Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 6 Next Last
Full Screen
47 articles on this page
Advertising

II The Cambria Daily r Leader" gives later news than any paper published in this dis- trict.

Advertising

kitiwm iwr The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street (fir floor), where adver- tisements can be recei d up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel. j 2276 Central. ii—mmmml

BYEELECTIONS OBVIATED I

BYE-ELECTIONS OBVIATED I SPECIAL BILL PASSED I MEASURE THROUGH ALL ST ACES IN COMMONS HOUSE OF COMMONS, Friday. The Speaker took the chair at non. The home Secretary formally handed in the Bill for establishing certain new Ministries, and for the appointment ot the aditional Secretaries of Under Secre- taries in certain Government Depart- ments, and it was read for the first time. RE-ELECTION BILL. I In moving the second reading of the Re- election of Ministers (No. ?) Bill, Home Secretary explained that it followed the precedent of an act p by the late Government in 1915. A member 011 Parliament, on accepting an office ot profit under the Crown, vacated his seat. There were, 'however, certain exceptions, end the result was somewhat capricious, because, without the Bill, about half the New Government would be able to retain their seats without re-election, while tho other half would have to Ap-e k re-election. It the Bill were not passed, Ministers closely connected with the carrying on oi the war would have to submit themselves to theih constituents, including the First Lord of the Admiralty, the Minister ot Munitions, the President of the Board ot Agriculture, and the projx>sed Pensions Minister, and the Minister for Lubour. This would mean a loss of valuable time, end some expenditure, which was unde- sirable at the present moment. Mr. Herbert Samuel supporte dthe Bill, but pointed out that, if the measure were not proposed, and any contests were' forced, the late Prime Minister, and those who acted with him, would have given the Ministers concerned whole-hearten support in the constituencies. (Cheers) Mr. Watt declared that the Bill lilcheu from the people one of their long estab- lished rights. Mr. Ginell opposned the measure in a long speech, during which he was re- peatedly called to order for irrelevance. The Speaker eventuailv reouested him to discontinue hi4 speech, and the hon. member at once resumed his seat. The Bill was read a second time with. out a division, passed through the Com- mons without amendment, was reported to the House, and read a third time amid t cheera, i I IN PARLIAMENT. UNITED IRELAND. r On the report of the Vote of Credit, Major William Redmond commented on the good feeling which existed between various sections of Irishmen in the trenches- He believed an understanding between north and south, which would settle the problem of Irish Government, )r-Yas not only quite possible, but essen. tial. Troops from Ulster, and other pro- 1 vinces of Ireland, bad been in close oon- tact, and nothing but the very best and i kindliest of feelings prevailed between these men from north and south. (Cheers).. In if?e of the enemy they all recognised they were brother Irishmen. There had been no failure on our side of the Somme. Our soldiers had proved t their superiority over the -trained troope: 1 of Germany, and they demanded they should have the support of a united 4 people at home. He said to his National- ist friends and to Ulsternn, and mem- ( bers of all parties, they ought, in honour, J to unite i ngiving all the support to the soldiers in the field.

LOCAL DIVORCE I

LOCAL DIVORCE. I ———. α- .——— Petition of Welsh Colliery Manager's Wife. In the Divorce Court on Friday, Mr. Justice Shearman heard the petition of Mrs. Constance Hewlett for the dissolu- tion of her marriage with Mr. E. Ilawlett. a colliery manager, on the ground of hie I statutory desertion and adultery. The case was undefended. Mr. Bucknill, for petitioner, said the parties were married in April, 1900, at the Parish Church, Wigan, Lanes. There j were no children. On June 4th of last year the lady obtained a decree of restitu- tion of conjugal rights. That was served on Mr. Hewlett, but he had not complied with it. Evidence had now been obtained that he and another stayed at Grosvenor Hotel, London, for two nights in March. Mrs. Constance Hewlett, petitioner, gave evidence in support of counsel's state ment. She was, she said, now living at Trnro, but at the date of the petition was living at Guildford. After her marriage she lived with her husband in various places, amongst others in Carmarthen- shire. On June 4th hist year, she ob- tained a decree of restitution which had 1 not been complied with. She was not at the Grosvenor Hotel on March 4th andi 5th. The assistant manager of the Grosvenor Hotel, Victoria, gave evidence that Mr. Hewlett stayed at the hotel on March 4th and 5th with a lady. His lordship granted a decree niai with costs. t

FRENCH HIGH COMMAND I

FRENCH HIGH COMMAND. I Paris, Friday.—The Matin says. following the appointment of General Nivelle to the command of the French armies in the north and north-east, further changes in the high command are inevitable.

