Collection Title: Herald of Wales

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 7 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
18 articles on this page
APPEAL TRIBUNALS

APPEAL TRIBUNALS —————- GO —————— British Employes in Foreign Firms, West Glamorgan Appeaf Tribunal met IUl Monday at Swansea, Mr. Hopkin for- can presiding, i An auctioneer applied for his sales clerk, aged lib and single. He said he had found it impossible to obtain a male clerk when ae advertised for one. Exemption was granted till Nov. 30th. A foreign ship chandler, said to be the biggest store in Swansea, appealed for his wad warehouseman, who had been classed £ 3. The application was based on the Assumption that the man was in a re-1 served occupation, and that this couten- ion had not been challenged by the mili- j :ary authorities. Mr. Hy. Thompson represented the ap- alieant. There are two partners in the business who. being Norwegians, are not liable to aailitary service, and the point was raised whether it was fair to unman British business to the advantage of foreign firms. Leave was given Mr. Thompson to with- iraw the appeal, so that the case might igain be considered de novo by the local! Tribunal. The Chairman announced that there iviere, two applications for leave to appeal, irliich were refused, and read the names. A young fellow rose and remarked: "All [ have to say. it's better to he a German in this court. You get better treatment I He was ordered to leave the court. Two months' exemption was granted to a wholesale wine and spirit merchant. If I am taken, it will mean ruin," said a credit draper. One month's exemption was granted. Captain W illiams (military representa- tive) appealed against a decision of the Swansea District Tribunal in the case ot a master butcher. The appeal was up- held. In a'nother case the period of exemp- tion, on the same application, was re- duced from three months to two. The military representative also ap- pealed against the decision of the District Tribunal in the case of a young farm hand. He held that the man was not in- dispensable, but that the farm could be carried on as efficiently without him. He also pointed out that this tenant had three sons, neither of whom was in the Army, and held it was more in the na- tional interest that this man should bo serving with the Colours. Mr. Thomas (representing the Board of Agriculture) suggested that this was a :ase which came under the new instruc- tion with reference to calling up farm hands. He said that other tribunals had adjourned such cases till January 1, 1917. Mr. Dd. Davit's suggested it was about time the authorities codified their in. structions, and the chairman also ex- pressed the opinion that it was stratjge that a circular of that kind. which they now saw by the courtesy of the military representative, should come into circu- lation before the members of the Tribunal received it. It was explained that this was prob- ably due to the absence, through illness, of Mr. King, borough solicitor. Mr. Dd. Davies said the last circular was one urging them to press on with all possible speed with appeals. It was decided to adjourn the appeal till January 1, 1917, unless instructions are meanwhile received that would justify the Tribunal in re-opening it. To a Russian Pole who thought he was an alien, and had so registered, it was pointed iut that there was a conscription Drder for the Russians. He was not able to say exactly how long he had been in this country as he was no scholar. The Chairman: You are scholar enough to keep out of both the Russian and the British Armies. The application was referred back for the observations of the local tribunal in the light of a, medical certificate which had been put in.. After a case H mentioned" by Mr. W. A. Thomas had been discussed for a I quarter of an hour, the chairman con-I ferred with his colleagues, and then said: We fail to see that this matter should eome before us at all." Mr. Thomas: I agree, sir, it ought to go before the Borough Tribunal. The Chairman Why didn't you say so before? WEST GLAMORGAN. Aid. Hopkin Morgan, J.P., presided 5ver the We6t Glamorgan Appeal Tribu- nal, which sat at Neath on Tuesdav. There were over 40 appeals, the majority from the military. Appealing against the decision of the local tribunal which gave a publican two months' exemption, Mr. T. Leyshon con- sidered it a wte of energy to keep a physically fit young man in a public- house. Mr. Edward Powell, for the respondent, said his client's wife had been under an operation, and was still too ill to look after the business. The appeal was upheld, and extension was granted until November 10, no further appeal to be allowed without leave. Hardship for the employers is no ground for appeal," said Lieut. Buchanan in prosecuting a military appeal against a firm of wholesale confectioners, whose assistant had been exempted until Dec- ember 15. The period of exemption was reduced until November 15, and no further appeal without leave. A public slaughterman, who worked for seven local butchers, was considered a most useful man for the Army if he used his talents on the Germans. lie had been granted exemption until December 1;). and Air. Powell, tor the respondent, asked the Tribunal to remember the Christmas trade. The military appeal succeeded, final ex- tension being granted until December 1. the president remarking that they took int.()-considet,ation tie fact that he was a ClasA A man. A local provision merchant, "for whom llr. Jestyn Jefteries appeared, said his business would be ruined if he had to join up. The decision of the local tribunal was upheld, but the president warned the res- pondent to make an effort to be released. SERVING TWO MASTERS. there was an interesting argument at th3 W P-st Glamorgan Appeal Tribunal, which sat at Neath on Tuesday afternoon, aver three colliery ca&es that had been a urnfd for a month by the Rural Dis- ■fct Tribunal. fjieut. Walter E. Rees contended that an adjournment wajs an appcalahle decision. In reply to Lieut. Buchanan, Mr. Edward Powell said lie, was present as desk to the tribunal which adjourned the cases, and e also advocate for the respon- dents-the Main Colliery Co. Lieut. Buchanan: Do vou represent the tribunai Mr. l'owell: I represent the respondents. Lieut. Buchanan: I make the formal abjection to that. You cannot have two interests. You are supporting your tri- bunals views and representing the re- apendelits. Supposing the decision is in your iavour to-day, when the case comes before your tribunal you will have an in- terest in it. Mr. Powell: As elerk I do not decide cases for the Tribunal. Lieut. Buchanan: You cannot serve two masters. It was stated that the men concerned were engaged as a store keeper, colliery clerk, and an export and shipping clerk. 't?spectively, and that no application had been made to the Colliery Tribunal. The Pre.s.ident (Aid. Hopkin Morgan), announced that they had decided to ad- kjurii the hearing until the next sitting, with the hope tha t a communication tould reach the Clerk in II)c, meantime, -4Quw.. ø w-ho bad

