Collection Title: Herald of Wales

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 7 of 12 Next Last
Full Screen
25 articles on this page
LATEST WAR NEWS

LATEST WAR NEWS GREATEST AIR RAID OF I THE WAR. BSC MOVE BY ALLIES IN FLANDERS. LONDON, Thursday. The following French com- munique was issued through the Press Bureau this after- noon: The Belgian troops last night repulsed two German attack: to the north and south of Dixuude. Thf first was driven back by a counter-attack, and the secord was arrested by fire. In the sector to the north of Arris two engagements took plaie. iast night, to the south of Scachez, we took possession of one of the enemy's trenches a the Chateau Tarleul. and aso took some prisoners, in- cuding an officer. To the east of Neuvelle St. <1 aast the Germans attempted an attack, which was broken by our artillery. At different points on the front, notably at Rheims and in the Vosges, there were artil- lery duels. One of our air squadrons, composed of 18 aeroplanes, each carrying 50 kilogrammes of prcjectiles, bombarded, at Ludwgshasen this morning, the caemical product factory of Btdische Analine, one of the 110St important explosive facories in the whole of Ger- mply. The verified results proved tfe efficiency of the bombard- ment. Several buildings were itruck and numerous fires were started. The aviators remained over six hours in the air, and cov- ered over 400 kilometres. This expedition against an important military establish- ment has furnished a reply to the attempt on the part of the German aeroplanes on Paris. The air raid on Ludwigshasen ranks atuon gtive most important of the war. The factory which was set on fire is one' of the largest of the kind in Germany, and great secrecy has been observed as to the work carried on there during the war. It is reported that large numbers of workmen were drafted into Ludwig- shasen some time ago.

BIG MOVE BY ALLIES IN FLANDERS I

BIG MOVE BY ALLIES IN FLANDERS. Towards Lille our First Army is still gaining ground along the Itichebourg- Festubert sector. Not for the nret time m: the war our Territorials have won dis-' tinction. In his last night's dispatch! Sir John French tells of the capture of a group of enemy trenches with prisoners and a machine-gun by a Tcritorial divi- sion. In ten days our First Army has pierced tho German iine along a front of over three miles. For nearly two miles the whole of the enemy's trench system has fallen into our hands. Along the remain- ing mile we have their first and second lines. Wednesday's 13. p.m. French commu- nique also recorded a British advance ju the direction of La Bassee and the captur-, ing of many prisoners. Extremely heavy j fighting is taking place all along the j front, but the Allies are in all places maintaining their gains, and at some points are making progress. Desperate Fighting. The following official communique was issued in Paris on Wednesday night: The British troops have made a fresh ji advance in the direction of La Bassee.1 They took sixty prisoners, including several officers, and captured eome machine guns. To the north of Arras the Germans continued their desperate efforts to re- capture in the region of Angres the posi- tions which they had lost yesterday. The lighting was of extreme violence ail day. At the work called Les (Jornailles an enemy counter-attack made us at first toll back, but less than an hour after- wards we bad re-conquered the whole position, and we have kept it since. At the adjoining work further south the enemy, after desperate attacks, re- captured part of the northern salient. We retained the western salient, and took a portion of the southern salient. between these two works and the Aix Noulette-Souchez road our attacks made progress, and gained us a footing at dii- ferent points in the lines of the enemy, who did not succeed in re-occupying any of the trenches captured ystcrdya by us. At the northern edge of the Aix Noulette—Souchez rotid a sharp fight occurred in the woods. The respective positions were not modified. Between this road and the Lorette Hill, in the Duval bottom, the violent fire of tho enemy artillery could not dislodge us from the positions conquered yester- day, and we again gained ground on the slopes to the north-east of the chapel of Lorette. We advanced .two hundred yards, notwithstanding an immense bombard- ment. On the outskirts of Ablain St. Nazaire we captured a quick-firing gun. At Neuville St. Vaast we carried, after a very hot fight, a group cf houses which formed a dangerous salient. The enemy in these different actions suffered very heavy losses. Aviatik Brought Down. A German aeroplane which was flying towards Paris, on meeting the air squadrons of the entrenched camp, threw bombs, without any result, on Villenoy, near Meaux. Air squadrons of the front, having been warned, awaited the enemy machine on its return. The Aviatik, v/hich carried four bombs, was brought down by one of our nUIines Hear Braiue.-in the Soissons district. Aeroplane?1 successfully dropped 69 i milimetre shells on the aerodrome of La Brayelle, near the Douai sheds, and the machines on the ground were struck. Railway Centre Damaged. Rotterdam, Wednesday.-The Allies have not been long in attacking the new German railway centre at Ghent. An enterprising raid by aeroplanes has caused extensive damage there. The chief objectives of the attack were the St. Pierre (Ghent) railway station and the railway bridge over the Scheldt. This bridge, which was only built a few years ago, carries practically all the traffic from: Bruges and Ostend and over it run the Berlin and Vienna expresses. Well-aimed bombs exploded on the 1 main arches and blew a great hole in the bridge. The railway station buddings: were damaged and also a quantity of stores.

