Collection Title: Herald of Wales

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 5 of 12 Next Last
Full Screen
20 articles on this page
THE WAR LOAN t

THE WAR LOAN. t BOON FOR SMALL INVESTORS. I Mr. McKenna, Chancellor of the Ex-I chequer, introduced the Government War Loan scheme on Monday in the House of Commons. The salient features are as follows:— The Loan is to be issued at par, bearing interest at 4t per cent. Holders of the Old War Loan Stock and Consols will be entitled on subscribing to "the new Loan in cash to convert an equivalent amount of their holdings into new Stock on advantageous terms. Small investors can secure Bonds of S5 and E25 through the Post Office, bearing 44 per cent. inteeret. Smaller investors can secure through the Poet dffice 5s. vouchers, the interest being 5 per cent. per annum for each com- plete month until S5 is paid, when a 4i per cent. Bond will be issued. Trade unions, friendly societies, and works will also be entitled to issue these vouchers. The total amount for each individual will be subject to a legal limit. Though the total amount of the loan is unlimited, it is not expected to exceed £ 910,000,000. The scheme was sanctioned by the House, and the prospectus issued by the Bank of England is published The War Deficit. I The War Deficit has accumulated thus: I x Up to March 31 334,000,000 Since that date 184,000,000 Total to-day 518,000,000 This deficit has been met thus: x Proceeds of Nov. Loan 331,000,000 Exchequer Bonds 43,000,000 Treasury Bills I. 235,000,000 Total 614,000,000 Less Repayment of South Africa War Loan 16,500,000 Net borrowings 597,500,000 In round numbers there is thus a sur- 1, plus, still unspent, of £ 80.000,000. But against this surplus must be set the lia- j bility of the Bank of England for bills of exchange, which liability stood at 12C millions. It is now reduced below Mr. Lloyd George's net estimate of 50 mil- Jjons, and this overdraft is to be repaid to the Bank. The discharge of the debt will assist th3 exchanges and help the, Bank to maintain the gold reserve. Post Office Issues. The new loan is to be issued by three methods. (1) Through the Bank of England by tile 9100. (2) Through Post Offices by Bonds cf £ 5 and S25 denomination. (3) By means of War Loam Vouchers of 5s., on sale at Post Offices, and II. through Trade Unions, Friendly Societies, and Works Offices. On these latter vouchers 5 per cent. interest, or 3d per 5s., will be allowed per annum for every complete month that the voucher is held. That is, one farthing a month will be paid as interest on every 5s. voucher. If a voucher is cashed, no interest is paid, but when 25 vouchers have been accumulated they may be exchanged for one C5 bond, carrying interest at 4i per cent. The additional -1 per cent. on vouchers is compensation for loss of interest on in- complete months. The amount to be sub- scribed through vouchers by any one person will be limited by law. Lists for ordinary subscription to the War Loan close on July 10. Mr. McKenna said plainly that he did not expect to receive Sl.000,000,000, and did not really want as much as this. He did not expect to receive very much from [ndia and the Dominions, which are at present borrowers rather than lenders. I-. Small Investors. Subscription through the Post Office! may be stopped at the discretion of the Government, and small investors should therefore apply without delay. If they take £5 at a time (without troubling about vouchers) they will save 8d. and only pay £ 4 19s. 4d. Persons subscribing through vouchers will receive Is. bonus when their £5 is complete. The following table shows how vouchers may be accumulated:— Complete Intst. ihtrchaees in £ a. months. d. 1 10 5 n 1 15 5 7 Angust 1 10 3 7i September 2 10 2 5 October 10 1 1 November 1 15 — — £11 0 28. 4d. The investor may then receive on December 1st the following: (1) £10 of stock (bonds) oarrying in- terest at 4 £ per cent. £ s. d. Ki;(2) Cash interest 0 2 4 .(3) CAwh bonus 0 2 0 .1 (4) Voucher balance 10 0 The cash may be put into the Post Office Savings Bank or it may be drawn out for personal use, and the voucher balance may be held for further invest- ment in stock, or changed into cash. Safeguarding Investors. Another important attraction of the new proposals remains to bo mentioned. It is this-that if any further loan should be found necessary during the war, and if such a loan has to be brought out at a higher rate than 4!, the Government pro- mise to take the stock of the present loan at par for the purpose of reinvestment. That feature was criticised by Sir Frede- rick Banbury, who thought that investors should be held to their bargains and not protected against loss. But the general feeling seemed to be that he who answers his country's appeal now ought not to be in a worse position than the man who looks at these War Loans from a strictly financial and business point of view. Mr. McKenna in most earnest language begged the country to remember that this appeal is to patriotism and that the country's needs are very urgent. At the game time he very justly praised the quality of the wares he has to sell, observ- ing that a Four and Half per Cent. Bri- tish Government Loan is a golden oppor- tunity for the investor, such as may never occur again. Now is the moment!" he said. The scheme was well received by the House, and, in explaining it. Mr. McKenna displayed a perfect lucidity. ■■

