Collection Title: Herald of Wales

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 6 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
11 articles on this page
Advertising

Keep Free  AL %Vu ??? from CoMs M???? Prevention is Better than Cure. To resist colds, influenza, bronchitis, there is no- thing better than a course of Angier's Emulsion. /Oft W Its soothing, healing effects and its tonic invigorat. ing influence upon all the bodily functions make i1 unequalled for the prevention of colds and catarrhal affections. If the cold or cough has already com- menced, Angier's is the best means of throwing it off and repairing the damage it has caused. Phy- sicians and hospitals have used Angier's for over ?B??N FREE twenty'nve years. TRIAL SR3 T??T?? ??''ess. 4d. postaM. and mention this paper. j ??JBM!?M? B?OTTLE AI?GIER CHEMICAL CO., Ltd., 86 Clerkenwell Rd..London. E.C. —— t ——

THE NEW WAR CABINET

THE NEW WAR CABINET Sir Alfred Mond and Lord Rhondda in Office The Press Bureau says the accompany- ing letter has been sent by the Prime Minister to all members of the House of Commons:- CoIDmons:- Whitehall, December 11th. Dear Sir,'—His Majesty the King has entrusted me with the task of forming a Government, and I have carried out His Majesty's command. I had hoped to make a statement in the House on. Tuesday, the 12ch inst., but I now find that this will tot be possible. j On Tuesday, therefore, Mr. Bonar Law, as the Leader of the House, will move its adjournment until Thursday, the 14th inst. The one predominant task before the Government is the vigorous prosecution of the war to a triumphant conclusion, and we feel confident that they caD rely upon your support as long as they devote their energies effectively to that end. I am, Sir, I I Your Obedient Servant, D. Lloyd George." We are officially informed that the composition of the new Ministry is as follows:— Office. Former Minister. New Ministr. Prime Minister and First Lord of the Treasury Mr. H. H. Asquith. Mr. D. Lloyd George. Ministers without Marquess of Lans- Mr. A. Henderson and portfolios downe Viscount Milner. Lord Chancellor. Lord Buckmaster Sir Root. Finlay, K.C. Lord President of the Council Marquess of Crewe Earl Curzon. Lord Privy Seal Earl Curzon ———— Home Secretary Mr. Herbert Samuel Sir Geo. Cave, K.C. Foreign Secretary Viscount Grey. Mr. Arthur Balfour. Colonial Secretary Mr. Bonar Law. Mr. Waiter Long. Secretary for War Mr. Lloyd George Earl Derby. Secretary for India Mr. Austen Chamber- Mr. Austen Chamber- lain lain. Chancell r of the Exchequer Mr. McKenna Mr. Bonar Law. Minister of Munitions Mr. E. Dr. Addison. Minister of Blockade Lord Robert. Cecil Lord Robert Cecil. First Lord of the Admiralty Mr. Arthur Balfour. Sir Edward Carson, K.C. Secretary for Scotland i Mr. McXiicon Wood iN. i-, r i. Munro, K.C. Board of Trade I Lvl r. Rumrnm Sir Albert Stanley. Local Government Board Mr. Wain • Long Lord Rhondda. Board of Agriculture Earl of wf'ord Mr. 3. E. Protheroe. Board of Education. Marquee f'Crewe Dr. H. A. L. Fisher. Lane E: ,of the t Duchy Mr. McKinnon Wood Sir Fred9rick Cawley. '!hief Secretary for Ireland Mr. H. E. Duke, K C. ? Mr. H. E. Duke, K.C. first Commissioner of t)T '1:s 1'lr L. H rcorrt 'r A!fred ?cnd. V\ v. 'L 1 ,:>' PI., 11' "I P.V-Cycnei-al Sr F. E. Smith, K.C. Sir F. E. Smith, K.C. ? tymastpr-GRncraI Mr. A. Hr?d?.r?on :?tn)3ste-r-General. Mr. J. A. Pe?e Mr, Alb2rt tHini?orth Solicitor-General I' Mr. Gordon Hcwart, Sir Geo. Cave, K.C. K.C. Lnrd Advocate  Mr. R. Murtro, K.C. Mr. J. A. Clyde, K.C. Solicitor-General for Scotland Mr. T. B. M?-'son. r.'r. T. B. Morison. Lord-Lieutenant of K. c.. K.C. Ireland Lord Wimborne Lord Wimborne. L.Td Chancellor of Ireland Sir Ignatius O'Frien, Sir Iqnatlus O'Brien, New Offices- K.C. K.C. Minister of Labour ———— Mr. John Hoflge. Minister of Pensions ———— Mr. G. N. Barnes. Food Controller Lord Devon port. Shipping Controller. J Sir Joseph Maciay. The WAR COUNCIL will consist of the following niembers Mr. Lloyd George. Earl Curzon. Mr. A. Henderson. Viscount Milner. Mr. Bonar Law. Lord Curzon will be Leader in the House of Lords. Mr. Bonar Law has been asked by the Prime Minister to act as Leader of the House of Commons, and. will not be expected to attend the War Council regularly. Sir Robert Finlay, in accepting the office of Lord Chancellor, has stipulated that his rights to a pensio n shall be waived.

