Collection Title: Herald of Wales

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 5 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
18 articles on this page
EISTEBDFOBAU h SutLU Ii t

EISTEBDFOBAU h ?SutL????U Keenly Contested Week-End; I Competitions. PORT TALBOT. II A children's ekteddfod, under the au&- pices of "CYlluüdorion Dyfryn Afau a 1 Margam," was held in the New Theatre, Port Talbot, on Saturday. While possibly j the eisteddfod did not pay its way tinam j cially, it is certain that the innovation discovered a good deal of talent. There i were excellent competitions on the musi- cal side, hut the literary was somewhat disappointing. With a little encourage-1 ruent, however, children could be got to j develop taste for literature early in life ) nie morning meeting was presided over j by Dr. K. T. Williams, Cwmafon, and in the afternoon, Mr. Wm. Jenkins, 11 Cymzner, was in the chair. ) In a short address, Mr. Jenkins con-j jfratulated the committee upon their von- j ture in holding an eisteddfod solely for j1 hildren. lie rejoiced to see so much at- i tention given to the rising generation, for in the past they had been too much i i neglected. Never was the intellectual de- j velopment of the young of such impol" tance as now, when so many brilliant young men were swept away in the war. (Hear, hear). Mr. Phillip Thomas, recalling the child- ren's held at Ystradgynlais f5 years ago, said that tho&e gathrings i had fostered such musical talents as Mr. J. T. Rhys and Dr. Dan Prothcroe. I The adjudicators were: Poetry, Rev. J. j L. Rees (Ap Nathan); music, Messrs. Phillip Thomas, Neath, and Lewis Daviec, Cymmer; recitations, Mi?s M. J. Francis (Llaethferch), Ystalyfera; art,. Mi&s E, ¡ Llewelyn, Glanamman. i The arrangements were made by a com- i mittee of which Mr. Haydn Lewis, Aber? alon, was the chairman, and Mr. D. M.I Evans, Cwmafon, treasurer. The dutiee ?! of &ecratariM were emciently done by Mi5

