Collection Title: Abergavenny Chronicle

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is the copyright of the Tindle Newspapers

View full details

First Previous Image 6 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
11 articles on this page
NOTES ON NEWS

NOTES ON NEWS. —— —— Tho pen hesitates in writing anything that  th&U do adequate justice t? the great career I MR. CHAMBERLAIN. of Mr. Chamberlain. Diverse I notes are sounded in the various papers, according I as they accept or reject his political faith, but one and all join in paying tribute to his amazing energy, his superb courage, and the quality that always appeals to an Englishman—his refusal to know when he was beaten. He was ever a fighter. Mr. Chamberlain changed much in his forty years of public life, and it was sometimes difficult to feilow the line of his actions: but it is possible to think that when history writes the final verdict it will be that he was con- sumed with a passion for the betterment of the people. He gave evidence of that during his BpWndid municipal career in Birmingham he was the first state man of any eminence to inscribe the legend of social reform on his banner: and his vision of a United Entire was inspired by a fervent desire to make the British race greater, stronger, and happier than it had ever been. It is difficult to touch on thi

No title

"English estate of £ 7,790 was left by the Maharajah of Cooch. Behar, who died at Cromer last September. Mr. Hedley F. Le Bas, Liberal candidate for the Watford division of Hertfordshire, has resigned his candidature through ill- health. "Eva" Horntter, the young" German woman who was arrested as a spy at Cher- bourg in March, was sentenced to a year's imprisonment and a fine of £ 40. Mrs. James Harding, aged ninety, of Batheaston. Bath, who has just died, had fc urtecn children, 78 grandchildren, 124 great-grandchildren, and three grcSt-gra&t- grandchildren. Owing to alleged heavy pier dues charged by the London County Council, the steam- boat service on the Thames between London and Greenwich has been abandoned.

SENSIBLE HOUSEHOLD APRON

SENSIBLE HOUSEHOLD APRON. Here is just the thing that every busy housewife will need. You will find this sensible apron so easy to make up. It is so practical, too; the edges meet right up behind, protecting the whole of the skirt, and the plain square bib covers a good por- til..u of .the blouse. Then the big pockets are extremely useful. They will hold pegs, keys, dusters, and all those little things that give you so many journeys backwards and for- wards throughout the day when you have no convenience for keeping them about you. This apron will look quite as well in a coloured linen cr casement cloth as in white calico. You will require three yards of material. Pin the pattern together and try on be- fore cutting out. If large enough cut exactly by pattern. Half an inch is allowed on aU seams and turnings. DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING. To Cut Out: Lay the pattern on the material according to the diagram. Mark round all edges and notches and through all I [Refer to D. L. No. 104.1 perforations with chalk. Remove the pattern and cut out exactly by the chalk lines, as all seams und turnings are allowed for. To Make: Join up and fell the seams. Horn the back and bottom edges. Neaten the pockets with a hem round, matching the notches at the top to notches of the front gore. Guther fullness in at the top. Hem the bib all round and gather the bottom edge slightly. The belt connects this with the skirt of the apron; it should be sewn firmly, and should be lined, the lining tc face over the raw edges of the joins. Make buttonholes and sew on buttons. t

IECONOMY IN UNDERWEAR FOR I ISUMMER COMFORT

ECONOMY IN UNDERWEAR FOR SUMMER COMFORT. Our comfort in hot weather demands that We shall cut down our underwear as far as possible, and this is one respect in which the modern fashions favour us, It posi- tively makes one shudder to think of the quantities of stiff, starched petticoats the summer dresses demanded at one time. Nowadays, the less underwear we don, the better our dresws fit, and it is quite a relief to think of the comparative coolness in store fo.- us through these basking summer days. One of the most sensible items of modern underwear is the French divided skirt, which does away with the old style of separate knickers and petticoat. A good example of this is shown here this week, [Refer to D. L. No. 105.] I and I am sure all my readers will want to have the pattern, for you can see at a glance what a lot of work it saves, and it is so comfortable, too. It makes up from three yards of thirty-six inch nainsook, and looks very dainty trimmed with band em- broidery, though ready-made Swiss is just as good if you have not sufficient time for ornamenting by hand. Pin the pattern together and try on before cutting out. If -arge enough cut exactly by the pattern. Half an inch is allowed for on all seams and turnings. DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING. I To Cut Out.—Lay the pattern on the material according to the diagram. Mark round all edges and notches and through all perforations with tinted chalk. Remove the pattern and cut out exactly by the chalk lines, as all seams and turnings are allowed for. To Make.—Close the top of front seam and fell neatly. Close the leg seams, and finish likewise. Hem the edges that are left open. Try on the garment. Take darts out at the waist, and finish with a shaped band or a narrow facing. Sew on tapes for fastening. Finish the leg ends with tiny iirme, set on beading and then frills. The latter consist of plain lace flouncing o-r straight pieces of material specially embroiderel, so as to be left open at the sides. Paper patterns can be supplied, price 6Jd. When ordering, please quote number, enclose remittance, and address to Miss Lisle, 8, La Belle Sauvage, London, E.C.