NAVAL RECRUITS LEAVE SWANSEA

NAVAL RECRUITS LEAVE SWANSEA. There was a large crowd at Swansea High-street Station yesterday to wit- ness the departure of a further large batch of South Wales recruits to trh- Royal Naval Division, A fine lot of fellows—one of the best contingents sent from the town—were, with Mr. J. Hodgens (hon. recruiting agent), Master-at-Arms Stevens, and P.O. Ilunking, played to the station by the Telegraph Messengers' Band, conducted by Inspector Richards. The White Ensign was at their head. They were given a hearty send off by a gathering in which there was a good sprinkling of khaki, and tttp train was also conveying men of a eariety of regiments back from leave. Before the train steamed out the Mayor Mid. Daniel Jones), who had given each iJZiruit a packet of cigarettes, addressed <&') them a few words of congratulation that they had joined this important branch of the Service. He was sure they would uphold Swansea's glorious tradi- tions. Congratulations were due also to Mr. Hodgens and his staff for the large number of recruits they had secured. In reply, the men gave hearty cheers for the MayAt.

EVAN EVANS1

EVAN EVANS. 1 ——— A Ffll END'S TRIBUTE. The Rev. Evan Evans, minister of Alexandra C.M. Church, Swansea, died on Monday in his 44th year, ) at The Bungalow, Langland. He had been in ill-health for some months, but, eight or nine weeks ago, there were com- plications, and after treatment in London he was brought back to Swansea on Thursday week last—to die. He was a native of Carnarvon, educated at Bangor, and previous to coming to Alexandra Chapel, about eight years ago. he had held pastorates in Mid-Wales, and Moun- tain Ash. It is almost impossible to one who held his friendship a sacred privilege to so order his thoughtsr-on the morning when expected news has proved none the less distressing—as to write of Bvan Evans's place in Swansea, and national life. These words must be halting and disconnected. The gracious, winsome per- sonality who has just gone out of our lives, leaving a space that nev.]r. will be filled, demands a tribute II written in calm, collected moments, for it was a great personality—a greater than i was generally recognised, for he loved and persisted in the ministry of obscurity —which has just left the frail body. That, as I say, is impossible now, when sorrow is still keen-edged and wounding. But there are some things which may be said when that sorrow is new. Evan Evans was a man of friendships. How many there are in Wales who loved him, one does not know; but they are to. be found all over the Principality, men who regarded him with brot-fierly affec- tion, who valued intimacy with him as one of life's rare and precious gifts, Wl1h ¡ will lay that love now between fragrant' cover and think it beyond price. Thay I iii-e to be found in all classes. There are leaders in \Velsh theological thought who knew him to be their master, in their I chosen line, but who treasured his com- pany more for the great spirit which never allowed envy or uncharitableness: to enter it. There are Welsh scholars who knew his eminence as a critic in literature, but had discovered that his charm went deeper than learning. There are Welsh politicians who, knowing their special field, were compelled to acknow- ledge that he knew it better than they, but who felt honoured by his friendship for quite another reason. There are dockers in Swansea who swear by him, men with whom he smoked the pipe A friendship with as much zest as though they were the highest in the land. He had a genius in drawing men to him, and these, when they grew—slowly, for he did not give his intimacy rashly-to know the white soul of the man, grew into knowledge also that his accomplishments were as nothing compared to his natural virtues. Why is it that our best do not get their deserts in this world? Why is it that Evan Evans, one of the greatest thinkers Wales has produced-the judgment is not mine but that of men more competent to express a verdict—had not, in his forty- fourth year, won an acknowledged place of eminence in the life of his nation? Why was he not more known ? I think the article he contributed to a recent number of The Welsh Outlook will explain why to those capable of understanding the fineness of his spirit. The manner in which the article had to be forced out of him may also explain: He had read a paper before the ministers of Swansea They acclaimed it the most brilliant and penetrating any of their number had ever contributed; some of them came to the writer appealing to him to use what influence he had to secure* the manu- script and have it published in a maga- zine fitting it. Then ensued a struggle between one who appeared content to ran his course in the quiet grove, scornful of the world's applause, and believing to his very depths in the ministry of the obscure, and another who was impatient that such gifts as his should have so limited a field. who knew that many, not so worthy, were famous upon a tithe of his learning. The article was obtained at last. Some of us hoped that it would lead to greater things; that now be would give to the nation that which he had liberally poured out to friendship. But he read it in a London 6ick chamber, when we knew he was doomed. Fame was not to come to this Methodist mini- ster. He had won, however, a higher possession than fame. Why? one asked earlier. Why ? The answer has come even while penning these unready notes. Fame is as nothing compared to love. And in love Evan Evans has died owning more than most men of forty-four. He has left little that is tangible be- hind which will secure for him a place n that Welsh life which is recorded. There are sermons perhaps, which may reveal his stature to the fworld; no work else. He could have done great things had his philosophy of life been less high. Had he thought of the world's applause, and worked for it, one sincerely believes lie could have secured it without ex- cessive cost. He chose the better way. He was a Methodist minister with a call and so he gave of that big brain of his-the best-ordered, the most tenacious in memory, the writer has known—to the friends who wondered why he never used it to his own immediate advantage. He was one who loved the evening fireside, and the talk which ranged lofty and rare over the speeding and unheeded hours. He was a poet who had never admitted the authorship of a line; he had a fine critical gift which, had he applied it in literature, must have gained him eminence. He was a social politician, afire against privilege, ardent for his country, far-seeing in his views. Well, he has died, at forty-four. I cannot write of his triumphant ending; that is too sacred for print. He died at what the world may say was the opening years of promise for which all the past was a preparation. Smaller men have won national repute. Evan Evans gcPA to his grave practically unknown outsid e of Methodism and his varied friendships But if the enrichment of many livea with new beauty, if the opening of many minds to new joys, if the inspiring of faint souls with new hope-if these things count—as they ought to count- higher than the mere winning of material advantage and the making of a name," he has died after having justified, and spent, his rich mental and spiritual pos- sessions. Few Welshmen have left so many debtors, so many who owed him what is lasting in life and death. And living as he did in a world inter- penetrated hy the spiritual, one believes he has served his day and generation worthily and well. In our hearts memory of him will remain in a sacred, fragrant chamber until we, too, have to face the great adventure into which he joyfully and bravely entered.

