Collection Title: Herald of Wales

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 5 of 12 Next Last
Full Screen
25 articles on this page
LLANDOVERY COUNCIL I

LLANDOVERY COUNCIL. I THE LETTING OF GREEN LODGE: STRONG PROTESTS. I The monthly meeting of this Council) was held on Monday, when there were I present: Alderman T. Watkins, deputy! mayor (in the chair). Councillors H. Havard, Daniel Lewis, W. Jon, J. l'rytherch, W. J. Esmond, G. Anthony, -At., II. Nichols, Richard Thomas, T. Roberts, and the deputy clerk (Mr. Wy-nd- ham Price), the medical officer of health (Dr. Morgan), the surveyor (Mr. Evan Williams), and the engineer (Mr. John Lewis). A Question of Tender. ) Mr. R. Thonias asked if any local trades- man had been invited to tender for hurdles for the cattle markøt r-The Deputy Clerk replied that the Tolls Com- miteee thought they could not supply them.—Mr. Richard Thomas: Mr. Jackson 6ays nobody asked him.—The Chairmaa: It is too late now.—The Clerk: I carried out the instructions of the committee. Mr. Roberts said that he quite agreed with what Mr. Thomas said, and was sorry the committee did not think of it. Complaints about Gutters. I Mr. Edwards, Waterloo House, wrote complaining of the nuisance caused by the gutter in front of his premises on rainy days, particularly during the recent heavy rain. It was aa inconvenience to passers-by and prevented customers coming to his place. During the last two days the water had been right up to his door.—Mr. Roberts moved that as it was a matter of urgency, that the surveyor should attend to it.-The gutter by the King's Head was also under notice. The Surveyor said he had asked the roadman to open it with a view to remedying mat- ters, but, aster that had been done, he found that the work necessary was more than he anticipated, so he told the work- man to discontinue. In conjunction with Mr. Gomer Henry, the county surveyor, be had made an inspection of the pave- ment and kerbing in Stone-street, High- street, &c. The former agreed that they were in a bad condition, but made no promise beyond that he would report the matter to his council. As to the drain by the King's Had, the county surveyor seemed favourable to the work being done at the joint expense of the Town and County Councils, and said be would re- port on it. Price of a Report. I Mr. D. S. Williams, engineer, Cardiff, wrote agreeing to reduce his fee for the report on his examination of the water mains from four to two guineas. His terms were accepted.—A reply was read from the Llandovery Gas Co. to the Council's application for a reduction of 1:5 in the charge for lighting the streets for the half-year. The company stated that they could not accede, to the appli- cation, and that they were carrying out the terms of the agreement. Any defect in the lighting was due to no fault of the company, but through the lamps being tampered with, and they suggested that those members of the Council who were ready to find fault should interest them- selveg in trying to assist in catching the offenders.—Mr. Rd. Thomas said that the request sent from the Council was a very reasonable one, and he thought they ought to have had a courteous reply. He held that the lighting of the town. had been below the terms of the agreement, which stipulated that they should have 150 candle power, and that the last lamp should be lit up at lighting-up time. The lamps had not been lit according to the agreement, nor had they had light accord- ing to the agreement. He thought it was only fair that the Council should have a little fair play. He did not think that they should pay for more than they got. He moved that a committee be appointed to go into the matter; particulars had al- ready been put in as to what lamps were defective, etc. They expected some re- compense where there was no light. He maintained that there was a fault with the gas company. They ought to rectify deficits in the day-time, and not expect the man to correct them in the darkness. They ought to adopt some better method. The following were appointed a commit- tee: Councillors Lewis, Esmond, Nichols, Anthony, and R .Thomas to meet the directors and go into the matter. Births' Act. I A circular was read with reference to the notifieation of Births Extension Act. —Dr. Morgan explained that all births had now to he reported to the Medical Officer of Health whether dead or alive. French and Russian Relief Funds. I Communications were read inviting the council to join in the movements in favour of the French and Russian Relief Funds.—The Chairman said that Council- lors T. Roberts and W. Jones had the matter in hand on the last occasion in favour of French Flag Day, and they could not do better than ask them to at- tend to it on this occasion, and if they did as well now as they did then their names would go down to posterity. The suggestion was agreed to, Mr. M. H. Nicholls being appointed secretary. Renovations to the Town Hall. I The Deputy Clerk produced the agree- ment between the Town Councils with re- ference to th-e repairs of the Town Hall. Under it the Town Council undertook the replacing of glass in windows, etc., and attending to internal belongings, includ- ing furniture, etc.—Mr. Roberts said that did not apply to the plastering, and he moved that their surveyor, in conjunc- tion with the County Surveyor, report on the subject. This was seconded and carried. Alleged Encroachment. I The Highway and Lighting Committee reported having vivsited a certain foot- path in the borough on which it was al- leged there was an encroachment. He came to the conclusion that the path was a private one, and should not be inter- fere d with. Miscellaneous. I The engineer reported having scoured the main pipes, and that the tanks were full.-The Tolls Committee recommended re the charging of tolls on a Llandilo ironmonger, who placed goods in White Lion Field, that the matter be deferred pending the return of the Town Clerk. This was agreed to, and also to charge 3d. per week for the storage of good in the market.—The Surveyor reported having visited the business establishments in the town. He found that proper arrange- ments had been made for the separating of male and female employes. Lett in Tolls-Alleged Interference by a I Member. The Chairman said they now came to the contentious part of the meeting. If there was to be any discussion he hoped members would keep cool. The resolution appeared to him (the chairman) to be a little vague, but no doubt Mr. Esmood would lay it plain enough before them. ITiey would then be able to judge for themselves.