THE POISON GAS j

THE POISON GAS. Terrible Story of Men's Agony. British Headquarters, France, Wednes- day.—The only result that the Germans! have achieved by their latest gas attack at Ypres has been to inflict great suffer-i ing on a large number of men, many of whom were caught by the names while still asleep. Material gain has resulted, as almost all lost ground has been re- covered. The determination of our men to crush an enemy initiating such cruel and re- lentless methods has been increased by this last outrage, and the spirit of the men has become still more bitter since the outrage on Monday. The attack was delivered at about three nclock on Monday morning, just before; dawn. Evidently the enemy was making! a desperate attempt on the Ypres Salient, I for the amount of fumes emitted from the German trenches was far greater than has been the case in the previous attacks. • Taken by Surprise, 'Witness the cloud' According to Eye-W itness the cloud in some places reached 40 or 50 feet, while the virulency of the fumes was such that that three miles away respirators had to be worn to escape the evil effects. Many even asserted that the presence of gas was felt as far back as some ten miles, from the Ypres front. The majority of! the men who had time to put on their respirators escaped more or less un- affected but a large number were taken by surprise and had no opportunity of using them. Others may have lacked the presence of mind One regiment, which had had special opportunity for practice in the use of their respirators escaped without a single i casualty. All agree that the men stood their ground splendidly against the gas, for which they were totally unprepared. The enemy had probably relied upon the darkness to screen the advent of the gas, and expected that our line would brealt before their subsequent assault. It was not till late, however, that they realiredi their mistake. A Terrible Scenei The scene at the casualty clearing station, whither the victims were trans. ported with all possible speed, on motor ambulances, was a terrible one. The first cases bg.n to arrive shortly after five on Monday morning, and from then onwards a succession of gassed men streamed in. The accommodation of station was soon exhausted, and the number of lighter cases were laid out on stretchers in the courtyard. The doctors who attended the men say that they have never seen a more painful sight than that of the rows of strong men in the prime of life suddenly stricken down by a power they had no means of re- sisting. Appeals to be Shot. All the brave fellows did their utmost to conceal the agony they were suffering, but the heaving chests and choking throats told their own tale. The whole place was packed with men coughing, spitting, and reaching. Some were in suoh torment that they shouted to the patient doctors and nurses to shoot them. Here one could see a lusty young High- lander tearing at his throat in his vain efforts to get relief, while near him lay another victim passive, and limp, too ex- hausted to continue the unequal fight. The labours of the doctors that morn- ing were truly heroic. The whole day they worked unceasingly, striving by every means in their power to alleviate the acute suffering of the poor fellows lying around them. The treatment is simple. All that can be done is to admin- ister ammonium carbonate dissolved in water, while in bad cases temporary relief is afforded by oxygen. The symptoms of gassed victims fall apparently into three phases: The acute asphyxiation, which is the first result of the gas, is succeeded after come 48 hours by a period of quiescence. In the average number of cases the patient recovers after the quiescent stage, but in the bad cases acute bronchitis sets in. very often with fatal resulta- Copenhagen, W.ednesday.A Danish surgeon and scientist of the highest repu. tation has succeeded in discovering what the German soldiers use to protect them- selves against the asphyxiating gases which they employ against the enemy. With a chemist he has tested this anti. dote, and states it is excellent for its pur- pose. He says the German troops employ a mask of twist or oakum. They ar,e sup- plied with a phial containing a liquid made of 10 per cent, of hyposulphite of sodium and either saturated solution of bicarbonate of sodium, or 1 per cent. of lime water. Before they put on the mask they wet it with this liquid. To deal with breathing difficulty they use one milligramme of atropin in the form of a subcutaneous injection and oxygen gas.

ANOTHER AIR RAID

ANOTHER AIR RAID. Two Zeppelins Drop Bombs on Southend. Once again a Zeppelin raid has been made on this country, with a measure of futility that has characterised such previous cowardly ventures. The attack was confined to Southend and district, and two women were killed and a schoolgirl seriously inj ured. The invader was chased by aeroplanes and seaplanes, and escaped in an easterly direction. The following official report of the raid was issued by the Press Bureau:— The Secretary of the Admiralty announces that late on Wednesday night a Zeppelin visited the Eut Coast of England. Bombs were dropped on 6outhend The casualties reported up to date are two women killed and one child badly inj ured. Very little material damage was dona. Aeroplanes and seaplanes proceeded in chase, but the Zeppelin succeeded in escaping in an easterly direction. Ninety Minutes' Raid. An Exchange Telegraph message says a number of buildings were set on fire by incendiary bombs at Southend. A Zeppelin was seen coming from a mSrth-easterly direction. and after circling over Southend, Westcliffe and Leigh-on-Sea, it went off in the direction from whence it came. As bombs were still falling, it was evident that another Zeppelin had taken part in the air-raid von the undefended town The correspondent adds that b'o Zeppelins were seen over Burnham-on- Crouch. Fortunately no bombs were dropped here. The raid lasted at least half-an-hour. At 45, Anneriey-road a bomb dropped through the roof and set fire to one of the bedrooms. A lady visitor to the town was killed at the corner of Eastwood-lane. She was alighting from a tramcar when a bomb diopped on her and killed her instantly. The Injured Child. The Press Association's Southend cor- respondent says that 11 p.m. on Wednes- day Zeppelins passed over Southend, going in the direct on of London. Several incendiary bombs were dropped, causing the deaths of two women, and injury to a child. The latter was in a house which was fired in Dowsefct-avenue, and she was removed to a local surgery. Her life is stated to be despaired of for treatment. A dog was also killed. Another correspondent says two Zep- pelins passed over Southend, and when last seen were proceeding eastwards. Bombs were dropped at Leigh, five miles from Southend, but no Elarious damage is reported. v Little Excitement. Altogether aoout ten or a dozen bombs fell on Southend, and two or three houses were fired, but the outbreaks were quickly subdued. There was little or no excitement dur- ing the raid, many people either sleeping through the bombardment or refusing to leave their beds. A few people were to be seen in the streets, but, as in no quar- ter of the town were there signs of fire, they quickly retired once more for the night. The Southend CStandard" states that two Zeppelins passed over the town. and incendiary bombs dropped caused out- breaks of fire in several buildings. Bombs in Bathroom. Mr. S. H. Perren, London manager f the Sheffield Daily Telegraph," was agai.n in the thick of the second air rai-i on Southend. He states that almost im- mediately on retiring on Wednesday night and shortly after 11 p.m., heavy reports were heard coming from the eastern end of the town, Once again the family were removed to the ground floor. On going into the roadway he plainly I saw one of the Zeppelins passing the! end of the road, flying several thousantll feet high, and dropping incendiary homos as a,he went by. One or two houses well-- hit, but no serious fires resulted. One house a couple of hundred yards or so from his house was hit by a bomb, whi,,ji lodged in the bathroom. A little farth jr along a large school received one in the! aarden. One Zeppelin Hit. The Exchange learns from a reliable source that one of the Zeppelins which took .part in the raid on Southend last night was hit. It was afterwards pur- sued by British aeroplanes.

