Collection Title: Herald of Wales

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 12 of 12
Full Screen
29 articles on this page
Advertising

LI. and T. BULLIN HEATHFIELD MEWS, SWANSEA. MOTORS AND CABS ALWAYS READY. Telephone Number, G5 Telegraphic Address: Bullin, Swansea.-

Advertising

NEATH AND DISTRICT BILL-POSTING CO. ADVERTISING CONTRACTORS, Owners of all the Principal Hoarding! in NEATH and DISTRICT., For Terms, &c., apply:— • A Manager, 45, London Road, Neath. ')

GLYrCORRWG COUNCIL

GLYr^CORRWG COUNCIL THE I NTOLERABLE NUISANCE. A meeting of the Glynoorrwg Urban District Council was held on Tuesday even- in?, Mr. h, Jenkins presiding. There vrare present: Messrs 1. T. Jones, W. Mathias, h. t>-ibb, D. Jones, D. Jenkins, J. Thomas, 1. \v ators, J. Rogers, and T. Munroe, ^ith tne clerk (Mr. Kdwa-rd Poweili, the surveyor i Vic. W. B. Jono?;, the accountant (Mr. H. 1' Davies), and the collector (Mr. T. J eul, IlS). Adopting a recommendation from l'e Finance Committee, Snpt. Ben Evans, of the Glamorgan Constabulary, was appointed inspector under the Hackney Carriages, Ft- plosives, and Petroleum Acts. Sewerage and Roads. Moved from the chair, and seconded, by was decided to ask the Marram Lounoll to meet them .it a conve- liLuut, dale to conier on the questions of sewerage and roads. The Seal of the Council was fixed to an agreement between the U.W.R. Company and the Council with reference to the sewer over trle railway biidge at Abergwynfi. The Dust Nuisance. The dust nuisance was again discussed as the result of a petition signed by the vesi- dent", d Glyncorrwg urging the adoption of tar-sprayiiig.—it was pointed out in the subsequent discussion that the system was a popular one, but had been abandoned owing to the increased price of tar. Several members spoke of the dust nui- since near Giyncorc-wg Schools, and on the proposition of the chairman, seconded by Councillor Waters, the Surveyor was asked to prcnaie an estimate of the cost of tar- spraying. Miscellaneous. The Margam Council wrote stating that tliv-y could not consent to proceeding with the mad from Ynys Fawr (desired to oon- licct the l'c-:d with Neath) as they could not spend any money under the embargo laid down by ihe LJdll Government Board.-A further letter from Margam was read «• tat- in g that trey could not all-ow Glyncorrwg to discharge into the temporary outfall, but that it the present rate of progress the main outiail would be finished within about two IT Jrlthl.-The Neath Rural District Council made an offer of a lump sum for the right to connect with the Glynoorrwg sewers for Pontrhydyfen and Cwmavon.— The Council decided to arrange a conference with the ilargam Council to discuss matters.

NEATH NURSING

NEATH NURSING. Privileges fcr Wives of Fighting Men. Tu3 annual meeting of thei Neath Nursing Association was held on Thurs- day night at the Gwyn Hall, Neath, Mr. E. L. Evans-Thomas, J.P. (the President), j presiding over a representative attend- allee. The Chairman presented the 18th annual report for the year ended April 30th, which showed that there were 410 new ]>&iie:it.s. The total number of visits paid by the nurses was 15,500. The health visiting and school work was carried out to the entire satisfaction of the medical officer of the town. After the outbreak of i war the wives of soldiers and sailors were attended without charge, and now 'a re- duced ice vas bcjing charged. The report was adopted. The treasurer's report showed a balance at the 1, :;c;: of J2149 12s. 10d., the receipts > IGs. 10d., and expenditure ¡"5. 'ijio hairinin, in moving the adoption of the report, said that the financial pool tion was very satisfactory, and he hoped t L;1 the subscriptions would be fully maintained through the present year. The value of nursing was never more ap- preciated than at present, and this was the only country where a system of trained nursing was carried on. He re-j ierred to the great work perfo-nned, by' tur nurses in Belguim and France. The report was adopted, and votes of [ Wianks were accoded to those who had assisted the association by making collec- tions and for gifts of clothing, etc. Dr. D. LI. Lewis, in supporting the ^solution, said, as a medical man, he o ild bear testimony to the excellent work jerforjaed by the nurses of the town. He rnev. that dozens of lives had been saved in that town since the advent of nursing there. (Cheers.)

ALLEGATIONS OF WtLFUL DAMAGE

ALLEGATIONS OF WtLFUL DAMAGE. I Ar Police Court on Monday, Wiliia ■-i ,t)nntphv (10), Thomas Dumphy (7i, Leonard Millward (12), of LloydV court. ami Enoch Davies (10), Wind- street, pleaded not guilty to a charge of doing wilful damage to contractor's plant to the extent of £ 21 5s., replying to the charge in chorus, It was a big [" collier boy." Edgar Thomas T'eee, contractor, Lon- dcu-rc-ad. Neath, said he was carrying out some excavation work at WoOdlaitd- rc-ad, and on Sunday evening, June 13th, lie di scovered two locks had been smashed, the lines torn up, and four t rnms smashed in collision. The follow- ing morning he got hold of William Dumphy, who confessed and implicated the ethers. The boys were cautioned by the Mayor I and dismi.^sod. Harold Clark (12), Union-road, and Charles Hooper (14), Gasworks-road, pleaded not -,iltv to damaging the tram « lines in Woodland-road to the extent of 5s on June llfh. William Evans, engine driver, said he saw the boys committing the damage, and the parents of the boys were ordered to pay 6s. each.