ONE OF THE SOMERSETS I

ONE OF THE SOMERSETS. News has been received by Mr. and Mrs. Harris, of 41, Trafalgar-terrace, Swansea, that their son, Pte T. J. Harris,! of the Somersets, is missing. Since Pte. j Harris rejoined as a reservist, his wife: ahd a child have died.

ENEMY AIRMEN TAKEN I

ENEMY AIRMEN TAKEN. I Havre, Thursday (received Friday).— I Two German aviators landed on Tuesday I on the Plateau de Rouelle near here. They were taken prisoners by some ( British soldiers.

MATRIMONIALI

MATRIMONIAL. I On Tuesday, Jan. 16th, the marriage i will take plaoe at the Parish Church, Swansea, of Muryel Gladys, fourth daughter of the Vicar of Swansea, and Mr. Patrick A. Buxton. F*?llow of Trinity College, Cambridge, son of Mr. Alfred Buxton, Fairhill, Toubridgw

WELSH LIBERAL COUNCIL

WELSH LIBERAL COUNCIL ACTIVE SUPPORT TO LLOYD GEURCE The Executive Committee of the Welsh National Liberal Council met in London on Thursday afternoon, Lord St. David's in the chair, and among the South Wales representatives present were Mr. W. J. Crocker (Swansea), Mr. R. Roberts, J.P- (Llandudno), Mr. J. W. Jones (Ystrad- gynlais), and Mr. Rees Edmunds (Merthyr). The meeting had been srmuBQoned to deal with the situation created by the change of Government in special recogni- tion of the fact that the president of the Welsh Council (Mr. Lloyd George) has undertaken the duties of the Premiership Eulogistic reference was made to the work of the late Prime Minister, it being recalled that he introduced the Disestab- I..Ahr,ier,t bill, and that the Ministry which he led has passed the great mea- sures of financial and social reform which have distinguished the past decade. After full discussion it was felt that no better course could be taken than to en- dorse the action of the Welsh Parlia- mentary Party taken at its recent meet- ing, and the following resolutions were therefore passed nem. con. "That in view of the supreme necea- sity of united action in the present grave situation, this Executive Committee of the Welsh National Liberal Council pledges itself to give active support to the Government of Mr. Lloyd George in the vigorous prosecution of the war. It offers most cordial congratulations to its fellow-countryman, Mr. Lloyd G-eorge, on his accession to the highest office in the Empire; and records ittf satisfaction and pride at the attainment of the Premiership, for the first time ip history, by a Welsh-speaking Welshman "This Executive Committee expresses its deepest gratitude to the Right Hon. H. H. Asquith for the great services h" has rendered to Wales and to Liberalism as leader of the Liberal party; and cordis ally endorses his call for hearty co-opera- tion in support of the present Govern- ment in the great task which it has undertaken.

SIR ALFRED MONO

SIR ALFRED MONO. Hint of Some Startling Proposals. There were few political developments on Thursday. Lord Rhondda made his first appearance as a Minister in the House of Lords, and Sir Alfred Mond took the oath before the Lord President of the Council on taking office under Royal War- rant as the First Commissioner of Works. Sir R. Finlay, the new loid, Chancellor, will take his eeat in the House of Lords on Tuesday next under the style and title of Lord Finlay. SIR ALFRED MOND. Sir Alfred Mond, the new First Com- missioner of Works, is getting a grip of the department of which he is the h-ead. and I am told (says a correspondent), not to be surprised if before long we hear ot some startling but salutary proposals. For instance, the parks might well be turned fr.om their present ornamental to more utilitarian purposes.