ITALIANS THREATEN TRENT j

ITALIANS THREATEN TRENT. j The King Takes Command. the Italian armies now occupy a chain of important positions along the Western and Eastern t'rolltiers of the Trentino, on uie slopes of the Carnic Alps, and, across the Lastern Frontier; along the western ballÃ. of the tsonzo. General Cadorna's troops threaten Trent from three sides; they have captured, in a bayonet auacii by night, the Val d'lnferno Pass, on tile northern frontier, and they have made good their footing in the direc- tion of Trieste. Monfaloone, about 20 j miles distant from that city, has been Dombarded by Italian airmen. King Takes Command. Rome, Wednesday.—King Victor Im- j manuel has assumed the supreme com- j mand of ail his land and naval forces.' The news spieao here and in the provinces like Wildiii-t. tlis Majesty is going to the ) iront, not for a visit, but permanently to work with his soldiers and to share their hardships; to run the same risks, and to have the same responsibilities as his gen ei ais. For this reason His Majesty has ap- pointed his uncle, the Duke of Genoa, his Lieut.-General during his absence from Koine, investing him with Royal preroga- tives. Tiie King, who is by nature earnest and determined, but of retiring disposition, is opposed to any form of publicity, and did everything possible to reach the front incognito, but all Italians knew, and all Itaimns followed with their thoughts and wishes, the train which was transporting to the front the great grandson 01 King Charles, Albert, who, when abdicating on the battlefield of Novara on that terrible night of March 23rd, 1849, left to his de- scendants the last injunction that the 6word of the Kings of Savoy should never be sheathed until the Austrians had be^n entirely driven from Italian lands. Blockade of Coasts Proclaimed. I Rome, Wednesday.—A blockade of the I Austrian and Albanian coasts have been I omcially declared.—Exchange Special. Count Tisza's Vow. I Amsterdam, Wednesday.—A Budapest I message says: Count Tisza, in the Cham. ber, severely criticised Signor Salaadra's I speech, denying the assertion of the Iberian Premier that the Monarchy de.. I siretl territorial changes; that they had altered the spheres of influence in the Balkans; and that the Monarchy had vio. lated the Triple Alliance treaty. He referred to the recent negotiations, and said the Monarchy would now more than ever astonish the entire world by its power of action, unity and virile resolu- don, the Hungarian nation, united with I all the peoples of the Monarchy, and with their powerful ally would wage this war to its last breath agaiust all the devils of I hell. Rescuing Refugees. I Udine. Wednesday.—Aa the Italians advance into the Austrian territory they are rescuing a number of Italian re- fugees, who are escaping from Austrian i brutality. Long processions of people, I half dead from hunger, fatigue and mal- treatment, carrying bundles of what they have succeeded in saving of theit pos- sessions. children, young girls and women are pictures of desolation. When they see tne. Italian so ldiers the spirits of the refugees revive. Some of the women insist on embracing and kissing the soldiers. Stirring Order of the Day. I Rome, Wednesday.—The King, on as- suming the supreme command of the land and sea forces, issued the following order of the day:- Soldiers of the land and sea-The solemn hour of the. vindication of your I nation has arrive and the national clarion has sounded. Following the example of my great ancestor, I assume "o-day the supreme command of the land and sea forces with a sure confidence in tho victory which your valour, your sefl- sacrifice, and your discipline will bring. The enemy whom you prepare to light is seasoned and worthy of you. Favoured by ground and by scientific preparation. I he will offer you an. obstInate resistance but ycui indomitable dash will certainly defeat him.. Soldiers, yours is the glory .or hoisting the tricolour of "'Italy upon the eiicred !Hounds which nature places as the con-, fines of our country; yours the glory ot j accomplishing the work undertaken; II with so much heroism by our fathers. Grand Headquarters, May 26th, I (Signed), Vittorio Emanuele. I Enthusiasm of Troops. I I Udine, Wednesday. lie passage ot the eoldiers, singing the most peculiar popu- lar songs of their natlve provinces, from half Arab and Sicilian airs to Neapoli- tan Ballaroles, and from the Romanesque llads to the Venetian serenades is a J most interesting and instructive spec- ¡ tacle. One realises the enormous differ- ence between these troops and the stiff, mechanic Austrian and German soldiers. Both military and civilians here join in idolising General Cadorna, whose vast military science is known to 'all, couplecl with marvellous activity and physical vigour, despite his years. In fact his ardour is so impetuous that it is con- sidered that he is admirably suited by the temperament of his sub chief of staff, General Powro, who is cold, calculating, and mechanical. j The comments on to-day s war cOm- i munique point oq? the ground occupied, across the frontier in Fruili represents) ,th effective occupation of territory. A? j regards the action on the Trentino froa- tier being triangular, with a base on the Alps and apex on Lake Garda. It slopes towards Italy everywhere, and is domi- nated very closely by enemy positions. It is a question of conquering, not in breadth, but in height, and capturing every dominating point whence Austrians; might make a speedy advance on Italian valleys. Austrian and Italian Armies Coming to Grips. An Exchange message from Copenhagen I dated to-day states: The Yossifelle, Zeitung reports that I a strong Austrian Army Corps has been' concentrated at the frontier district of; the Trentino, where they have strongly1 entrenched themselves. The Italian Army is now two miles dis- tant from the Austrian Army.