Advertising

THE LONDON CITY & MIDLAND BANK LIMITED HEAD OFFICE: S, THREADNEEDLE STREET, E.C. SUBSCRIBED CAPITAL f,22,947,804 PAID-UP CAPITAL. 4,780,792 RESERVE FUND 4,000,000 CASH 33,496,834 ADVANCES, &c. 62,455,792 DEPOSITS 136,767,983. FOREIGN BRANCH — — 8, FINCH LANE, E.C. I

DRINK UNDER HIS COAT I

DRINK UNDER HIS COAT. I Wm. Petter, licensee of the Lark Inn, was sun mened at Carmarthen on Monday for keeping open his premises on Sunday, May 15 for the sale of intoxicating liquor. Mr. T. Howell Davies defended. The Head Constable (Mr. May all) said that about 12.45 p.m. on May 16 he was standing in Quay-street, and saw the defen- dant at the top of th; lane near the li-irk Inn with something bulky under his coat. He said, "What have you got there?" and defendant replied. "A. drink; 1 am going to diink it myself. I ofter. take it out when I go for a walk." Evan Williams, who was with Petter, said, "I was coming from duty from the sawmills to Blue-street when 1 saw Mr. Petter in Bull-lane He made a sign to m, with his hand, and he said to me, 'Take th:.s bottle down to the men.' You came then. He had no time to say more." Defendant said lib was simply going for a walk with his wife He started out first, attl he turned back to see where his wife was when ho met WUiiams, and had a con- versation with him. He stoutly denied tell- ing Williams "Take thiló bottle to the mell." la cross-examination defendant stated that the head constable told Williams at th, polioe station to add to his statement The Head Constable. That is a serious statement. Do yoa swear that 1 told Wil- liams to add to his statement?—Yes, you said, "That is not quite what you told me on the square. I smjgest. that you add some- thing to it. Did W My to you 'Take this to the men.' M.r. Howell Davias intervened, and said it was simply wasting time. The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. H. B. White): Xv, it isn't. He makes an allegation against the head constable and two other police officers. Mr. Davies: It is not an allegation 

PONTARDAWE SCHOOLBOYS ABSENCE

PONTARDAWE SCHOOLBOY'S ABSENCE. Pontardawe School Managers met on Monday, County Councillor D. T. Wil- liams, J.P., presiding. The following appointments were made: Mr. Arthur Davies to Cwmgorse School; Miss Sarah Walters, Llangyfelach, to Pontardawe, and Miss C. Morris, Rhos, to Alltwen Infants'. One of the attendance officers reported upon the case of a boy who was absent through neglect. The officer said the mother told him that the boy was kept home through headache. On the same day he (the officer) saw the boy about the roads, and the boy told him he could not go to school because he had no boots. On the other hand, the officer produced a cer- tificate from a doctor certifying that the boy was suffering from headache. Several of the managers expressed sur- prise that the doctor should give a certi- ficate for such a complaint. The Chairman suggested that the Edu- cation Committee should be asked to engage a solicitor to prosecute, and that the doctor be subpoenaed to give evidence. It was agreed to issue a summons. Dr. James, Cardiff, wrote suggesting that the group should appoint women teachers to authorised vacancies for men during the duration of the war. This had been approved by several groups in the County.