No title

Mrs. Catherine Murphy (twenty-five) was committed to the Assizer at Newcastle charged with the attempted murder of her seven- months-old child and with attempting suicide. The Bishop of Arizona has arrived ifci London for a short holiday. The entries for the King's Prize at Bislev are about the same as last year. The final closing date is July 21st, and an ootry of 1,200 is expected.

MOTHER AND HOME m

MOTHER AND HOME. -m. Despite the pessimists, most people do the things they should do. At least they have a try at it, and generally a brave one. Comparatively few women try to shirk re- sponsibility. But it is one thing to do ()!W'B duty, and another to do it graciously. Who does not know the woman who is a paragon of self-sacrifice? She slaves in the interest of her family until her fingers are in danger of getting worn out; she flattens her purse to help undeserving relatives; she deprives herself of every pleasure in life, and take upon herself the burdens of her whole family. But she feels she is doing her duty, and she tries to make others feel it too, though they are often buirdeneil and worried by her unnecessary sacrifices. WHAT MEN LIKE. Women have been accused by male cynics of dressing no" to please men so much as to outshine each other. A lady, who de- clares this to be a gross libel, offers the following hints to women who desire to please the masculine taste. Men like nice air dressing. They are not, however, greatly impressed by stylish coiffures. They like soft, glossy hair that looks as though it had been prettily arranged. They like daintily manicured hands, and the woman who has soft and shapely hands should not detract from their charms by wearing many rings. Usually they prefer coloured shoes to black ones. In their eyes it adds- to a woman's daintiness. Men admire rosy cheeks, too. The pale-faced girl does not appeal to them half so much as she appears to suppose. REAL BEAUTY SLEEP. A woman needs seven hours sleep for the building up of her system. Then she needs two hours more for the recuperation of her body, and the extra two hours will restore her complexion, make her eyes bright, take the wrinkles out of her face and keep her form elastic. The woman who wants to de- rive the fullest benefit from her beauty sleep will compose her mind before sinking off into slumber. She will think pleasant thoughts. Worrying thoughts make fur- rows in the brow and set lines round the mouth. A little light in a bedroom is a good thing for some people, for it will act cheerfully upon the nerves. Do not allow yourself to be awakened in the morning if you mean to get a beauty sleep, or, iffvou must be roused, let it be every so gently. Do not wake up with a start, with an alarm clock, or in consequence of a bell ringing, for these harsh sounds will de- stroy the sense of the good the sleep has done you. A PRETTY TABLE COVER. 1 A dainty little cover for a cheet of drawers or bedside table can be made from four embroidered pocket handkerchiefs. Join the four together oy kme't handkerchiefs. ,ans of a, narrow torchon lace insertion, then border the whole with a beading of the same lace. Finish the edge with a rather plain frill of lace to match, and run a narrow silk ribbon—in some colour which will harmonise with the furniture—through the beading. J A. GIRL SHOULD LEARN- I TO sew. To cook. To mend. To be gentle. To value time. To dress neatly. To keep a secret. To keep idleness. To avoid idleness. To darn stockings. To respect old age. To make good bread. To keep a house tidy. To be above gossiping. To make home happy. To control her temper. To take care of the sick. To take care of the baby. To sweep down cobwebs. To marry a man for his worth. To read the very best of books. To take plenty of active exercise. To be a helpmeet to her husband. To keep clear of trashy literature. To be light-hearted and fleet-footed. To be womanly under all