropped 40 shells on the railway station at Grande-Re, 8 on that of Challe- range, 30 on the enemy bivouacs at Fatoy-Le-Chateau and at Abri- court (north of Lassigny), where two fires were observed. During the same night 10 of our aeroplanes threw 240 shells of 120 milimetres on the railway station J at Conflas, and 30 of the same calibre on the railway station of "txourceiies. The objectives were struck by many of the projectiles. Another of our machines dropped 6 shells on the railway line of Cagny-Sur-Moselle. TO-DAY'S RUSSIAN OFFICIAL. I Western Front.—Under cover of a violent artillery fire, the enemy, about a battalion strong, launched an attack on our advanced post, occupying the western bank cf the River Shara, in the region of Goodovitchi. Our troops retired to the eastern bank of the river. Transylvanian Front.—On the wes- tern bank of the Maldavia the Rumanians, after a short offen- sive, captured the village of Bolfan, on the Piacha Rotkol heights. On the Northern Valikhla frontier the Rumanians have arrested the enemy's offensive, and are con- solidating their positions. On both banks of the River Jiu fierce fighting continues. Dobrudja. Enemy attacks con- tinue along the whole front, our troops and those of the Rumanian Army still offering a stubborn re- sistance, and are returning to the north of the Hirsova-Kacapking line.—Wireless Press.

POPULAR COMEDIAN I

POPULAR COMEDIAN. I Mr. Alf. Thomas Among the Soldiers. A pleasant evening was spent on Thurs- day, when Mr. Alf Thomas and his concert party again gave a concert to the soldiers engaged on local defences. The hall was full, amongst the audience being lady visitors, officers cf the V.T.C., etc. The programme was an excellent one, as usual. and Mr. Alf Thomas was ablv !-n->T>orted by Madam Evan Thomas and He Iris Thomas, Messrs. Griff Charles and Dai Morris, who are great favourites with the men. and East and Murton. with their in- strumental selections. Master Ivor Thomas mode, an efficient accompanist. During the interval nrc.sen-.rtions wre made which elli-lale all a pleasant surprise to the recipients. Ideut. Tver Thomas, on Mha-If /if his .C.O:. and men, presented Mr. Alf Thomas with a silver-mounWl phony walking-stick, suitably inscribed, and Cantain Da vies, on behalf of visitor* and friends, presented little Mi-w Iris Thomas with a beautiful -dressing-case. T,i(,1t, Thomas, in making- the presenta- tion. spoke of the good work Mr. Alf Thomas was doing amont'si the soldiers, the wounded especially. Mr. Thomas suit- ably responded, and thanked all on beh'ilf of himself and daughter for the unex- kindness shown to them. Lieutenant hor Thoma? himself was the next to be surprised, and was presented by friends with a silver-mounted uipe in case and also a cigar-case. Lieut. Thomas, who is leaving Swansea, replied and spoke of the kind he should miss. Thanks are due to Mr..Tim Griffiths, Mr. •loe.k Edwards, Ser^rt. Barnes, and others, who worker! hard and saw that all were Made eomfor*hie.

SWANSEA MINISTERS ILLNESS I

SWANSEA MINISTER'S ILLNESS. The Rev. W. Meredith, of the Forward Movement Hall, Port Tennaut, is wry ill, and is unable to carry out his appoint-I £ ienU. j

EPIC OF THE NAVY I

,EPIC OF THE NAVY. I fORPEDOED MINE SWEEPER GOES DOWN I FIGtiTlHG THE rOE. SWANSEA MAN AMONG LOST I The following announcement was iasucd by the Admiralty on Thursday: One of our mine-sweeping vNSels, H.M.S. Genista (Lieut.-Commander John White, R.N.), was torpedoed by an enemy submarine on the 23rd met., and sunk. All her officers and 75 men were lost. Twelve men were saved. When last seen the ship was sinking, but was still engaged with the enemy submarine. SWANSEA MAN AMONG LOST. 11 Included in the crew was Stoker Ed- ward Smith, R.N.R., whose home is at 7, Pleasant-row, Foxhole, Swansea. Official notification was received from the Admiralty on Friday morning that he was among the 73 men and officers who went down in the vessel. Deceased was enrolled about twelve months ago, and prior to joining the Navy he was employed at one of the works on that side of the river Tawe. Edward Smith was a married man and leaves a wife and a family of small children.