THREE SWANSEA BROTHERS

THREE SWANSEA BROTHERS. Geo Miller. The news was re- ceived in Swansea on Monday of the death in action of Private Wm Miller, 1st Welsh, whose home was at Prince of Wales road, Swansea. He was 22 years of age, and leaves a wife and one child. Prior to enlistment he was employed at the Graigola Fuel Works. Another brother, Pte. Geo. Miller, of the Grenadier Guards, has been wounded in action. He served in South Africa during the last Boer War. A third brother is Trooper Leonard Miller, who is at present serving I Pte. Wm. Miller. Tpr. L. Miller. with the 11th Hussars. The fourth brother, Mr. Harry Miller, is a member of the publishing staff of the Cambria Daily Leadcr." =—

I CLYDACH RECITATION MEETINGS

I CLYDACH RECITATION MEETINGS. Cyrddau adroddiadol" (recitation meetings) of an enjoyable nature were held under the auspices of the Sunday school at Hebron Congregational Church, Clydach, on Sunday. The meetings. which were well attends were presided over by the Rev. D. Eiddig Jones (pastor), and a good miscellaneous programme had been arranged by Mr. Arthur Morgan (superintendent), to which the following contributed:—Recitations. Misses Mary Thomas, Winnie Cook, Edith Jones, Katie Rees, Hilda Smith. Mavis Thomas, Gertie Smith, Enid David. Hannah Mary Thomas, Ethel Harris, Beatrice Deer, Maud Jones and Masrsie R. Grove, Masters W. David, W. David Thomas, Watkin Morris, David Thomas, Brinley Rees, Messrs. Arthur Morsran and John L. Jenkins; addresses, Mr. Henry Lewis and the Rev D. Eiddig Jones; songs, -D'e Jon(?s. Enid David. Misses Irene Hill, J ODes. Enid David Catherine Thomas, Muriel Rees and Hannah Williams. Messrs. Willie Thomas and David Jones; duet, Mis, S. A. Rees and Master W. D. Davies: selection, Hebron Children? Chon. MessM. Wil- Ham Stephens and )'?ihp?r? also took part devotional. Mr. Gwilvm l Grove (organist) wa? tht accompanist during the day*

SWANSEA RUGBY FORWARD

SWANSEA RUGBY FORWARD. Marriage of Lieut. Edgar Morgan, of I Pontardawe. Considerable interest was taken in the wedding which was solemnised at St. Peter's Church, Pontardawe, on Saturday morning, the church being packed with guests and the general public. The parties were Lieut. Edgar Morgan, of the Brecknockshire Battalion, now stationed in Pembrokeshire, the eldest son of Mr. John Morgan, engineer and surveyor to the Pontardawe District Council, and Miss Hannah Davies, eldest daughter of Mv. and Mrs. William Davies, of 6, High- street, Pontardawe, and niece of Coun- cillor L. W. Francis, Pontardawe. The bridegroom is well known in South Wales as the Swansea forward and Welsh Inter- national football player. The bride, who was g-i,en away by Iter uncle. Councillor Francis, looked charm- ing in a powder blue crepe de chine dress with black hat trimmed with forget-me- nots and pink roses to match. The duties of best man were carried out by Mr. Sid Edmunds, of Pontardawe. The officiating clergy were the Rev. Joel Davies, M.A. (vicar) and the Rev. W. Edwards (curate). As the newly married pair left the church the organist (Mr. loan Williams) played the Wedding March." A recep- tion took place at the home of Councillor Francis, after which Lieut. and Mrs. Morgan left for Torquay, where the honey- moon will be spent. They were the re- cipients of a large number of valuable presents. The bride travelled in a lavender blue costume with. nigger brown hat to match.

GOWER MAN AND A PREFERENTIAL I PAYMENT

GOWER MAN AND A PREFERENTIAL I PAYMENT. At Swateea County Court on Tuesday his Honour Judge Bryn Roberts gave reserved judgment in the case in which Chas. Harvey, trustee in the bankruptcy of Evan Williams, farmer and hay and corn dealer) Gower, applied that a sum of 241 9s. 9d paid on October 1st, 1914, by bankrupt to Messrs. James and James. auctioneers. Swansea, should be deemed a fraudulent preference, and that the money should be paid into the estate. In giving judgment hie Honour said bankrupt was indebted to respondents, and in October last he gave three pro- missory notas of the total value of tl4S 10s. 6d., also signed by his wife and W G. Davies. his brother-in-law, who acted as sureties. The notes were payable six months after date. The payments were not made. and writs were eerved on bank- rupt, but at his request they were not served upon his wife and brother-in-law, but held over. Later, however, Davies was served with a wtH and thereupon he had an interview with bankrupt, who promised to pay the whole amount. Cer- tain payments were made by bankrupt, and later readondentcl solicitors wrote pressing for the payment of the balance, and on October 1st last the 941 9s. 9d. was paid. On October 19th a receiving order was made on debtor's own petition. I The trustee suggested that the object l of the jjajment was not so much to make the auctioneers safe as to make the sureties safe, the sureties being his, own wife and his brother-in-law, and that he was at that time contemplating bankruptcy. It was clear bankrupt had been pressed severely for some time, and he was aware of his insolvency twelve months before the petition. His Honour said it was clear that at the time of the payment Williams was contemplating bankruptcy, and he was satisfied that the dominant motive in making the payment was to make his wife and brother-in-law safe. Under the circumstances he must declare that the payment was of fraudulent preference, and that the money must be paid to the trustee, with costs. Mr. Trevor Hunter (instructed by Mr. C. R. Newcombe) was for the trustee, and Mi. Villiers Meager ilinstflicted by Mr. A. M. Jamas was for the resjxindente.