—Mr. W. J. Esmond said that before moving the resolution which stood ill his name, perhaps they would permit him to revive the circumstances which led up to tie present situation. It would be fresh in their minds that at the June meeting a resolution was passed granting an application of Messrs. Bostock and Wombwell to occupy Green Lodge ground for putting there their menagerie. Vthen seconding the motion he (Mr. Esmond) was aware that some sort of precedent existed for such sub-letting, and, in order to be on the safe side, he particularly asked if on the previous occasion anyone had question the right of the Council in so sub-letting and to receive the rent for the ground? -If- was then assured that the Council received the money without question, and that fact, the acceptance of rent 81 thg Council, »seiugd I Council's right to sub-letting. It was not his intention to attempt to excuse or jus- tify the repudiation of any irregularity, but he did submit that if any irregularity occurred, it occurred two years ago, and the whole Council were equally respon- sible for any sub-letting of the ground. On this occasion they merely folowed the pre- cedent—the unquestioned and unchallenged precedent—that had been established. What he wished to emphaisise was that the present situation had been brought about through no desire on the part of the Council ¡o ignore agreements, but through the alleged action of one gentleman who, in order to impose his will on the rest of the Council, ¡ went behind their backs, eo it was cnaid.- The Chairman: I hope you will not indulge in personalities. I have been a member cf this Council for 34 years, and the members have always been getting on nicely with the business, and they have never been charged with being personal.—Mr. W. J. Esmond: I accept full responsibility for what I say, and as a representative of the people I claim the right to say what I con- ceive to be my duty to say. I shall hurt the susceptibilities of no one. Proceeding, Mr. Esmond said that the allegation was that the gentleman under notice commiuii- j cated with the landlord. He would say nothing of the manliness, the uprightness, and the ethics of that action. He was con- tent to leave that to a tribunal of public opinion. But aside from that the action in his judgment was a, deliberate attempt to create difficulties detrimental to the in- terests of the borough, and that being to, it deserved the condemnation of this Council. It was. in fact, a direct invita- tion to the landlord to interfere and put the Council in an impossible position upon a matter which might possibly have been regarded as a mere technicality, and but for this invitation to interfere might pos- sibly have been acquiesced in by him on it would be generally conceded that this as on previous occasions. He be- lieved it would be generally conceded that his fellow councillors and him- self had not sought this situa- tions. They believed in respecting not only agreements, but also resolutions of the Council, and if any one man by what can be described as unwarrantable private action seeks to nullify such resolutions, the fault is his, and the Council has a right, to criticise such action, for the right of criticism was the very breath of demo- cratic action. It was his (Mr. Edmonds's) intention to have asked him to admit or deny the report, but, his absence renders that, course impossible. He now moved "That the Town Clerk be requested to communicate with Ald. C. P. Lewis, asking him to deny the prevalent report that he had communicated with the landlord or hit; agent, and if unable to that, to fur- nish the Council with a copy of his letter, or if the information was gf ven orally, then to send the Council the substance of his conversation."—Mr. Rd. Thomas secoT)ded.-Th,B Chairman thought, there would be no harm if he (the Chairman), stated his opinion on the matter—Mr. Esmond said he did not think it was farr that he shoutu try to prejudice his motion. —The Chairman eaid that before he voted pro or con he had a perfect right tD,"em- press his opinion.—Mr. Esmond said he had been anTTclpating.—The Chairman then asked if there was any amendment, and declared there WAS not. The Chairman proceeding, said: Thn I will be pretty silent unon it. We cannot see eye to eye in matters of this sort. There's an agree- ment, and it is stipulated in that agree- ment.—Mr. Rd. Thomas: Ime to a point of order. You have put the motion to the meeting, and it has been carried. The Chairman said he would have to ask for particulars.—Mr. Rd. Thomas argued that as there was no amendment when be put it to the meeting 4he Chairman should have declared the motion carried.—The Chairman: It doesn't go with my sanction. I say it is perfectly illegal.—Mr. Esmond: fls. the motion carriedThe Chairman: ,there is no amendment. He protested against, the motion—Mr. Ba. Thomas then moveu: "That an application be made to Mr. Gwynne Holford's agent for a. copy of a letter received by him, -or the name of the informer of any information received re Green Lodge, go that the complaint re- ferred to be inquired into."—Mr. Esmond seconded.—The Chairman: My opinion is that we have no right to interfere in the matter, and I am afraid-I should like you to listen to this-that by trifling with this matter, if Green Lodge is worth retaining, I think we ought not to take this course, because the landlord will sure to be rather surprised tha-t the Corporation should take this step, especially as we have had what was stipulated in the gareement explained plainly to ue over and over again. We have no right to sub-let. However, I de. cline to take any responsibility in this matter. So if we loee it to-morrow I shall not be a party to it.—Mr. R. Thomas: It won't be much lose to lose it.—The Chair- man admitted that this resolution was again carried, but it was illegal.—Mr. Rd. Thomas: It is not illegal, sir.—The ChaiT. man said -that the Mayor said so.-Mr. Rd. Thomas: He said it was not in order, but I hold it is perfectly in order. Treasurer's Account. I The collector's statement showed re- coverable arrears £ 330 17s. lld. in the general district rate, and in the borough rlllte zE49 66. 3d.—On the motion of Hr. R. Thomas, seconded by Mr. T. Roberts, it was decided that copies of the agenda be sent "reporters before each meeting.—The Chairman: I am not aware of any public body which requires their Clerk to supply reportere with agendas.—Our representative informed the Council that it was the rtfte everywhere he went to.

