Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 6 Next Last
Full Screen
12 articles on this page
Advertising

AMUSEMENTS. J 6.30. TO-NIGHT! 8.40. BIG SUCCESS of Mr. E. C. Rolls' Latest and Best Production, LITTLE MISS MUSTARD Full Company of 70, including BERT GILBERT, ERIC RANDOLPH, FRANK LIDINGTON, ELSIE NORRIS, HERBERT LA MARTINE, IVY RAY. Varieties by SAMMY SHIELDS, TOM E. HUGHES, MAY STARR, & BIOSCOPE, MATINEE BOXING DAY at 2,30: GRAND TH EATR E SWANSEA. MONDAY, DECEMBER 18th, 1916, Six Nights Only at 7.30, Joseph Millaine's Co., presenting an En- tirely New and Up-to-date Drama, entitled- When the Heart is Young. Next Week- Return Visit of ROMANCE." THE PICTURE HOUSE. High Street. TO-DAY, 2.3G-10.30. A Fascinating Romantic Drama, THE GAY LORD W A R I N G, Fetturing J. WARREN KERRIGAN, tho Popular Screen Star. Joe Jackson and Mack Swain in When Rogues Fall Out, A Triangle Keystone. CASTLE CINEMA Thur., Fri and Sat., 2.30 to 10.30. THE L A 1%1 B A Brilliant Production in Five Parts, Fall of Excitement and Laughter; aleo containing Thrilling Buttle Scenes. Supervised by D. W. Griffith. THE YELLOW GIRL, Unique Futuristic Film. SHACKLES OF BLOOD, A. Splendid Two-Part Domestic Drama. XMAS DAY.-NO PERFORMANCE. BOXING DAY.-12 to 10.30. CARLTON CINEMA DE LUXE, Oxford Street, Swansea. v TO-DAY, 2.30-^18.30. A Blue-Bird Photo-Play, THE GILDED SPIDER, Featuring Louise Lovely. A Double's Trouble, Featuring Alice Howells in a Funny L-Ko Comedy. Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Drew in Sweet Charity. ELY SI U M. 6.30. TO-NIGHT. 8.30. Matinees Thursday and Saturday, 2.30. A BABY BOYS' DREAM OF FAIRYLAND, THE KIDDIES' TREAT. PEG 0' THE RING, Final Episode. WHEN ROGUES FALL OUT, 3,000 Feet of Laughs. ASPHYXIATING GASES (Interest), GAUMONT GRAPHIC. ROYAL THEATR E, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, CHARLIE CHAPLIN in THE FIREMAN Star Piet-Lixe, HIS UNKNOWN CHILDI (Drama in Four Parts).—Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Drew in SWEET CHARITY. —Continuous Performance, 2 till 11 p.m.— MONEY. CHRISTMAS COMES BUT ONCE A YEAR. .Aud it's every one's delight to keep it up Wla'a t. 'd the. t P Got no money? Then apply to tho BRITISH FLXANCE CO., and they will advance you as much a„s you require with- out any bother or delay. }io payments ex- pected during the Holidays, .interest and repayments lowwt in J:Iigltlnd. £88. zno/ithly; £ 15—206. monthly; £ 20—32s. monthly; £ 40—64s. monthly; £ 50— £ i monthly; £ 100— £ .7 monthly. Larger arnount6 less rates..No suietios. Gash delivered in thi* district. Existing loans paid off. Prospectus Free. Ti-i E BRITISH FINANCE CO., Tel 1675. 20, Bridge-street, BKISTOI* r- MONEY LENT -5 BY POST, WITHOUT SECURITY. 1 THE CITY AND COUNTY PRIVATE FIHABCE H{ CO. IlAd.), make cash advance* from E30 to 9 iCS,009 t > Ladies or Gentlemen, Merchants, S op- B keepers, rsrBierr, and to ail responsible persons on S Note of Hand alone. Strictly private. No fees charged. 8 Borrower- dclinj with other firm, can have taj 9 loans paid oif or increased, and they are advised to B pay no preiinnuary expenses. Fall iaformatioa sup- g and fre. B Writs to the StonUry, HP. H< -u&adl, H B ?,on. W. EDUCATIONAL., ■ rzxmm.— POSTS FOR ALL. Wfcll-paid permanent Bueiness Posts for Girle and Youths. SWANSEA COMMERCIAL SCHOOL (The De Bear Spools, Ltd.) offer.# special for attaining p.ro. ficiency in Shorthand, Typewriting, Book-koep- ing and Accountancy, English and Precio Writing, Business Aieihods, Commercial Arithmetic, CoraiysrciaJ Correspondence, Handwriting French. DAY AND EVENING TUITION ALL THE YEAR ROUXD. Studente Readily Placed on Oompletion. Apply The Principal, CASTLE BUILDINGS, SWANSEA. Tel. Cea. 587. And at 90-92, QUEEN-STREET. CARDIFF. STUDENTS Suooestfully Prepared for Prtv )0 fioienoy in PITMAN'S Shorthand, Local MARINE BOARD. and Civil Sc-rvice LES- 80NS (riven in Arithmetic. Er-lish. Book- keeping, etc Satittfaction guaranteed.—Mr. H&mN. 56, Oxford-street. 8wet, Cardiff; 141, Cor- poration-street. Birmingham. SECOND-HAND ALLDAYS CAR, 10-12 h.p.. 4-aeater, GaXe Caiar-ce, 4 speeds and reverse, with 3 lamps, oomplete. Xi5. This is most suitable for Lorry or V«ki bdy 1 to carry about 10 owt. NEW FORO CAR, with English-made Mohogany Panneiled Ash Frame Van Body. Painting: and can be done to suit Purchaser. NEW FORD TOURING CAR, Complete, £136 plu delivery. SEVERAL SECOND-HAND CARS AT BARGAIN PRICES. Writ. at once for Partioulan. DAVID JONES, MOTOR AGENT, THE GARAGE, AMMANFOBAr Sun Rises 8.6, Sun Sets 3.51. Lighting-up Time, 4.21. Subdue Lights visible from the sea- Swansea 4.36, Llanelly 6.37 2-3, Aberavon 4.36, Pembroke 4.40J. Subdue other Lights- Swansea 6.6, Llanelly 6.7 2-3, Ammanford 6.7. Abera-von 6.6, Neath 6.6, Car- ¡ marthen 6.8, Pembroke 6.10i. High Water, 3.6 a.m., 3.37 p.m. King's Dock—35ft. a.m., 36ft. p.m. I To-morrow, U a.m., 4.39 p.m.