QUEEN OF THE BELGIANS GAZES UPON WRECKED CITY

QUEEN OF THE BELGIANS GAZES UPON WRECKED CITY. British Headquarters, Sunday.—Of all I the inconspicuous but significant events I of the war therkl have been few that for interest, and in a measure for pathos, have surpassed ths quiet visit of the Queen of the Belgians to-day to an eminence which she was able to obtain a view of the ruins of her loved and lost Ypres. Nothing could have been more in sym- pathy with a day from which no huma i help could rob the sorrow than simple arrangements of this unnoticed and unheralded journey. All that was due to honour was rendered; nothing that mere ceremony claimed. Almost alone the Queen went oat towaiZ6 flat much-ham- mered salient, and though those whose right it was to welcome her were with her there, it was almost alone in spirit tliat she let her eyes fall over the cruel havoc and desolation of the jewel of all her husband's cities. The afternoon was brilliantly clear, and the white wreck of the famous Cloth Hall, so fast sinking to the ground, was again and again illuminated by a ray of sun wilen all round was shadowed by the pass- ing of the high overhead clouds. With the reticence of those who were with her as I an example of grace, there is no word more to add to this bare note than to say, that once an English aeroplane thrummed exultingly overhead on way to Ypres and the German lines.

No title

Mrs. Wicks, of Cerecent-road, Cowley, Oxfordshire, has received a letter from the Ning expressing appreciation of the patriotic spirit which has prompted her five sons. a son-in-law, a nephew, and a g**ndson to enlist. (

I I DONT LAUGH

I I DON'T LAUGH." BRITISH PRISONERS' REVUE. I That the conditions under which the British civil prisoners are interned in j Germany have vastly improved is made clear in a report just received from the American Ambassador in Berlin. The report is on the camp at Kuhleben, in which are approximately 4,000 of the 4,500 British civil interned prisoners. The remaining 500 are in small detachments in various camps, but within a few months all will be at Ruhleben. Very considerable improvements have been effected, says the report. Graf Schwerin, Baron Taube, and the other camp authorities have done everything in their power to bring about these improve xuents, and have been materially helped throughout by the camp captains. The effect produced has been a general improvement in the- physical and moral condition of the camp. In general the health ot the prisoners can be said to be excellent, practically no cases oi conta- gious or infectious diseases, barring a mild epidemic of German measles, having oe- curred. The improvement in the food, and the increased possibilities of the pur- chase of additional nourishment from the outside, have nearly silenced all com- plaints. The work is still constantly progressing, and it is fair to state that the conditioni are steadily, if slowly, improving. Eight new barracks of one storey have been erected, the last one with a special view towards housing con- valescent or delicate persons. The construction of the new barracks, the transfer ox eome hundred persons to Dr. Wailer's Sanatorium, and the relea--el of about a hundred persons have made it possible, says the report, to largely re-! duce the crowded conditions of the loits' 01 the old barracks. Twenty per cent.i of the occupants of theee have been re- j moved, and it is estimated that when the new harrackc are fully occupied another 53 per cent, will be removed from the lofts, so that only a quarter of the! original occupants will be left there. Sport and Entertainment. The moot signal improvement effected! in the last few month s has been the permission afforded the prisoners to use; the ground encircled by the race track i from 8 a.m. to noon, and from 2 to 5 p.m. The space thus gained i6 approxi- niately 200 by 150 yards, and affords a splendid field for all kinds of games. Materials for various sports have been! provided by the camp, including the laying out a football held and a small golf course. Permission to use the grandstands from 8 a.m. to 8.30 p.m. has further been obtained. As the stands are of modern brick and cement construction, a large enclosed hall is lorined underneath the tiers of seats. In this hall a stage has. been erected and a com.plete theatre in- stalled, witli scenery, dressing rooms, orchestra, etc Performances, varying from Shakespeare to musical shows, are given practically every night. I The Camp Song-wriier. The report gives a list of improvements effected, one of which is that the time for turning out the light has been changed from 9 to 10 p.m. The devotion to duty and uniform kind- ness of all the camp authorities, says the American Ambassador, has been wonder- fuL and the relations of our Embassy with them always most agreeable. It: impossible to conceive of better camp commanders than Graf Schwerin and Baron Taube. A specimen programme of the enter- tainment? given is incorporated in the re- port. This is of a revue in eight epi- Bod, entitled Don't Laugh." The fol- lowing "Ruhleben Song." from the revue. II Sung by John Roker and the chorus of Ruhleben "Boys," shows that the camp in- mates know how to keep a smiling faoo- Oh we're roused- up in the morning, Wlien the day is gently dawning, And we're put to bed before the nigbt's begun. And for weeks, and weeks on end, We have never seen a friend, And we've lost the job our energy hai won. Yes* we've waited in the frost, For a parcel that got lost, Or a letter that the po&tmen never bring v < And it isn't beer and skittles, Doing work on scanty victuals. Yet every man can still get up and S sing— So Chorus- Line up boys, and sing this chorus, shout this chorus all you can, We want the people there, to hear in Leicester-square, That we're the boys than never get downhearted. Back, back. back again in England, then we'll fill a flowing cup, And tell 'em clear and loud of the Ruhleben crowd, That always kept their pecker up. Second Verse. Oh we send our love and kisses, To our sweetheart or our miesie, And we say the life we lead i& simply grand, And we stroll around the Tea'ns, Where the girls can sometimes see us, And we say it's just as good as down the Strand. Yet there sometimes comes a minute, When we seen there's nothing in it. And the tale that we've been telling isn't true. Down our spine there comes a' stealing, Just that little homesick feeling. Then I'll tell you boys the best thing you can do—Just Chorus— Line up boys. etc.