WOUNDED WHILE HELPING COMI RADE

WOUNDED WHILE HELPING COM-I RADE. Pte. Bert Andrews, of Baglan, Briton- terry, a member of the let Welsh Regt., arrived in Flanders on January 15th. He took part in several battles, but on May 2nd he was wounded by chrapnel in the back while carrying a wounded comrade to safety. He is now well again, and has just left for France to rejoin his regi- ment.

SEQUEL TO A VISIT TO A BAZAARI

SEQUEL TO A VISIT TO A BAZAAR. I Maria Holden and Emily Harris, two married women, who each appeared in the dock carrying babies in shawls, were charged at Swansea Police Court on Tues- day witli stealing various articles value 8s. 3d. from the shop of Messrs. F. Wool- worth and Co., High-street, Swansea, on Monday afternoon. Elizabeth Harris, an assistant, said she saw Holden come to the stall and pick up one thing after another and place them in her bag. She did the same at other stalls for about ten minutes when witness told the manager, and Holden was taken to the stock room. Emily Harries was with Maria Holden, and she could see what was occurring. Mr. Bradley, assistant manager of the shop said he saw Holden, who had an un- wrapped ball in her hand. She said the baby had picked it up. When she was taken to the stock room a number of articles were found in a net bag she carried. Asked if she had paid for them she replied, Yes," then added, I am sorry. Let me pay for them." Harries also had some articles in a bag, and she replied to questions in a similar fashion. P.C. (138) Brooks was called. Both accused pleaded guilty, and ex- pressed their sorrow. It was their first offence. It was stated that the women bad come to Swansea for the day. Harries' husband was in the A.S.C. in France. They were each fined 20s. oc U days,