TWO KILLED TEN HURT

TWO KILLED, TEN HURT Explosion in Munition 1 Factory in Kent. The Ministry of Munitions regret to announce that an explosion took place on Wednesday at a. munition factory in Kent. Some damage was done to the works, and there were several casualties, includ- ing two deaths, and ten persons seriously I burned.

WAR ON SHIPPING

WAR ON SHIPPING. German Plans for New Submarine Campaign. Copenhagen, Friday.—In leading Ger- man circles no secret is made of the fact that the submarine war will be re-opened with hitherto unheard of violence, per- sistemssj,, and energy. The two great events expected by German diplomatists are this new sub- marini war and a new great offensive on the Eastern front. MORE STEAMERS SUNK. Lloyds report the British steamer Rowanmore and the Norwegian stoamer I Skog have been sunk.

THE SURGEONS F I N DI

THE SURGEON'S 'F I N D.'I Remarkable Operation at I Neath War Hospital. One of the most cheerful patients at I the Neath War Hospital is a private in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, who, by an operation, has been reminded of an inci- dent in France which gave him the pass- port to Blighty. Two months ago he was mounting a German trench when he fell backwards, and an upturned bayonet en- tered the dorsal region, inflicting a rather severe wound. After a week in a base hospital, he was sent to Neath, and the wound was healing nicely. But the sol- dier was constantly complaining of a pricking sensation. He was about to be discharged to a convalescent home, when he mentioned the fact to Capt. Williams. After a superficial examination he was placed under X-rays, when it was found that the pricking sensation" was caused by the blade of a bayonet em- bedded in the body. An operation was performed by Major Brook (Swansea) and the blade of the bayonet—14J inches in length-was ex- tracted. The blade, which was in a very dirty condition, is now in the possession of Capt. Williams. The soldier is progressing favourably, and remembers quite well how he searched for the bayoiiet ait.cr the incident, but could only find the handle.

PATRIOTISMI

PATRIOTISM. I; Is patriotism consistent with Christian I' faith ? Such was the question which the Rev. J. R'. Gillies, D.D. (London), asked, and set forth to answer, in his ser- mon on: England, our duty to her/' preached at St. Andrew's Church, St. Helenas-road, Swansea, on Thursday evening. He drew a striking picture of the Englishman, the hero, the poet, the mystic, and the saint. He sketched the greatness of England in arms, and her still greater and grarider victories of peace. And from this graphic picture of what England is, the preacher solemnly asked the question, What then of our duty to her?" Music was rendered during the evening by the organist, Mr. Dd. Hughes (Swan-j eea), and the choir.

FEMALEMUTIONERS FEMALEfUTIONERSI

FEMALEMUTIONERS. FEMAL E f UTIONERS. I Numerous Recruits, But Many! More Wanted. There has been a large response to the appeal for women to train as muni- tion workers. During the last two or three c];»vs more than 2,000 requests for information and offers of service liavc been made at the Training Department of the Ministry, and at the various train- ing school" throughout the country the applications h«ve also been numerous. Already some of the schools in the pro- vinces have a waiting list, but at the schools at Brixton, Shoreditch. and other London centres there are vacancie.s for a considerable number of learners, From F,(10 to 1,1)(\0 women are needed every week in the to take the places of the men who are now being called up for the Army. and to the increasing call for munitions. Applications, in writing, should be made to the Ministry of Munitions (Training Department), 6. Whitehall- gardens.

WORK FOR C CLASS MEN

WORK FOR C CLASS MEN. With reference to the announcement, in Thursday's papers of an offer to' married or single men classified for Cl, C2, or 03 to bike up clerical duties in the Army Pay Offices, the Press Association is informed that thp work is intended for C2 and C3 men. bnt C1 men may apply for appointment as pay clerks, and, if considered particularly suitable, the en- ?a!xn?nt m'?' be eartfticn?d hy the War Omc? AppIicntioTif: from men iin???'r years of age will not be entertained.