EISTEBDFOBAU h SutLU Ii t

CROSS HANDS. 1 A successful eisteddfod was held at the Public Hall, Croas Hands, on Saturday afternoon. As the proceeds are to be d,3, voted to the Soldiers' and Sailors' Recep- tion Funds, it is gratifying to note that the fiisteddtod was well patronised. Mr. C. E. Cl eeves, Swansea, one of the owners of the New Cross Hands Collieries, was the president, but he was unavoidably absent. He, however, forwarded the sum of S5 towards the funds. The chair was taken by Mr. D. F. Davies, M.E., man- a.ger of the New Cross Hands Collieries, while the conductor was the Rev. Evan Davies, B.A., Gwauncaegurwen. The ad- judicators were: Music, Dr. D. Vaughan Thomas, M.A., Swansea; literary, ltev. Evan Davies. The accompanist was Mr. Tom Jamos, T.C.L., Cross Hands. The secretary was Mr. Rhys James, Cefn- eithin. Mr. W. Vaughan and Mr. D. J. Lang were the chairman of oommittoo and treasurer respectively. The following were the awards:— Solo for children under 8: 1. t^illie Davies, Cefneithin; 2, Lily Maud Lloyd. Cefneithin; 3 (special), Dora Phillips Loughor. Solo for children under 12: 1, Maggie Rogers, Pontyberem; 2, Maggie Phillips, Loughor. Pianoforte eolo (under 13): 1, Joseph Mainwaring, Cefneithin; 2, awarded be- tween Eva Jones, Cross Hands, and Agnes Thomas, Pontyates Recitation (under 11): 1, Ivor Howell Hughes, Hendre; 2, Evan Matthews, Cofn- erithin. Solo (for boys under 16): 1, Gethin Jones, Cefneithin; 2, Willie Jones, Cae>- hryn. Pianoforte solo (under 16): Gethin Jone £ Cefneithin. Violin solo (under 16): Emlyn James, Cefneithin. Acrostic on Llanrvon". Joe. Henry. Dref'aah. Solo (for girls under 16): 1, Gwen Maddox, Llannon; 2, May Harris, Cross Hands. Solo for those who had not previously won 5s.: Jennie Evans, Garnant. Adult recitation: Oliver Roberts, Glan- amman. Soprano solo. Divided between Gwennie Thomas, Drefacli, and M. A. Williams, Trimsaran. Tenor solo; Stephen Rogerson, Glan. amman. Englyn: Joseph Henry, Drefach. Bags solo: Gwilym Evans, Cross Hands Easay: Daniel Davies, Tycroes. Poem: Joseph Henry,. Drefach. Ladies' choir ( one entry): Cross Hands (conducted by Mr. Gwilym Evans). Chief choral competition—" Dyddiau Dyn Three choirs 6a.Dg, Pontyberem (conducted by Mr. D. Henry), Cross Hands (W m. Vaughan), Glana.mman (Mr. Tom Phillips). The prize was awarded to Glanamman. ABERDULAIS. I The annual eisteddfod of Forest C.M. Chapel was held at the Baptist Hall on Saturday last, president Mrs. Ll. D. Howell, Sunny Bank. The adjudicators were: Music, Mr. Edwin Price, Llanelly; literature, "Cadifor"; accompanist, Atr Ben Mortis, Cilfrew. Awards:— Boys' solo: Master A. W. Morgan, < Tonna. 1 Girw' 6010: 1, Miss Francis May Owen, { Neath; 2, Mair y Bryn, Neath Abbey. J Recitation, under 14: Divided between Misses Morfydd Jones, Llanelly; Hettie i Jones, Skewen. Mrs. Howell gave a 3rd t prize to Miss Ircuie Jones, Llanelly. Essay, Mr. T. J. Meyrick, Aberdulaie. Duett, under 14: Miseee Gertie and Beatie Jones, Neath. Soprano eolo: Mias Ceinwen Pr i ce, Sennybridge. ) Pianoforte solo: Mies Winifred Jones, Skewen. Tenor eolo: Mr. D. T. George, Cilfrew. Ba«s solo: Divided between Mr. Tom Davies, Bryn, Port Talbot, and Mr. J. ¡ Jones, Skewen. Duett: Messrs. Griff Griffiths, Cilfrew. and H. Han, Neath. Recitation: Mr. Tom John, Neath Abbey. Chief choral competition (four choirs): 1, Tabernacle, Skewen. — I The proceeds are to be devoted to- wards the Soldiers' Memento and Cigarette Fund. GWAUN-CAE-GURWEN, Th, following were the chief awards at an eisteddfod held at Carmel, Gwaun-cae- I G urwen Tenor solo: Garfield Roberts, Erypamman. Bass sgio: 1/avid M. James, WOwa un-cae- Gurwen. Soprano solo: Miss Esther Annie Davies, Brynantman, and Miss Sarah Evans, Gar- nant, divided. Contralto solo: Madame Deborah Jones, Gwaun-cae-Gurwen. Octette: Music Lovers (conducted by Mr. E. Roderick, Owaun-cae-Gurwen), EL-say-4 JOavid D. Davies. O.Q., Abcrteswg. Poem. Tom Morgan, Brynamman Chief recitation: Miss Ceinwen Smith, Cwmgorse, and Dan Jones, Gwaun-cae-Gur- we l. MAESTEG. Ibo first annual eisteddfod in connection with liope Baptist Chapel Oaerau, was held last Saturday, at the Town Hall, Maesteg. The entries numbered nearly 300. Mr. Hugh Edwards, M.P., presided. The adju- dicator? were Mr. Ivor Owen, L.R.A.M., A T.O.L., and Mr. Tom Mor-ris, both of Swan- sea; recitations, Dr Clarke, M.A., Porth. The secretaries were Messrs. E. Alyrddin Thcmaa and Hooper Morgan. In all there were 16 choirs entered in the chief choral. Omr&u were adjudged the wirinem; ma-Ie voice, Nactyffyllon; juvenile choirs: 1, Blaen-Rhondda; 2. Glyncorrwg, In the ever me the hall was packed, and the pro- ceedings proved a hig success.