APPEAL TRIBUNALS

l)0('n granted a further extension to Dee- ember 15, was objected to by the military, who claimed that a single man. aged 25, who had passed Class A. should lie re- quired to -serve in the Army. Ke.spondcnt claimed that although he was a single man, he had a married, man's responsi- bilities, having to support his aged mother and keep the home going The appeal was upheld, and the period of exemption withdrawn. MAR,GAM. Nine cases came before the Margam Tri- bunal on Monday night, Mr. Edward Low- ther presiding. Three months each was given to a motor garage proprietor (of), a confectionery business manager (37), and a man of 33 engaged on munitions. A .shipping clerk .(:!9) was deferred for medi- cal examination, and a carpenter and joiner (34) was given three months, with no further right of appeal. A shipping clerk (18 and 7 months) was refused, and a crane driver (J8 and 2 months) was adjourned for 14 days lor medical exami- nation. Two cases were referred for the eoihery court. A married coal haulier (29) was given two months with no appeal, and a powerhouse man (21, single) was refused. PONTARDAWE. The Pontardawe District Tribunal met on Tuesday at the Council Chamber, Pontardawe. Mr. Morgan Davies pre- sided. Capt. Williams represented the military authorities. Captain P. K. Phillips, J.P., platoon commander of the Pontardawe Volunteer Kegt., attended the court and asked for pome definition regarding the men who had been granted various terms of exemp- tion and who had not been enrolled in the Volunteer Kegiment in accordance with the conditions laid down by the tribunal. ile stated that a good number of men had complied with the condition, but a larger number had ignored the instructions given them. Mr. Phillips said that in Swansea an officer had been appointed to follow up the men, and the results had been very gratifying. Captain Williai-D, said that unless the men attended as instructed it was the duty of the tribunal to review the cases and have the certificates withdrawn. He (Capf. Williams) would then see that the mcnin question would be. in the Army. Captain Phillips said he thought it would be well if the tribunal made an example of some cases, otherwise the V.T.C. could not possibly make progress. The tribunal expressed the opinion that the men who had ignored the condition could not expect the same favour in future, and a committee was appointed to review cases. During the hearing of the cases Mr. Wade Evans said he could not understand why so many applicants from Pontardawe were in Class C. III. .The Chairman replied that Pontardaf/e bad sent a large-number of men to the Army and the majority of those left were not fit for the Army. Capt. Williams opposed an appeal by a pitwood cutter who had come out of a colliery to do the work. A Member of Tribunal: From one um- brella to the other. Application refused. A grocer and tea merchant with a round of sixteen miles was refused. We can do without tea, but; not with- out beer," remarked a member, amidst laughter. A man who had left the steelworks to work in a brewery asked for permission to appeal. Member: Is this work of national im. portance? A Pontardawe organist and music teacher appealed on personal grounds. He said that if he lost a finger or a foot his living would be gone. Capt. Williams: And so would mine if I lost my tongue. Applicant was also part-proprietor of 1}, colliery of which he was the pay clerk- No time was granted on personal grounds, but three months were given ún account of the colliery. It was stated that at the previous meet- ing several eases .had been acljudicaterl. Sinco then the applicants had gone away to work in munition works. Capt. Williams: Let me have their names and addresses, and I'll get them back. The acting secretary and commercial manager of a Clydach tinplate works was given three months.