Sil 47 A MINUTE r

Sil 47 A MINUTE. r PREMIER'S COLDEN WCS8810 THE MISERS' ) LEADERS. I HINT OF STATE CONTROL. I The Evening Standard states that the direct cost of the meeting of coal miners and owners addressed on Wed- nesday by the Prime Minister was £11,2"20, being S:2,720 in third-class rail- way fares and £8,5UO in wages and ex- penses. The meeting lasted 76 minutes, so that it works out at about 1-147 a minute; but the ostensible purpose of the meeting was to hear the Prime Minister, who 6poke 31 minutes. Therefore, this osten- sible purpose was at the rate of nearly Jf.362 a minute. And the chief thing the Prime Minister said was, Reduce ab- senteeism by 5 per cent. and you will make up the required demand for coal." It is well understood (adds the Even- ing Standard ") that it was the prelude to important developments in the coal- mining industry. On Thursday Sir R. Redmayne and other officia4; of the Mines Department of the Home Office were again in confer- ence. The outlines of Lord Milner's pro- posals are known to certain of the miners' leaders, and to the Government, which has them under consideration. The subject is a very complex one, and the difficult problems raised are being care- fully considered. The Evening Standard is informed on good authority that State control of the mines is one of the considerations. To this the Government has not yet given approval. A decision, it is understood, will be reached by the beginning of November. Lord Milner's report will be published subsequently. The miners, as a body, adds our con- temporary, offer no insuperable objec- tions to State control. M.F.G.B. CONFERENCE. As the result of Wednesday's coal con- ference a national conference of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain will probably be convened at an early date. !*t*

FIRE AT A HOSPITALj I

FIRE AT A HOSPITAL.j Five Children Killed and 15 Missing. Farnham (Quebec), Thursday.—A fire, which is attributed! 'tn.a defective chimney, destroyed the Great Elizabeth Hospital here. Three hundred and fifty persons were sleeping on the premises at the time of the outbreak, and most of them escaped by jumping out of the windows. Twenty- five children were injured by jumping from their storey on to the stone pavement below. Five children are reported to have lost their lives, while fifteen others are missing.—Re uter.

MOUNTAIN MOVES I

MOUNTAIN MOVES. Sequel to Alarming Occur- rence in the Rhondda. In an action by the trtlRteeS of Craw- shay Bayley v. Cory Bros. and Co., Ltd., Mr. Clauson, K.C., applied to Justice] Younger in the Chancery Division on Fri- day to bring pressure on the defendants to prevent a large mountain of spoil from oontin uing to do damage, damage having already been done. The defendants, he said, had a righ-t to tip spoil on the Pentre Mountain, but large quantities had re- cently been tipped, with the result that it was breaking into houses, had pushed out the back wall of a bank, and had de- stroyed a skating rink. His lordship suggested that it was hardly a case for an interim injunction, Mr. Clauson said the matter was caus- in a great deal of agitation locally. The defendants desiring time to answer the plaintiffs' evidence, his lordship directed the motion to stand over for a week.

DEPORTED TO GERMANY I

DEPORTED TO GERMANY. Amsterdam, Thursday (received Friday). —It is stated that 1,200 Belgians from Namur and Charleroi have been sent to Germany. The Germans are preparing to carry out similar deportations in several other Belgian towns.

FROM PULPIT TO LATHEI

FROM PULPIT TO LATHE. I The Rev. J. H. Harry, minister of Attleborough Baptist Church, Warwick- eh ire, has resigned that position in order to devote his whole time to working in a munition factory.

BLINDLESS POLICE COURT I

BLINDLESS POLICE COURT. Woolwich Police Court has no blinds i over its largo centre skylight, and on Thursday, at 5.30—the new blinds1 down time—the 'magistrate was obliged to adjourn several summons-ec, in order j that the lighting restrictions should not be infringed.

THE BELGIAN FRONT I

THE BELGIAN FRONT. Havre, Friday.—The following offiical communique was issued here yesterday:- The Belgian-French artillery began and, iti "pite of the renly of German heavy ar- tillery, contiued a destructive fire on German works in the directions of boun- dary stone 16 on the Yoor.

THE LATE SIR THOS PRICEI

THE LATE SIR THOS PRICE. Mrs. J. C. Rees, Neath, sister-in-law oft the late Sir Thos. Roes Price, K.C.M.G., t'h? South African arilway magnate, who? diM at Itpi

A WELSH DRAMAI

A WELSH DRAMA. The cinema of Ystradgynlais was packed I on Thursday night when the Welsh! drama. "Endaf y Gwlad Garwr," was! performed by the Ystradgynlais Drama- tic Society, under the able oonductorship of Mr, Wm. Thoma (Isynys). Hundreds of people were unabl e to gain arlmi$ion.; The efforts of the actors and actreasea were of a very high standard, and super- ior to anything yet performed in the dis- trict. Mr. Thomas is to be heartily con- gratulated on five fine work of his com-1 piny. Mr. Tom Williams was the stage I ma Dager. The whole of the proceeds will1, be handed over to the local sailors and, soldiers reception committee. A i-ol)eat; performance will be ifiv-en this (Friday) j night. j