SEVEN SISTERS BAPTIST CHURCH I

SEVEN SISTERS BAPTIST CHURCH. I TL. new English Baptist Chapel at I Seven Sisters has just been completed, r The gate of the chapel grounds was r opened by Mr. Evan Jones (treasurer) on Vhalf of Mr. Madox, of Britonferry, and the chapel door by Mr. William Jones, of Oiuhcyn. The pastor's room was opened by Mrs. W. J. Watkins. Swansea, and the vestry door by Mr. Parry, of Seven t, -ters. Seventeen persons took part in the o.K'iiing service, including many mini- iters from a distance, of both English and Welsh A^-cciution, as well as local nntor". Mr. Williams, president of the ? Welsh 1hT}ti>,t A?fx'ia.tion, and Rev. -1 ? 'arry. Aberdulais, gave .drc5E'e6, as did l Mr. W. J. aJkms, of Swansea The pastor. Rev. A. Harries. r«ad a long list of contributions to ine church. In the evening a sermon was delivered by the Ew. if. C. Madder, of Swansea, and on the two fol1owing evenings by Rev. D. Pugh Be van, A.T .S. (Port TLl- bot), and Rev. Degwell Thomas (Neath). t)n ?undny the pastor preached morn. ing and evening, and Rev. J. Pipe, A.T.S., Ab?rcravc, in the afternoon. All services were well attended, and will be remem- > be red for their warmth and spiritual fervour. last Sunday an open Sunday school t service was held. The chapel is very com- for.:ably seated and furnished. A beauti- f ful motto has been hung in the vestry by Mrs. Mander, of Swansea. Collections on the opening day realised over S21. i.

I POLICEMANS GUISE

POLICEMAN'S GUISE. THE "JOCKEY'S" DRINKS AT A "TEMPERANCE" HOTEL. The Aberavon County Police Court on Monday had the appearance of a first class hotel by reason of a pile of beer cases and bottles of wines and spirits 1occupying a conspicuous position near f the witness-box. The articles were there as a sequel to a police raid made on the premises of the Central Temperance Hotel, Station-road, Port Talbot, owned by John Edwin Warhurst, against whom there were four separate charges of sell- ing intoxicants without a liceuse. Superintendent Ben Evans prosecuted on behalf of the police, and Mr. R. T. L-eyson (Swansea) defended. P.C. Lisk (Penrhiewtyn), said that on May 30th he went to the hotel and asked defendant's wife for lodgings. She asked him inside, and in an inner room was a seaman with a glass of beer in front of him. Witness was eventually shown into the dining-room upstairs, and re- marking, I enjoyed the bottle of beer, and I should like another." was sup- plied by the landlord. Defendant, on oath. denied serving the witness. If anything was served by his wife it was without his knowledge. 1. Mr. Leyson, for the defence, strongly criticised the "spying methods" of the police. Inspector W. E. Rees (Port Talbot) I deposed to going in company with other officers to defendant's premises on June 6th. He found defendant in the kitchen, and also the witness Lisk. The officer asked defendant if he knew who Lisk was. and defendant replied, Lewis Herbert, a horse dealer and jockey from Carmarthen." (Laughter). Lisk had a cup of ooffee and rum before him. He said that he had paid 2d. for the coffee and 4d. for the rum. Defendant, when spoken to, admitted that he had sold beer and rum to the jockey." (Laughter.) P.C. Lisk, in further evidence relating to the incidents of that evening, said that defendant remarked, What do you think? There are some detectives in the other room. I can smell a policeman, and can tell them by the parting of their hair. (Laughter.) Defendant told wit- ness that the coffee was Jumbo coffee and grand for the nerves." (Laughter.) Defendant was fined C.5 for each offence, S20 in all, or in default one month's im- prisonment in each case. The liquor in court was confiscated, and defendant dis- qualified from holding any justices' licence for five years. Defendant was further charged wi an offence under the Alien Restriction Order by failing to keep the necessary register. Inspector W. E. Rees deposed to calling at. defendant's premises on May 21st and finding three men on the premises who bad not been entered on the register as required by the provisions of the Act. For this offence defendant was fined S2 [or 14 dayst, imprisonment.