Advertising

M F M T ø- ? For Men In Training J M Hers is a splendid hint for men in training—keep a small M bottle of Sloan's Liniment handy to relieve stiffness and soreness W and to stop pain instantly in cases of bruises or sprains. Laid W « on lightly—no need to rub it in—Sloan's Liniment eases the muscles and drives away all feeling of stiffness at once. E S ?"?T?? & ?Y'? ? WI?T'Sr??FV?B?TMEr? ?' | mm ONIMENT s 5 KILLS PAIN. '? ?\ J7 £ Pte. \V. R. L. Watkins, 1775, 2/7 Welsh Regiment (CycHsts), .S  ?"??'  w rites :-I' In civiliaii life I am aninu?ionistandHandcurl Ktng, ?????? W tag and at that time I found Sloan's Liniment invaluable ?rJt?N?ty??? 1 flj relieving stiffness and soreness, for as you are no doubt j?iBNMf?j?J? ? ? aware, men of my profession are tied up in all sorts of w* positions. It has aiso been a boon to me since being in 

No title

To-day the Coronet Theatre will be I opened as a "picture house de luxe. '5 I

TONN FOOTPATH I

TONN FOOTPATH. I- Breezy Discussion at Llan- dovery Council. At a meeting of Llandovery Council on (Monday, Alderman T. Watkins, Deputy Mayor, presiding, the committee appointed re lonn footpaths reported that Mr. D. Thomas, the agent. informed them that Mr. Wilmor, the owner of the estate, acknowledged the right of the public to traverse over the Pontaur footpath, and ^STK^sted that a wicket gate be erected hy the Council alongside the present entrance Jrate from the Cilycwm-road to Pontaur. He had previously acknowledged the right of the public along the footpath running from the old chain bridge end to Dolau- hirion. Aid. D. Saunders moved that wicket gates should be placed where suggested without delay Aid. Jones said he took it that this closed the Tonn footpath question. Mr. M. H. Nichols asked if anything had transpired with regard to the entrance at the gate of the drive. The entrance by the bridge wa« quite unsafe to elderly women and children. Aid. I). Saunders Thomas concurred, and asked if Mr. Wilmor confined them from bridge (o bridge, or did he acknow- ledge the right of the public to use the gateway. The Clerk: He simply acknowledges the right from bridge to bridge and the Pon- taur footpath. That is all that was asked for. Mr. M. TT. Nicholas differed. If the com- mittee had agreed to any arrangement which would allow the jrate to be locked, they had exceeded their dutv. The Chairman Wouldn't it be better in the first plsee for someone to move the adoption of the report ? I am on the com- mittee, so are Mr. Esmond and Mr. Roberts. We were perfectly satisfied, and I really think the Council pught to be. If an amicable arrangement is not arrived at it will mean litigation; and the expendi- ture of an immense lot of money. Mr. Richard Thomas failed to see what there was to complain about any more. He moved the adoption of the report. Aid. Thomas seconded as far as it goes. Mr. Nichols moved a negative until we are certain the gate is not to be locked." A warm passage at arms ensued between Mr. Nicholas and the Chairman, the latter objecting emphatically to the former using the word "quibbling." He asked Mr. Nichols to withdraw the expression. The latter refused. The Chairman: Then I will rule you out of order. Mr. W. Jones (Alma House) seconded Mr. Nichols. He thought they ought not to close this matter until they had decided i as to the path from the gate. That was the way everybody went. I Aid. Jones supported the adoption of the report of the committee, inasmuch as nothing further had been referred to it. Anything beyond required notice of motion. Mr. Nichols was again proceeding to speak when the Chairman ruled him out of order. Mr. Nichols: You allowed Mr. Jones to speak twice The Chairman Two wrongs don't make a right. T am trying to treat all alike. Mr. Nichols: I will shut up. Aid. Jones was proceeding to speak when Mr. Nichols remarked: "You are allowing- him to speak again." Mr. Nichols was then allowed to make .:t i d that w l t(?n t l ii.,i his explanation. He said that when this matter was brought forward the intention of the Council was to retain these paths as they always existed, and if that was not put in the reference to the committee, it was quite understood. The business of the committee was to endeavour to retain the mths, except that which passed by Mr. Wilmor's house. Ultimately, Aid. D. Saunders Thomas irave notice of motion on the subject for the next meeting. The Chairman: If I have said anything I ought not to have said, I hope you will look over it, and let's go on amicably.