CANADIAN CATTLE j

CANADIAN CATTLE. j REMOVAL OF EMBARGO URGED. I The question of removing the embargo on the importation of Canadian cattle formed the subject of an important dis- cussion at a meeting of the Free Importa- tion Canadian Cattle Association of Great Britain on Monday in London Mr. Morgan Hopkin, oi Swansea, in moving that the association should con- I tinue and its work be actively proceeded with, said that if it were abandoned it wouid be nothing short of a national. calamity. Now was the time to trrive home every point with effect. The whole of England and the greater part of Wales was united in contending that Canadian cattle should have a free and proper access to this country. Mr. W. L. Morgan, of Swansea, hoped there was now some chance of getting a bill through Parliament which would en- able the people to obtain good meat at a cheaper price Otherwise there was tre- mendous trouble ahead for the poor. There was no question of the. perfect soundness of all cattle from Canada, which had a better record in that respect than our own cattle. (Hear, hear.) They had in no instance brought any sort of disease into this country. Mr. R. E. W. Stephenson, of Liverpool, also maintained that Canadian cattle were the soundest in the world. He could not imagine what arguments could be adduced against: their importation. The resolution was carried unaimously. Mr. David Neave, of Dundee, mentioned that owing to the war an addition of about 40 per cent. had been made to the price of butcher's meat. He believed this country was in a better position than any other to feed cattle. Mr. H. D. M. McCombie. of Aberdeen, stated that whereas last year only 430 head of Canadian cattle reached this country before the British ports were closed to such imports we received 120,000. A deputation of fifteen, including the chairman, was appointed to interview the Earl of Selborne and Sir Robert Borden. Sir Robert Borden, Prime Minister of Canada, received a deputation from the Free Importation of Canadian Cattle Association at the Savoy Hotel, London, on Tuesday morning, the object of the deputation being to ask Sir Robert Borden to use his influence to secure the abolution of the restrictions on the import of Can- adian cattle. The deputation, which represented in- directly municipal, farming, butchering, and other interests, was introduced by the chairman of the association. Bailie Edward Watson, of Glasgow, who said they represented upwards of eighty-five municipalities throughout the country. The Association, in common with the re- presentatives of the Co-operatiev Societies, desired to obtain a better meat supply by allowing cattle from Canada and other districts to be introduced to the pastures of Great Britain. The Irish herds, which principally supplied England and Scot- land, had been greatly depleteing to the war. The question was to some extent a political one, ut they hoped Sir Robert would be able to put a little pressure on the Government to bring about the free importation of Canadian cattle in the interests of stockbreeders of Canada and of the people of the United Kingdom. Alderman R. E. W. Stephenson, of Liverpool, said his Corporation felt that the mass of people in the United King- dorii were debarred from purchasing meat supplies owing to the rise in prices. There was no risk of Canadian cattle carrying infectious disease into the United Kingdom. With the high prices ruling since the war broke out, the need of more meat here to keep down prices, and the fact that it would be a compliment to the heroic assistance of the Canadians in the war to allow their cattle free access to this country, it is thought that the twenty-year-old embargo might be abolished. Some idea of the former importance^ the Canadian cattle business in this coun- try will be gathered from the following table; Value Number. (dollars). 1874 63 I. 142,280 1884 53,962 4,631.000 1889 60,000 4,990,000 1890 66,965 6,565,000 1891 107,689 8,425,000 1894 80,530 6,300,000 Before the passing of the 1896 Act the value per head of Canadian cattle in this country ranged from £14 Is. to £19 12s. After the Act it fell to between £10 15s. in 1897 to S13 9s. in 1903. Of late years the trade has all but ceased to exist. The Canadian Government have in- formed the Imperial Government that they can ship, as a beginning, from 1,000 to 2,000 cattle per week, and the association expresses the hope that ar- rangements will soon be effected whereby this can be done. Mr. II. D. McCombie, Aberdeen, said they were face to face with a serious situa- tion, which he thought the Government did not appreciate. The Government must not be allowed to stop short of any- thing less than the full opening of the ports to the importation of Canadian cattle. Mr. H. J. May, representing 3,000,000 co-operative members, urged the removal of the embargo in the interests of the con- sumers Sir Robert Borden, in reply, said, look- ing at the question from a political stand- point, it was not one with which the Over- seas Dominions should attempt to inter- fere. All I can say," Sir Robert went on, is that eo far as this question con- cerns the interests of Canada, we have made representations from time to time in the past. If it should become necessary we shall make similar representations m the future. On the other hand, so far as the meat supplies in the United Kingdom are con- cerned, and so far as considerations of that character are taken into account, they are purely questions between you and your own Government. I am sure you will realise with me the unsuitability of one coming in a representative capacity, as I do, from the Overseas Dominions making any suggestion on the subject. We in Canada are very jealous of the self-government which has been entrusted to us. and which we hold entirely as a right. As you hold your powers of self-government, we claim the right to deal with all our own matters as we see fit. Your interests must always be matters which you must take up with your Government. I assure you that in all matters in which it is desirable, and perhaps profitable, for us to co-operate with the Government of the United Kingdom in the great affairs of the Em- pire, it has always been our desire to do our duty in the way of effective co- operation. That was our course before the wag, began; it will be our policy in the future. Councillor James Young, of Glasgow, briefly thanked Sir Robert Borden for re- ji ceiving the deputation and for his reply,

A ROYAL ENGAGEMENTI

A ROYAL ENGAGEMENT. I We are informed that a marriage has been arranged between his Royal High- ness Prince Philip of Bourbon-Sicile, son of his Royal Highness Count di Caserta, and her Royal Highness Princess Marie Louise of Bourbon-Orleans, daughter of their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess de Vendome et Alencon. Prince Philip, who is the fifth son of the Count di Caserta, will be 30 next December. He has an honorary commis- sion in the 19th Regiment of Spanish Cavalry. Princess Marie Louise will be 19 in December. She is the eldest child of the Duke de yendome, and her mother is the sister of tho King of the BelgUtM. 1