BRILLIANT SKEWEN STUDENTS I

BRILLIANT SKEWEN STUDENTS. The two sons of Mr. Thomas James, I M.E., manager of the Bryncoch Pit, Main Colliery Co.—Messrs. John James and David Jam-have achieved the high honour of capturing the gold medals offered by Sir W. Jas. Thomas, Yyns- hir, for the best re- sults in the mining and mine surveying examinations of the Glamorgan County Council, the elder brother taking that for mining, the second that for mine surveying. Coming to Skewen some 14 years ago, when voung boys, they iiave gained many brilliant successes in their special line as the result of un- tiring efforts. Mr. John James, the elder brother, is 24 years of age, and is at pre- sent surveyor with Baldwin's, Ltd., at I Port Talbot, having been recently ap- pointed Mines Act Inspector under the 1 I, company. He re- ceived his elemen- tary education at the Gor..einon ar,d Coedffranc Council Schools, Swansea Grammar School, and Neath County School. Hew a 51 artided a? ,;rvtyor to Mr. R. Vaughan Price, general man- ager, Main Collierv Co. In 1912 he secured the Home Office certificate for colliery surveyors, and the first class, Stage I. and II., in surveying; first class, 3rd Stage, mathe- maties; first c l a. in matics; first clas in geology; fit class in principles of mining, 1. II., III., and IV. Stages, in the County Council examina- tions; first class preliminary ordinary and honours mine surveying of the City and Guilds, Stages I., II., and III. St/John Ambulance (medallion); and first class occurrence, raising and dressing of ores, Honous Stage. Ho attended the summer course in surveying at Penarth in 1911, and was the prize-winner of the term of scholarship in the final stage. In 1912 he went on a continental tour, inspecting mines, &c.; he also won the continental tour prize for 1913, but was unable to accept. He holds also the fireman's cer- tificate. Mr. David Jame?, thp second brother, is just 21. and is employed a", a collier. He has attended practically the same sch-ools as his brother. Amongst his successes are: }fining—first class in Stages I., II. and III., being the top of the county in 1914; mine surveying—ifrst class in Stages I. and II.; firgt class machine l drawing; first class, Stage I.. mathe- matics; first class geology, and I. and II. Stages ambulance (County Council ex- aminations) first class Board of Educa- tion principles of mining; first clase pre- liminary and ordinary grades mine sur- veying; and first class, first stage, occu r-I rence. raising and dressing of ores in the City and Guilds examinations. At the Penarth summer course in surveying lie won the first prire in t-bo third grade in 1913, and first class in Grade V. in 11J. TTe. holds ab-o fn- The brothers have received all their ¡ training in these technical, £ «.. snb-ie^-ts at the Sewefl centre of the Glamorgan County Council technical and evening classes, and their teachers—for the last two vears Mr. David Richards. M.E., and previous to that Mr. Richard Richards, M.E.—deserve the utmost credit for such efficient instruction, these two gentlemen also being natives of Skewen.

No title

Lack of doctors at the present time makes it necessary for the Lambeth Board of Guardians to stop the summer I holiday* of the medical staff.

POETIC CRAY LOVER

| POETIC CRAY LOVER. THE PASSIONATE BUTCHER, THE I GIRL, AND THE BABY. Flowers may wither, Leaves may die, Friends may forget you, But never will I. The above were the lines written by Josiah Albert Jones, a butcher of Cray and Crynant at the close of a letter ae sent to Bessie Thomas, also of Cray, but lately residing at Cwmtwrch, in reply to a letter sent by her breaking off an ell-' gagement. Above the verses was t-he, sketch of a heart with the word "Broken written inside, whilst the letter was signed from "Your true and faithful lover—Joe." The story of the three years' courtship between them was unfolded at Ystrad- I gynlais Court on Tuesday, before Ccl.i Gough and other magistrates, when Jones] was summoned by Bessie for affiliation, Mr. Jones Williams appeared for the I girl, and Mr. Henry Thompson defended.! Mr. Jones Williams said the couple1 had been courting for three years, and they were recognised lovers in the di- trict. Only a garden separated their homes at Cray. The defendant was a most ardent lover judging by the number i of crosses appearing on letters which iie produced. Defendant used to meet the j complainant later in the night after .Alie: other members of her family had gone to bed. Complainant said she had been residing lately at Rhydywernen-road, Cwmtwrch, j but her home was at Cray. The baby was born on March 2nd. She first kept company with defendant about three years ago, and misconduct took place up to December last. When she told defendant of her condi-j; tion he told her to wait a little, and that they would have to get married She: went to Crynant, where defendant was in business, last August, for the purpose of seeing the house where they were to live in He also wrote to her asking if he could go to Neath to publish the banns. He (complainant) was willing to get married, but her father and sister ob- jected. A wedding was also arranged to take place at Coy church, but she de- clined to go there on account of her con- dition. She had been with defendant at Devynock Festival in June, 1914. Mr. Williams: He was a very pas- sionate lover, I believe. Complainant: Yes. By Mr. Thompson: They had quarrels occasionally. On one occasion defendant was jealous because a widower stayed at her house a few times. It was not true that she had been sitting up late at night with the widower. Mr. Thompson: Your father looked upon defendant as being too poor to marry you? Complainant: Yes. He wanted you to look out for the prince with the golden coach ? There was no answer to the ci-Liestion. Margaret Gwen Jon^s,: 'sistar, of com-.i plainant, said that on October 15tJi- defendant asked her to try and influence her father to allow him to marry the complainant, because he was ashamed to, see her condition. Thomas Jones, husband of the last; witness, said he had had several conyer- i sations with the defendant with respect. to the complainant, but he never denied being the father. Other witnesses were called- After Mr. Thompson had addressed the Bench, the defendant went into the box. He admitted courting the girl, but he denied intimacy. He behaved as a sweetheart should he-j. have, and it was his intention to marry the girl last November. At that time, however, the complainant became rather: independent and cool, and she said her: people were against him, and she could upt gfci married, Mr. Winiains: Have yoMnearly dnven this girl to desperation?—No. Have you ever threatened to cut your throat in her presence?—No. Have you ever cut your throat with a razor and fetched blood? No. After retirement the Bench made pn order of is. per week for 16 years with costs. I