SWANSEA WEDDING I

SWANSEA WEDDING. I The marriage took place on Monday, at St. James' Church, Swansea, of the Rev. Ifor Davies, assistant curate of Cadoxton. Barry, and Mis,, Ada Evans, daughter of Mr. Jenkin .Evans, of Swansea and New- port.

SHERLOCK HOLMES GLUE I

'SHERLOCK HOLMES, GLUE ] UNSUCCESSFUL CLAIMANT TO MENZIES BARONETCY. I At Edinburgh on Monday the trial was i opened of David Prentice Menzies, of i'lean Castle, near liannock burn, Wie unsuccess- ful claimant to the Menzies baronetcy and to the chiefship of that clan, upon a charge of uttering fabricated documents and perjury. The charge arose out of a petition which Mr. Menzies presented last year to the Court of the Lyon King of Arms at Edin- burgh, claiming the matriculation in his name of the Menzies arms. The indict- ment bore that in support of his claim the accused uttered as genuine certain docu- ments which had to his knowledge been falsified in certain particulars, and also that upon two occasions accused swore upon oath that the said documents were genuine, the truth being, as he well knew, that they had been falsified. The accused pleaded not guilty. Mr. Morrison Smith, copperplate en- graver, Edinburgh, referring to the back- ing of a bill dated 1719, said that "Robert, son of Captain James Menzies, of Comrie," was a recent addition. These words were obviously written with a steel pen, and steel pens did not come into existence until after 1810. The bill was written with a quill pen. It was quite evident that the ink was different and that the addition was the work of another hand. The case was adjourned until Tuesday. When the case was resumed on Tuesday, defendant, in his evidence, said he was 64 years old. He had been an engineer in Glasgow, but had retired from business. He had always been interested in questions relating to the Clan Menzies, and the fruits of his research were embodied in a handsome volume produced in court. The late Sir Robert Menzies was the last of the direct line. Witness, since his youth, had been interested in the question whether he himself represented the line. He thought he had sufficient information to justify his claim, and he presented his petition to the Lyon King of Arms. Hi, petition had nothing to do with property or title, but was concerned solely with his right to hold the Menzies arms. Witness explained how he acquired the Menzies papers at a sale in Edinburgh, and stated that the documents now produced were in the exact condition in which they were when he acquired them. He had submitted documents to expert investigation, and lodged them in connection with his peti- tion merely for what they were worth. It was suggested that addenda to the writings might have been made with a mixture of red and black inks. In order to test the soundness of the suggestion, witness had made experiments. These were not suc- cessful. The police found at Plean Castle inks with which he had experimented. H., had not used the mixture to write the challenged parts of the documents in ques- tion. With regard to the perjury charge, the question was never put to him whether he had added anything to these documents in his own hand. he had never deposed that all the writing on the documents produced had been written I at the same time. The Crown departed from the charge of perjury. His lordship, summing np, said that the whole evidence was directed to whether it could be said that the addi- tions to the documents were made subse- quent to March, 1914. The jury, after 011 absence of 10 minutes, returned a unanimous verdict of Not guilty," and accused was dismissed from the bar.