TO THE SONS OF WALES

TO THE SONS OF WALES A SWANSEA SOLDIER'S APPEAL. A Welsh soldier in the firing line makes the following appeal to Young Men of Wales" I have received many letters from friends at home telling me that there are still ma.ny able-bodied young men parad- ing the principal streets of my dear old native town (Swansea). Being a Welshman by birth, I can hardly realise that there are still many of my countrymen hanging back from joining his Majesty's Forces, who are do- ing nothing less than fighting for justice and our very existence as a free and civi- lised nation. Of course, we must have somebody at home to keep the mills and factories go- ing, but surely there must be more than enough men at home too old to join who could take the place of younger ones, who ought to be anxious to have the privilege of wearing the dear old khaki. I have seen men out here old enough to be my father, their hair being quite white. Just think how such men as these will shame and scorn you after this -terrible crisis is over. It may be that I shall never see my dear home and native' town again, but I shall die with a contented mind, know- ing that my life was given for a just cause in the eyes of God. But what of yoursel ves ? Fellow-countrymen, when my dear mother sent me out a, paper with the serious news that there was an immense strike on among the colli-ers in Wales, many of my comrades passed the remark that such as you should be put in the trenches to see how you would like that. I spoke to them and told them of the glorious traditions that the Welsh regi- ments carry. I mentioned the affair of the South Wales Borderers at Rorke's Drift under Major Wilson, when they fell to the last man, and also when the wounded aang H God Save the Queen." Don't you think that is good enough to stir the heart of any Welshman ? I have done my best as a Welshman to serve my King and country; then why should you not do the same? I left: a good home, and, worst of all, I left a dear old mother all alone, just to be able to say that I, as a Welshman, had done my duty for the great cause of humanity and justice. j Therefore, fellow-countrymen, t ask you to join with us out here to crush a ruth- less and murderous foe, and I also ask you to show Britain that her sons of dear little Wales are always ready for such a foe of inhumanity anywhere or at any time. A Welshman to the Core.

SWANSEA LANCECORPORAL KILLED IN FRANCE

SWANSEA LANCE-CORPORAL KILLED IN FRANCE. Mrs. W. P. David, of 15, Bernard-street, Swansea, received a letter on Sunday from Corporal Cyril Excell stating that her son, Lance-Corporal James Stanley David, has been killed in action in France. Lance-Corporal David, who was only 23 years of age, was well known in Swan- sea, and much respected by a host of friends, by whom he will be sadly missed. He left Swansea about three years ago to take up an appointment in the Argentine, and returned home last March to join the 1st Welsh. His brother is Mr. Ken David, of Eaglesneld and Co., Onyx Steamship, Ltd., Fisher-street, Swansea. A memorial service will be held at the Unitarian Church, High-street, Swansea, on Sunday next.

II NATIONAL WINNER

II NATIONAL" WINNER. The winner of the mezzo-soprano con- test at the Bangor National Eisteddfod was Miss Beatrice Burnett. one of the best-known vocalists in Swansea and dis- trict. Miss Burnett is the possessor of a lovely voice, and her rendering of the two competitive solos created a very favourable impres- sion.

DEAD WAUNARLWYDD HERO

DEAD WAUNARLWYDD HERO. Intimation has been received by Mr. and Mrs. Mungo Mitchell, of Albion House, Waunarlwydd, that their son, Private Tom Mitchell, has been killed in action in Flanders. Private Mitchell answered the call in the early stages of the war, and joined the 11th Hussars. Ho was transferred to the 3rd Worcesters, \nd had been only two days in the trenches when he met his end. Deceased svas only 19 years old.

LORD KNOLLYS NIECE DROWNED

LORD KNOLLYS' NIECE DROWNED, Miss Knollys, a niece of Lord Knollys, Secretary to King Edward, was drowned while bathing in a pool at Chirk Castle. Denbighshire, on Tuesday afternoon. She was a guest oi Lord Howard de Waldeu. i

THE EMPENS CAREER

THE EMPEN'S CAREER., CAPTAIN VON MULLER TALKS OF I HIS EXPLOITS. I Mr. Conrad Haumann, a gentleman of Scotch birth, but German extraction, who has arrived in Australia after release from internment at Malta, in an interview, speaks interestingly of talks with Cap- tain von Miiller, of the Emden. Muller, a model of modesty, would, he says, often laugh when he thought of the many times he bluffed his pursuers, and particularly so when he told the story of how the British representative on a small island, ignorant of the state of war, welcomed him and his sailors and treated them to wine and cigars H The captain attributed his long cruise to his good luck and to the valuable as- sistance lie received from intercepted wire- less messages He spoke of an instance when he was in the. Bay of Bengal. There he picked up a wireless message, Have you seen the Emden P' from a merchant- man, to which he replied, 'Yes; here I am,' and followed up a little later by looting and sinking the inquirer." The captain said that at first he mistook the Sydney for a vessel of his own stand- ing, and he resolved to make a fight of it, but as soon as he made out the Aus- tralian cruiser he knew that his hour had come. He saw but one alternative to running away, and that was to approach the Sydney and torpedo her. That he en- deavoured to do, but when he saw that Captain Glossop of the Sydney was not I to be caught that way and retreated with him, keeping the Emden's guns outranged all the time, he whistled to the men on the island, indicating that danger was near, and then made a dash for Direction Island. When he was taken on board the Sydney he saw that what shots did get that vessel had made no impression on I her. He denied that he ever used false flags.