THE NEW PREMIER I

THE NEW PREMIER. QaJant little Wales cannot but feel a thrill oi pride in the supreme honour and responsibility conferred by his Majesty, in thia cri?c hour. on the Right Hon. David Lloyd George. There is no better' known man in Wales, or. for that matter, in the United Kingdom; a fact which obviates the necessity oi giving more than a bare outline of a brilliant career. In York Place, Manchester, on January 17, 1863, a baby was born. He is a sturdy, healthy little fellow," wrote the fond father on that self-same day. stronger and much more lively than his little sister. He has fine curly hdlr. I am quite proud Of him. May he live to be- come a great man." When a year old, he had an attack of crctup. and his life was despaired of. but the skill and assiduity of a local doctor, still alive, taved me child. I never dreanlt." he afterwards said, that in saving the life of that little child as he lay unconscious in the wicker cradle on that farm hearth, that I was saving the life of the national leader of Wales." For the schoolmaster, his father, had now become a farmer near Haverford- west. On the death of his father, the boy Lloyd George was taken charge of by his uncle at Llanystumdwy, a picturesque little village on the banks of the River Dwyfawr, two miles from Criecieth, on the Carnarvon coast. His uncle wished the lad to become a doctor, but the Fates decided that the! law should claim him. He became an ardent advocate of Welsh Nationalism, and in 1900 won his seat for the Carnarvon Boroughs, in the teeth of the greatest odds, through sheer force of principle and popular enthusiasm." For a long while Lloyd George was pretty mach of a free- lance, encountering considerable \oppo6i- tion from his own people, and during the Boer War took a strong line in opposition to public opinion. His sterling abilities were recognised in 1905 by his appointment as President of the Board of Trade, an office which he adorned, startling many by his hitherto unsuspected aptitude for business manage- ment and peace-making negotiations be- tween great national bodies, In 1908 Lloyd George became Chancellor of the Exchequer, and eo closely is he associated with the Insurance Act that to this day people speak of paying insurance contri- butions, to, and receiving insurance bene- fits fro]&-Llqd Qearge. I As a peacemaker he has attained to a world-wide reputation, but perhaps the most notable irwtanco-, of his success in this direction were the settlement of the South Wales miners' strike in 1914 and the more recent Clyde dispute. He was se- lected also as the master adjuster this year, when troubles arose in Ireland. As Minister of Munitions he magically changed our position from being sadly deficient in war material to that of a body supplying such material wholesale to the Allies, besides having overwhelm- ing quantitios for our own use. 'On the tragic death of Lord Kitchener this year, Mr. Lloyd George, by common consent, was recognised ae, the one man fitted by nature and ability to fill the breach. His selection was hailed with acclamation by our Allies and the leading men in neutral I countries. In the ordinary course, as shown by his past career, Mr. Lloyd George is pre-eminently opposed to war, but being convinced that the present struggle is essentially one for the defence of national and world peace, he has thrown himself heart and soul into t:: leading place for carrying the war to d successful termination. His pre-war atti- tude and his war speeches have therefore gripped the whole civilised world. SIR ALFRED MOND. I Sir Alfred Mond, Bart.. has represented Swansea in Parliament since 1910. Pre- vious to that he cat for Chester, and as representative of that ancient city he had a good deal to do with the abrogation of I the Ordinance under which the Chinese labourers worked in South Africa. The wail from the Rand was that white men could not if they would, and would not! if they could, do the necessary work in the mines. Sir Alfred undertook to da. monstrate, practically, the negative of the two parts of this proposition. He paid six men from Chester to go to the ltanu, to labour for six months at the most difh- cult jobs in the goldfield. They went. they worked, and they proved to demon- et,ration that the cry against the white man was one to which the British public need pay no heed. He won the Swansea constituency by the biggest majority that has ever bean accorded any of its representatives, after a fierce electoral struggle calculated to warm the blood of any true fighting man. One incident out of the numbers that made the contest notable stands out vividly in the memory of those who wit- nessed it. It threw aA iilttfttinating glow i upon the character of the man and upon the intensity of his sturdy Liberal opinion. It was at a meeting at the Al- bert Hall, packed almost to suffocation. He was replying to hostile criticism, and he said, It is urged against me that I am politically ambitious-" His opponents ironically cheered, expecting an explana- tion or a denial. They received neither! The answer, given with buoyant enthu- siasm, rang clear. Nothing could be more true! I am politically ambitious!" With his frank and candid confession, the cause for cheers rested with his sup- porters, and their enthusiasm knew no bounds when the candidate added, with quiet sincerity, I do seek power, but only for the purposes to which it can be honestly applied—for the making of just laws, for broadening the liberties of the people, for adjusting the hideous inequali- ties that favour the rich and oppress the poor, for seeing, if I may put it so, this I grand old country a little better that it was when I was born into it." There are few men in the Empire who have a more profound knowledge of economics or greater capacity for pre- senting public questions in a lucid, in- teresting, and convincing fashion. On one occasion the Prime Minister and the pre-war Liberal administration com- mended Sir Alfred's contribution to the debate as the best speech that had been heard upon the subject for at least four years. sir Alfred Mond's father. Dr. Ludwig Mond, was one of the brainiest chemists in Europe. In middle life he perfected the Solvay process for the manufacture of ammonia soda, and, in conjunction with Sir John Brunner, built up one of the most prosperous businesses in Britain. Then he found a new method of produc- ing s;as for power purposes, and during his later years, collaborating with Dr. Langer, he discovered the means of pro- ducing pure nickel from Canadian ores. Sir Alfred was bora at Farnworth, neai Widnes, on the 23rd October, 1868. He commenced his education at Cheltenham, going thence to Cambridge, where he took his science degree, and subsequently t<. Edinburgh University, where he also dis- tinguished himself. The year 189-1 was one of great import- ance in his history. He was called to the Bar at the Inner Temple, and he was married, his bride being Violet, daugbtei of the late James Henry Goetze. Lady Mond holds a high position in London Society, where she finds ready recognition flf her fine artistic temperament and her vfis'.iiiitv A singularly bean tiful woman, she has had the distinction | <>. u.aing hei portrait hung in the Royal Academy on very many occasions, one of the- v iTJtings being of her brother, Sigis- mund Goetze, whose fame would be firmly established if it rested only on his won- derfully impressive picture, The Despised and Rejected of Men." On her husuaud's political career the influence oi Lady Moad has been very great, be- cause she is always a great force. Although he has been called to the Bar, Sir-Alfred Mond, in accordance with the unwritten law which requires that bar- risters shall not combine legal and com- mercial pursuits, does not1 practice. In- deed. his commercial activities are sufficiently numerous to forbid that, but thero is little doubt that had he chosen otherwise, ho would hare attained fame a6, an advocate. He is managing director of Messrs. Brunner, Mond, and Co., Limited, the largest manufacturers in the world of alkali, employing over 5,000 men. Messrs. Brunner, Mond were the pioneers of the eight hours day for the workmen in the chemical industry, and also were the first to introduce a scheme of holidays for good time-keeping, and many other schemes for the benefit of the workmen, a system of employment which also pre- vailsat the Mond Nickel Works in Swan- sea Valley. There, the workmen have an eight hours day, a bonus for regularity, whilst the firm maintains two bands, and also provides the most complete facilitie-s for the rational recreation of the employes It is the model metal manufactory of the world, and the workmen are accounted amongst the most contented in the Prin- cipality. The Power Gas Company is another of the corporations of which Sir Alfred Mond is chairman. The company was formed to produce Mond Gas and ammonia bye products from coal. It sup- plies most of the gas power plants in operation in England and other parts of the world.