SCENE IN COUNTY COURT

SCENE IN COUNTY COURT. There was a scene" at Swansea County Court Monday, when the case of Thomas Simonds, 60, Strand, Swansea, v. the Anglo-American Steamship Co., came on for hearing. Applicant's son, a boy of 14, lost his life on the steamer Tsingtau, which was torpedoed in the North Sea by a German submarine, and the application was for the payment out of court of £35 awarded as compensation. 'I Applicant, an elderly man, on entering the witness-box, said he could not read, and was told to repeat the oath after one of the officers of the Court. He got along faitly well until the words Shall be the truth," when he exclaimed, Of course I have come here to tell the truth. I should not be here if I hadn't." The Judge: Well, say the words. The old man seemed tongue-tied for the moment, and his Honour said he had better stand down. I don't want to stand dowu," he an- swered, I have come here to tell the truth." Stand down," replied the Judge in stern tones. As he was leaving the box, applicant exclaimed: "You have had plenty of proof that I am the father, and there's the mother (pointing to the body of the court). What more do you want?" He was then eecorted out of court. His Honour informed Mr. Vaughan ledwarda, who appeared for applicant, that he would peruse the affidavit and other documents before him, and notify his award to the Registrar.

Advertising

I The Welshman's Favourite MABON Saiice As good as its Name. DON'T FAIL TO GET IT. ^^vnV/v/ff-BiAWeH's, St. Peter St.. Cardiff

LLANDILO GUARDIANS

LLANDILO GUARDIANS ACCEPTANCE OF TENDERS. The fortnightly meeting of thi6 board was held on Saturday, wte there were pieeeni Mr. Evan Itevies tchairrnan), Mr. R. met-, thems (vice-chairman), Mrs. Roberts, and; Messrs. Arthur Williams, Dan ioneb, W., Stephens, J. Lewis, V. W. Lewie, G-omtr, Harries, W. Will iamb, L. JN. Powell, W. Hop- kins, Oaloeb Thomas, li. Powell, J. Eichards, J. L. Williams, 0. Harriet, D. Thomas, J. Bevan, W. Lewis, Humphreys, the clerk (Mr. R. Shipley Lewis;, the deputy clerk (Mr. D. Jonetj-Moiiis.i, and the other officials. -The Master reported that the number of inmates was 54 -aguii.,6t ? the correspond- ing period 1a" year. Number of vagrants relieved for the fortnight, 70; corresponding fortnight last year, 115. A service had baen held at the houie by the Kev. W. Hughes, C.M. Tenders. Tenders for the enj>uiiig Quarter w-. rc-, accepted. Goal, Mr. lifcydderch Da, iili, Am, manford, red vein, Mr. Dew,-e. County lr, £ 5 10; butter, 1c. 5d.; cheese,. 7d., Mró. Daviee, Pentrecwm, LlaIJdilo.-Witt regard to flour, which W.8 quoted at £:: 9s.. Mr. L. N. Puiveil suggested, aa prices wer. coming duwn. that tor ilie pro-e^t th.. Board had better buy from hand to mouth. -The Chairman thought that last iIhk they did not accept the contract, but bought at market price.—Mr. J. Lewis prc- pc.:>ffi the. they adopt Mr. Poweii's wugges-' tion. Mr. L. X. Powell siid he believed oc-, a rule in accepting tenders, but the circum-, stances at present wtre exceptional. He simply threw out the suggestion.—lu\ J. L. Wl!!i

RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL 1

RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL. 1, A meeting of the Rural District Council was held afterwards. The chairman, Mr. I Rees Powell, J.E.. presided. No Plans. I Mr. R. Matthews said the committee had no plans of houses before them that day They bad also sat as a sanitary committee, when the Inspector presented his report, which was considered. The report was Lot a very long one, and did not contain much that the Committee could onlarge. upon. It referred mostly to the places he had visited The Committee desired to recommend taat the Council give the Inspector the neces- sary authority to write to different people in respect to various small matters re- quiring attention. The Brynamman people, he said, were getting rather proud, xhey wanted a big shed to hold the sanitary 2nd highway tools lie submitted a pi-an ac- companying which was an application from I Brynamman asking if they should be al- lowed to build the proposed shed on the plot marked 2. The shed would be larger than tho present one. He mcged the adop- tion oi the report, and Mr. Gomar Harriets seconding said he was very glad Mr. Evan Jones had visited the Brynammm meeting. He made a. very good impressioij, and he (Mr. Harries) trusted that as a result tbe sanitary condition of the district would be improved. The shed would be a great ac- quisition.—The County Council wrote ap- plying for thitt Council's contribution (.ElDO) towards the cost of the erection of Fferws Bridge, in wmrdanee with the agreement of September, 1912. It was reeolvod that the amount be paid.—The Olerk said he had re- ceived a letter from the Local Government Board in regard to the proposed bridge over the River Amman at Rhydymardy in respect to which a loan of 91,500 was ainctioned to the Rural District Council oil the 2nd of September lafit. The building of the bridge had not yet been commenced, and the L.G.B. directed this Council's atten- tion to their circular letter of March of this year, from which it appeared that the fur- ther sanction of the Board would be re- quired before the bridge could be built, and the L.G.B. did not see their way clear to grant that further sanction at the present time. Another bridge mentioned by the Clerk was Velindre Bridge.—Mr Evan Davies said he had a report in respect to that. The committee had visited it on the previous day, and they were very much satisfied with the erection of this bridge. Theye -re unaniniouz in the opinion thxt it had been very well done. It was a vrey great Im- provement. and reflected credit on the con- tractor and architect.—The Clerk said he had that morning received a letter from Mr. Henry Evans, Broken House, Llandilo, the contractor, in which he applied for the balance due on the bridge. The work; he said. had been completed, and had been, he believed, approved of both by the surveyor and the committee of inspection. He wished to point out that he had suffered a, con- siderable loss on this bridge owing to the outbreak of war. The work was estimated for under normaJ conditions of trade, but it was not started until after the commence- ment of the war. with the result that he found he had to pay considerably more for labour and material than would have ordin- arily been the cas*. Consequently he had to expend over E30 in excess of what was originolly intended. He had also carried out extra. work. He tendered before the outbreak of hostilities, unaware of the cl'ange which ultimately took place. After the war started, the cost of materials, par- ticularly steel work, went up to abnormal prices. He had a1"0 to procure the haulage of stones from 1'1 distance, and not in the vicinity of the work, as originally intended. Tii? haulage, therefore .was a big item. He trusted the Council would see its way clear to make up the £7,J deficiency which was due to unforeseen circumstances.—The Chairman said th-y, felt satisfied frcm Mr. Davies'a report that the bridge had been built in a proper manner, but as to the sum mentioned, £ 30, thoy would have to discuss ihe matter further. He invited the opinion of members.—Mr. Fvan Davies said thit the contractor had mentioned these things on th ■; previous day, and he and the surveyor I einted out some extras he had done, and ,-lso the increased cost owing to the^ war. The committee, of course, passed no resolu- tion, but for himself he (Mr. Davies) must I' say that he was convinced that he did have a claim to a certain .amount" They all knew that he tendered before the war, and I that the work was to some extent delayed owing to the fact that the local contribu- I tor" had not signed the note. and so he was I delayed to some e). tent. They had, of course, to do their duty to the ratepayers; they had also a duty as a matter of right to the contractor. He (Mr. Davies) believed thai if he had this done on his own expense he would consider it hib duty to allow him I a, certain amount -as a matter of right. He dll not know whethe • the contractor had suffered to the extent of L30, but he dara- say he would accept a smaller amount.— J1.r. L. N. Powell asked if. assuming they voted him anything that day, would the auditor pass itr—The Clerk: Under the cir- cumstances I think he would. At any rate, I am sure the L.G.E would sanction it. That is my opinion—Mr. L. IN. Powell: He bis no legal claim.-—Clerk: -NO.-Oliairinan: He doesn't claim that he has.—Mr. Evan Davies said he had carried out several im- provements. He ba been or committees in connection with Pv liaucochim and other ¡ h'id:;¡> ho1'f" and he committees were ii(,Ltlle,l aguiu &nd again to the spots over some dispute or other, but in connection with this bridge, which was only some three miles away from where he lived, the com nittee had never been called to see the bridge from beginning to end until they were called to pais it on the previous day. —Mr. W. Williams proposed that the Conn: cil pass for payment tha.t day the balance of £ 129 due to the contractor, and as to the extras that they refer the matter to the consideration of the committee to report, in conjunction with the surveyors thereon that day fortnight—Mr. Gomer Harries secon- ded.—Mr. Williams said that in this he thought they should meet the man fairly In ordinary circumstances he would have given him nothing extra, as he would be taking the risk as to whethea- he lost or gained on the contract. Under war condi- tions it was different. Appointment of Road Labourer for Llansawel, The report of the Koads Committee was submitted by Mr. J. L. Williams. This recommended, among other thing's, that, on account of the scarcity of labour, the surveyors be authorised during the har- vest to allow the roadmen to assist the farmers, and that the appointment of a. roat. labourer for the parish of Llansawel be deferred for a month in order to com- ply with the wishes of local members.—Mr. L. N-. Powell, in respect to the road labourer, thought they could make the ap- pointment that day. They did not want to be canvassed by applicants.—Mr. Evan Davies said that thers were complaints all over the country that on acoount of the wa-* labour was scarce, but here when a vacancy occurred they had a stream of ap- plicants. He wishod to avoid this convass- and to appoint that day.—Mr. llum- phreys speaking in Welsh, as a member for Llansawel, said he wished, in order to give the applicants a fair chance, to have the appointment adjourned to that day month. Ee did not wish accusations of unfairness t) be hurled at his head later. Three of the applicants had been in school the same time rt.- him—Mr. E. Harries moved that tho vacancy be filled by a married man, and not a single man. Three of the applicants had families. The-e were good men on the list.—Mr. Matthews: I propose that Thomas Davies be appointed. He was the first man to canvass me. (laughter.)-M.r. Gomer Harris: Is he a married man?—Mr. Mat- thews: I don't know.—Mr. Griffiths, purveyor for Llansawel, sajd there were several ap- plicants.—It was stated that Thomas Davies was a single man, aged 44, for whom his sis- L''r acted as housekeeper. All the other applicants wore much beyond military age. —Mr. L. N. Powell seconded Mr. Matthews, "for a different reason-"—Mr. E. Harries thought the job should be given to a mar- ried man. He assured the Council that. this appointment was creating a good deal of feeling in the district.—Mr. W. Williams Iroposed Thomas Williams.-Mr. Glyn Jen- kins seconded, on tho ground that prefer- ence should be given to married mm.—Mr. E. Harries proposed Roderick Williams "to have him on the li«t."—Mr. Gomer Harries seconded.—A member suggested that the ■coting should be by baVofc—Mr. L. N. Powell proposed tbat it be by a show of hands.—Mr. Evan Davies: Put two. and then pu the other man against the winner.On the first show of hands three voted for Roderick Williams, four for Thomas Wil- liams, and six for Thomas Da-viea. In the last voting five voted for Thomas Williams. and nine for Thomas Davies, who was ap- pointed.