LLANDOVERY COUNCILI

LLANDOVERY COUNCIL. Mayor for the Twelfth Year. The' Llandovery Town Council, at its 'meeting on Monday, nominated Mr. J C. V. Pr; ? e-Rice. }l':r-?ra.£ the I' twelfth year' in'suGceeaion*?'" "'??** The Clerk rported that the local Govern- ment, Board had refused sanction to the OouDci1 to borrow the sum necessary for the purchase of the Cattle Market which formed part of the Cawdor Estate and was recently put up for sale by public auction. Tbs property had been knocked down to Councillor T. Roberta, J.P., for £ 400, and the latter had expressed his readiness to tianefer it to the Town Council at any r futiu*a time. Aid .Saunders Thomas said the Council certainly owed a sincere vote of gratitude to Covncillor Roberts, to whom he formallv moved a vote of thanks, which was carried unanimously. The Rev. W. W. Poole-Hughes was ap pointed warden of the college on the man body of the Llandovery Son-provjded School in the room of the late ISr. T Phil- lips, Picton Court, by seven votes as against three recorded for Councillor R. Thomas. Mafeliing Villa, The seat had been vacant for two years. The Christmas market will be herd on the 221111 of December Tc-ie Town Council affixed the Corporation seal to the second inetali#snt of a general di?tiict rate at 3s. in the £ for the year. On the motion of Councillor Irl T, NichoHs, the Llandovery Town Councij ba? (Ífcjdd to make a representation to the local Tribunal urging them not to call up any more married men until all the single m'll have been dealt with. Councillor Dl. Lewis oaid that the ma jority of the married men had gone. What abou:. these? Were they going to ask that they should be de-mobilised? The Town Clerk said he had received; in- timation that no elections would be held this year. 4 With regard to the registration of war chcritiee, it was decided that applications should be dealt with by a committee ap- pointed for the purpose at once, so that thor.i may be no unnecessary delays. )

WAGES IN WELSH FLANNELI FACTO A 1 ES r

WAGES IN WELSH FLANNEL FACTO A. 1 ES. Employes of the flannel factories in West wales wlio are members of the Dockers' Union having made application tor increased wugee, cill off-er Ilias been received from the latter' raising the wages of the females, but in the claim ot the men weavers the employers were not, prepared to offer the advance. The mat- ter will be further negotiated. I

Advertising

FOR INDIGESTION 1 Mpa. §s!' That Mother Seigel's Syrup may be "the very thing" for you if yon 'suffer from ?iS???/???t ?o< '??? Indigestion is suggested by the fact that thousands upon thousands of former ???????? ?S?dS uffercrs have put 