Advertising

i -:=" "PC ?'? ??'y P¡,trrre here s ? I??M ?  N 0 Excuse for  unwise Livin It Poisons '= M? i An overload of uric acid 2-jL in the blood is a bad thing. Some people pro- duce uric acid twice as fast as others. It comes in two ways—partly from meat and other strong foods, partly I from using up of body tissues during exertion. Uric acid victims are rheumatic, ner- vous, cross, suspicious, headachy, dizzy at times, or racked with sudden, queer pains. They grow old too fast, and in time develop heart trouble,! gravel, hardened arteries, dropsy, or incurable I kidney disease. Take warning at the first sign of uric acid trouble. Eat little meat and not too mn'Ch of any food. Drink milk and water. Exercise, reat. and sleep more. I Uæ Poan?s Backache Kidney Pills to re- I pair the weakened kidneys and help t1,m filter the uric poisons from the blood. You have here an honest Swansea opinion a„s to how Doan's Pills can. help. What could bo more convincing? I Send for Free Book on Nioderation I Cheerfulness, & Other Long Life Laws." Swansea Evidence. On May 29th, Mr. D. Davies, of 112, St. ilclen's-a'venue, Swan&ea, said: I was troubled with kidney complaint for five years, and the I)-ain-, caught me so sud- denly sometimes that I have often felt I should drop. I have on several occa- sions had to stay from work. There was also some urinary dis- order, but I did not seem to he able to get any relief until I used Doan's back- ache kidney pills. I was induced to try these pills through reading about them, and I found they were just what I needed, for they gradually cured me. It was not long before my back was well and the urinary disorder was corrected. I always keep a box of Doan's pills in the house.—(Signed) D. Davies." On March I st.- -nearly seven years later —Mr. Davies said "I cannot possibly j praise Doan's pi Us too much after my, seven or eight years' experience of them. They cured me, and there has boen very little to complain of in that way since." Be sure you ask for DOAN'S, and get DOAN'S—the Pills Mr, Davies had. All dealert, or 219 a box, from Foster-McClellan Co.. 8. Wells St., Oxford St., London, w. Backache Kidney Pills

ITHE NEW WELSH TENORI

THE NEW WELSH TENOR. Me. W. Amman Michael, of Garnant, Amman Valley, whose career at the Royal Academy of Aliisic has been at- tended with euch phenomenal success faitly eclipscd his previous record this week when he was awarded the Bos* Scholarship of £67 a year tenable for three years at the Academy, and winning the. behest possible praise from the ex- aminers. Mr. Michael began his career ae a baritone vocalist, and quickly m?'? his way to the first flight of amateur vocalists. However, when lie entered U.e Academy three years ago, the voice specialists unanimously decided that good baritone though he undoubtedly was, he was in reality a tenor of unusual latent talents. From that moment Mr. Michael "took his fortune in both hands." as it were, and he very quickly proved that the specialists had not made an error, but that his was a voice of a rare tenor type. The College authorities decided to give him the leading tenor role in the opera The Cricket^ on the Hearth during his first year, and his appearance was hailed with delight by the critics, who proclaimed him one of the most promis- ing tenors in the Kingdom, and since he has invariably played the leading role in all Academy productions. Besides ful- filling important engagements at the leading halls in London, and the Pro- vinccf;, Mr. Michael has enjoyed extra- ordinary success as a student, capturing all possible prize? and honours at the Academy, and besides his latent success, he is the holder of the Joseph Maas and Swansea Prizes, the Silver Certificate, and the Bronze, Silver, and Gold Medals. Mr. Michael's chief powers lie undoubt- edly in opera, but he is also in a class of his own as an oratorio and ballad singer. His many Valley friends wish him con- tinued success.

No title

The men of H.M.S. Circe appeal for a bulldog at a reasonable figure to take the place of two pet cats they have recently lost. i- m i

Advertising

I Welshman's Favourite. MAS ON Sauce. I M? ?4? good as its Name. I (DON'T FAIL TO GET IT. ???t??BLAHC?'S. St. Pator St.. n?di?