WAR SECRETARYSI TRIBUTE rfc

WAR SECRETARY'S I TRIBUTE rfc STATUARY UNVEILED AT I CARDIFF j: < FREEDOM OF CITY FOR LORD RHONODA 1: Mr. Lloyd George made his first public appearance in Cardiff as Secretary of State ior War on Friday, on the occasion of an j important double ovent, the presentation of the honorary freedom of the City to Lord Rhondda of Llanwern, M.A., D.L., in recognition of the services he has rell- dered to the city, and the unveiling by the Minister of War of the Welsh histori- j' cal statuary in the City Hall piesented by Lord Rhondda. In the Marble Hall. where the interest- ing ceremony took place, there was a j' large gathering fully representative of the varied interests of the Principality, while many distinguished people occupied the platform. The Lord Mayor (Dr. R. J. Smith) presided, and beside Mr. Lloyd George and Lord Rhondda those present! included Lady Rhondda, Lady Mackworth, i the Lady Mayoress (Miss Smith), the High Sheriff (Sir John Curtis), the Recorder (Mr. W. Llewelyn Williams, K.C., M.P.), a-nd Principal Griffiths. ■'Vfter the utsual formalities attendant" upon the presentation of the freedom, the Lord Mayor paid eloquent and glowing tribute to Lord Rhondda. LORD RHONDDA ACKNOWLEDGES. Lord Rhondda acknowledged the great honour conferred upon him in a fitting re- i spouse. He remarked that they were there to commemorate a work of great Welshmen of the pa&t. We have amongst us the greatest living Welshman —(applause)—the man to whom we look as organiser of victory in this great struggle. The name of Mr. Lloyd George rings out from one end of the Empire to the other as a man who gets things done Ho has been asked to this ceremony to- day not as Minister of War, but as a great Welshman." The unveiling of the eleven statues was carried out by vaijous officials of the Cor- poration at the direction of Mr. Lloyd George, who received a great ovation on rising to address the assemwy. MR. LLOYD GEORGE'S TRIBUTE. j Mr. Lloyd George stated that his excuse for playing truant from the War Office that day was that he once took an oath to be obedient in all things to the Lord Mayor, and aMermen and councillors of the CXty of Cardiff. He wa? glad l? l? present, he went on, because he owed a epwial debt of gratitude for the aid given to him at a critical time by the citizens of Cardiff. When the Prime Minister asked him to undertake the terrible task of equipping the new armies raised by Lord Kitchener, one of the first whose services he secured was Lord Rhondda. He gave me ready and effective aid." Mr. Lloyd George remarked. Although at times we have been political foes we have never ceased to be personal friends." (Applause.) He knew of no man of his acquaintance who could render more assistance in the organisation of muni- tions in America, including Canada, than Lord Rhondda, and he could assure them that his highest hopes were surpassed "A GREAT WORK." The work ho then, rendered to the Em- pire oas a :j':t:eai- work, which was bearing i fruit now in victory on the battlefields of the Somme, and even if the services he had rendered to Cardiff—and they were great—had not been sufficient of distinc- tion for the honour they were conferring upon him that day, the services which he as a citizen of Cardiff rendered to the Empire in themselves justified what they were doing.

WELSH OFFICER DISMISSED I

WELSH OFFICER DISMISSED. Thursday night's London Gaette announced that Temporary Lieut. H. M. N. Anstey (transport officer), Royal Welsh Fusiliers, has been dismissed the service by sentence of a general court martial, dated 31st August last.

MORRISTON BROTHERSI

MORRISTON BROTHERS. I Official news has been received by Mr. and Mrs. David William Lawrence, of Crown-street, Morriston, that their son, Private Oswald Lawrence, was killed in action on Octolier 3rd. It was only three weeks ago that his brother, Private Robert Lawrence, wis killed it action. Private Oswald Lawrence was only 20 years of age. Prior to enlistment he worked in the tin- ¡¡ works.