FIGHTING AT VERDUN

FIGHTING AT VERDUN. (Admiralty Intercepts Collected by Wire- less Press.) Berlin, Thursday.—Attacks made by the French on the eastern and western banks of the Meuse began during the evening. | ,n

ANXIOUS BERLIN

ANXIOUS BERLIN. Amsterdam, Friday.—Berlin papers agree that the impression created in the Entente countries by the Chancel- lor's peace proposals cannot be judged from the first comments sent from the enemy capitals, and not until the New Year will any considered judgment be possible.—Reuter.

SWANSEA BOXING I

SWANSEA BOXING. At the boxing tournament to be held by Mr. Alf Barry at the Olympic Hall, Swansea, on Saturday evening, Chris Langdon (Ystaiyfera) will oppose Arthur Bishop (Caerphilly) in the principal contest, instead of Young Mog Pugh. Langdon is one of the cleverest lads at his weight in the country, so that a good contest is assured.

A PEMBROKESHIRE BRIDE

A PEMBROKESHIRE BRIDE. The marriage took place on Thursday at Mary Abbot's, Kensington, London, of Brigadier-General G. F. W. St. John, C.B., and Miss Gladys Gregg Philipps, youngest daughter of Sir Charles and Lady Philipps, Picton Castle, Pembrokeshire. The bride was formerly commandant at Cottesmore Red I Cross Hospital, near I Haverfordwest.

CRUELTY TO HORSES I

CRUELTY TO HORSES. I A long list of convictions was proved for similar offences at Woolwich on Thursday against John Murray, job- master and contractor, who was charged with working two unfit horses. The penalties included fines of 9,24, F.25, two of £15, one of S5, and one of Y,3, with five guineas costs. The fine on Thursday was £ 25 on a first summons and one month's imprisonment on a second sum- mons. Defendant intimated his inten- tion of appealing against the sentence of imprisonment.

A ROYAL BIRTHDAY I

A ROYAL BIRTHDAY. I The Mayor of Swansea sent the follow- ing telegram on Thursday to his Royal Highness Prince Albert at Buckingham Palace, on the occasion of his birthday: "The Mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of the county borough of Swansea send 10:161 greetings." The following reply was received on Friday: "I heartily thank you, aldermen and burgesses of Swansea, for the kind message dispatched to me on my birth- day.-Albert."

AT THE TRIBUNALSI

AT THE TRIBUNALS. I Mr. E. M. David presided over a sitting on Friday. There were 26 cases. The manager of a Gorseinon grocery business previously given conditional ex- emption, had his certificate reduced to one of three months. All tin plate oases were adjourned, and the Clerk instructed to write asking for information. An undertaker, the onlf one in the dis- trict, pallied for clerical work, was given three mouths, as also was a draper in the sanM class. l "A ^rtner in a firm of accountants was given two months final. t

THE PEACE OFFER

THE PEACE OFFER; AlliES DEFINE ONLY POSSIBLE TERMS REPAMHON AND SECURITY The German Note containing the peace offer has been" received in Washington, but as yet it has not reached the Allied Powers, and until it is in their hands no pronouncement can be made upon it. But with regard to any peace offer there is no uncertainty about the atti- tude of the Allies, which was defined by Mr. Bonar Law on Thursday in the House of Commons and defined in the words of Mr. A-squith:- TIWY (tlie Allies) required that there j shall be adequate reparation for the past and adequate security for the future." That," said Mr. Bonar Law, is still the policy, that is still the determination of his Majesty's Government." In a menage to M. P&ehitch, the Serb- ian Premier, Mr. Lloyd George saY6:- Your gallant nation and my deter- mination to Oü-Olwrate with our Allies until the final victory is secured and the independence of Serbia is restored. In a semi-official Note the Russian Gov- ernment yesterday laid bare the machina- tions 01 the German Government which is making use of peace propaganda in order to secure the hegemony of Europe. Meanwhile great popular excitement is reported in Berlin. THE PUREST LOVE." Amsterdam, Friday.—The Cologne I, Gazette" &ays:—?The English Press is incorrect when it represents the pea?e offer of the Central Powers, which was caused by the purest love of humanity, as bluff. From the British Government we did not expect anything else but the brutal will to destroy us.Itet,ter.