TliE LAST OF TIIE DRUIDS

TliE LAST OF T'IIE DRUIDS AN APPARITION IN THE BUCK iViiiUuTAi^S Private E. Roland Williams, of Fontar- dulaia, has an interesting article in the London "Star" of Friday. He says: It was just a typical Welsh mining vil- lags, a straggling amorphus mass of workmen's cottages and sidings and pitheads. It just lound room for itself in a high cirque among the mountains whose fastnesses it had violated, polluting the upland air with its pall of liooty smoke and spent steam, breaking the eternal alienees of the hills with the drone of fans and the clank of engines. The great Black Mountains shuddered away from it northwards towards the wiild slieeplands of Radnor and the virgin grandeurs of Plynlymon and Mawddwy. A river ran through the village, a dirty dribble thick with coal-dust—once it was a clear mountain torrent glancing with trout and grayling. A path runs aloiag it and loses itself beyond the village among the mountains. Up along this riith it waa my wont to stroll of an evening. It was on one of thsse strolls that I met the strangest apparition 1 have ever seen .;n this civilised land of ours. I had just reached a spot on the path where one could forget the exeresenee of a village behind. A silver birch here and there and hazel thicket lent a touch of wild mountain ooauty to the scene, and an old Druidic circle and a cromlech in a dingle near by reminded me of the mys- tery and the ancientne,^s of the hilI". Suddenly I coming up the path an old white gander; it strolled up with all the portentous gravenees of its kind and passed me with an an able clack and a shako of its fail. It was followed by th: weirdest figure of a man i have ever-seen; a tall, muscular old man, with a long, patriarchal white beard, who stooped slightly with age, and had little blue pitted scars on his face, showing him to be a miner. But the remarkable thing about him wa-s his garb. Above nis coal-grimed corduroy trou- sers he wore an old red velvet ooat, faded and dirty, and on his head a greasy goat- skin cap with the horns left on. He muttered to himself as he came on and asked me in Welsh for a match. He proceeded to light an old clay pipe and asked for news of the war he con- tinued on his way. 1 saw him take out a hunk of unwrapped dirty bread from his pocket and teen Jus satellite, the old white gander. Then— what myetihed me most of all—I saw him bow deliberately and reverently to an old split elm-ITeC' befon' he disappeared from view among the hazels. I returned and sought my friend the schoolmaster. Ah" he laughed, as he lit his pipe, "so you've &een him!" I have," 1 replied; "and who and what is he, apyway pH Well," he said, he regards himself as the last of the Druids, and if you'd kept. on talking to him much longer he v. ould ) probably have told you that he intends to be buried at the foot of that old elm tree that he bowed to. No, I can't tell you whether he's doddering or not. He's a miner, right enough, but he has his periods when he puts on his horned cap and goes about bowing and kneeling to this and that tree. And he's very useful to the local Lodge of Shepherds when they have their annual do.' He leads the proces- sion in that old cap and coat of his." Pan at a bun-fight!" I ejaculated. That's about it. Anyway, you can 6ay seen a real worshipper, and in the twentieth century at that." And on the fringe of modern indus- trial South Wales P" And on the fringe of modern indus- trial South Wales," rejoined my friend. Or you might just as well have said, on the fringe of as romantic a stretch of country as you could find anywhere, for to the north oi you lay Llyn-y-Ftiu with all its wondediit fairy legends and tra- ditions, and to the north-west lies Mydd- fai, famed for its herb-lore, the tgme of the famous old Welsh physicians of medieval times. And you must have seen for yourself a cromlech and an old Druid's circle?" I had. Well, and there are two tumuli not ten miles from here, and remember, too, that these short, dark, long-headed men that form the main element in the popu- lation of the South Wales mining valleys are the true hill people—the oldest trace- able stock in the British Isles, if we be- lieve the ethnologists..Now, what are we to make out of an old collier who lives amid such surroundings and goes on holding corroboreee on his own with an old white gander—who meets him every day as he comes from his work, by the way—and bobs and bows to trees and wo.ojs? Now these things that I have related here are true. That old miner, I under- stand, is still living among the Black Mountains of Wales just on that fringe where tradition and legend and myth are tardily retreating into the heart of the hills before the advancing tide of in. dustry and innovation. What of it?

BURRYPORT COUNCILI

BURRYPORT COUNCIL. At the monthly meeting of the Finance and Highway Committee of the Burry- port Urban Council, The Clerk reported that the audit had taken place, and that the auditor was very complimentary. The Collector reported that all who had not been excused the rate had paid, with one excoption. It was decided to hold a rate estimate meeting next Wednesday. An application wa-s received from Dr. Owen Williams, medical officer of hfialth, for an increase of salary. In his applica- tion he stated that his work had more than doubled during the past few years. Mr. Dan Davies moved that an increase of S:20 per annulu be granted, making the salary ,£50 per annum. Mr. Sam Bees &econded, and the motion was carried. The Medical Officer reported that 15 births were registered—4 toys and 11 girls —equal to a birth rate of *27.01 per 1,000. Five deaths were notified, equal to a mor- tality of 9.04 per 1,000. A curious thing had happened, said the M.O.H., one of the deaths waa not certified either by a doctor or by a coroner, and an inquest was held. Mr. McDowall called attention to the fact that the bridge and gate at the G.W.R. Station was being closed to the public.—A committee, consisting oi Messrs. R. G. Harris, Dan Davies, p. Leyehon, and Surveyor and Clerk, were appointed to wait on the station-master to discuss the question.