LANGLAND MAN WOUNDEDI

LANGLAND MAN WOUNDED. I Private Stanley Lloyd, of a Welsh regi- i ment, who has been wounded and is now in a base hospital, is the son of Mrs. j Stephen Lloyd, Langland, and grandson of Mr. James Lloyd, of Greenslade, Mumbles. He joined the Army about, seven months ago, and had only been in France five weeks.

DEAD NEATH MAGISTRATEI

DEAD NEATH MAGISTRATE. I Before commencing the business of the court at Neath County Sessions on Fri- day, Mr. Edward Davies, the presiding magistrate, referred to the lamented death of his colleague, Mr. Wm. Jones, who. he said, was a personal friend, and would be ■ greatly missed by him. As a magistrate he was most useful and impartial in his judgment. He moved a vote of condo- II to the widow. Mr. James Revall. on behalf of the legal i profession, and Supt. Ben Evans, on be- half of the police, associated themselves with the resolution, which was passed in j silence.

PIT PROPS FOR WALES I

PIT PROPS FOR WALES. I Mr. Russell, replying in the House of Commons to a question as to Irish timber j being shipped to Wales for pit props, says the Irish Department, of Agriculture is aware that timhcr has been sold and shipped as stated, but the export for this purpose is not at present greatly in excess of the average of recent years. The De- partment. have no specific information as to the state of the timber supply in Wales, and in view of the present scarcity of timber the Department would not lie pre- pared to recommend that the export be stopped and t.hfit anv commercial titiil)f,r I' should ho used lor firewood even though  ooal is dear. j,

ALL MEN UNDER 30 I

ALL MEN UNDER 30. I GEN. CAMPBELL'S STRONG APPEAL TO I WELSH EMPLOYERS. EXISTING BADCES TO CO The Man-Power Beard have made a new recommendation. It is that all the existing badges of reserved workers and |! the present de-badging machinery should be scrapped. In its place the Board pro- pose a scheme for establishing local boards all over the country, of employers and employed, with a military representa- tive in attendance, to do the badging all aver again, with a view to getting more men out of munitions and reserved oc- cupations into the Army, and further di- Luting labour. SOUTH WALES MEN. I. Lient.-General Sir William Pitoairn Campbell, K.C.B., General UiScer COJJI- J manding-in-Chief, the Western Command, Visited the Cardiff xchange on Thursday, Mid addressed a large attendance of mem- bers on tJ?e question of the eubstitutioa of labour. General Campbell, who met with an en-I thusiastic reception, said a scheme had been prepared for the substitution oi labour, the details of which would be sup- plied very shortly. He hoped they would all support the scheme, and thus help to win the war as boon aö possible. I- rance had not exempted a single man under :P I, years of age, and I want every possible fit man up to 30 years of age," said the General, and especially the young un- married men." I THE NEED FOR MORE I In the afternoon General Campbell at- tended a conference at the Royal Hotel, Cardiff, of chairmen of military tribunals and military representatives for the counties of Glamorgan, Monmouth, Brecon, and Carmarthen. General Campbell explained that if tri- bunals fell: bound to grant temporary ex- emptions to men to enable them to settle their private affairs they should make the exemptions for as short a period as poa- sible, and should stipulate that they were final. The need for men was as great now as ever it was. It should be borne in mind that our casualties were necessarily heavy, and that successes were always purchased heavily. Although at the present time events were turning in our favour, it did not mean that efforts to get men should be slackened. The time of victory was not i the time to slacken our efforts to obtain reserves, but rather the reverse. "If we are to make good our gains and push the enemy etill further back it will be neces- sary at all times to have strong reserves."

SERBIAN FRONTI 4

SERBIAN FRONT. I .4. —:— Bulgarian Soldiers Volun- j tarily Surrendering. (From the Press Association's Special Correspondent) Salonika, Thurooay.-Only small en- gagements of a local character took place to-day on the Serbian front. The Bulgars appear to be waiting fur reinforcements | with a view to undertaking a fresh ofycii- sive, the forces facing the Serbians, al)- parently not affording sufficient guaran-. tee of success, which moreover would seem to be confirmed by the fact cf the 1 fairly good number of prisoners which the Serbs continue to take, although there has been no serious fighting in the last ten dayS. Bulgarian) prisoners are surprised at their humane treatment at the hand of the Serbs, hence the increasing numher of prisoners. The Bulgars "believed they would all be massacred, but having as- certained that no such fate awaited them they surrendered more easily. A comical incident is reported. One Buigar prisoner asked to lie allowed to re- turn to his comrades with a view to in- j ducing them to surrender to. After a w'hiki. be returned bringing; with him quite a respectable number of fellow sol- diers.