circumstances. MOTHER'S WISDOM. I If things have gone right, the child begins to perceive tha.t his mother's injunctions are to be obeyed, not only because unpleasant- ness supervenes if they are not-this he hardly thinks about-but because there is a positive gain of a spiritual kind. Her plea- sure is manifested at his obedience, and he learns to find a lofty satisfaction in her pleasure simply because he begins to return her love. The least hint of displeasure from that quarter Ls more than he is prepared to face. And then her wisdom! Before many mweks are out (says Dr. Lvttelton in "The Corner Stone of Education r,) he has begun to substitute for his unreasoning enmity against small feathered things a keen and sympathetic interest in them, so that it be- comes to him a really regrettable fact that he ever put his foot on that blind and sprawling fowl. Of course, he recognises that he knew no better; but his mother did all the time, and long before, indeed, she was possessed of the wisdom which taught her a thing he could never have learnt with- out her. OUR GRANDMOTHERS' SECRETS. I Our grandmothers were usually the pos- sessors of exceedingly fine soft skins, and guileless of wrinkles. What was their secret? Briefly this: They avoided extremes. Ex- tremes of heat and cold, extremes of food and clothing were carefully set on one side; they were far more temperate in every res- pect than are we to-day, and plain living, early hours, and an abstention from undue excitement accounted for the unlined com- plexions of many old ladies of other days. Rain-water, too, was regularly used by them, and this may have had much to do with the absence of wrinkles. How TO REMOVE CROW'S-FEET. A mass of fine lines collecting about the eyes results in crow's-feet, one of woman's greatest enemies if she desires to remain young-looking. Bagginess round the eyes often accompanies these. Crow's-feet can be removed by careful massage, which must be done in firm circular movements. The baggi- ness beneath the eyes will also yield to mas- sage, smooth movements from the inner to the outer corner of the eye being neces- sary. The skin should be prevented from getting loose, for often the absence of fat beneath the skin is the real cause of wrinkles. A careful but not too rich diet should be chosen. The following lotion is very good for the removal of crow's-feet, as it tends to tighten the skin. Take fifty parts Tose-water, twelve parts thick milk of almonds, and one part sulphate of alumina. A small portion should be mixed at a time, and the bottle kept well corked when not in use. It should be applied with a camel-hair brush. How TO BE PRETTY. I Would you be pretty? Then first aim at being healthy. Eat slowly, and see that your food is nourishing. Take plenty of exercise, and keep your windows open day and night. Prettiness depends to a very large extent upon daintiness. Never let anything interfere with your daily bath, keep your hair well washed and brushed, and your hands and nails scrupulously clean. Women, especially whose first youth is gone, should, if they would retain their good looks, see that they have an occasional rest cure. This may consist of a day in bed, when reading should be prohibited, and only fever diet allowed. When this is impossible, rest quietly for an hour or so in a semi-dark room. CLEAN YOUR JEWELLERY. I Beautiful jewellery can be a great addi- tion to any costume—if it is clean and always well polished; but nothing makes a woman look so badly dressed as dingy orna- ments. Girls arc apt to get very careless about these minor details, because it is too much trouble to attend to them. Precious stones can be kept in as good a condition at home as they can in the hands of an expert. To cleanse it put the jewellery in pure alcohol for a few minutes, then rub gently with soft tissue paper. Do not use a nail brush or a harsh cloth, as it will sciwfech the stones.