THE PRESIDENTS NOTEI

THE PRESIDENT'S NOTEI In this country most people outside the ranks of the unthinking, have always credited the President of the United States with the possession oI a strain of exalted idealism. Be- cause of that belief in Dr. Wilson they have never joined in the chorus raised by his detractors from time to time. They have felt that the I one great neutral outside the ring of combatants would hold the brief for the cause of civilisation, that he would exercise his influence in lull sympathy with the Allies who 1 were fighting for those things America has placed on high. But what are they to think, to-day, of Dr. Wilson's Note? What are they to say of its language, its asser- tions ? The President observes that'' the objects which the statesmen of the belligerents on both sides have in mind in this war are virtually the same, as stated in general terms to their own people and to the world. He continues: Each side desires I to make the rights and privileges of weak peoples and small States as I secure against aggression or denial in the future as the rights and privi- leges of the great and powerful States now at war. Each wishes it- self to be secure in the future, along with all other nations and peoples, against the recurrence of wars like I this. Each is ready to consider i the formation of a league of nations to insure peace and justice through- out the world. E«ach side What an amazing assertion! Are we to be placed in the same category with the nation that ruined Belgium and Serbia, that refused to .agree, in the i days when things were in a balance to a conference of the Powers? Are we to be classed with the l nation th?t has exhausted the cab'-I logue of horrors, that has murdered American women and children? Our belief in the idealism of Dr. Wilson has been given a mortal I blow. However strongly we protest against the terms of the Note, it is I with relief we see that there is I idealism in America still, thap the old puritanical strain ks not yet worked out. For the American Press itself is in arms against" the President. The Tribune is 'bLlvel enough to say that The nation that did not protest when Belgium was invaded could not wait until the liberation and restoration of Belgium' was assured before raising its voice on behalf of whatever German p ;r pose lies undisclosed behind the German peace proposal." And otherj journals are not less courageous. But yesterday the American I Press was commending the speech; of the Premier. To-day the Ameri- can President talks aB though Ger- many had her hands clean of inno- cent blood. Tie has to be told that, when we entered into the struggle, when we went to war as the avenger of two little nat i on., of two little nations, we determined to fight until we had made such acts as the violation* of Belgium impos- sible in the future. As the "Times" says, to parley with wrong while it arrogantly claims to be victorious would be to be false to the right, to acknowledge the definite triumph of militarism, and to confess the failure of democracy. For these reasons amongst others the Empire will say with one voice that we can- not listen to Mr. Wilson's pleading. We need scarcely say that peace- at-any-price snipers occasionally draw their guns upon us because of expressions used in these columns displeasing to them. We remain untouched and unrepentant; their aim is as poor as their realisation of what the war means to the country. This week, however, we have come across, in a Canadian journal, the letter of an officer from the great western Dominion which may explain to them the sentiment of the soldier and of all who have seen in France what unspeakable: woe the Boche has wrought to the I world. The Canadian officer speaks of the ruins that line the front, What once were thriving communi- ties are now nothing but ruins, the desolate playthings of ruthless guns. Not one of these places is habitable, and not one of them can be made so. They stand as the very apo- theosis of ruin. There are no civilians, the inhabitants now are men of warlike mien and strange paths and the dirty rats, of which there are untold millions. And then he speaks of