RAID ON ABERAVON BEACH I I

RAID ON ABERAVON BEACH. I I At a special juvenile court on Tuesday at I Aberavon, five young boys living at Sand- flelds, Aberavon, named Albert Harwood, (16), James Davies (H). Walter Hynee (9), Wm. IIylies (9), and Charles Ogk<=by (10). were charged with stealing two boxes of rock, one box of biscuits, 24 bathing i drawers, six balls, bat and wickets, value 145-. 6d.. the property of David Williams, a sweet stall proprietor on the Aberavon beach. Ellen Davies, Phoebe Stow, liargaret Hynes. Edward Bush and Charles Oeiesby, the parents, with Ed. Bush and Alfred Stow, 8 a-nd 10 years respectively, were II charged with receiving the stolen goods. J P.C. Jones deposed to soeing the beys coming up from the sands with the tit?o?,an I articles. He made inquiries and found I that a stall owned by D-avid Williams had been broken into. After making inquiries he arrested the boys and recovered some of the articles (produced) Margaret Jenkins, Church-street, said that on the 7th June she visited her father's stall on the Aberavon beaoh and found the articlee mentioned missing. j The Chairman (Mr. Cha/S. Jonee) severely reprimanded defendants, and the parents of James Davies, Ed. Bush and Chas. Oglesby we're ordered to pay 5s, and the others 3s. 6d. The case against Albert Har- wood, which was not proved, was dismissed i

IS THIS THE OPEN AIR LIFEI

IS THIS THE OPEN AIR LIFE? I A charge of selling beer without a license was preferred at Aberavon Oil Monday, against Edward Brain, a collier, of Station-terrace, Pontrhydyfen. Supt. Ben Evans prosecuting, said the charge was of carrying on a kind of Hotel de, Mail on Sunday, May 16th. Tho police, hidden near defendant's house, saw him come out with a bulky overcoat, go to a spot near the river, and give them flagons of beer, a transaction being witnessed. Evidence to this effect was given bv P.S. Evans, P.C. Rogers and P. C. ColB gave evidence to this effect. Defendant in evidence denied sellir 4 the beer. The beer bottles found on hi; were not his property, as they had (XX ,I purchased at the Avon Vale Hotel, Ab avon, on Saturday night by his frienr Jones and Davies, and he (witness) ], ■mly kept the bottles overnight for t! ■ hey were ashamed to take them he John Jones and John Davies gave. dence in support of defendant, and a.t; that it was a custom between them o meet on the mountain side on .Sunday morning and drink beer. W Henry of Avon Vale Hotel, Aberavon, said that he remembered the man Davies purchasing the three flagons of beer on Saturday, j May 15th. I After a short retirement,t chairman ] intimated that there was considerable j doubt in the case, and that they would! give defendant the benefit of it. The case wag ed. -N

I VC ABRMAfij BURIED

V.C. ABRMAfij BURIED. 50,000 PEOPLE ATTEND LIEUT. WARNEFORD'S FUNERAL. The burial of Lieutenant Warneford, V.C., in Brompton Cemetery, on Tuesday afternoon, was attended by 50,000 people. Outside the gates great crowds waited unable to enter the cemetery grounds. In. this way London paid tribute to the young airman who died last Thursday in Paris when trying a new machine, his death coming only a few days after he had re- ceived by telegram the V.C. for attacking single-handed in mid-air and destroying a German Zeppelin. As early as eleven o'clock people gathered in the cemetery grounds and paused beside the newly made grave, which stands in the main avenue just be- yond the Bell Tower and next to the grave 01 Sir Thomas Wemyss Reid. The first part of the funeral service took place in the cemetery cliapel. Round the coffin, touching the edges cf a widespread Union Jack, were placed the many beauti- ful wreaths. One from a child was in- scribed From a little one who might have been killed if that Zeppelin had not been brought down by this hero," A iew minutes before the funeral procession left the chapel a wounded soldier was helped out of the tight-packed crcwd by the police and allowed to approach the grave- side. He hobbled forward, took a look down into the grave, raised his service cap, and hobbled ba?k into the crowd. A moment later the funeral procession came along the avenue. First a firing' party of 50 men of the Royal Naval! Division formed up in two ranks facing the grave. Two Navy chaplains led the way in front of a party of 20 sailors who pulled the gun carriage bearing the coffin, At each side of it were four naval lieu- tenants, some of them comrades of the young airman. Behind came Lieutenant Warneford's mother and sisters and other relatives, and after them marched 100 men of the Naval Division. The funeral service was read by the two chaplains. Three salutes were fired and the rifles remained at present as bugles played "The Last Post." For hours afterwards, till the cemetery closed, crowds of men. women, and chil- dren filed pas