A GREAT RETREAT

A GREAT RETREAT. How the Russians Defeated German Move. The first comprehensive account of the German drive .in Galicia comes to-day from Mr. Stanley Washburn, the Times" correspondent with the Russian Forces. Great as was the enemy's suc- cess (he says), beginning with a bom- bardment on the Dunajec which rivalled in intensity that of Neuve Chapelle, it fell short of their expectations, which appear to have been to inflict such f disaster on the Russians that they could not recover from the blow. The Russians, however, made a great retreat, which is compared with that of i our own retirement from Mons, and took their stand on a line much stronger than: that occupied before, and the confidence of the Army is unshaken. According to the Germans, the en- circling of Przemysl is proceeding. They have forced another crossing of the San eleven miles north of the fortress and, auve also exienaea by several nines tiie zone held by them on the east of the San. Przernysl's Safety. I Petrograd, Wednesday.—The enemy is] developing a fierce artillery fire, under! cover ot which certain movements of troops along the front are proceeding.! Military observers consider that Przemysl is at present quite safe, and there is no I' reason to apprehend the euvelopment and blockade of the fortress. The con- flict is proceeding on those fronts of, Przemysl constituting a continuation of the line in all the other collisions on this I front. ————— ————

HMS TRIUMPHI

H.M.S. TRIUMPH Torpedoed in the Dardanelles. I The Secretary of the Admiralty an-I nounces that H.M.S. Triumph was tor- pedoed on Wednesday by a submarine, near the Gailipoii Peninsula, and sank, shortly afterwards. The majority of the officers and men were saved. Amsterdam, Thursday.—A telegram from Constantinople says that the torpe- doing of H.M.S. Triumph, which had,, been cruising all day off Aribiurnu, took place on May zb, haif an hour after noon. There was a terrible explosion, which turned the Triumph over on her side within a minute. Seven minutes later the turned turtle and was flpating keel; upwards, after which she sank rapidly. Amsterdam, Thursday.—According to an' official telegram from Constantinople the, Triumph was torpedoed by a German submarine. THE BUSIEST BATTLESHIP. I JH..M.O. iiiu??n was one 01 tne two! ba??t?ouips uK?t. to me order of \'Jl vmncm uoveimuent in i?Ut, and lUAt:llj uu.uuv>r guiii, witn two uorpbuo tuoes. outs uu'i>eu i uu ulcers and men, auu utJ: oust was jio-WjiAii). xier pie- »> af ovation was iliwd. Ait-er tne i siii^wiu v!4-W1l8 sue was allowed uy tue -MimidUy to Oiiiiy a piiUe ueicriuiug me but) natt uuax-u in tiie xar J,;¡ao¡.6.Lll xue xriumph has seen more fighting in uus war uiau any omer Oatuesixip. one neaped to reuuee Lo a pile ot rums tne utiiuan stronghold of ismgeau. una sumi nit tlle snip on UctoDer l'ith. one ojxicer and one .wan being Killed, -lie was in We origmal squauron cornni^nued uy V ice-Admiral bacj(VlHe H. Caiaen, l kvnich opened the attack on the forts at I Llie entrance to tne Uardanelies on r ebru- ary 19th. She has been in the thick of ah the hghting, and has been mentioned naif a ao?en times in official reports. It was a picked party from the Triumph and Majestic which took part in the dangerous exploit of destroying the sLranued Elo. Tho expedition was com- manded by Commander Lric Robinson, of the Triumph, and was one of the most- daring episodes of the war. A Day's Work on the Triumph. A day's work on the Triumph was re- cently described by Keuter's correspondent thus:—The Triumph has been hit by three shells from one of the Dardanelles batteries while she was bombarding a position on the Gallipoli Peninsula. The. uamage doxlo was trifling, but two men were wounded. After half-an-hour's shelling of the enemy's trenches at a range of about 7,000 yards, the Triumph proceeded further into the Straits, and came under tha fire of a howitzer battery on the Asiatic shore, which dropped about 16 shells around her in about a quarter of an hour. Two men, a stoker and a bluejacket, were wounded by a shell which lighted on the bridge and fell through on to the deck below. The Triumph's guus were able to silence her assailants in a few minutes after they had been located. Submarine in the Straits. The rumours that German submarines were operating in the JEgean receive startling confirmation They hate been spotted in the Mediterranean, and the British Embassy at Athens offered a large reward for information of their move- ments. The latest class of submarine built by Germany could do the journey from Zeebrugge comfortably in ten days, steaming on the surface, and well within three weeks if compelled to submerge for protection. They would still have' a large radius of action after' reaching the Dardanelles. Where their base is in these waters is a mystery. Naval writers, like Mr. A. H. Pollen, suggest Smyrna as the most likely place. However close the British blockade of that port, it is known from experience in the English Channel that a submarine can come and go when it pleases. It has also been suggested that supplies arranged in advance might be secured in the innumerable islands of the Greek Archipelago. The suggestion that Austrian submarines might do mis- chief at the Dardanelles is generally dis- countenanced, since the class of vessel used by Austria would be quite incapable of the long voyage south from Pola, and every submarine Austria possesses is re- quired in the Adriatic, especially after Italy's decision to join in the war. French Submarine's Success. Athens, Wednesday.—The action against the Dardanelles continues vigorously. Reinforcements are arriving continually. The Turks Appear to b$terrorised by the incessant attacks which show the decision of the Allies to force the Straits. The shells of the Allies are falling like a veritable rain of fire. A report is current that a French sub- marine succeeded in entering the Straits and torpedoed a Turkish destroyer, which sank not far from Constantinople.