LADIES BEAUTIFY YOUR HAIR AND STOP DANDRUFF

LADIES! BEAUTIFY YOUR HAIR AND STOP DANDRUFF. Hair becomes charming, wavy, lustrous andsthick quickly. Every bit of dandruff disappears and hair stops coming out. For a shilling you can save your hair. In less than ten minutes you can double its beauty. Your hair becomes light, wavy, fluffy, abundant and appears as soft, lus- trous and charming as a young girl's after applying some Dandarine. Also try this— moisten a cloth with a little Danderine and carefully draw it through your hair, talcing one small strand at a time. This will cleanse the hair of dust, dirt, or exces- sive oil, and in just a few moments you have doubled the beauty of your hair. A delightful surprise awaits those whose hair has been neglected or is scraggy, faded, dry, brittle or thin. Besides beautifying -he hair, Danderine dissolves every particle of dandurff;; cleanses, purifies and invigorates the scalp, forever stopping itching and falling hair, but what will please you most will be after a few weeke use, when you see new hair--fine and downy at first-Yffi-but really new hair arrowing all over the scalp. If you care for pretty, soft hair. and lots of it, be sure to get a bottle of Knowlton's Danderine, and just trv it. All chemists sell and recom- mend Da ferine. Js. Hd. and 2s. 3d. a bottle-no increase in price.

PEER FINED FOR D AND D I

PEER FINED FOR "D. AND D." I Lord Headley (61) was at Tower Bridge, on Saturday, fined 10s. for being drunk and disorderly. Defendant, who is a Mahometan, denied the charge "on his honour as a Peer of the Realm." It was stated in evidence that he put his arm roupd the neck of a woman of "medium age." He said he might have tried to kiss a pretty young woman,, btft-OLGt an old J frwPJi* i

Advertising

I SWANSEA SOLICITOR I o

SWANSEA SOLICITOR. I- -o I Mr. David Eynon James Dies at Ledbury. I As briefly reported on Saturday, the death of Mr. David Eynon James, solici- tor, took place on Friday at Ledbury, i Hereford. The deceased gentleman had only been at Ledbury about five weeks and expected to return home to Swanse-a. this week. He was taken ill on Thursday, and passed away a few hours before his mother reached his bedside. Mr. James, who was only 27 years of age, was a very promis- ing young gentleman and much respected in Swansea and Mumbles. Mr. James was the eldest son of Mr. and! Mrs. David James, 11, St. Albans-road, Swansea, and was a faithful member of Shyddings C.M. Church, where a short service will be held on Wednesday prior to the funeral at Cockett Churchyard. Mr. James was for some time a member )f the Mumbles V.T.C. He was educated .It the Swansea Grammar School, and was articled to Messrs. Davies, Ingram and Harvey. He was a member of the firm of Messrs. A. J. Morris and James, Fisher- street.