IRIRS AT NEUVE CHAPELLE

I R.I.R.'S AT NEUVE CHAPELLE. The following verse was written by TJifleman W. Whelan, of Aberavon, who fought in the battle of Neuve Chapelle with the R.I.R.'s, and in which four of his companions were wounded:— Come, please just pay attention, and a story I will tell Of how the gallant R.I.R.'s were first in Neuve Chapelle; Colonel Laurie gave the order for the regiment's advance, And double quick the Germans were led a lively dance. j 1 With bayonets fixed we rushed them, though outnumbered four to one, And each one proved a hero, and gallant deeds were done; Our noble Colonel he was killed, our Major fell as well, And a score of our brave offioers lost their lives at Neuve Chapelle. Our men they fell in hundreds—no sol- diers could do more, J And when the fight was over our officers numbered iour; Yet manfully they struggled amidst that living hell, And of all the British unite we were first at Neuve Chapelle. Then here's to the gallant R.I.R.'s, those riflemen so brave. Who nobly did their duty and found a hero's grave; And may their glory ever shine—those boys who fought and fell, The five Avonian heroes in the fight at Neuve Chapelle.

SKEWEN EXAMINATION RESULTS I

SKEWEN EXAMINATION RESULTS. I The following are tho successful students from the Skewen centre who have passed the Glamorgan County Coun- cil examinations. The teacher was Mr. David Richards, M.E., one of the county mining lecturers. The results are highly creditable:— Mining.—1st class, honours, John James (top of county and winner of gold medal), David James, Henry Griffiths; 2nd class, Stage III., P. Davies; Stage II., 2nd class, Arthur Jones, L. Jones; 3rd class, J. R. Davies. Stage I, 2nd class, D. J. Davies, T. E. Davies; 3rd class, J. It. Davies. Mine Surveyiiig.-lst class, advanced, David James (top of county and winner of gold medal), Henry Griffiths; elemen- tary, 1st class, P. Davies, T. E. Davies, L. J. Williams, J. Davies, Ivor Evans; 2nd class, D. J. Davies, Arthur Jones, F. Curtis, T. Evans, L. Jones. 1

IILLANDOVERYS OLDEST INHABI I ITANT

LLANDOVERY'S OLDEST INHABI- I I., TANT. The death has occurred, in her 89th I year, of Mrs. Anne Davies, Queen-street, I Llandovery's oldest inhabitant. Deceased i was in many respects a remarkable old lady. She retained her faculties unim- paired to the end, and to the close of her days she was able to -o walk- ing fairly briskly about the town. -She lived for over half a century in the same street, King's Anns-road, removing to the house she occupied at the time of h,r dainise some yj;;ars c.-go. She w as a faith- ful member and attendant at Salem COil- gregational Chapel, Her husband, who predeceased her by many years, was the la.te John Davies, a brother of the late Alderman W. Mabon Davies, of Glan- sawdde. Llangadock. She leaves a number of children, grandchildren, and great- grandchildren.

THE RIGHTS OF PRIVY COUNCILLORSI

THE RIGHTS OF PRIVY] COUNCILLORS. INFORMATION AGAINST SIR E.1 SFEYEK AND SIR E. CASSEL. ) In a Divisional Court in the King's Bench on Wednesday, counse l on behalf of Sir George Makgill, Bart., moved for an order nisi directed t(. Sir Edgar Speyer, Bart., to show cause whv an information iu the nature of a quo warranto should not be exhibited by the King's Coroner directed against him (Sir Edgar Speyer) to show by what authority he is or claims to be a member of his Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council tor Great Britain, and exercise., or claims to exercise, the rights, powers and privileges or a person who is a member of that Council. lie had also to move for a similar order in the case of Sir Ernest Cassel, Knight, on similar grounds. The grounds upon which the motion was made, said counsel, were that both these gentlemen were born out of the Kingdom cf Eng- land. Scotland and Ireland and the Dominions "thereunto belonging, and were not born of English parents. Sir Edgar Speyer, according to an affidavit, was the son of Gustave Speyer," of Frankfort, and was born in New i York in 18(:2, not of British parents. In 1892 Sir Edgar was naturalised. In ?1M6 he was created a baronet, and in 11909 was sworn a Member of the Privy ICoulicil. Counsel's submission was that Sir Edgar Speyer was not a member, and never had been lawfully a member of the Privy Council by reason of the statute. Sir Ernest Cassel was born in Cologne in 1852, and was the son of Jacob Cas- sel, of Cologne. He was created a knight in 1905, and sworn a Member of the Privy Council in 1902. Counsel argued that Sir Ernest was not lawfully a member of the Council, and said he thought they might take it that there had not been, until quite re- cent years, any appointment to the Privy Council of anyone not a born British subject. The Lord Chief Justice: Are you right in saying that? Counsel: Is your Lordship thinking of the late Prince Consort? Lord Chief Justice: No. I had in mind certain members of the Privy Council ro whom I thought your observations might apply, but certainly I won't mention names. After further argument, the Lord Chief Justice said counsel had shown enough at any rate to justify the court in grant- ing an order nisi, so that there might argument on the matter, and that a de- cision might be pronounced. Of course it must be understood they were expressing no opinion either as to the facts stated, or as to the mode of procedure adopted. All ques- tions upon that must naturally be open to those who showed cause on the further hearing. Notice must be served on each of the respondents to the order, and notice must also be given to the Home Secretary or the Attorney-General and to the Clerk of the Privy Council. Counsel said with regard to the service on respondents, he did not think there would be any difficulty in regard to one ¡ of them, but the other, it was suggested, had gone elsewhere for his health or for some other reason, and there might be I difficulty in serving him personally. The Lord Chief Justice aid personal service was not necessary, but the respon- dents must have the opportunity of ap- pearing. lie did not think the Court could hear arguments before July 26th. The rule was granted accordingly against both parties.