DAUNTLESS HEROES AUNTEROES I

DAUNTLESS HEROES. AUNTEROES. I Malta, Wednesday.—I have had conver-j sation with an officer just back from thej Dardanelles, who assisted in the landing operations. He speaks in the highest pusbioie terms ol the grand landing of the uncomparable British Army, and said that everyone in the fleet was filled with the highest admiration for the heroism of all ranks of the landing forces, which surely was without parallel, even in the glorious annals of Great Britain. You have no idea," he continued, what the British forces achieved. They simply did wonders. You may have read accounts of the landing, but however graphic they have been, they could never have done full justice to the wonderful I enterprise in overthrowing that which the' Turks and Germans had for a full nine months done all that money could pro- I cure and science achieve. One had to be there to comprehend in some degree, be- cause it is impossible to grasp tully the undreamt-of obstacles that our army over- came in the face of the most terrible odds, which required all the coolness, bravery, dash and doggedness characteristic of the British race. Surely no other army could have landed in the Dardanelles. The pri- soners themselves admitted this. The thrilling scenes of self-sacrifice, heroism and devotion to duty witnessed throughout the landing operations made one feel proud as never before of British blood. In some places the boats, in charge of midshipmen yet in their teens, stood alongside the destroyers, awaiting their load of soldiers, and pulled ashore before they had received their full com- plement. The number of the naval occu- pants was reduced by the continual hail of shot and shell. Dauntless Heroism. Nothing daunted, however, the boat returns and soon becomes alive with men in. khaki. It starts again forthwith, but already gaps are taking place, and the men are seen dropping here and there. The boat is rushed ashore, but less than half the number are there. There were not a few instances in which the boats lost practically the whole of their complement before getting to'the beach, but they returned for a fresh load. Some of the men were shot to bits, and others wounded, but the ghastly scene makes no impression on our brave men. There is a rush for the boat, it is filled anew and starts again, this time with bi-t'r. luck, but not without casualties. Such scenes were by no means con- fined to the place where I was, but were witnessed at all the points of landing. As regards the endurance and the fighting qualities of our men after they, had landed, it has already been said how the Turks orders were to drive the British to the sea, and how, in attempting; to carry them out, the TnrJts were re- peatedly baffled and hurled back, mainly by the bayonets of the landing force. The great thing—the greatest and most diffi- cult of all the venture—the landing has been achieved. No Going Back. rv o amount of Turks. even when led I by the wily Teuton, can compel the Bri- tish forces to yield the position which they bled so freely to acquire. Once our army has obtained a footing on the Galli- poli Peninsula the enterprise is assured of success. It is true that there has been sanguinary fighting, and that there will still be, but the British have asserted their superiority, and it is unquestion- able that they can do what they like with the Turks. The time is drawing near when this will be proved to the hilt. Press Association War Special. Adrianople's Reduced Garrison. Athens, Wednesday:—According to mail advices from Adrianople the authorities there continue to reduce the garrison of the fortress. Troops with large quanti- ties of war material and seige guns are being despatched to Southern Thrace. The Staff of Second Army corps has likewise quitted Adrianople. The gar- f rison is at present composed of about 10,000 men mostly untrained and com- manded by officers of the commissariat.