LLANELLY FIRMS GIFT i

LLANELLY FIRM'S GIFT. P-5,000 for the Technical I College Fund. In connection with the movement initi- ated by Mr. R. Beaumont Thomas, J.P., with the view of having a technical col- lege established at Llanelly, it is stated on excellent authority that his ifrm, Messrs. Richard Thomas and C6., Ltd., the well-known Welsh steel and tinplate manufacturers, have given a fine lead to the other manufacturers of the tbwn and district by offering < £ 5,000 towards the fund.

I GERMANYS PLIGHTI

GERMANY'S PLIGHT. I Clamour for Peace: Position I Desperate. Berne, Thursday.—From the bewilder- ing succession of telegrams which are reaching Switzerland mainly through the agency of the Wolff Bureau, one domi- nant factor emerges (says the Daily News" correspondent at Berne). It is that the German masses firmly be- lieve that their Government's offer brings peace within measurable distance. Scenes bordering on frenzy occurred at Berlin immediately after the gist of the Chancellor's speech became known to the public, and according to the latest mess- ages still continue. Men rushed wildly from cafes and res- jtaurants to snatch up the newspapers, strangers shook hands excitedly with each other, and women crowded the churches, when Protestant pastors and Roman Catholic priests offered up extempore 1 prayers for peace. These scenes show better than anything else could show how heavily the nightmare of the war weighs upon the German, people. "A DESPERATE POSITION." I Paris, Thursday.—I quote from the H Gaulois this startling statement which the well-known writer Henri de Nous- sanne received in Switzerland from a pro- minent German-Swiss: You must hold on and do nothing rash. The depression of the mark is obvious, and more is to come. We know here that: your enemies are in a desperate position, and that what they have done in Ruma- nia has given them no decisive result, and their chiefs are now reduced to saying, We fight only now for our lives." They i know they are done for. Think what the fate of their rulers will be. If victorious they may be assassinated. If vanquished the scaffold awaits them.

FRANCE AND DRINK I

FRANCE AND DRINK. I Prohibition Measure Fore- I shadowed. Paris, Thursday.—The Government has just introduced an important Bill in the l Chamber empowering the Ministry to adopt by simple decree certain measures of national defence connected with indus- trial and agricultural production and food supplies. It is hoped that the Bill will be passed rapidly, and one of the first measures en- visaged is the requisition of alcohol for the needs of national defence and the sup- pression of ordinary consumption of alcohol. I "EQUIVALENT TO GREAT I VICTORY." Paris, Thursday.—M. Briand?s declara- tion in his speech in the Chamber yester; day that the Government intended to sup-" press alcohol was anticipated by public opinion, and has produced a most excel- lent impression. An eminent member of the Chamber interviewed upon the matter declared:— The decision of the Prime Minister, which assures physical strength and moral i balance, is of more value than i.) raising of a new army, and its effect upon the result of the war and tlie fate of the country will be equivalent to a great vic- tory."—Wireless Press.

BRIDE IN OVERALLS I

BRIDE IN OVERALLS. I At Elated, Surrey on Thursday, Miss Goldsmith, a muntion worker, was mar- ried to Gunner J. W. Long. The bride was attired in "overalls," and a party of the bride's girl friends also wore their working dress. I

NEW PAYMASTERGENERALI

NEW PAYMASTER-GENERAL. I It is officially announced that the Right j Hon. Sir Joseph Çomptoll Bicketts has been appointed. Faymaster-General.