PIERMASTERS SON I

PIERMASTER'S SON. I Among the commissions announced in Friday night's Gazette" was that of Cadet George William Twomey, who has been appointed to the Welsh Regiment as a second-lieutenant (on probation). Sec- ond-Lieutenant Twomey is the son of Capt. P. J. Twomey, the well-known Mumbles piermaster. He was employed in the pro- cess department of the Cambria Daily Leader," and was associated there with Bay Sears, who was recently killed in action. Lieut. Twomey, who is not quite 19 years of age, joined the Artists' Rifles O.T.C. 11 months ago, afterwards transferring to the Officers' Cadet School. He was born and bred in the Mumbles, where, during the roller skating craze he gained great I distinction on the pier rink. Among his accomplishments as a roller skater was the winning of the Welsh championship when only 11 years old. He has four cups and ) a number of medals. Skr. P.O. R. Bowen, Aberavon. (Killed.) P.O. G. H. Manning, Swansea. (D.S.O.) Pte. 0. G. Evans, Landore. (Killed.) Pte. E. L. Bodycombe, j Iseatn Abbey, I (Missing.) j ? I

Advertising

I INS.ST OW HA. YING t3rpWSIOWAV9% B?BAKKING POWDER. I ? BEST, PUREST AND STRONGEST. Ji avoid all cheap bulky packets and I)MG ?S ?h?mx!????? '?' .tft?t