NEW BOOK OF CHRONICLES

'NEW BOOK OF CHRONICLES. In a Prize Court case on Thursday the partners of a firm were named Charles Samuel Emmanuel and Joseph, the son of Samuel. Their grandfather came from Mulhouse, and was named Joseph. Sir Samuel Evans said it sounded like a new Book of Chronicles, with Joseph as Abraham. (Luughtoer).

NORTH SEA LIVELINESS

NORTH SEA "LIVELINESS. The Christiania correspond-nt of the "Daily Telegraph," in a dispatch dated, Thursday says: A message from Sta- vanger states that violent firing like that which took place on the occasion of the battle of Jutland was h?ard at that plac?. coming from the direction of the sea on Wednesday.

DEATH OF A KC11 DEATH OF A KC

DEATH OF A K.C. 11 DEATH OF A K.C. Mr. Geo. Elliott, the well-known K.C., who has been ill for some time, died early on Friday morning. Called to the bar in 1882, Mr. Elliott had been engaged in many famous cases, including a num- ber of murder trials, among them Chap- man, the poisoner; Dougal, the Moat Farm murderer; Rayner, cpnvicted for 7 the murder of Mr. Whiteloy; and < Devereux. He was also connected with the trial of Lody, tlw German spy, and with the D. S. Windell frauds.

MORTALITY RETURNoc if

MORTALITY RETURNoc. if | 1 For the week ending Oct. 21, the deaths registered in the 96 great towns of England and Wales were at the annual rate of 11.8 per 1.000 of the aggregare civil population. In South Wales the statistics were:— i Death No. of No. of Pop. rate, deaths, births Cardiff 181,900 9.9 35 74 Swansea 110,843 9.9. 21 62 Newport 80,379 13.0 20 35 Rhondda 156.2R0 10.3 31 75 M<,rth:vr 76.493 10.9 16 35 Aberdar 51,279 6.1 6 21

LOCAL CONTRACTORS WILL

LOCAL CONTRACTOR'S WILL. Mr. Charles Tfann-P., v. of 15, Bay-vstreet, St. Thomas, Swansea, formerly of Brook Cottages, Clydach-road, Morriston. Swan- sea, contractor, who died on the 10th July last, left estate of the gross value of 1:1.167 6s. 7d„ of which X'258 15s. 5d. is net personalty. Probate of his will daied 5th August, 1913, has been granted to his sons, Mr. Frank George Hanney, of 19, Brynmill-avenue, Urvnniill, Swansea, con- tractor, and Mr. Wiii. llenry Hanney, of Spencer-street, Rrytihyfryd, Swansea, in- surance agent. The testator left his es- tate to his children, Frank, WiJliam, James and Ernest Hannev in eaual shares.

TODAYS WAR RESUMEL

TO-DAYS WAR RESUME L Leader Office, 4.50 p.m. This morning's British official speaks of heavy rain during the night. On the front, south of the Ancre. hostile artil- lery was again active. At one point we successfully raided enemy trenches. In the Russian communique reference is -made to a German attack on an ad- vanced post, in the course of which the enemy occupied the western part of the River Shara, in the region of Goodo- vitchi. The Russians retired to the eastern bank. The Rumanians, after a short offensive, capturc-d a village. At another point they have arrested the enemy's offensive and are consolidating their positions. In the Dobrudja enemy attacks continue along the whole front. The Rumanians I are offering a stubborn Thei'c has been fierce fighting at Verdun and the enmy's losses have been on a huge scale.

TODAYS HEWS IN BRIEF I

TO-DAY'S HEWS IN BRIEF I At Banbury English wheat reached the record price of 73s. a quarter. Colonel J. R. Royston (12th Australian Light Horse) is gazetted a brigadier- general A man of 95, named Hollroyd, was burned to death at a fire in Glamorgan- street, Pimlico. Mystery surrounds the death of Violet Crookes, aged eighteen, whose body has been found on Folkestone beach. During the week ending October 14, 1,42^,156 War Savings Certificates were sold, making a total of 41,367,219. All persons in the employ of the Home Office are natural-born British subjects, said Mr. Herbert Samuel on Thursday. On and after November 1 mem bers of the Services will be elected to membership of the Royal Aero Club without entrance fee. The Liverpool Corn Trade Association has given Y,1,550 15s. to the Kitchener Memorial Fund, which now amounts to more than < £ 31-3,000. On behalf of the Australian Government application is to be made to the London County Council for a music license for Australia House, Aldwych. Bodies washed ashore on the south coast have been identified as those of Charles Morris, Mowbrey-street, Liverpool, stew7 ard; and J. White, coal trimmer, both of the Cunard liner Alaunia, and the third as that of a member of the crew of the Dutch steamship Fortune (? Fortuna).