those tragic cemeteries behind the line—those holy plots of ground where the best blood of France and Britain rests. I can only hope," he writes to his friends across the sea, that the new harvest will exact a, heavy toll for them. I am not vindictive by nature, nor is war my trade, as you know, but any sane-minded man I who sees what war has done to this land can have but one opinion, and I but one object. That one opinion is that there can be no peace while the I mad dog is loose; that object is to achieve the submission of the Hun. It is not an easy task. It will not I be secured by the making of patri- otic speeches and worrying about after L" war.' No. These met4o" l won't do at all. The only way is to wade in whole-heartedly and hammer the Hun down to earth. It is a costly task, but it must be done, and it is going to take some time." If once the nation becomes I thoroughly in earnest!" cries a writer in the Welsh Outlook." To i men who have endured month after month of the dreary monotony or the merciless agony of war, the zenith of desire is home and cleanliness, rest and quiet. Yet it has happened that when they have come back to us out of it all for a few brief days, and we have hastened to give them all that they can enjoy, sometimes they were not sorry to leave us and our comfort behind and return to the cramped and sordid misery of Flanders. Why is it so? asks this writer; and the heart-searching answer comes that ILI is because the best of the Army does not find among us the vision, or the understanding that makes it all worth while. They do not talk of it to us, or even to themselves. But it is there-the one thing that saves their sanity in the brutal hour of battle. And because our soldiers find among themselves that saving touch of idealism smd do not find it among us they are glad, sometimes, to go from us. Spade-work is a catch-phrase nowadays for propaganda work; and the day has come for spade-work in that sense, with a literal applica- tion. We cannot be too clear on the point that the ploughshare, some day to be the successor to the sword, is of almost equal import- ance to the country to-day. Last year, with a weak lead, we all played at gardening. Some who had never dug a sod of earth before, turned up the soil with zest; but in too many oases the zest evaporated be- fore the time came to earth the potatoes! The day for the dille. tante agriculturist has gone. Every- body with ten square yards of gar- den who does not put something into the soil towards reducing the nation's expenditure is falling short of his duty. The man who, amidst the other duties that will fall to his lot as of national importance" manages to cultivate a plot of ground may lay some claim to patriotism; the man who neglects to do so will jeopardise his title to the word. v It is cheering to note thus early in the Plenty" campaign that Swansea and West Wales is ready to do its part. One looks with con- fidence for emulation among land- lords of that spirit which has prompted local gentlemen to offer land for allotments free of cost. Another excellent idea has been the offer of free manure by a Swansea firm; others should, and no doubt will, follow suit in this respect also. The small man—those with cot- tage gardens, or with allotments— will be well advised to put in such indispensable vegetables as potatoes, greens, and onions; those with bigger resources will of course go in for more ambitious schemes. With the public parks to be ploughed we l shall expect no more to see big stretches of ground devoted to oma- mentfal flower beds. The nation wants food; and there must be no dalliance. Our energy or lassitude now may make all the difference be- tween victory and defeat. The farmer's part. is even greater. Gower grew far more wheat thah usual last year. But if we are to be able to say in the piping days of peace that we did all that lay in our power when the dark cloud over-, shadowed Europe, we must do much more. Every foot of untilled soil, every neglected hack garden, will be an argument against our moral right to victory.. Every sqzic of vegetables will be shell" shot home against the submarine men- ace.