I SOLDIERS MARRIAGE BY LICENCE1 I

I SOLDIERS' MARRIAGE BY LICENCE.1 Mr. David Caird, of the Liberation r Society, writes to the editor:— Complaints have recently been made of difficulties experienced by soldiers be- longing to Nonconformist Churches who desire to be married before going a broad, or on their return from the front on short leave. Marriage by certificate in such cases being impossible owing to military exigencies, there is no alternative to mar- riage by license, and the cost of a licence issued from the office of a. superintendent registrar is felt to be excessive. Fre- quently, indeed, the cost has been found to be prohibitive to those whose means are limited. The usual fees for a. marriage by license amount to JE2 12s. but since October 12th last the Commissioners of Inland Revenue have been authorised to remit to soldiers below commissioned rank the ten shilling stamp luty on each license, so that the fees now legally payable by Statute are limited £2 2s. It is, however, within the power of registration oiffcers to still further reduce tbpqe fees, and even to forego them altogether. Let the circumstances be frankly stated to the Superintendent Registrar and the difficulty will disappear.

I GOWER CROPS IN DANGER I

I GOWER CROPS IN DANGER. I The Gower peninsula is filled with holi- day makers, but the question of their entertainment is not the main topic of conversation. Visitors and residents alike are chiefly concerned with the success of the harvest, realising its supreme import- ance to the district. The inclement weather has had a detri- mental effect upon the crops, and at the moment of writing the outlook is far from favourable. The bayfields have been cut for several week, but the persistent rain has made it impossible to gather in the hay, and unless the weather clear§ im- mediately it will be spoiled. The corn is in splendid condition, but here again the weather is interfering with the success of the harvest, the heavy grains being beaten down by the rain. As a consequence the state of the fields is deplorable. On Monday the clearing away of the clouds aroused' hopes, but on Tuesday the skies were again what Mr. Lloyd George 1 would describe as mottled," and nothing could be done. One week of fine weather i would enable the farmers to do all that is necessary, and this boon is now ardently II desired.

I CURATE DEPUTISED BY LADY I

I CURATE DEPUTISED BY LADY. I In the St. Mary's (Wardleworth) Parish Magazine for August is the following:— The dearth of clergy, which is already serious, will be much more severely felt in the immediate future. The national call to arms has resulted in the universities and clergy training colleges being almost empty of students, and if we add to this f the refusal of the Bishop to allow a deacon to come to us on account of the [ vestments which have been in use in our church for nearly half a century, and of which the Bishop disapproves, the pros- pect of filling our vacant curacy seems very remote. I Seeing the pastoral work must go on the vicar has secured the services of a trained lady worker from St. Hilda's House, Manchester. Miss Davy will com- mence her duties at the beginning of October. She will wear a grey uniform, but it should be clearly understood she is in no sense a nurse, her duties being entirely religious."

I GLASGOW STRIKERS FINED I

I GLASGOW STRIKERS FINED. I A third general munitions tribunal was] held at Glasgow on Tuesday, when 30 holders on employed by Messrs. Lobnitz and Co., Limited, shipbuilders, were! charged with taking part in a strike. It was alleged that on July 13 the holders on demanded an increase of a shilling a day. The shipyard manager was absent from the yard on business and the foreman riveter was not competent to deal with an application of this kind. In his absence, as the increase was not con- ceded, the men left the works at midday on Saturday and did not resume until the! morning of Tuesday, August 3, although they were told the country needed the ship they were working at, and could not get that particular class of vessel too soon. All the men who appeared—28—were found guilty and fined 5s. each with the alternative of five days' imprisonment.

A COLONEL REPRIMANDED

A COLONEL REPRIMANDED. The findings of the Court-martial I which recently sat to hear charges of alleged offences preferred against Lieut.- Col. C. L. Prior, contrary to paragraph 90 of the King's Regulations, were pro- mulgated on Monday. Lieut.Col. Prior was ordered to be severely reprimanded. Originally Lieutenant-Colonel Prior Wa6 charged with conduct to the preju- dice of good order and military discipline, in that be, in London, on Feb. 17th, 1915. when commanding officer of the No. 1 Re- serve Transport Depot at Deptford, in- vited several officers serving under his command to accompany him to a house in Connaught-square for the purpose of gambling and himself gambled in their company. Paragraph 90 in the King. Regulations requires that a commanding officer shall discountenance any disposition in his officers to gamble.