CANADIAN STEAMER TORPEDOED I AND SHELLED

CANADIAN STEAMER TORPEDOED I AND SHELLED. Lloyd's agent at Milford Haven tele- graphs:- The steamer Morwena, of Montreal, 1;114 tons gross tonnage, from Cardiff to Sydney, British Columbia, was torpedoed and shell on Wednesday 160 miles west by south from St. Ann's Head. The crew was landed on Thursday afternoon by a Belgian steam trawler. One man was killed and three wounded. Belgian Steam Trawler's Plucky I Deed. Our Milford Haven correspondent tele- grapias The Belgian steam trawler Jacqueline, on Thursday arrived at Milford with flag at half mast. She had on board about survivors and one dead of the crew of the cargo steamer Morwenna, of Mon- treal. which left Cardiff on Tuesday af- i ternoon for Sydney (Canada) in ballast. When 160 miles south by west of Mil- ford. at eleven o'clock on Wednesday morning, chia saw a submarine. She tried to ev4de it. but was attacked by gun- nre. and, the crew being prepared, got the boats ready and were able to launch them. A particularly brave and daring deed was performed by the Belgian skipper, Arseni Blondi, who chased the submarine under heavy fire. Shelled While Lowering Boats. I The crew of the Morwena had a thril- ling experience. Three of them were severely wounded by gunfire in lowering &6 boaœ and cutting the tackle. One of them, Thos. Carrigan.i a Canadian, had his head blown off by ja shell. The submarine continued to fire heavily on the trawler, and something like 50 shots were fired without effect, though 6ome missed by inches only. Skipper 13iondi engineered his vessel in masterful fashion, and endeavoured by 4.wry means to ram the tiUbLuarine. Lna eventually succeeded in frightening her off. Wounded Members of the Crew. I The names of the crew injured are: J. Johnson, a Canadian; a fireman named I Piercey; and Fred Le Vette, who had a shot through his leg and one through his arm without touching the bones, and his scalp was furrowed. Two of these men have been taken to the Pembroke Dock Naval Hospital, and the others are being cared for at the John Cory SailorS" Bethel, Milford Haven. The skipper and crew of the Morwena are loud in their praise of the gallant conduct of the Belgians. The Morwena belongs to the Dominion Coal Company, of Canada, and her regis- ter is 1,500 tons. ) Danish Steamer Sunk. I The Press Association states thai the I Danish steamer Petty was torpedoed jin I the North Sea on Wednesday. The crew was brought to Shields to-day.

BELGIAN SUCCESSI

BELGIAN SUCCESS. I Havre, Thursday.—The following Bel- i gian official communique has been issued: The German artillery yesterday bom- barded our advance posts and the village of Oostherd. Our batteries replied with success, es- pecially in the direction of Schoore, where their fire caused a confiargation and violent explosions.

TWO ENGLISH AVIATORS KILLED I

TWO ENGLISH AVIATORS KILLED. I Paris, Wednesday.—A telegram from Hazebrouck to the Petit Parisien says that thu raptor of an English aeroplane exploded yesterday, and the machine caught fire and fell to the ground at Old I Berquin, near Hazebrouck. The two aviators died from their in- juries.—Exchange. «

SOUTH AFRICAN TROOPS DEllOBILtSED

SOUTH AFRICAN TROOPS DEllOBI- LtSED. Johannesburg, Tuesday.—A portion of tho Union Southern force has returned from German South-West Afrioa on being demobilised. Enslin's Horse, the Northern Transvaal Rifles, and Collier's Scouts, who were disbanded at Pretoria to-day, have been on active service since the commencement of the rebellion in September last. General Smuts briofly addressed the men, and expressed tho thanks of the Government and the nation for their services signally rendered since the out- break of the war. After promising that the men would have their rifles to keep during life, General Smuts ended by thanking the troops for their good work and their exemplary conduct, and assured them that future generations of South Africans would be proud and grateful.

GENERAL VON KLUCK

GENERAL VON KLUCK. T-he -Cologne Gazette made the fol- lowing announcement on Sunday about General von Kluck:— Colonel-General von Kluck, who is re-i covering from his wound, is at present staying at Wiesbaden for the complete: restoration of his health

INSTRUCTED TO VOLUNTEER

INSTRUCTED TO VOLUNTEER. Amsterdam, Thursday.—According to the Telegraaf," the German military authorities have requested all untrained Landsturm over 35 years of age to volun- teer for active service. The newspaper adds, Germany apparently wants every man at the front." In the Rhine province it is rumoured since the outbreak of the Italian war that all trained railwaymen and miners, of whom there are many exempt from mili-, tary service, will now be called up. The railway service and mining will be greatly restricted > -———— 4*

WHEN DID GERMANY MOBILISE I

WHEN DID GERMANY MOBILISE? The Hamburger Fremdenblatt" on May 18, in an article on the railways in war time. made a remarkable admission about the German mobilisation long before the outbreak of war. After refer- ring to the work of the railways in 1866 and 1870, the writer says:— At the mobilisation the German rail- way system proved its perfection, since on nine railway lines on the days from July I 24 until August 4 not less than 384,000 men with full equipment were carried to the frontier." This is equivalent to saying that the German mobilisation began on the day of the publication of the Astrian ultimatum to Serbia.