A CRUEL PASTIME

A CRUEL PASTIME. At the meeting of the Llanelly Rural Council on Thursday, the Clerk (Mr. J. H. Blake) reported that the Ministry of Munitions had been making inquiries with regard to rabbit coursing in the dis- trict, and he had submitted a report. Mr. Griffith. Harry: What -is their in- tention ? The Clerk: I suppose they propose stopping it so that colliers shall not waste their time when they oould be cutting coal. The Chairman: It is a cruel pastime and should be stopped.

WELSHMEN AT LIVERPOOL

,WELSHMEN AT LIVERPOOL. At Liverpool Stadium on Thursday night Bombardier Joby Culverhouse, Tre- herbert, met Young McDermot, Dublin, Irish welter champion, for 15 rounds. Honours were even, but the Welshman was knocked out after a game display in the thirteenth round. The chief event followed, Seaman Pat Sheridan, Ports- mouth, opposing Young Charles, Newport. The Welshman was the most scientific ex- ponent, the Navy man swinging wildly for a knock-out. Charles sustained a nMty cut over the eye in the tenth round, which was medically examined in the ring. The proceedings later were lively, but Sheri- dan was well beaten, and in the thirteenth oession the referee stopped the contest.

LABOUR MINISTRY TO LASTI

LABOUR MINISTRY TO LAST. I The new Ministries were temporary creations, to cease at the end of the war, said Earl Curzon on Thursday, in moving the second reuding of the Ministers and Secretaries Bill. But in one case, that of the Labour Ministry, it would be a permanent feature of the GoverLL^i^nt of the country, and it might very well be found that the Air Minister had also come to stay. In a reference to the Board of Trade, Earl Curzon said there was no sugges- tion or suspicion that the Board had not done its work exceedingly well. The contrary was the case, for the late Presi- dent, Mr. Runciman, was one of the most competent Ministers who ever sat on the Government bench.

No title

Richmond (Surrey) Education Commit- tee has granted teachers war bonuses to the extent of £ 1,436. Four males and one female were res- cued by the London Fire Brigade at a fire at the iesidenoe of Captain F. A. Hart, Pimticoi,

CORPORAL PICK

[CORPORAL PICK] Christmas Reminiscences of Swanssa THE Christmas season of last year jt was followed by a boisterous week- end, that luied the newspapers wiuu many movrng accidents on eea and land. Tlioso who wore privileged by cir- cumstances to spen

No title

During the past month ,Cl,oi)o worth of I goods have been pilfered from Carter, I Paterson's, Ltd, Mr. S. A. L. Fisher, President of the Board of Education, was formally adopted by the Haliam Liberal Association. One million sixty-two thousand three hundred and twenty-five persons have vi^itod the Zoological Gardens this year, which is an increase of 25,285 on last year. Reports from Cologne statue that the Chilian Government is negotiating with Krupps for the building of a number of mibmarinoe immediately after the war. For the sale or supply of any kind of I crane a, permit is necessary from the Ministry of Munitions, which is also mak- [ ing a census of the cranes in the country. {