i MRS LLOYD GEORGE

i MRS. LLOYD GEORGE STIRBING ADDRESS OH THE DRINK TRAFFIC I (By AWS fl N). I A public mooting organised by the So?th Wales Women?s Temperance Cnion ( Merched y De ) was heid on 1 ue,day evening at th e Tabernacle, Morriston, Mrs. Lloyd George presiding. The audi- ence, which hlied the spacious chapel, and over-tiowed lobbies. vestries, and entrances, was estimated to number con- eiderably over 2,001) people, and the pro- ceedings were marked by great en- tliusiadiu. With Mrs. Lloyd bporge was her hostess, Mrs. T.J. Williams, Jlaesy- gwernen, and among those who supported were: Mrs. J. D. Evans (presment or Mere'heti y Dowlais; Jlre. Tydfil Thomas, U.A., Cardiff; Mrs. Thomas, Newcastle Emlyn (treasurer) Atfcxj Hasina l)avies* 1-erryside (the secretary;; Mrs. D. H. Davies, l'entre, Khondda; Jurs. Owen, Llwynypia; Mrs. Morgan, l'entre; ri-i&s Williams, London; Mrs. Hope Evans, Eliondda; Miss Agnes Slack (sec- retary of the. World Women's Temperance Union); and practically all the leading local ministers, and others. Although announced for ti.30 I)-m-, tli(I building was crowded long before six, and a powerful choir of local gingers, under the leadership of Madame kate Alorgaii- Williams, Urynamiuau, contributed much to the success of the gathering, the ren- dering of A\eish hymns being a magnifi- cent leature of the proceedings. When the devotional part of tht work of the evening had been concluded—anil it was all carried out by women—Mis» Bofdna Davies, the ne? ?secretary, on whom .it is felt Cranogwen's mantle I hd:S íal1en,id Uie battle cry of Mer- f .cited y lie" was "Temperance aDd I'urity," She asked permission to add to Ie :thnft. it wa", possible to be tem- perate and pure without being tnrifty, but it was not possible to be thrifty with- out being temperate. She asked for a c how of hands from tliv, iliemlwrs of Mf-rehed y De as to whether she hart their permission .to add "thrift" to the battle cry. The response was seemingly a unani- mous one, and the audience cheered heartily. Mrs. Lloyd George, as chairman, then delivered an address in Welsh, and the cheers, which had been very cordial w'hen she rose, were re-doubled when it was noticed that she was speaking her native tongue. She first of all expressed regret at being somewhat late in arriv- liUg, and explained that the reason was, she and the ladies who were with her had been for some time unable to enter the building because it was so densely crowded. She was very pleased to be there to preside over the annual public meeting of "Merched y De," but she hoped the audience would bear with her, as -'lie was not accustomed to the task of presiding over such a great assembly as she now saw before her. (Applause). She had promised their late leader, Cran- ogwen," whose death they all deejily lamented, that she would come to preside over one of the meetings of the I'nk. but until now had not been able to do so. Although Cranog-well" was not with them that day in the nesh, she was with them in spirit. (Applause). She remembered the first time she heard Cranogwcn was when that lady lectured at Crieeietb, and she (Mrs. Lloyd George) was then only a little girl, prompted by curiosity to see 'and hear a woman lecturer, for to' fioai- a tvonvan speaking in public" was not then so fre-, quent as it. was to-day-as they could see. (Laughter and applause). Her father told her that he regarded Cranogwen as a very manly, determined woman, and she had since seen Cranogwen** deter- mined attitude in carrying on her life work. (Applause.) She had also since then had the pleasure of taking the chair JAr" Ç¡;. lWtq'!I\<\Ad;:i1.(>(.wf.1}tl,v ",thr;"y, be- came great frietuls. She and others were at iirt a little afraid of Cranogwen. but when she came to knew her she found she was -i tender and loveable woman. (Ap- plause.) She did a great work, and in connec- tion with this movement, it was to be hoped that her mantle would fall upon one of the daughters of the South." (Applause.) The. drink traffic was one which was the subject of much anxiety in this country. It was felt that the present time was opportune for dealing with it, and some of them had thought that with the beginning of this great war had come the time for putting an end to the traffic. They were disappointed. They had had improvements and amendments in regard to regulating it, and they were thankful for small mercies. It was a traffic which caused poverty and discomfort in homes, and it was a traffic which marred the efficiency of the nation. Tliev heard much in these days of war economy, and of proposals for meatless days. Well, she would like to see a drinkless day—one day i iii every week 'without the drink, and the money so saved to be Pwiit in helping the war. (Applause.) Slic, had heard from a prominent gentleman connected with one of the Welsh seaside resorts that the re- striction of hours had done good—that the streets were as quiet now at half-past eight as they were at midnight before the re- strictions were ^ut in force. (Applause.) There was anxiety among' the women of Wales and the women of Great Britain concerning their sons who were in the trenches. But among the women of the Colonies whose sons had come forth to fight for the Motherland there was also deep anxiety lest their brothers and their sons should be led astray when in this ?oiis of t]iL, (ir country h;; the temptations of the drink traffic, and towards relieving that anxiety they, as Merched y De," were doing, and needed to do, all they could, to secure further improvements and to help in attaining what they all looked forward | to—victory in the end. (Grelt checring.) Mrs. D. S. Thomas, Ton, Jihondda, also delivered a telling Welsh address. Rev. D. E. Thomas (Bethania-* briefly explained the aims and objects of Merched y De," after w hich Mi«"» Agnes Slack spoke. She said she thought Wales tvus the dominant partner in the British Empire to-day. When they needed muni- tions for the men in the trenches they turned to Wales and got Mi\ Lloyd George. (Applause.) When t hey had- secured enough munitions tlic- turned to the eaiue Welshman and put him to see to the carry- i ing on of the war on behalf of the British people. (Great cheering.) A-nd she was pleased to have responded to the invitation of Mrs. Lloyd George to eom-e here- to help I Merched y 1À'" in their great Welsh movement for temperance. Mrs- Lloyd George, like herself, was a life-long tee- totaller. She stood before them to-night for prohibition. She reviewed the steps taken by Uaissia in regard to the drink traffic, and declared that it was Russia's teetotal army that, had saved France and j England, and probably Wales, from the j' fulfilment of the plans of the Kaiser. (Ap- plause.) If you want to beat Ihe Germain," emphasised Miss Slack, "you must se-nd out a teetotal army," and he went on to point out that drink, was the British nation's greatest enemy. In the first year of war 85,000 men were killed by the Ger- mans, whilst in the same period more chil- dren died at home through drink than that total. And that enormous loss when the child life was more sacred than ever before: She referred to the temptations which bpspt .soldiers from the other coun- tries when they came to Britain, and made a stro-ng plea for the abolition of the liquor traffic. Rev. Barrow Williams. Llandudno, de- live:?! an address in Welsh. and .Mmark- ahiy e??cHvp so?s wprp ?un? by Madame Kate Williams and Miss Rosma Davies. j the "reat meetilm bein broub,t to a close i