THE CREEK CRISIS a

THE CREEK CRISIS a ALLIES' NEW MOVE TO CLEAR MATTERS UP Demands are about to be presented to the Greek Government by the Entente with a view to clearing up the unsatis- factory situation. Lord Robert Cecil, Under Secretary for Foreign Affairs, in making this statement in Parliament on Thursday, said the Bri- tish Government were fully alive to the danger of delays. In reply to a question he also stated that the complete blockade of Greece did not imply that a state of war existed be- tween Greece and the Allies. SITUATION AT ATHENS. Salonika, Thursday.—The situation at Athens is becoming more grave, and energetic intervention is expected by the Allies, who are arranging matters with a view to settling the measures necessary for the obtaining of satisfaction for the crime oonunitted at the beginning of this month. All communication between official Greece and Corfu, Morea and Euboea have been rendered impossible owing to the vigilant watch kept by the warships of the Allies. The arrest, imprisonment and execution of Venizelists by the royal authorities and troops continue.—Wireless Press. Paiis, Thursday.—The Mutin" says. with regard to the intentions of King Coustantine, that in view of a certain danger, the Allies have decided to act without delay. King Con&tantine, the paper adds, must clearly show by his act,, that he would not be in a position to effect his hostile de- signs even if he continued to entertain them.-R,euter. ATHENS AND THE. ULTIMATUM. Athens, Thursday (received Friday).— There are indications of acceptance in principle of the Allied ultimatum. The Cabinet Council has been held under the presidency of the King. [Note: All news emanating from Atheiig is suspect, as has already been pointed out.]

EVENTS IN BALKANS

EVENTS IN BALKANS. Big Guns Busy in Lake Doiran Zone. TO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. There were no important events dur ing the course of the night. ARMY OF THE EAST. There were intermittent, artillery actions on the whole of the front, particularly accentuated, in the Lake Doiran zone. In the region to the north of AIgn- astir an enemy column was dis1 persed by our fire, and there was great activity amongst the Allied aviators. An enemy machine was brought down to the south of Petrit.

PRIME MINISTERS HEALTH

PRIME MINISTER'S HEALTH. An Exegange Co.'s message says: On enquiry at No. 11, -Downmg-street it was stated that the Prime Minister was mifch better. The right hon. gentleman will keep indoors for a day or two, but has every expectation of being present in the House of Commons on Tuesday next.

iSHOP HOURS ACTj

SHOP HOURS ACT. At the Llanelly Police Court on Wed- nesday a number of tradesmen were fined, one for serving a customer with soap after one o'clock on the day of the weekly half-holiday j another for serving eggs after seven p.m., and a third for selling corned beef and cooked meat after hours.

GREEK STEAMER SUNK

GREEK STEAMER SUNK. Madrid, Thursday (received Friday).— The Greek steamer Salamis (6,300 tons) was sunk by a German submarine. The crew were towed away by the submarine in eight boats belonging to the ship.— Press Association War Special.

BIG LEVY ON THE WILNAI

BIG LEVY ON THE WILNA. Amsterdam, Friday.-According-to the semi-oiffcial Norddesutchi Allgemeine Zeitung," the German authorities have announced a single leby of one million roubles will be made on the district of Wilna to defray the cost of supplies pro- vided for the population of Wilea in the past, and to cover" the expenditure on supplies which may be provided for the inhabitants in the future.-Pr(vs Associa- tion War Special.

CAPTAIN BLAIKIE I

CAPTAIN BLAIKIE. I The President of the Navy League having telegraphed to Sir Edward Carson that the Navy League views with profound concern. the possibility of the murder of Captain Blaikie, and appealing to the First Lord of the Admiralty to take measures for the safety of the officer's life and for the vindication of the law of nations upon the high seas, the following reply has been received:—"The views of the Navy League have my entire sym- pathy. The question must be faced frith earnestness and determination.—Edward Carson."

A YOUTHFUL BACCHUS

A YOUTHFUL BACCHUS. A nice-looking, chubby-faced boy of 16 was charged at the London Guildhall on Thursday with being drunk and incapable, It was stated that he worked at a wine- shop in the City, and that his wages were 5s., but tips brought it up to 30s. and 35s. a week. In answer to questions the bov said he ,got druJik on champagne, and ndd-ed. "There is always a bottle open." Sir John Baddelev Sued him 5s., and hoped I that would be lesson to him for life.