WilSON TAKES A HAND

WilSON TAKES A HAND. AMERICAN PEACE MOVE MLLIOBEUJCERMISIOSIAlE IMmS Press Bureau, Thursday, 7 p.m.-The: following Note was communicated by the United States Ambassador on December 20th, 1916:- The President of the United States has instructed me to suggest to the Government of his Britannic Majesty a coarse of action with regard to the pre- sent war which he hopes th.?e P?r?, Majesty's Government will take under consideration, as suggested in the most friendly spirit and as coming not only from a friend but also as coming from the representative of a neutral nation whose interests have been most seriously affected by the w r, and whose concern for its early conclusion arises out of a manifest necessity to determine how best to safeguard those interests if the war is to continue. The suggestion which I am instructed to make the President has long had it in mind to offer. He is somewhat embar- rassed to offer it at this particular time, because it may now seem to have been prompted by the recent overtures of the Central Powers. It is, in fact, in no way associated with them in its origin. And the President would have delayed offering it until those overtures had been answered but for the fact that it also con- cerns the question of peace, and may best be considered in connection with other proposals whicn have the same end in view. The President can only beg that his suggestion be considered entirely on its own merits, and as if it had been made in other circumstances. CALL FOR AVOWAL OF TERMS. I The President suggests that an early occasion be sought to call out from all the nations now at war such an avowal of their respective views as to the terms upon which the war might be concluded, and the arrangements which would be deemed satisfactory as a guarantee against its renewal or the kindling of any similar conflict in the future as would make it possible frankly to compare the.m. He is indifferent as to the means taken to accomplish this. He would be happy himself to serve or even to take the initia- tive in its accomplishment in any way that might prove acceptable,, but he has no desire to determine the method or the instrumentality. One way would be as acceptable to him as another if only the great object he has in mind be attained. He takes the liberty of calling attention to the fact that the objects which the statesmen of the belligerents on both sides have in minds in this war are virtually the same, as stated in general terms to their own people and to the world. Each side desires to make the rights and privileges of weak peoples and small States as secure against aggression or denial in the future as the rights and privileges of the great and powerful States now at war. Each wishes itself to be made secure in the future along with all other nations and peoples against the recurrence of wars like this, and against aggression or selfish interference of any kind; each would be jealous of the formation of any more rival leagues to preserve an uncertain balance of power amidst multiplying sus- picions, but each is ready to consider the formation of a League of Nations to en- sure peace and justice through tout the world Jf ore that final step can be taken, how- ever, each deemrf it necessary first to settle the issues of the present war upon terms which will certainly safeguard the inde- pendence, towitorial integrity, and poli- tical and .,umercial freedom of the nations involved AMERICA'S POSITION. In the measures to be taken to secure the future peace of the world the people and the Government of the United States are as vitally and as directly interested as the Governments now at war. Their interest, moreover, in the means to be adopted to relieve the smaller and weaker peoples of tne world of the peril of wrong and violence is as qllick and ardent as that of any other people or Government. They stand "ready and even eager, to co-operate in the accomplishment of these ends, when the war is over, and with every influence and resource at their command, but the war must first be con- cluded. The terms upon which it is to be con- cluded they are not at liberty to suggest, but the President does feel that it is his right and /his duty to point out their intimate interest in its conclusion, lest it should presently be too late to accom- plish the greater things which lie beyond its conclusion, lest the situation of neutral nations, now exceedingly hard to endure, be rendered altogether intolerable, and lest, more than all, an injury be done civilisation itself, which can never be atoned of repaired. TO COMPARE VIEWS. The President, therefore, feels altogether justified in suggesting an immediate op- portunity for comparison of views as to the terms which must precede those ulti- mate arrangements for the peace of the world, which all desire, and in which neutral nations as well as those at war are ready to play their full responsible part- If the contest must continue to proceed towards undefined ends by slow attrition, until one group of belligerents or the other is exhausted if million after million of human lives must continu to be offered up until on the one side or the other there are no more to offer; if resentments must be kindled that can never cool and despairs engendered from which there can be no recovery, hopes of peace and of willing concert of free peoples will be rendered vain and idle. The life of the entire world has been profoundly affected; every part of the great family of mankind has felt the bur- den and terror of this unprecedented con- test of arms DECLARATION SOUGHT. No nation in the civilised world can be said in truth to stand outside its in- fluence or to be safe against its disturb- ing effects, and yet the concrete objects for which it is being wag-it have never been definitely stated. The haders of the several belligerents have, as has been said, stated those objects in general terms, but, stated in general terms, they seem the same on both sides. Never yet have the authoritative spokesmen of either side avowed the pre- ci-se objects which would, if attained, sat- isfy them and their people that the war had been fought out. The world has been left- to conjecture what definite results, what actual exchange of guarantees, what political or territorial changes or read- justments, what stage of military success even would briny; the war to an end. It ma.7 he that peace is nearer than we know; that the terms which belligerents on the one side and on the other would deem it necessary to insist upon are not so irreconcilable as some have feared. That an interchange of view, would clear the way At least for a conference and make permanent concord of the nations a hope of the immediate future, a concert of nations immediately practi- cable. The President is not proposing peace. r He is not even offering mediations. H. is merely proposing that soundings b< taken, in order that we may learn-tht neutral nations with the belligerents, hovs near the haven of peace may be, for whici all mankind longs with an intense and increasing longing. He believes that the spirit in which N speaks and the objects which he seeb will be understood by all concerned, an he confidenlv hopes for a response which, will bring, new light into the affairs oi the world. United States Embassy, London, December 20, 1916.