i MRS LLOYD GEORGE

with votes of thanks to Mrs. Lloyd George I and the principal speakers for their assist- ance, and to the chapel authorities and the Morriston people for receiving the visitors i as honoured guests. Pledges were then signed by a large J number of women. It was stated that the Merched y De" now number over 12.000 members, who were represented at Morri.ston by about 80 delegate?. j As emphasising the vision of the people on the work of the organisation and 1 ne movement it (tarries on. the vast audience sang, and several times repeated the triumphant Welsh hymn, 0 Fryniau Caersalem."

Advertising

—.——————- —————— '^| Keep Free from Colds Prevention is Better than Cure. y\ To resist colds, influenza, bronchitis, there is no | thing better than a course of Angier's Emulsion. Its soothing, healing effects and its tonic invigorat. ing influence upon all the bodily functions make i< unequalled for the prevention of colds and catarrhal affections. If the cold or cough has already com- menced, Angier's is the best means of throwing it ? off and repairing the damage it has caused. Phy. sicians and hospitals have used Angier's for over FRF-E twentv-five years. *mm! TRIAL Send name and address. 4d. postage, and mention this paper. BOTTLE AGIER CHEMICAL CO., Ltd., 86 Clerkenwell Rd., London, E.C.

j 26 YEARS IN AFRICA j

j 26 YEARS IN AFRICA. Bokshurg, South Africa, has lost its I most popular character, tli(- Wllsli mother." Mrs. Elizabeth Davie*, wife of! -the Rev. E. H. Davies, whose manse was ever a favourite rendezvous for Welsh folk-a typical Welsh home where a typical; Welsh welcome was always extended to. emigrants from Wyllt Wali;i. Of Mrs. Davies it is sai'liat after 26 years in Africa, she retained all her native characteristics. Her Welsh was as pure, j her accent as pronounced, and her interest in Wales and its people never lessened. -No one has done more to maintain in-a far away land the liest traditions of Wales, to foster its language and customs, and I godi'r hen wlad yn ei liol" than this worthy family. | The funeral was one of the largest and most impressive ever known in Boksburg, and the singing of Welsh lirmns (favour-j ites of Mrs. Davies) was reminiscent of old times when among the vales and hill-s of the homeland. The last good-bye had been said to dear ones in Bydd myrdd o ryfeddodau." Among the ministers pre- sent were five Welshmen—the Rev. Da Yid Davies, B.D., J. Alban Rogers, Ben Evans, M.A., Glyndwr Davies. and W. H. Kinsay.

I AMMANFORD SOLDIER I

AMMANFORD SOLDIER News has been received at Ammanford that Private Ernest II. Roberts has been awarded the Military Medal for hie con- duct in the field. Private Roberts, in writing to his mother, modestly says: I had the surprise of my life yesterday, when one of our officers informed me that I had won the Military Medal for a parti- eularly hot day's work we had in July. I cannot express Jay surprise, and also how pleased I was when told, as it was never expected and the episode was almost forgotten. Private Roberts is a brother of Mr. D. A. Rol>erts, cashier of Rhoos Colliery In July he was engaged as dispatch rider.

MR GINNELL MP

MR. GINNELL, M.P. Conviction Upheld; Defendant Elects to Go to Prison. At the London Sessions on Tuesday Mr. I| ljawrence dnnb! M.P appealed against 'nis conviction and the sentence passed upon him at Bow-street upon a charge of 'obtaining admission to certain military detention barracks by making a false statement, and by signing the visitors' hook in the false name of Labras Macfin- gail, thus omitting his real name, with intent to defraud. Mr. Ginnell was pre- sent. There were very few people in court. Mr. Timothy Healy, for the appellant, raised the objection that the conviction was bad because it was drawn up in such a way as to reveal or disclose more than one offence. Mr. Bodkin, for the Crown, argued that the conviction was perfectly proper, and the re»)Iy disclosed oulv one offence. The court over-ruled the objection. Sir Robert Wallace tchairman). how- ever. stated that the objection was not frivolous, and the court gave leave tft appeal. Mr -Bodkin addressed the court in oppo- sition to the appeal, and reviewed the whole of the facts at considerable length. In the result the court confirmed the conviction, but reduced the fine to £5() or three weeks' imprisonment in the first division. Mr. Ginnell elected to go to prison.