ITS JIM MY HUSBAND I

IT'S JIM, MY HUSBAND. I A pathetic incident oocurred 00 Monday afternoon at Droylesden Electric Theatre whilst the official war Aim. The Battle of the Somme," was being shown. One of the scenes depicted the recovery of the wounded in ót No Man's Land," and suddenly a woman in the audience jumped to her feet crying It's Jim, my husband." She was Mrs. Wilson, of 11, Lloyd^treet, Droylesden, and she had previously re- ceived notice that her husband had boen killed in action on July 6, a day or two after the picture was taken. He wae re- cognised as being one of the stretcher- bearers by many other people in the theatre, as he had been well known in the locality. He was the father of nine children.

No title

The order prohibiting the sale of liquor I in Dublin after 9.30 p.m. has been ex- [ tended until January 9, 1317, i

THE SOLDiER ON THE LAND I

¡THE SOLDiER ON THE LAND I SOME ISEALS HE WILL BRING BACK FROM fRAMGE WHEN the boys come home," wha' will they uo, to wnuL oceupatiou- will they settle down r Will the- clerk go back to his desk, and the shop assistant to his eounter Will the tin- plater return to the mill, and the collier to the mille: Here are quetitions largei than any, outside the conduct of the war, Lhat are troubling busy minds to-day, questions it is impossible to answer dog- matically, for the mind of man is as varieo as the universe, and he cannot be cata- logued and tabulated. We must bewari above all things 01 the danger of definite assertion. We must be careful not create types out of the few individual caw we know of. Let us reason, in this matter, slowly, not jumping at hasty conclusions. Upon a few points it-is possible to speak with some degree of certainty. W liu, the boys come home," there will be [ number who will never return to the oh confined life, who will never be content again with the prison of town. For thv first time in their existence they have come to know the joys of a wider, iullr spacious life, the rapture of great space- and clean winds, the mysteries of thi 1 starred skies. They are not ooming baci to the soul-destrn.ving grind of comm. cialism. They will seek to re-build the:: careers in places where they can breath- easily, and if not here. they will turn their faces to the broad Dominions whe-r* there is still room for all. But they wiL seek their opportunities, first, here, an" they will fight for them as hard as thr are fighting the enemy in France. Th" have lived for two years "on the land" many of them, when they return, wil want to go on living "on the land." Ane our laws relating to the land, if they in. pede that desire, will have to be swes aside. They will be swept aside. TL factor of the future will be that the re- making of Britain is to be in the hands oi its soldier-voters. When the war was yet afar off we were preparing to plunge into an internal upon the land question. Matters of tenure, of privilege, bad laws concerning agricul- ture, rentals, leases, improvements, were being arrayed for our consideration. Or one side tho upholders of the old order, on the other those eager to establish ti-r new and brighter Britain. The war clouds broke; in the deluge all these problem* were flooded out of sigbt. When the tide recedes they will still bo there, and cir- cumstances will make them of paramount importance. For the solder now billeted in the little homesteads of French village's. seeing how many the land supports in fair comfort, noting how carefully the land is cultivated and how little is sterile, will want to know why what is possible in France, is not possible in this country. I I have spoken with very many, at the front and far behind it, whose highest ambition it is to own sufficient land to suffice