HIS LITTLE LOT I

HIS LITTLE LOT. I An applicant before Swansea Rural I District Tribunal was a butcher. The following dialogue took place: Capt. Williams: Are you maxriedi- j Yes, sir. How many children have yon ?—I had eight air, but I had two more last Mon- j day. I thought at first it was one. Capt- Williams: Congratulations. Applicant: Thank you sir. They are boys. Capt. Williams: Further congratula- i' tions. Granted six months* exemption.

MONEY AND WAR

MONEY AND WAR BRITAIN'S FINANCIAL POSITION COLOSSAL BUT NOT ALARMING I Mr. Bonar Law, the Chancellor of the I Exchequer, made an important speech on the nnancial aspect of the wdr when moving a new V'o^ of Credit for £ 400,000,000 in the House of Commons on Thursday. The new vote brings the total votes of credit up to £ 3,532,000,000. The daily expenditure is now L5,710,000, including £ 100,000 daily in advances to Allies. For the year the total war expenditure is likely to be £ 1,950,000,000, an advance of £ 350,000,000 on the Budget estimate. The New Vote, Mr. Bonar Law ex- ? plained, should carry the Government on to February 24. The increase of expen- diture over the estimate was due to two .factors munitions and loans to our Allies. He described his final figure as colossal, but not alarming. This was not a war in which, in his belief, it would lever have been possible to go on inde- fnitely as in the Napoleonic wars. EVey-! thing Lad to be thrown in. The armies now embodied by tJw Allies could not be kept at their present figure indefinitely, and all that could be hoped for was that they would be kept at the strong figure jlong enough to beat our enemies. In the iswiae way, we could not hope to go on in- I definitely on this financial scale, but he believed that we could go on long enough to make it sure that we were not beaten jfor financial reasons.

IDANISH INDIES SALEI

I DANISH INDIES SALE. I Copenhagen, Friday.—The plebiscite taken on the sale of the Danish West  Indies to the United States hae resulted i in 283,694 for, 157,596 against—Router. 11

HOLLAND AND WARJ

HOLLAND AND WAR. J I The Hague?riday.—During a 6peech 1 The Budg^ the Minister for State I said Holland's munition supply had been considerably increased. There was, he j said, a danger of Holland being dragged j into the war, and it was therefore un- avoidable that sufficient military forces should be kept at their immediate dis-I posaL

FOR THE MINESWEEPERS I

FOR THE MINESWEEPERS. I I The local branch of the British and Foreign Sailors' Society (under the care of the Rev. R. G. James) has con- tinued its good work in providing com- forts for Swansea boys who are braving the perils of the sea on minesweepers. I This week the society has distributed 50 pairs of socks, mittens and gloves, 50 mufflers, and about two dozen shirts and I other parcels are being prepared.

I LOCAL RABBIS POSTI

I LOCAL RABBI'S POST. I I The Rev. E. M. Levy, son of Mr. A. Levy, Swansea, has been appointed by the United Synagogue, London, minister of the Aldershot Hebrew Congregation, and by the War Offics (on the recommendation of the Jewish War Services Committee, London) to the post of clergyman to the Jewish troops in an important com- mand. Last year Mr. Levy was invited to the ministry of the Llanelly Hebrew Congregation (which he now re- signs) and to represent that congregation on the London Board of Deputies of British Jew-s.

A WAUNARLWYDD MINISTER I I

A WAUNARLWYDD MINISTER.! I —— The death occurred on Wednesday night of the Rev. John Bevan, who had been minister of Sardis for 50 years, and was 86 years old. He took a prominent part in the movement establishing the ele- I mentary schools at Waunarlwydd. and i he was one of the old School Board, and remained until his death one of the boarct of managers. Eight years ago he retired, being succeeded by the Rev. D. M. Davies. The funeral takes place next Tuesday at 2.30, The church has also suffered anothei loss in the death of Mr. John Griffiths, a deacon and the leader of the singing. He was well-known as a conductor, and had won many prizes at Eisteddfodair.