THE SCROLL OF FAME

[ THE SCROLL OF FAME ———.  — —— Information has been received that Cpl. Wm. Tucker, RQyal Welsh Fusiliers, son of Mr. W. Tucker, stonecutter, Mydrim, St. Clears, has been killed in action. Lce.-cpl. T. Crowther. of the Welsh Begiment, is now at his home at No. 7, Cae Bricks-road, Cwmbwrla. Swansea, on a few days' lea.ve, having been wounded twice. Mr. and Mrs. Harris, Blaennantymab, Abergwili, near Carmarthen, have been notified that their son, Pte. D. H. Harris, has been killed in action. He joined the forces in Australia. W. H. Fry, who has been on active ser- W. H. Fry, vice with the Somerset IJight Infantry for I the last 18 months, has been promoted to sergeant, this being his third promotion within 12 months. Sergt. Fry is a brother of Mrs. D. N. Thomas, 52, Trafalgar-ter- race, Swansea Mrs. Eidd, of No. M, Rodney-street, Swansea, has been notified by the War Office that her adopted son, Trevor Tucker, of the Royal JSaval Division, has been missing since November 13th. lie is about 19 years of age. Lieut. H. Spencer Morris. Welsh Regi- ment, son of Mr. J, F. Morris, solicitor, I Carmarthen, and of Mfs. Morris, has been promoted captain, to date from June 20. Capt. Morris was a solicitor, in partner- ship with his father, and is now home on sick leave from the front. Mr. Sydney Charles Hopkins, who joined the Inns of Court Training Corps, has just been given his commission in the Mon- mouths. Lieut. Hopkins, who, prior to his entering the Army, was an assistant master at Rutlalld..street School, is the son of Mr. W. P. Hopkins, H.M. Custom of Excise, Swansea. Lce.-cpl. Gwilym Lewis, Warwickshire Begiment, son of Mr. Thomas Lewis, ot Graigola-road, Glais, arrived home on eonvalescent leave late on Thursday even- ing. He was wounded in the shoulder during the fighting on the Somme in July last, and has been in hospital in Man- Chester for the past two months. News has been received in Swansea of the death in action in France of Bifleman i Leonard Creasey, of the Rifle Brigade, one of the employes of Ben. Evans and Co. Creasey, who was a young man of about 30, joined the Army in June, 1915. A native of Leighton Buzzard, he was well known to many people in Swansea, par- ticularly in Association circles, being the captain of the Temple Association Foot- 11 ball Club. His eldest brother was killed in the war last March, and two other brothers are serving in the Army. At a well-attended public meeting, pro- moted in connection with the Local Sol- diers' and Sailors' Reception Committee, at the Public Hall, Clydach, on Saturday evening, Ptes. W. J. Whitter, T. J.! Broome, and Johnny Thomas, all home. on leave, were accorded a warm welcome; and were made the recipients of gifts of money. Mr. loan Davies, M.E., (Clydach i Merthyr Collieries), presided, and made the presentations. A programme, ar- j ranged by the Calfaria Brass Band. was provided during the evening, to which the Calfaria Band (conducted by Bandmaster J. Jones), Messrs. loan Davies, J. J. Wil- liams (Trebanos), Sam Davies (Ynys- tawe), and others, contributed. Lieutenant J. D. Vauihan. of Burry-I port, has been awarded the Military Crors for conspicuous bravery. The gallant lieutenant was officially informed by the general oiffcer that he and two other offi- cers of a Welsh regiment had been hon- oured. Lieut. Vaughan is the only son ot Mr. and Mrs. Henry Vaughan, of 44, Man- eel-?treet, BurryporL. H. 'reJ.Yed his early education at the Burryport School. He won a scholarship at the Llane'dy In- termediate School, and from thence he went to Aberystwyth College, where he obtained his B.A. with honours. He was appointed assistant master at York I County School. Hesubseoliontly removed to Derby Secondary School as assistant master. T. tucker, K.N.D., Swansea. (Missing.) A.B. E. Simons, I Landore. (Missing.). Str.-Br. E. A. Miles, Landore. (Died of Wounds.) Pte, Will Morris, Swansea. (In Hospital.) Pte., Albert Scarr, Plasmarl. (Killed.) Lc.