AUSTRIAN PLOT DISCOVEREDI

AUSTRIAN PLOT DISCOVERED. New York, Wednesday.—The Canadian military authorities have unearthed and frustrated an Austrian plot to wreck troop trains which were expected to pass a certain spot, and the conspirators have been captured red-handed. An officer stationed at Smith's Falls, Ontario (50 miles from Ottawa) became suspicious of a recruit who had enlisted as a Russian pole. Inquiries established that he was an Austrian, and he was carefully watched. Last night he was shadowed to a boat- house near the railway bridge, and soldiers surrounded the building.- Ten Austrians were arrested with dynamite enough to destroy the bridge and the ex- pected train. The Vancouver authorities have also had trouble with Austrians and Germans, 115 of whom have been arrested in the Vancouver Island mining district., They have been interned.

BELGIAN STATESMANS WIFE I

BELGIAN STATESMAN'S WIFE. I Amsterdam, Wednesday.—A message despatched from Brussels to the H Tele- graaf states that Madame Carton de Wiart, wife of the Belgian Minister of Justice, has been arrested. It is alleged that proofs that she corresponded with her husband were found in her house. The nature of the correspondence has not, however, been disclosed. It is also stated that a Court-Martial sentenced Madame de Wiart to three months' im. prisonment, but that the Governor sub- stituted for the sentence one of deporta- tion to Berlin

DEATH OF LADY CARDIGAN I

DEATH OF LADY CARDIGAN. The death of Lady Cardigan, which occurred at her seat, Deene Park Northamptonshire, at the age of 90, ena-pa one of the most picturesque links which connect prosaic modernism with the old world of romance. Lady Cardigam was one of the greatest beauties of hex day. Among the men dhe might have married woe the Count de. Morrtemoiin, the heir to the Spajnieh throne. But his devotiofi to his beautiful English fiancee lost him his kingdom. Other suitors included Disraeli. In 1909 Lady Cardigan worte a book which shook the world of society like a bombshell. Secrets of many families were revealed; skeletons in cupboards laid bare; and can, troversy ran high around the terrible volume. But while the outraged raged, the bgok sold. —

BOMBARDIER WELLS IN A WELSH REGIMENT

BOMBARDIER WELLS IN A WELSH REGIMENT. Bombardier Welle, the heavy-weight i boxing champion of Great Britain, has enlisted as a private in the Second Rho j- dda Valley Miners' Battalion. He will join the regiment as soon as his forthcom- ing match with Sergt. Dick Smith is over. He is now in training at Brighton for the contest. The bombardier, who has several brothers with the colours, has taken part in many memorable contests. One of the most sensational of his fights was that with Carpentier at the National Sporting Club in December, 1913, when the French- man knocked him out in Imin. 13sec. Carpentier is now serving in the Aviation Corps of the French Army. Another con- test between Wells and Carpentier has been mooted, but now they will be com- rades in arms against a common enemy. Among Wells' triumphs were the defeat of Mahoney, Pat O'Keefe, Gunner Moir and Colin Bell. I Fred Delaney, the Cardiff and Brad-, ford boxer, brother of Jerry Delaney, the I well-known light-weight, has also en- II listed, following the example of his t brother, who is a member of the Sports-r man's Battalion. Carpentier, the world'6 champion boxer having obtained his pilot's certificate as an aviator, is now definitely attached to the Aviation Corps of the French Army. I

FELODESEI

FELO-DE-SE, I At the inquest on Kuepferle, the I German spy who was found dead in his cell at Brixton prison, a verdict of I felo de se" was returned. Evidence was given that Kuepferle was suspended by a silk scarf, behind the door of his cell, and that on th. slate the man had written that he was not dying as a spy, but as a soldier. Dr. Dyer, medical officer of the prison, said he had several talks with Kuepferle in his cell, and he was fairly cheerful. The man was in good bodily health and mental condition. There were no signs of feeblemindedness. He was rather an in. tellectual man.

No title

The Canadian Indian trappers have been badly hit by the war, as the Leipzig market for furs no longer exists, and the l demand of London dealers as fallen to insignificant proportions.