for the needs of their family. To own, I emphasis. Peasant proprietorship is the ideal, the example France has set in many a soldier's mind. Not the systems urged tt;)on him in the past, not small holdings, lut cwier- ship. Let us consider for a moment what it is the soldier sees in Picardy to-day! First, of all, he sees how very carefully every available scrap of land is cultivated, how even hedges are not tolerated on the up- lands where are the wheat-lands. No tracts of waste country given over to furze and bramble! No moorlands water-logged and useless! I remember now a view of the Somme Valley as one mounts the hill over Amiens, seen in all the glorv of ripe summer-timo. It was like a patchwork quilt, a soene not to be paralleled in any Welsh county. Even the woodlands seemed to be U under control," so onlred f they were, so different from the confusion of an English wood. I recall the downs above a little village in this valley. They rose four or five hundred feet, and one could walk mile after mile across tne narrow paths over the downs without see- ing a bit of land without its use. 1. aw glorious this countryside looked in J uue, how rich and fat' And I recall rhe words of a soldier companion who often Jramped the hills with me, a soldier who had been a draper. « This he said to me, his arm sweep- ing over the glorious fields that ran, un- tramelled by hedges, to the horizon, this is what we are going to do to our own Wales, and to England also. No more drapery for me! You know where I am billeted? Well, the Lemaires have just fifty acres up here, and I see how com- fortable they are and how secure. They work hard, you know what a slogger the old man is, but they have sent Jules to the Academy, and I believe madame has a decent stocking." Why can't we arrange our country like this, why can't we put more on the land in- stead of letting heaps of it go derelict." He breathed deep and long; then he went on ty! I've been in the open two years now, and you see what it's done to me. How can I go back to the counter -a"lcer this? Why should I go back? Isn't there enough land for thousands of us yet." I thought of the Gower wastes, in particular of a village in Car- marthenshire where there were furze- ;rown fields and homesteads in decay, and with him I asked Why? And I thought also of Goldsmith's wail, the long gnuss oJertops the mouldering wall," and his lines a bold peasantry, their country's pride, When once destroyed, can never be supplied. Ah well, aiieh as the soldier-draper, and many of like mind, men who will return with new ideals of happiness, and-mark this, you who believe the wheels wiN re- volve in the future as in the past—with a new fund of energy, eager for action and impatient of the old contentions and the old privileges, will have something to say on the land question when they come back. They will command the situation at the polls. I had meant to say something on the social life of rural France, on the manner in which the farmers gather for com- panionship into little hamlets, on the jealous care the farmers' wives bestow on the kitchen garden. But the other topic has run me out of my «pace. It may be profit- a.ble to oome back to it later, for it seems to onoobserver, who did his best, during two months' lodgment in a rural com- munity, to see how French farm life is conducted, that there is an example here for us who say that one of the drawbacks of life on the land is its loneliness. The landsoape of France lacks the subtle charm of our land, with its farm here and there, away from all company, but perhaps it is one of the secrets why young France remains "on the land" that his work there does not entail a hermit-like separa- tion from his fellows. J. D. W. I