-Cpl. I. Roberts, Morriston. (Wounded.) Pte. W. J. Saunders, Cwmbwrla. t (Recommended.) Bdr. R. W. Edwards, 1. Llansamlet. (U ?edal. ) 1 (Military Medal.) Mr. end Mrs. Caleb Morris, of Gwrhyd Mill, Rhodiad, St. David* have received information from the commanding officer that their son, Sapper -Tames Morris, Royal Engineers, was killed instan- taneously on the night of November 28th lar.t- News has been received that Corpl. D. E. Howells, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, son of Mr: Daniel Howells, of Balaclava-street, has been wounded, and is now in a Lon- don hospital. Before the war he was employed as a oleprk on the Midland Rail- way loco dept., Upper Bank. Trebooth Hall was filled on Thursday evening, when a meeting was held under the auspices of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Fund. Mr. Herbert Evans presided. Mies Muriel Williams presented Corpl. Trevor Jenkins, a local hero who is now home on leave, with a medal. Corpl. Jenkins has been in the fighting line for the last 18 months, and has been wounded twice. Le.-Ct. LI. Williams, Clydach. (Died of Fever.) A.B. W. E. Hanson, Manselton. (Wounded.) (Photos by Chapman.) Mjr. S. L. Hunkin, Neath. (Private to Major.) Lt. J. D. Vaughan, Burryport. (Military Cross.) Sgt. W. A. Thomas, A beravon. (Killed.) Cpl. W. Bunting, i (Presented with J).C.M. at Neath.), f News has been received that Private Glyn Watkins, of the H.A.C., and son oi Mr. William Watkins, M.E., CwmMyn* fell, has been wounded bv bullet through the wrist. The wound was inflicted by a sniper. Pte. Watkins has been at tht front for about four months. Major J. Aubrey Smith, formerly of the Welsh Regiment, has been appointed on the Staff of Army Headquarters. It is a high compliment to an officer who has rendered magnificent service. He is at present home on short leave, and has been the recipient of many inquiries as to his health from friends, who have incidentally confused him with a Captain A. C. Smith, also of Swansea, who was recently reported ill with diphtheria. Mrs. M. J. Evans, Ystrad, Fforestfach, wife of Pte. Lewis Evans, Welsh Regi- ment, has received a letter from the offi- cer in charge to the effect that her hue- band has been wounded by shrapnel in the shoulder and back, and that he lies at the base hospital. Pte. Evans has also writ. ten, stating the nature of his wounds. He has seen 13 months" foreign service on French soil, and latterly has acted as stretcher bearer. News reached Port Talbot on Thurs- day of the death in action of Second- Lieut. Arthur Jenkins, of a Machine Corps. He was a teacher in the Hafod Schools, Swansea, and resided at 193, Dinae-efcreet, Landore, before receiving his commission in the Welsh Regiment, in May, 1915.- He had been in France only three months, and his section only went into the trenches on Sunday. He was killed on Monday last. Sixteen months ago he married Miss Amelia Parton, of Port Talbot, organist of Libanus Chapel, Morriston, and a well- known music teacher. His brother-in- law was Harry Parton, of the H.A.C., and he was in the same division. His only brother has been wounded twice, and was in the South Wales Borderers. The death—already reported-is now officially announced of Lieut. Arthur Em. lyn Jenkins, Machine-gun Corps. Deceased was one of the most popular and pro- mising young men in this district, being well-known in eisteddsfodic cities and also in the scholastic profession, having been for several years a teacher in tho Hafod Schools, Swansea. His only brother, Lieut. Tudor M. Jenkins. has been twice wounded in the Dardanelles, and is now serving in Mesopotamia. The greatest sympathy is extended to Mrs. Jenkina (nee Miss Parton, A.T.C.L., Dinas-street, Plasmarl, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Parton, Connaught-street, Port Tal. bot), and to his father, Mr. Rhys Jenkins, accountant, Oxford-buildings, Oxford- street, Swansea. It was a coincidence that on September 18th last, when he first en- tered the trenches it was deceaseds 27th birthday.