GOWER CASUALTIES

GOWER CASUALTIES. Among the Gower men who have fallen in action is Pte. David Thomas, of Llan- iuadoc. lie had been previously reported as missing, possibly a prisoner of war, and his parents were hoping for his sate re- turn. It now transpires that he died at Mametz Wood. The Gower Parish Magazine says that the first oi the Iston boys to meet his death in the war is Pte. Henrv 11. Da vies, son of Mr. Eliae Davies, of Park- mill. He was shot through the neck while assisting to carry a stretcher. Rifleman Glyn Griffiths, of the K.R.R., and Rifleman Sainy Davies. of the same regiment, both of Penclawdd, are among the casualties, the former with tiesh wounds, and the second named being a victim of shell shock. Sergt. R. J. Richards, Welsh Guards, of Reynoldston, was killed on Sept. 10. Lieut. J. G. Moreton, of the Royal En- gineers. of the same parish, has been wounded in the leg.

Advertising

  ???w ^BOVRILj ?? Strength toWin  I BARKER'S BIG BARGAINS. I STRONG CHEAP FIELD GATES. OVER 200 WEEKLY. 288. Order Oarriag-e aft. long. 9ft. long. 10ft. long. 11s. lls. 6d. 12s. Creoaoting, 1/- extra. Planed lor Painting, 18. 6d. ertra. Hanging Irons, 78. 6d. per set. STRONG SHEEP HURDLES. loft. long, t 65. 6d. Oreoeotj ne 9d, extra. 20s. Ordr F"' Oarriac-e Paid. THE RELIABLE COOP. 4s. 6d. each. BB rami fil S H I 535. per dozen. Ej^BB S M E| S f Croosoting, 6d. extra, OR MOV ABLE lid. eachextrfc. STBONG WIRE TOP RUNS. 3ft. long, 4s.; 4ft., to.; 6ft., 7s. lei. STRONG SITTING BOXES. 2-divisions$/- jji: hj fTf]! 3 div-isions 5 divirions 16/8 All 20s. Orders Carriage Paid. THE LINCOLNSHIRE HOUSE. 60s. 5ft. 5 J: 4 J: 6ft. hich. 8. C-rwsoting. 6ft. x 5ft. x 7ft. high. 8ft. x 5ft. x 7ft. high. 110s. 155s. Carriage Paid. These houses are made of best. ISD. tongued, grooved. V-joiated Matchboards on strong frame-work, and mounted am four heavy 126in. wheels. THE FANCIER HOUSE. OuR PRICE. 14 x 3 x 3ft. hih. I Carriage Paid. jj^ | The BEST & CHEAPEST house em the market They can only be made at the above law pri?e because of the enormous quantity wo sell. TTMy &re made in aec. tions of the Best Red Deal Matchboards I in sections to screw toeetber, -and are ocmplete with two up and down shutters sliding over 1in. meeh wire net-tint:, trap door for fowk' entran-ce. parches and lock-np, attendant's door. Long. Wide. High. Floors. W&4 iton 4ft. x 3ft. x 3ft. 22s. ss. 46. M. 6ft. x 4ft. x 4ft. ass. &,L 4s, Gd. I 6ft. x 4ft. x 5ft. Sft 1ts. Is. ad. ft.. x Sft. x 5ft. M as. Is. fid. All Oirriaire Paid to any Station. [ Oreoaoting. 2a. extra. PORTABLE SHEDS from SSs. fid. b MOTOR CAR HOUSES from 4t!. F. W. BARKER & CO., LTD., CARLTON, NOTTINGHAM, j SIGHT TESTED SIGHT TESTED FREE OF ySOKSB3 FREE OF CHARGE. CHARGE. N. JAMES SCOTT, =8 Jjk Oculist Optician, jjggS|jBin 1 2, Victoria Arcades Goat Street, ^|||||l||pr & Waterloo Street, S W A N S E A The Only Scientific Oculist Optician in Swansea. For Preebopia, Myopia, Hypermeropia, Asthenopia, Astigmatism, or 6f¡1IiII8. Ophthalmic Surgeons' Proscriptions Scientifically Applied s Schools Attended by Appointment.