WALES AND SHELLS I m

] WALES AND SHELLS. I — m I KITCHENER'S APPEAL ANSWERED A very large and representative gather ing of employers and labour leaders wai held at the Council Chamber of th< Cardiff City Hall, to consider a suggeetioi emanating from Lord Kitchener, througl the Earl of Plymouth, of the possibility of turning cut thousands of shells an« j fuses in a factory or factories whict might be established or arranged out 0; existing works in South Wales. The matter was regarded as so urgenl I that every hour's delay was serious, Unl the meeting was urged, if it approved oi the scheme, to proceed forthwith to ap point a committee to consider the details; Lord Plymouth occupied the chair, an4 was supported by Mr. McClellan, repreo sentiag the Government Munitions De partment; Mr. Browning, President oi the Amalgamated Society of Engineers. at representing Mr. Arthur Henderson, M.P., President of the Board of Trade; Colonel Wright, acting as secretary oi the gathering; Sir Ivor Herbert; M.P., Principal Griffiths. South Wales Insti. tute of Engineers, Mr. J. C. Wright, Colonel Henry Lewis, Greenmeadow; Cap. tain Edwards, H.M.I, of Factories, an4 others. The Council Chamber was filled to over- flowing, and a large number of those-pre, sent signed their names in the visitors' book for the purpose of showing theii support of the movement. The Alternative Proposals. Lord Plymouth explained that at an interview with Lord Kitchener a few days ago be was asked to convene this gather- ing with a view to ascertaining whether i1 was feasible to arrange for the manufac- ture of munitions in South Walea in order to help the Government as speedily as possible in the present war. His Lord- ship explained that in Leeds a similar proposal had been made, and had already been put into operation, a committee oi manufacturers and laobur leaders being called in order to organise the movement properly. He read to the meeting a lengthy memorandum from the War Office explaining the various alternativeg as to methods of procedure, and stated that whilst he used the term factory it did not necessarily mean that there would be only one factory in South Wales, be- cause it would be a matter for the ooirt- mittee to consider. The important point was concentration in order to avoid un- necessary expense and a great deal of supervision. Co-operation Essential. He suggested that if they approved ol the proposal they should appoint a com- mittee representative of the trades affected, and also of the labour headers. as co-operation was so essential in such a matter. It would be for them to inquire whether South Wales could undertake the making of shells and fuses, or of shells only. He suggested that there might also be a sub-committee to go into the details, as-was done in Leeds, and tc visit Woolwich and other places to see how far the methods in vogue there could be adopted here- He appealed for co- operation, and said the response to the invitation had been far greater than their expectations. The Resolution. He then formally proposed that a com- mittee be appointed to consider the mat- ter and see whether anything, and if so, what could be done in response to Lord Futchener's appeal. Sir Ivor Rerbert seconded, and ex- pressed appreciation of the action taken by Lord Plymouth. Mr. Browing, Amalgamated Society of Engineers, in supporting from the Labour standpoint, explained that the question of relaxing some of the trade practices would not prejudice the position of the men at the end of the war. If there had been such a possibility, the Trade Union. would be strong enough to deal with it. Mr. McClellan explained that the pro- posals meaat turning out about 5,008 shells a week, possibly only the steel cases. He did not know if they could undertake to make the fusea. The motion was unanimously carried and with acclamation, the names for the committee including reprosentative-s of Swansea and trades and Trade Unions.

IWHEN CHUMS PART

WHEN CHUMS PART. (Passed by Censor). The Llandovery representative of the Herald" has received a letter from Private E. James, 2nd Welsh Regiment, a brother-in-law of Mr. J. Johnson, Bristol House, Llandovery, in the course of which the writer says:— This is a terrible war.- Oh, the sorrow and the pathos of it all to low your best chum by your side, and the terrible sights you see. The bullets the Germans use cause terrible wounds., They are ex- plosive and dum-dum bullets. And how our boys bear their wounds! It fills on# with pride. Sunday, May 9th, I shan't forget in a hurry. The 2nd Welsh attacked the Ger- man tranches at dawn after our guns had bombarded them. It was like hell let looee. It is on occasions like that you can observe theb ravery and fortitude of our boys. My chum got hit by a piece of shell in the leg. I knelt by him. H. looked up at me with a smile, and said, "Good bye, dear old Jamsie. This is nit 'C last trip. I have been and copped a nasty one." He was my best chum. We always had our food together, and slept side by side, and shared each other's sor- row and joy. The Tide Turning. I feel the tide is beginning to turn. The French are doing good work on our right. May God grant that it will come to a successful issue soon. I haven't seen any Llandovery boys. The weather is lovely, and the Indians are happy and full of fight- Our cavalry horses and men are looking well, and are only waiting fox; the word "go." But we must get them out of the trenches first. Tell every Llandovery young man t. join, and come to give us a hand. Tell them not to let their age be an excuse-* I am 42 years old.

QUEEN MARYS QUIET BIRTHDAY

QUEEN MARY'S QUIET BIRTHDAY. Queen Mary's birthday on Wednesday passed without even the usual salutes in the parks. This was in accordance with the ?ing's direction ome weeks ago, thai no salutes should be fired at any of the home' stations in honour of any Royal birthdays while the war lasts. At Buck- ingham Palaoe, too, the celebration* were of the- quietest character. Hiq • Majesty gave a private luncheon, ai which the guests included Queen Alex- ander of Teck Queen Mary received a larger shoal of congratulatory telegrama than ever-an indication of the wide. spread appreciation of the work she is unostentatiously performing for all manner of war relief movements. By the way, it is an interesting recol. lection that two years ago her Majesty celebrated her birthday in the German I Emperor's family circle, for the anniver- sary came during the visit of the King and Queen, as well as the Tear, to Berlin on the occasion of the marriage of Prin- cess Victoria Louise (the Kaiser's only daughter) to Prince Ernest of Cumber- land. On that last visit of the British Sovereign to Potsdam the Kaiser par- doned the three British oi%ctrs-ow of whom has now been killed at the front- who were being detained in a German fortress on a charge of espionage.

No title

To replace the 74,000 railwaymen who have joined the Colours, applications for various postr., such as booking clerks, telegraphists, ticket collectors, porters, and carriage cleaners have been received v from more than 30,000 women. Bucharest, Tuesday.—Among the muni- tions attempted to be smuggled through to Turkey as German diplomatic luggage was a consignment of poison gas bombs.