Advertising

 ¡.  ¡  Our portrait is of Mrs. E. Hocking, of 25, Fife Road, Canning Town, London, who writes-e- U I have much pleasure in writing to you in regard to the safe cure of my leg and foot through taking Clarke's Blood Mixture.' For two years I suffered from a very bad Ulcerated Leg and Foot, which became very swollen and so painful that I could hardly put the foot to the ground. I tried many other medicines and oint- ments to make a cure of it, but found in 'Clarke's Blood Mixture' the best and only cure. I took nine bodies in all. and it has taken every bit of poison out of my blood, and made me a well woman. I wish you to have v this published, as it is a wonderful thing to be able to say." In a further letter, received June 8th last, 2! years since her cure, Mrs. Hocking writes:- "I am pleased to say that my leg and foot still keep well, and I feel quite well in myself." If It's Any Disease I Due to Impure Blood sucb as Eczema, Scrofula, Bad Legs, Abscesses, Ulcers, Glandular Swellings, Boils, Pimples, Sores of any kind, Piles, Blood Poison, Rheumatism, Lumbago, Gout, or any kindred complaint, Don't waste your time and money on useless lotions and messy ointment* which cannot get below the surface of the skin. What you want, and what you must have, is a medicine that will thoroughly free the blood of the poisonous matter which alone is the true cause of all ybur suffering. Clarke's Blood Mixture is just such a medicine. It is composed of ingre- dients which quickly expel from the blood all impurities from whatever cause arising, and by rendering it clean and pure can be relied upon to 4 give ipeedy relief and lasting benefit. Pleasant to take and warranted free from anything injurious to the most delicate constitution. Clarke's Blood Mixture By reason of its Remarkable Blood Purifying Properties is universally recognised ad THE WORLD'S BEST REMEDY FOR SKIN AND BLOOD TROUBLES. Sold by all chemists and stores, 2{9 per bottle (six times the quantity ltl-), REFUSE ALL SUBSTITUTES. The OH^arnis!r ^siS^ FOR FLOORS IN 12 NATURAL SHADES I VCi pt., 1 pt., 1 qt. £ gall., & 1 ?a!t. T!NS. | ASK YOUR IRONMONGER OR DECORATOR FOR STOVO STAINOLEUM A SEE THAT YOU GET THEM, MANUFACTURER Q|r BOTH: JAMES RUDMAN, BRISTOL. STOVO," The Famous BLACK ENAMEL For Bicycle*, Gntes. & all OmamentAllronwork. eN TINS OF CONVENteNT SIZES .I. vF i. sssasssaasssss