MOTOR BUS OUT OF HAND

MOTOR 'BUS OUT OF HAND. At tho Aberavon County Police Court on Monday, Thomas Jones, a motor-'bus driver plying between Glyncorrwg and Cymmer, was summoned for reckless driving to the danger of the public. Mr. Lewis M. Thomas d-ifendpd. Sergeant Evans said that on Monday, the 7th inst., he was on duty with other officers in the Square, Cyrnmer, where a recruiting meeting was held, and there were GOO people present. The T)us driven by defendant came down the hill at the rate of 30 miles an hour. The dangerous speed of the 'bus caused the people to fly m all directions. The 'bus ran at full speed into Afon-street, down to the Farmers' Arms, and on to the, pavement outside the Post Office, where! it was brought to a standstill. Whro i Rpoken to, defendant said th,,1t the brakes were all right, and that the cause of the car going o,,it. of control was a quantity of grease which had got, on the brake. Sergeant Davies, Cwmavon, corrobor- a,t ed. -N f. T h on-t?n For the defence, Mr. L. M. Thomas said that the defendant greatly appreci- a.ted the splendid and prompt action of the police in the matter, which un- doubtedly save a great catastrop lilp, facts of the case were that the footbrake of the motor 'bus failed to act, and the defendant was therefore Pct responsible for what unfortunately had occui. ?,d. Out of the 12 persons in the 'bus, not one was injured, or any people in the crowd. It was hrigihly satisfactory, under the cir- cumstances, tha.t the driver was able to keep his head. These ftets were borne wit by defendant, and corroborated by John Howells, colliery manager, who- was a passenger, and said that defendant had always proved a most, capable and care- ful driver. Defendant was fined JB2.

ISKEWEN NAVAL CASUALTIESI

SKEWEN NAVAL CASUALTIES. I I Mr. and Mrs. James Johnson, of Wood- land-road, Skewen, have received official intimation that their son, Jim Johnson, was missing after one of the engagements in the Dardanelles. He joined the Navy soon after the outbreak of war. lie is ?f years of age. An unoMieial report has reached Mr. and Mrs. Thomas ,¡O, DYIHWOr-roacl,1 jthat their son, David Jones, who had also I gone with his ship to the Dardanelles, I had been wounded in action, and was at present in hospital. This has not yet I been confirmed. So far as is at known, these are the first Skew-en boys to be in the Naval casualty lists. These two are j I friends of the same age, and both are I i A.B.'s

j CANNOT AGREE AFTER 30 YEARS I I

j CANNOT AGREE AFTER 30 YEARS. I I At Pontardawe Police Court on Friday, i Daniel Benjamin .Toim lM), was sum- monad by his wife, Mary John, for dSN- tion on May 30th. Mr. Morgan Davies defended. Complainant said they had been mar- ried 30 years, and there was one child, Her husband gave her an>"th.In.g. from Is. to n a week. Mr. Davies: Is it not a fact that your husband has come home night after mght I and not a morsel of food in the house for him? I Complainant: It's his own fault. He won't give me enough money. Defendant offered to contribute 12s. 6d. [ per week, but the Bench made an order for 15s. per week.

NEXT OF KIf

NEXT OF KIf". j AUSTRALIANS' RELATIVES WHO CANNOT BE TRACED. Many of our readers are doubtless not aware of the very large accumulation of monies which are now lying dormant and unclaimed in the various Govern- ment Departments of our Dominions. It is estimated that there are many thousands of pounds emanating from Australia alone, and we propose during the next few weeks to publish a portion .of a list of unclaimed balances to which claimants have been unsuccessfully sought for in Australia, and which ~as not hitherto been published in this country. Readers who may consider they are justly entitled to enter claims against these monies should write to the Editor of this paper, marking their envelopes "Unclaimed Monies," or write direct to Lloyd's Inquiry. 55-6, Chancery-lane, Lon- don, W'.C., who have established offices in Australia and who keep records of the particulars relating ;to same. A stamped envelope should be sent for reply. The following is the weekly list:— William Dear. James Dickenson, Mar- garet Dntton, Patrick Fitzpat.riok, Henry Hall, William Jackson, John Kenny, John Keating, James Knight. Peter Martin, Wil- liam McKay, Edward McKenzie, John Net- man, John Norton, Joseph Pike, Samuel Robertson, John. Russell, William Scarlett. John Shunks, Charles Walker, James Westram, John Wilon.

NO MORE YOUNG VEAL

] NO MORE YOUNG VEAL. The Board of Agriculture and Fisheries have under the. Slaughter of Animals Order of 1915 prohibited the slaughter of (a) animals which are visibly or obviously in-calf or in-pig; and (b) cal ves under the age of twelve weeks, except male calves of Channel Island, Ayrshire, and Kerry breeds. The restrictions do not apply to (a) s laughter of an aiiimal under the powers conferred by the Diseases of Ani- mals Acts, 1894 to 1914, or any Order made thereunder; or (b) slaughter of an animal necessary fr desirable on account of accidental injury to the animal or its illness; or (c) slaughter of an animal if in the opin- ion of the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries the slaughter is desirable çi}f any exceptional reason or purpose, and the slaughter is authorised by a licence granted by that Board or an officer of that Board. Any contravention or failure to comply with the Order renders the offender liable to a fine of £20, or if the offence relates to more than four animals to a fine of ,t5 for each animal.