Advertising

Great Weakness Stomach Trouble A very Remarkable Cure by Dr. Cassell's Tablets. ) "I hardly think I should be alive now but for Dr. Casseil's Tablets," says Mrs. Smith, 163, Ca. ;c- 9treet, Great Grimsby. "I was in a dreadfully run-down, nervous state, with indigestion so severe that I was afraid to eat at all. I bad iMbin at the chest, too, and headache tor- tured me daily. Then a lump grew in my throat. I was told Mr.5. Sm/lh ( ,cis was due to nerves, and that I had rier. '-ùus debility as bad as I could have it. To tdd to my trouble, I could not sleep; often I ay awake till four o'clock in the morning. "I tried everything possible, and had good ned'ical .a..dic.e, but nothing seemed to touch ny case. I was in such a low, depressed con- iition by this time, that I was a-fraid to be eft alone. However, a kind neighbour advised Dr. Casseil's Tablets, I got some, and from ,bat time I improved daily. Now I am ua veil and bright as eVN." Dr. Casseil's Tablets. Dr. Casseil's Tablet* are a genuine and teetod remedy for all forms of nerve or bodily weakness in »ld ot YO'Q. Oomponnded cd nerve,-nuti?euta &nd tonics of indiputably proed efBc&cy. thet are tie wttiivd m.yi^rii hom" treatment for:- NERVOUS BREAKDOWN KIDNEY DISEASE "ERVE PARALYSIS INDIGESTION SPINAL PARALYSIS STOMACH DISORDER INFANTILE PARALYSIS MAL NUTRITION NEURASTHENIA WASTING DISEASES NERVOUS DEBILITY. PALPITATION SLEEPLESSNESS VITAL EXHAUSTION RNAEMIA PREMATURE DECAY ISwiallr valnable for NnnirLiz Mothers and durix-c Lhe Critical Periods 01 Life. Chenc-sts a.no stores in all part? of the world sell Dr. Oas&ell's Tablets. Prices 101-i. I I1, aurf 2.9—the 2{9 17P1 being the most Foonomica]. A Free Trial Supply will be seart ro you on receipt of name and address and two peonr.y rtarnps for postage and packing. Address: Dr. Car. Do.. Ltd.. 418, Chaster-road, Manchester.

I LOUGHOR PIT DtSPUTE OVER

I LOUGHOR PIT DtSPUTE OVER. On Friday evening, the hon. member On FTi(ia, evening. the hon. member for Gower 

Advertising

206th YEAR OF THE S UN FIRE OFFICE The Oldest Insurance Office in the World. l;¡, irom Poirtp "sod 173b Insurances Effected on the F ollo..ng Risks:— FIRE DAMAGE. Resultant Loss of Kent and Profits, EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY. PERSONAL ACCIDENT, SICKNESS AND DISEASE, TIDELiTY GUARANTEE, BURGLARY. PLATE GLASS. Swansea Office:- VICTORIA CHAMBERS, TOM A. DAVIES, District In-speotor. ? a»h* 8, OXFORD STREET.