No title

I ¡ There will be no alterations in the pas- senger service on the Brecon and Merthjrr Line for September, end the time table j issued for July, Auguet and 6eptb6r, 1915, ?:,? remain in fwoe.

Advertising

DISGWrL YILIEII The tendency of the times to ??,?r ADVANCE PRICES in e\?y \?? direction cannot escape your R/ y notice. Isn't it a t "WISE pOLICY" ? %??i!??'%f??') to buy your ATnUMN <  ?F  *?r**??? SUIT now. You hae the ~$w%w/z/m/w\iir l r—\ tor opportunity of getting a ?m?50/-PALMER '?   SUIT fop '???? (To Measure). IV Ml "7 50j- Suitings offered at 500. & \M M? ? ?/-?M?M?O/??J?t?C/. I YOU SAVE 20/- I After the SALE you can't GET ONE NWAOWU# get a Palmer Suit for 30 ONE NO" pALMER, 12 Castle St., Swansea.

BLACKSMITHS DEATH

BLACKSMITH'S DEATH. Flying Piece of Steel Penetrated His Thigh. Following upon an accident on July 29th at the Berthlwydd Colliery, a black- smith named Harry James Howlett. a married man, of The Hollies, Cefn Stylle, died at the Swansea Hospital on Saturday last. The inquest was held at the Coroner's Court. Swansea, on Tuesday. Mrs. Lizzie Howlett, the wi dow, said after the accident her husband walked home without assistance. Referring to the accident, he told her that* he had a piece of steel or iron in him." and he showed a wound on the right thigh. The next day (Friday) he went to work, re- turning home later than usual, and then complained that his leg was very painful. Coroner. You did nothing to it after he came home on Thursday or Friday? Witness: I did not think it was so serious, sir. Continuing, Mrs. Howlett said she sent for Dr. Jones, of Gowerton. on Saturday, but the wound gradually got worse. On the following Thursday deceased was re- moved to the Swansea Hospital. Coroner: Did your husband tell you how the accident happened when in con- versation with you at home ? Witness: He did not give any details, sir. lie said a piece of steel new off into his thigh. In answer to the foreman, witness said when her husband came from the works he had had his wound bandaged. Joseph Henry Sivern, a drum-smith. said he was working with the deceased at the time of the accident. They were punching a hole in some iron/ Deceased was holding the punch land witness was striking. First of all a piece off the top of the punch, which witness produced, struck the latter. Then another piece came off and went into Howlett's thigh. Howlett did not seem to trouble much, as lie just brushed his trousers and then the work proceeded. John Phillips, the manager of the col- liery. said Howlett reported the occur- rence to him on Friday morning. Wit- ness inspected his leg and saw a small hole in the thigh. Deceased showed a piece of steel, which witness described as being about three or four times the size of a pin head, and which deceased said he had removed from his leg the previous night. He said he felt no pain, but wit- ness advised him to have it bandaged, and this was done. Dr. Boyle, of the Hospital, said de- ceased was admitted suffering from blood poisoning. He was in a very bad state. The Coroner thought it was quite clear fhat the death was due to the accident. It appeared that it was not absolutely necessary to remove deceased to the hos- pital, as he could have been dealt with at home, where of course there would not be all the facilities of the hospital. The blood poisoning might have been caused in many ways, such as dirt from the trousers, or a dirty flannel when washing. It only showed the great need of looking after the slightest scratch. The jury returned a verdict of death from blood poisoning, and expressed their sympathy with the relatives.

WOUNDED PONTARbULAIS MAN

WOUNDED PONTARbULAIS MAN. ] Our photo is of Private D. C. Col- lins, of the 2nd battalion Welsh Kegiment, who is now lying at Swan- .sea Hospital suffer- ing from the eftects of shrapnel wounds. Private Collins is 29 years of age, and prior to the war lived at Pontar- dulais with his wife and three children, where he was em- ployed at the local tinplate works. A Reservist, he was called to the colours on the Saturday night preceding the declaration of war, and on the fol- lowing Wednesday was in the trenches. He was in that memorable engagement in which Captain Haggard fell, and was one of the few men of his regiment who were left to answer the roll-call after the battle. It was during the struggle on the Asine that Private Collins was wounded. receiving pieces of shrapnel in three parts of his left side. He was treated for several months at iMetley Hospital, but only two portions of shrapnel were the doctors able to remove, and a few weeks ago he was conveyed to his home at Pon- tardulais. and subsequently to the Swan- sea Hospital. A bullet embedded in the left lung has not yet been removed, and the brave fel- low is, as a result, progressing very slowly. Our photo was taken two weeks ago at his home.