MISSING BRITONFERRY MAN I

| MISSING BRITONFERRY MAN. Considerable regret if; manifested :n Britonferry regard- ing the news that Private Tom Arnold of Shelone-road, is is missing. It will be remembered that voung Arnold joined the Naval Brigade k Plyi-noutli Divi- sion) in October last. He recently went to the Dar- danelles, and has been reported miss- ing. Prior to joining the Navy yvuog- Arnold was engaged as clerk with Mr. Tom Griffiths, the well-known eecre- tary of the Steel Smelters' Union, Neata. I

I JOY FOR MISSING SWANSEAI IISOLDIERS FAMILY

JOY FOR "MISSING" SWANSEA I SOLDIER'S FAMILY. As illustrating the hope that may still be entertained by relatives of soldiers reported missing, the case of Private John Sea corn be, of the Welsh Regiment, i* remarkable. For seven years in tho 2nd Welsh, Seacúlllbe was in action quite early in the war, came through the Mons retreat uziscatJfed, but was wounded at the Aisne, and visited his sister, Mrs. Jones, of 18, Vincent-st., Swan- sea. On 18th Feb- ruary, according to a letter received from a comrade, he was left dead on the battlefield. Re- peated requests to I the Wtar Office brought information that he was "wounded and missing," but after months. in which he has been given up for lost, Mrs. Jones received a letter from him under the address. "Red Cross Hospital, Grammont, Belgium." Private Seacomoe says he was wounded on the 18th February in the shoulder and ear, but was getting much better. Al- though he was a prisoner, he added the reatment and attention he was receiving was splendid. Private Seacombe has two brothers in training—George in the 9th East Lanes., and Harry, in the 11th Worcesters.

CANADIANS IN THE FIRING LINE

CANADIANS IN THE FIRING LINE. An important Order in Council has been issued at Ottawa to the effect that where a homesteader, who is a member of the Canadian Expeditionary Forces or the British or Allied Forces, loses his life on active service, free patent, is issued for the land immediately. The old Act only gave, free patent at once in the case of a Canadian Volunteer being disabled by wounds, but it ha.s been decided that if a man be killed on "active service in de- fence of any part of the Empire his estat.e should be relieved from any further duties. The Order in Council also pro- vides for any homesteader serving with the Canadian, British or Allied Forces, counting active service as residence upon the homestead. The old Act only allowed this to members of the Canadian military forces, and not to those engaged in British or Allied Armies.

I PORT TALBOT GENTLEMEN HAVE A LIVELY EXPERIENCE j

PORT TALBOT GENTLEMEN HAVE A! LIVELY EXPERIENCE. j Tliree Part Talbot mottaaste had aii TjnnsoaJ. experience on Saturday) when, j they were arrested under military ordora I irt Scotland. They were Mr. Fred E. Jaoob, collier v I owner; Captain Hamplirey Jones, ha: bour master; and Mr. Daniels, manager of the Londcm and Provincial Bank. Port Talbot, who were on a motor tour in the l North, of Scotland. Inadvertently getting into prohibited they were placed under arrest. After ex- tensive inquiries had been made by the military authorities the three gentleman were released,