ILATE MR E L LAWRENCE I

I LATE MR. E. L. LAWRENCE. I The funeral of Mr. Edward Laver Law- rence. 38. Bernard-sreet, Uplands, Swan- sea. took place on Thursday afternoon at Sketty Congregational Churchynft. A service was held ait Pantygwydr. The Rev. A. Bevon Phillips officiated. The mourners were Mr. J. Lawrence, Mr. F. Lawrence, Mr. W. Lawrence. Mr. G. Lawrence (brothers), and Mr. W. Berridge (brother-in-law). Amonpr those present were Rev. A. E, Turtle, Sergt. B. Brooks, Mr. Oswald Thomas, Mr. Brown, Mr. Parsons Mr. John Howells. and Mr. Thomas. Mr. John Lake. Mr. Bowland, and Mr Symonds (Cardiff), Mr. Jollife, Captain Edwards, Mr. John Bevan, Mr. Guy, Mr. D. C. Davies, Mr. Stoneman, Mr. F. Brooks, Mr. J. W. Jones, J.P., Mr. Llew Howell, Mr. Fursland, Mr. James, Mr. Evans. Mr. George Owen, Mr. Will Owen, and Mr. Greatrex.

PENTRE SLIDE SEQUELI

PENTRE SLIDE SEQUEL. I In the King's Bench Division on Thurs- day. before Mr. Justice Bray, judgment was given in an action tried before his. Lordship and a special jury at the ad- journed Glamorgan Assizes at Swansea, in which Mr. and Mrs. Idris Gould, of I Pentre, sought to recover from Messrs. Cory Bros and Co., Ltd., damages caused to eight houses, the property of the plain- tiffs, situate at ystrad-road, Pentre, caused the plaintiffs alleged, by subsidence of the surface of the land through the work- ing-s of the defendant's collieries beneath. Tho defence was that the damage was rp sultant from a mountain slide, and not \from the colliery workings. When the case was tried at Swansea, the jury found in favour of plaintiff, and assessed the damages at X330 for Mr. and £ 200 for Mrs .1 Gould. Legal arguments followed as to liability, and it was upon these that his lordship now gave judgment. Mr. Elli: Griffith. K.C M.P., and Mr. Mar lay Sam- son represented the plaintiff, and Mr. Llewelyn Williams, K.C., M.P., and Mr. V:llie Meager appeared for defendants His Lordship said that there was no ritrht on dc-feridante part permitting sub- sidence, and he gave judgment for the plaintiffs for the amount found by the jury, with costs. On the application of Mr. Williams, a stav was granted w a t a view to an appeal.

TODAYS WAR RESUME

TO-DAYS WAR RESUME Leader Office, 4.50 p.m. According to an A thens message re are indications of the acceptance in prin- ciple of the Alliee ultimatum. Although the German Note containing the peace offer has reached Washington, it has yet to be received by the Allied Powers. The latter, however, have made their attitude clear, who require that there shall be adequate repa-ration for the past, and adequate security for the future. British guns have again been busy on the Somme, and enemy trenches have been entered. Britain's war expenditure is now esti- mated at X-5,710,000 daily, in which is included an advance of £ 500,000 per day to the Allies.