No title

Stated to have delayed an Admiralty con- tract by staying; away from work for two d&-Yc, John Holdham. a workman, was fined L2 at Leeds on Tuesday. The Austrians are making a last desperate effort to remove the Italian character from the city of Trieste, which it is proposed to rename "Franz Josepbehafen." Of the 370 Italian teachers in Trieste only thirty are left, the remainder having been exiled, im- prisoned, or sent to concentration camps. j

I YOUNG GIRLS HOLIOAJT ADVENTURE

I YOUNG GIRLS' HOLIOAJT ADVENTURE. The story of a holiday adventwe fit LoDe rion of t'vo girls of 17 years of mge, end how it was abruptly terminated is Byde Park; comes from a peaceful harotefc naar Aber- dare. On Wednesday week last TWh girls left home without breathing a word of their intemiom. They proceeded by rail oør to Neath, an i there took express to Paddi- ton. This much the anxims parents cf the missing girls had ascertained by Satnrday. On Saturday evening two uncles of one of the girls proceeded in Quest of the missing ones. Inquiries were immediately made of the London police and at Scotland Yard, but without result. An official of the last- named service tersely remarked, "It's just like looking for a needle in a haystack." It was quite by chance," arid one of the uncles, "that we came across both girls in Hyde Park between three and four o'clock on Sunday afternoon." He esplained that the descriptions pupplied to the police as to clothing, v.ere useless because the girls were found attired in new dresses, whioh they had bougbt. since leaving home. Statements made by the girls to their rela- tives go to show that upon arrival in lion- don they engaged rooms for a week, and paid £4 in advance. When found by their uncles the girls said that they had tried to obtain employment as lady clerks in. the city.

I WELSH TERRIERS ADVENTIHRE

I WELSH TERRIER'S ADVENTIHRE. j The adventures of a little brown Welsh, terrier named Jim, which got lost in the- tunnels of the District Railway, have caused surprise among the officials of the line. The dog wandered away from its owner about 11 o'clock on Friday night, and was next heard howling by the sida of a live rail. According to his owner, Jim, mad with terror, tore off into the blackness of the tunnel leading to High-street, Kensing- tono" Later on workmen reported that Jim had been seen at High-street, but he was in no mood to stop. Messages were telephoned to other stations, and he was next seen at Gloucester-road, speeding through the station in front of a non-stop train. The dog did not stop either, but his small size saved him, the train pass- ing without hurting him. He repeated this performance at South Kensington, afterwards visiting Sloane-square and Victoria, where he was reported running up and down the tunnels. After many escapes from trains and shocks from live rails, the dog was found, still-in a tunnel, at midnight on Sunday —unhurt. Electricity evidently is life, for 'Jim's first act on reaching home was toa chase a cat half way down the street, proving that his adventure had left him none the worse."

ISWANSEA BARDS SUCCESS IN AMERICA

I SWANSEA BARD'S SUCCESS IN AMERICA. Events on the battlefield have com. pletely over-shadowed doings in other parts of the world, and even the great International Eisteddfod held at San Francisco last week received little notice in the Press of this country. Among the successes, however, there was one of especial interest to Swansea. In the epic poem competition on Abra- ham Lincoln," the liev. Crwvs Williams, of Swansea, was adjudged the winner, the prize being a silver crown and 250 dollars. Crwys, 881 bf'\ is popularly known, is one of Wales's most uecessful bards, and has won ten chairs, two national crowns, the Pittsburg gold medal, and several other trophies. Born at Craigcefnparc. the hamlet juat outside Clydaeh, Swansea Valley, Crwye had ample opportunities to, at any rate. commune with nature, even though facili- ties for educational advancement wt-re conspicuously absent. He was educated at Bangor, and until January last held a pastorate at Brynmawr. At the beginning of the year he came to Swansea, succeed- ing the Rev. D. Eurof Walters, as South Wales representative of the British -4ud Foreign Bible Society.

IA FIELD MARSHAL OF INDUSTRY

I A FIELD MARSHAL OF INDUSTRY. At the monthly meeting of the. Swansea Harbour Trust on Monday, the chairman, referred to the death of the late Lord Glantawe. For 41 years the late Lore Glantawe, he said, had been. a membej of that body. That was a record that, had only been surpassed by the late Lord Swansea. He had also been chairman of the Trust for a period of seven years, in the course of which great advances had been made by the port. Lord Glantawe's life had been almost unique, and his rise had been the result of perseverance and sagacity. Napoleon once said that every soldier carried a field marshal's baton in his knapsack, and it was clear that in the commercial political world in which the deceased lord took part he carried .such a baton. Mr. J. Aeron Thomaa seconded the vote of condolence, whick w&a carried in silen