I MR ASQUITHS LIST

MR. ASQUITH'S LIST. Two Welshmen Get Recogni* tion Honours. The following list of honours, conferred on the recommendation of Mr. Asquith on the occasion of his resignation, was issued on Thursday night. It will be seen that two distinguished Welshmen are in- eluded. THREE VISCOUNTS. Lord Sandhurst, G.C.S.I., G.C.I.E., Lord Cowdray, and Right Hon. Lewis Haroourt, M.P. FOUR BARONS. Right Hon. Joseph A. Pease, M.P., Sir John A. Dewax, Bart., M.P., Sir Thomas Roe, M.P., and Sir Edward Partington. THREE PRIVY COUNCILLORS. John W. Gulland, Esq., M.P. Thomas Wiles, Ecsa., M.P., and FOUR BARONETS. Leif Jones, Esq., M.P. Right Hon. James H. Campbell, K.C^ M.P. James Hill, Esq., M.P., and Sir Jesse Boot. SIX KNIGHTS. Arthur Carkeek, Esq. Hugh Fraser, Esq., LL.D. William Gundry, Esq. The Very Rev. John Herkless, D.D. Edward Smith, Esq.. and ORDER OF THE BATH. To be G.C.B. (additional Order for War Services), The Right Hon. Sir Samuel Evans. To be K.C.B., Maurice Bonham Carter, Esq. To be C.B., The Hon. Theophilua Russel, C.V.O. K.C.M.G. To be K.C.M.G.—^The Hon Eric Drum- mond, C.B., who has been private secre- tary to Viscount Grey of Falloden. SIR SAMUEL EVANS Sir Samuel EvánB distinguished ser- vices as President of the British Prize Court have given him an international reputation and he will go down into his- tory as one of Britain's greatest judges. Born at Skewen, near Neath, in 1869, and educated at Swansea Collegiate School and Aberystwyth College, his contem- poraries were Principal T. F. Roberts, Mr. Ellis Jones Griffith, M.P., and the late Mr. T E. Ellis, M.P., each one of whom was destined to play a prominent part in the history of their nati land. It was first intended that he should be- come a Nonconformist minister, but ho chose the legall profession. Hie great op- portunity came in 1890, when, in succes- sion to the late Mr. C. R. M. Talbot, he was unanimously selected to champion the Liberal cause in Mid-Glamorgan, and the electors of that division, having heard what he had to say for himself, sent him to Parliament. His selection as Solicitor- General in succession to Sir W. S. Rob- 'JH was a recognition of the great ability he had shown inside and outside Parlia- ment. On the retirement of Sir John. Bigham in 1911, he was appointed Presi- dent of the Probate,' Divorce, and Ad- miralty Court. MR. LEIF J0NB&. Mr. Leaf Jones was born in London in, 1862, and is the son of the late Rev ( Thomas Jones, the poet-preacher of Wales, for many years pastor of Walter^* road Congregational Chapel, Swansea*. and chairman of the Congrega?ona.Tt Union of England in 1870. He is a bro-t??her, of Sir D. Brynmor Jones, K.C., and of the j late Principal Viriamu Jones, F.R.S., on Cardiff. He is well known throughou l England and Wales as a public speakel on temperance, and, like many otheri [' Welshmen, he rendered the Liberal Party valuable services outside his native land] He fought the people's fight in London, Leeds, Manchester, and the North, but not always with success at the polls. He was elected for North Westmoreland. Although his duties necessitate almost all his time being spent in England, Mr. Leif is thoroughly Welsh in hi9 interests and sympathies., I

OUTFITTERS POSER

OUTFITTER'S POSER. [ What Man Would Care to be I Measured by a Woman? At the Carmarthenshire Appeal Tri- 1 bunal at Carmarthen on Thursday, the military, in appealing against the ex- emption of two Llandovery tradesmen—a draper and a gent's mercer-held" that the businesses could be carried on by their wives. The tradesmen contended that a knowledge of Welsh was essential for the transaction of business in Llandovery, and as both had married English wivea who could not speak Welsh, they would not be able to carry on business if they were called up. Capt Cremlyn (military representative) said he knew Llandovery well, and Welsh and English was spoken there. The gent's mercer said that on the day he attended before the Medical Board he lost the' sale of two coats and wais-bl, coat on account of the inability of hid wife to speak Welsh. What man iq there/' he asked, who would care for a woman to measure him for a suit of clothes ?" Both military appeals were allowed.

CORRESPONDENCE

CORRESPONDENCE. (Lott,oro to the Editor should be brief. le I tho point, and about somethin* Oor- respondents should -end their names and ad