GREEK CONCESSiONSI

GREEK CONCESSiONS. I 60,000 Soldiers to be I Disbanded. Athens, Tuesday Night.—The first of the Entente Powers' new demands has been conceded. To-night a royal decree will order the demobilisation of various Army groups totalling (10.000 men and leaving the Greek forces on a peace foot- ing of about 35,000. The next istep to be expected will be the transfer southward (from Thessaly) of the remainig forces to positions satis- factory to the Allies.—" Daily Mail." Thursday Afternoon.—The district of Koritsa (Epirus) is expeded to -go over to-day to the Salonika Government. I

WOUNDED AND MISSING I

WOUNDED AND MISSING. I Mrs. Lillicrap, of Caebricks, Cwm- bwrla. would be grateful to anyone who could supply her with news of her brother. Private David Griffiths, of the Somerset Light Infantry, who has been officially repcrted wounded and missing. No news has been received from him since July 2Gth. Pte. Griffiths is nearly 30 years of age, and was formerly employed at the Graigola Fuel Works.

FAMOUS LOCAL CASE I

FAMOUS LOCAL CASE. I At Neath County Sessions on Friday, the Clerk (Mr. L. Kemptnorne) was com- plimented by the bench on the presenta- tion of evidence in the celebrated milk case—Evans v. Cox—which had just been decided against the appellants with costs in the High Courts. The Chairman also associated Supt. Ben Evans with the con- gratulations. Mr. Dan Perkins, solicitor, joined in the congratulations, and added that Supt. Evans* name would always be linked to a famous case under the Food and Drugs Ac. an" quoted throughout the land.

BENEFIT OF THE DOUBTI

BENEFIT OF THE DOUBT. I When charged at Neath on Friday with trespassing in search of conies, Wm. Richards, collier, Resolvcn, was stated to haxe been picking water cress. John Griffiths, water bailiff. Cwm- Efwrach, who prosecuted, said he saw de- fendant on Colonel Vaughan's land at Rheola, with two dcgs-a whippet and a retriever. lie watched defendant for 20 minutes, and heard him say to one of the clogs, Go on, good dog, pick them up." When approached, and asked what he was :loing, defendant replied. "Doing nothing. [ can see 110 game here." The offence was denied, and Mr. W. [jeyson assured the Bench that defendant ivas picking water cress. Defendant was iv-en the benefit of the doubt and the case I ,vas dismissed.

AIR RAID LIGHT COSTS 128 i i

AIR RAID LIGHT COSTS 128. i i I A Golder's-green baker, named Ludwig Henkl. who was stated to be a German j naturalised just before the war broke out, was fined S25 at Hendon on Thurs- day for allowing a light to shine through his bakehouse window on the night of an air raid. A man, who was repairing the. oven at the time, and lit the gas, was fined k3, with costs.

VIOLATED PLEDGE TO USA

VIOLATED PLEDGE TO U.S.A. Viscount Grey made a reply in the I House of Lords on Thursday to questions with regard to the sinking of unarmed I merchant ships by U-boats, in violation of the pledge given to America by Ger- many. He said he saw little use, at this moment, at any rate, in discussing the question. The pledge was one which passed between the German Government and the Governmet of the United States. It was not a pledge given to us, and he did not think any good would be done by discussing the question of what the policy of the United States was or ought to be with regard to the German Govern- ment on this subject. That was a matter for the United States Government itself*

Advertising

j CLAIMS FOR EXEMPTION. At the Swansea Borough. Tribun'. 1.. this afternoon, a local coal exporting firm | appealed for iho o^rrr.pUor, of their Cs- toms clerk and Freneh correspondent, It was shown that iL, firm ?'?'To ?-.Jpp?T?? coal ? France, o'.c. Ono mcmÜl'" cx- coal tn Frarc-?: 0-no C