f CORRESPONDENCE

f CORRESPONDENCE. I THE WELSH SUMMER SCHOOL. To THE EDITOR OF THE "HLD:" j Sir,-May I crave your usual indulgpzwo. to call attention to the above}, sunmiec school? It is now unnecessary to s»eak ice terms of praise of its work. This being „hej thirteenth year of its existence, jLt now speaks fur itself, and its. list of. lecturers ia a-guarantee of its educational success this year again. The list includes Sir Ieambard Owen, Prof. J. E. Lloyd, Prof. J. M. Jones, Mr. S. J. Evans, Mr. R. T. Evans, Mr. Howell Howells, Mr. J. W. Berry, Mr. Ernesfc Hughes, Mr. Ifor Williams, Mr. David Samuel, Mr. J'ohn Griffith, Bev. Elfet Lewis.. Rev. Dyfnallt Owen, Mr. Morgan Watkinø., and Mr. Evan R. Davies. I Efforts are being made to secure specials railway facilities to enable students to rcach Pwlhelli with a minimum of incon, venience. If I receive the ntunes of at leaatt too visitors, whether students or not, to, Pwlhelli, desirous of travelling thither ore the 31st of July, the Cumbrian Railway Co, will provide a through train from Fouthr Wales. It is unfortunate that excursion rates have been discontinued, but the tour- ist rates are quite reasonable, considering the circumstances. Syllabuses and time- I tables of the Summer School. and also guides to Pwlhelli, giving a list orroo „ may be obtained, on application to the towf cieik of Pwlhelli, or to I D. JAMES (DEFYNNOG). Secretary of the Welsh Language Society* Treherbert. I PROPOSED EXTENSION OF QUARTER BACH. To THE EDITOR OF THB HERALD." Sir,—Before proceeding any further it would be well if "Majiorabonite" gave hi^ age, because Quarter Bach might then M induced to let the matter stand over until such time as he takee to reaoh his majority. In his first letter' your critic made a display, of his knowledge; in his last he gave a;" sample of his logic; and the two obrabined"- gave us such a hotch-potch as nobody O()u!( understand. He states at random that thei proposed alteration of boundaries would n--irly double our ratee." Why not say treble or quadruple or something equally six foolish, and have done with it? He then Btates-and I beg here to make a correction if the Parish Council had been awake to their duties there would have been no need; for the expense that they went into in orftt, to get what they had. from the Joint COnyo mittee." No doubt, Mr. Editor, tie erroU that crept in here was quite unintentional 3a»; it should have read: "If the DiatripfiCouncil had been awake to their duties there would^ have been no need for the expense, etc., etc. Joint Committee." If "Manorabonite'* has any doubts on this point let him traca again the history of the muddle between the District Council and the Joint Board in its initial stages, when they lost the chanos of getting the trunk to Cwmgarw or RhofM. amman, and afterwards and to erawl and! take whatever they could get-n *IT, a trunk to Farmers' Bridge, and that in main because Lilanguioke wanted it them," At the end of his able letter Manorabon- ite" reveals himself with the obefcructtonteta of public footpaths. One might fancy that it wa.9 the Pirieh Council that had closed a footpath and created all this shindy. Let our old friend remember That the obstruo tion of a right of way js a public nuisance, and that the author of the obstruo* tion may be indicted for misdemeanour at the Assixee or Quarter Se.eW':ne and punished by a- fine or imprisonment oif both." (Local Government Act.) Of course. he knows that the short cut from Cwmeirw road to Mouhtain-road haa been ohatienged: repeatedly of late at its lower e,. The' landowner wanted to take a carters? footpath th.it may be conatructed by thit Council, but it was left to somebody who was neither a tenant nor a landowner 04 this spot to challenge the right of way heret altogether. If we listen to such miik-ae& water counsels as Manorabonites we stall soon have every Tom. Dick, and Harry itv vesting himself with the power of Quarteg Sessions to close every footpath, in thrf r)arish.-Yours, etc., 1- DYNAMITE.;

0 I PATRIOTIC NEATH scm OOLOoyr

.0 I PATRIOTIC NEATH sc-m OOL-'Ooyr;* At a meeting of the Neath CountP School governors on Monday, Alderman' Hopkin Morgan, J P., presiding, a voteot condolence with the widow and family ol the late Mr. E. S. Phillips and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Thomas and family, Gnoll Avenue, whose son. Lieutenant Dan Thomas, was the first of the County School old boys to be killed in the war# were passed in silence. Mr. Davies, headmaster, in lus report, expressed the desire of a large iltmber ol hQg that they should be allowed t^ p* 4.it in the making of munitions of war. I The governors suggested that the lads ■ migkx; be of some service to the farmers in the hay fields, as no opportunity existed locally to mak e munitions-

Family Notices

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, AND DEATHS4 BIRTHS. DAVIES.—On Sunday, June 29th, at The Got," Four Oake, Birmingham, to Mr. andi Mrs. Welter Davie*, a eon. WltiTiTAMS.—On the 17th inst., to Mr. andl Mrs. Ernest Williams. Sunnyhurst, Rhylit dings, Neath, a eon. MARRIACES. TIDCOMB—WILTON.—On June 14th, by special license, at amount Pleasant Ba-ptiab Church, by the Rev. H. C. Mander, Charlea Betram Tidoomb, of Manor Farm, Wool- etone, to May, elder daughter of Mr. and YNI. A. S. Wilton, 132, Oxford-street. I WljlliLS— JONES.—On the 15th inst., art St* Andrew's Presbyterian Church, by Rev. R. Greenshielde. M.A., assisted by Rev, David Price (Betheeda), James Herbert., eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. James Wells, Princeiown. Devon, to Maggie, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Jonee. 141. Walter-road, Swaneea. DEATHS. AINLY.—On June lftth. at Oymla Hoffpitalg I Neath. Annie, the wife of J. H. Ainly* I)AVIF-S.On Saturday, June 19tb, Lig Cj-nghordyfech,dydach, Hannah, daughtei2 of the late John Davies. EVANS.-On Monday. June 21et, at 7be Bungalow, Langland, the Rev. Evan EvaDe, Minister of Alexandra C.M. Church, Swan- sea, in his 44tb year. HAYMAN.—On June 6th, at Biue Do Temple* Peris, Louise Luialie, widow ol the IW.49 Alfred Hayman, of Neath; aged 81. ROWE.—On June 21&t, 1915. &t the re?idenow J of her daughter, 1. PhiUipe-parade. Sarah Jane, relict of t-he late Oapt. T. Row*. *» SAMUEL.—On the 21st inol. ?t 7, Eva?e?ep- ra?e, D?nysrai?-road. St. Thomas. Swam ¥ eaa, Frank, youngest- son of David and Sarah Emily &Lmuel, age 13 years. SQUIRE.—Drowned at sea, iltb inct., Oapt, E. U. Squire, of 24, Approa