TODAYS NEWSJN BRIEFI

TO-DAY'S NEWSJN BRIEFI Mr. Kennedy Jones took his seat in the House of Commons on Thursday. Sir Harold Elverston, M.P. for Gates- head, is acting as organist at Winslcrw Church. The increase of 15 per cent. in South Wales miners' wages is being paid from December 1. The French Ministry is* to include an Under-Secretary of Aviation, under the War Minister. Twenty-five motor-ambulances are being sent to Verdun by the British Sportsmen's Ambulance Fund. The King and Queen on Thursday visited the Freemasons' Wai Hospital and Masonic Nursing Home, Fulham-road. S.W. 189-2 Is. has been subscribed in the Wes- tern Province, Gold Coast, to provide an aeroplane. At the Thames Police Court to-day Ching Shu (24), student, was fined 2100 or 52 days' imprisonment for harbouring opium. Putting his bead out of the window while travelling from Holyhead to London Private John Sullivan, of the Australian Forces, struck a wall and was killed. Mr. John Wallace, an Irish barrister, was in Dublin sent to a lunatic asylum, being unfit to plead to a charge of send- ing an obscene postal packet to public officials. The Duke of Connaught inspected in the quadrangle at the War Office on Friday morning five ambulances provided by Boy Scouts, to be used for war service abroad. 13,000 boxes of cigarettes, chocolate and mint lozenges have been sent to the Bir- mingham soldiers at the front with the best wishes of the Lord Mayor and Mayoress of Birmingham. The death in action of Pte. Aubrey Hill, of the Australian Forces, removes the last male survivor of the Hill family, who have held the sextonship of Crowland Abbey, Lincolnshire, continuously for 150 years. A postal official, named Frank Edwards, was fined = £ 10 at Willesden for assisting a conscientious objector to conceal himself, and 40s. for taking in the same man as a lodger without registering him. In connection with the statement pub- lished recently that 8,000 parcels for pris- oners of war in Holland were destroyed, the Post Office have now informed the Central Prisoners of War Committee that only 40 out of the 8,000 parcels were damaged, and that -those 40 parcels have been re-packed and forwarded to Holland. The certificates distributed at the Municipal Secondary School on Wednes- day evening by the Mayoress, were in connection with the evening continua- tion classes. Certificates were awarded to lads engaged in offices, business houses and works of the town and neighbour- hood. It was admitted by Solomon Raisner, a widower, who was sued for breach of promise in the London Sheriffs -Court, that he purchased two diamond rings for the plaintiff—Miss Minnie Taylor, a taiiloress—out of his dead wife's insurance money. He was ordered to pay Miss Tay- lor tlO. Mr. C< > W. Neville was awarded AM damages in the Lord Chief Justice's Court for libel against the Daily Express" newspaper. The action arose out of Mr. Neville's scheme of advertising New Auzac-on-Sea. The jury also found for Mr. Neville on the question" of main- tenance ,and the question of damages will ba argued on Saturday.

TO REDUCE CHURCH DEBT I

TO REDUCE CHURCH DEBT. I A sale of work was held at St. Jude's Church, Swansea, on Thursday, which realised about Æ180, which, with addi- tional contributions, will be used toward reducing the debt on the church. Mrs. George Lennard opened the sale, and the Mayor presided. He was sup- ported by a number of ladies prominent, for their philanthropic work in the town. The Rev. Watkin Joneslopened the pro- ceedings, and the chairman and Mrs. Len- nard made short addresses:' Many gentle- men responded and heartily guppwted the vote of thanks to the Mayor and Mrs. Lennard. It. was interesting to note that the articles offered for sale were attractive as Xmas presents, and soon found buyers.

GAME TRESPASS AT NEATH I

GAME TRESPASS AT NEATH. I At Neath on Friday, Robert Edwards and Edward Edwards. Cilfrew, did not appear in answer to summonses for tres- passing in pursuit of conies on the Ynis- gerwen Estate. Prosecuting, Mr. W. Leyson said the men were seen laying down snares, and had two whippet dogs with them.—They were each fined 20s.

NORTHS NEW DIRECTOR I

NORTH'S NEW DIRECTOR. I Mr. Thomas Jones, of Craig-y-Mor, Mumbles, who was appointed a director of North's Navigation Collieries (1889) Ltd., is a member of the Swansea Rural District Council, a partner in the firm of Jones, Rees and Co., stock brokers, Swan- sea, and Emlyn Rees and Co., coal ex- porters and contractors, Swansea; also a director of the Imperial Navigation Coal Co., Ltd., tlio Gwauneaegurwen Colliery Co., Ltd., and other companies.

WELSH FARMERS PLEA

WELSH FARMER'S PLEA. A farmer who appealed for the eXIn I tion of a farm hand at the Carnarvon- shire Appeal Tribunal at Bangor was asked whether his grand-da?gbtrr could not milk the cows. He replid 

Advertising

I IMPmSONEO IN SHAFT. The 20 men imprlvfted in the Ham- titeod Colliery ere still i;nrekacv-?. Work&wi hafe been continually <■- pgod eidft Twteday flisrht repairing tlie winding gmr, but it hes act. y«t been restored, snsrJ neather the up or the