WEST GLAMORGAN TEACHERSI

WEST GLAMORGAN TEACHERS. I At a meeting of West Glamorgan teaeh. ers held in Swansea on Saturday, the pre- eent position of the residence question was discussed. Miss Emily Morgan, B. and 0.. hon. w. of Clydach, reported that the branch had contributed C247 18s. 6d. to war aid funds, and as this represented the effort of quite a small number of schools, the teachers who had contributed had done magnifi. cently. The principle of a general levy on xaei&bec& was aoopted.

JtI A SORDID STORY

———— = —- Jt. I A SORDID STORY, iMMORALiTY REVELATIONS IN 4 SWAriSEA It was conclusively prove d at the Swan- 6ea Borough l'ohcc Court, on Friday, that the scandal exposed In the columns of the Leader is by no means con- fined to the Docks area. Sordid revela- t-ions were mad e in a case where Nicholas Pinto and Santiago Rayes, Spaniards, were charged with unlawfully keeping, managing, acting, or assisting in the xaanagement of a brothel at No. 29, Union-street, on September 28th, and also the 20th, 21st, 22nd, 25th, 26th, and 27th of September. Mr. Harold King proeecuted on behalf of the police. Detecave A. Eyncn said that on the dates in question he kept watch on the premises from about 8 p.m. until nearly 11 p.m. Tliere were numerous visitors every night, almost all foreigners, and certain women. Lights were seen in the upper window, and on one occasion the detective 6aW a man and one of the women struggling near a window. On another occasion two women of a cer- tain class entered the shop in the after-1 and Pinto, atter remarks had been passed, commenced kissing and hugging one of them. One night a man went to the shop taking seven foreigners with him. The man left the foreigners in the hop. In the afternoon of the 28th the detective heard one of the women say to Pinto: "Have you any men to-night ?" Pinto replied: "No, but if you come in the afternoon there will be plenty of men here.. You know they car/t come ashore in the night now." In reply to question's, Mr. Eynon said that the girls were about ]7 to 19 yeaTs, M age. Another time, two of th?se per-! cons left the premises so drunk that they were vomiting. Ultimately, in the com- ¡ paiiy of Detective Clifford and Inspector | Fielder, on the morning of the 29th, about 12.10 a.m., he knocked at the door which was answered by Pinto. At that time, Rayes was away. He was present how- ever on other occasions. When witness went upstairs a man rushed out of a bedroom and someone locked the door ■ from the ir.?ide. Pinto, after the raid, --aid to witness: "The girls oome heie with eailo-rs. I can't stop them. Detective Clifford corroborated. The Chairman said that he eor«ider<> ir 2 months' imprisonment, imposed in each case. The Bench decided to re• w;mmord to the Home Office Secretary that hoth defendants should be deported as undesirable aliens. The same defendants were also chariyed with failing to enter in the aliens' register pfèrticular, of two aliens, (Greeks), who were staying at their refreshment house. on September 28. Pinto said that he ("ame to the police station and it was shut. Rayes proved that he. was absent at the

JtI A SORDID STORY

time. The caee against him was accor- dingly dismissed, but Pinto was fined £ 10. or two months. Defendants applied for time to pay, say- ing that they had only 53 between them- The Chairman: We cannot grant timeN in a case like this. The Bench a-terwar^p instructed the. police to and the name'of the owner of-; the property, because, 6aid they, it Was- a scandal that such places should exists tie again complimented the police.

Advertising

f' BRYNAMMAN POULTRY KEEPERS!* Are you pouring your profits down youif birds' throats, or using LIFO POULTRY MEAL &nd putting them in your pocket? LIFO POULTRY MEAL is 25% Cheaper than Biscuit Meal, and gives bettor Can he used Wet or Dry Mash. USE LIFO and make your Poultry Pay. LIFO ooste 16. 5d. per 71b. Bag, or lbs. per Cwt. SOLD BY TOM D AVI ES, Bradford House, Brynamman

STRUCK BY MOTOR CAR

STRUCK BY MOTOR CAR. Lady's Action in Carmarthen County Court. A sequel to an accident at Carmarthen railway crossing in June last was heard at Carmarthen County Court on Satur- day when Miss Clare E. Hopkins, The Quay, claimed S10 damages for personal. injuries, etc., from Charles Cooke, motor garage, Pontyberem, it being alleged that the inj uries were caused by negligent? driving. Mr. J. F. Morris wae for plain- tiff. and Mr. H. Brunei White appeared* for defendant. Plaintiif's case war, that when she saW": defendant's motor car ooming over the, crossing at a rapid rate, :he jumped off her bicycle, and was then ftruck by the, car on the left side, and carried on ther bonnet of the car for 20 yards. She fell- off yad the car ran over her. Deferdant denied negligence, and said- that when plaintiff dismounted she. lo-t r head, ajid ran across the road right. in fi-ont cf the car. Sfrgt. Jones, Pontyberem, who pa-sfcongsr in the car, corroborated, and- scid that the ?i»eod wius only six to eight mileo an Dour. His Honour said the effective csuse of the accident was that plaintiff lost her head after dismounting, and tried tcr crck-s the road. lie gave judgment for de-' fen dant.

No title

At the S-?a?stM. ?"ocu?h Police Court, o? Moi?d?y. Mr. Charles Hall, of 2, B

Advertising

¡ ¡ I I ¡ t. f II y I i ¡ i 11 It. th 18 °1 8 P 8 t It is the olive oil in Puritan ii Soap which saves the I Ii clothes from wash-day I jl wear and tear.$j  For this reason alone thou- | jj sands of housewives say f ii quite truly that i j  )J PURITAN I  ¡ I   II SOAP S ?? ??S?? B?JyjAL"TB? ?jSL j] s?ves its cost every week H in the clothes it saves. j j { I j j Will you order Puritan Soap 1 i from your grocer, oilman or t | j stores ? It is sold in several sizes—a size for every neecl I i I i 11 CHRISTR. THOMAS & BROS., LTD.. BRISTOL.