No title

A bag of salt standing where there is a eniell of fish will absorb the odour. Raw potato-juice is a valuable cleanser. It will remove stains from the frauds and also from woollen fabrics. When making soups or stews, if there is too much flavour of one particular veget- able, a sprig of parsley added wilj equalise f.he flavouring. After washing lamp-chimneys, try polish- lag them with dry salt. This gives the glass a brilliant shine and prevents it from cracking. Starched material, even though it keeps c1".an longest, should be avoided during Warm weather. The starch prevents a free current of air passing through. To whiten the kitchen table scrub with powdered bath brick, then wash off with tc pid water. When the kettle is furred fill with potato peelings, then add a little water and boil fa-st till clean. To strengthen shirt buttonholes stitch round and round with the machine after the buttonholes have been worked over. Before cleaning knives on a knife-board, damp them slightly. They clean more quickly, and gain a better polish. To rid a kitchen of beetles mix one ounce of borax with brown sugar and place over the hearth or in the corners and cupboards. Should paraffin oil be spilt when filling lamps, a little salt sprinkled over it will prevent the unpleasant smell. I DISTASTEFUL TO MOTHS. I The odour of printer's ink and cedar is not at all agreeable to moths. An ordinary trunk lined with clean newspapers, under which a number of small pieces of wood from cigar-boxes have been laid, makes almost as safe a storage as place for clothing as an expensive cedar chest. I BICARBONATE OF SODA. I Bicarbonate of soda will remove stains from enamelled saucepans if placed in the water boiled in them. Added to meat when stowing, it makes it much more tender. A pinch added to the water in which greens are boiled will keep them a good colour. A pinch added to milk in warm weather will prevent it from turning. Silver goods rub- bed with a little sprinkled on a leather will look equal to new. I To IMPROVE CURRANTS. I To improve the flavour of currants and sultanas which are to be used for cakes, place them in a bowl, pour boiling water over them, and leave to soak all night. The fruit swells to twice its former size, but should be drained from the water and dried in the oven before being added to the other ingredients. To KEEP MILK COOL. Directly the milk is left at the house take it at once into a cool larder or cellar and stand the jug in a basin of cold water with a handful of salt in it. Place a piece of wet butter-muslin over the top of the jug. The water must reach the milk-line in the jug. When infants are being fed on milk this method should always be put into practice. Cream should be treated in the same way. FURNITURE REVIVER. The following mixture removes dirt, grease, stains, etc., and produces a. fine polish with very little labour: half-quartern each tur[>entine, methylated spirits, vinegar and paraffin. Mix well together in a pint bottle. and it is ready for use. It should be applied on a soft rag and the furniture well rubbed. The bottle should be well shaken each time of using. To WASH A KNITTED JERSEY. The secret is simply this-not to wring it at all. Wash it with a good white soap in lukewarm water, and rinse thoroughly in water of the same temperature. Lay a white bath towel upon a table, and spread the jersey out on this, arranging it in the shape you wish it to dry. Place the table in the open air, but not in the direct sun- shine, or the jersey (if a white one) will look yellow. When one side is dry, turn it carefully and dry the other. SOME USEFUL RECIPES. I KIDNEY FRITTRRs.-Make a good thick batter. Season it with pepper and salt. Cut some ox kidney into moderately thick slices, dust them lighty with flour, and dip them in the batter. They should be rather thickly coated, so it is better to dip them twice, allowing a short interval between the first and the last immersion. When the fat in the frying pan emits a faint blue smoke, put the fritters carefully into it, and cook gently; turn them over when browned on the top side. The kidney may, if desired, be cooked for a short time before using the batter; in that case it takes less time to cook the fritters. They must be done very thoroughly. RICE SAVOURY.—Boil one pound of rice in water with an onion finely chopped. When tender and nearly dry stir in the following mixture: Three tablespoonfuls of grated cheese, three tablespoonfuls of tomato sauce, a dessertspoonful of chopped parsley, salt and pepper to taste, and two ounces of but- ter. Turn on to a dish and serve hot. GINGER BEER.—Put into a large pan, two pounds of loaf-sugar, two ounces of best Jamaica ginger (very well bruised), and two gallons of cold water. Boil the whole for half an hour, and skim it well. Pour the liquid into an earthen pan, adding a sliced lemon, or even two lemons, and half an ounce of cream of tartar. When about new milk heat add a teacupful of yeast. Let the beer ferment for two days. Strain it, and bottle in small stone bottles. The corks must be very carefully wired down, and the bottes kept on their side in a cool place. In very hot weather those likely to be wanted may be placed in a bucket filled with cold water; this may be changed occasion- ally. If ice is to be had so much the better. I RHUBARB WiNE.-Take two large bundles of rhubarb, some Demerara sugar, two lemons, a few pieces of ginger, and a few red peppercorns. Wipe the rhubarb, and cut it into small pieces. Place these into a large earthenware pan or basin, fill the pan with cold water, cover it, and let it stand for five days. Then strain off the water into a clean pan, and throw the rhubarb away. now measure the liquid, and for every four quarts add three and a half pounds of sugar. Again cover the pan, and leave it three or four days till the sugar has dis- solved, then put the liquid into a cask or large stone jar. Add the lemons (cut in slices), the ginger, and the peppercorns, and allow it to ferment. When the wine has ceased bubbling on the top, strain out the lemons, etc. Colour it carefully with burnt sugar till it is the tint of sherry, then bottle it. The longer this wine is kn4 the nicer it will be, and it has a decided resemblance to champagne. -<

No title

There are about 170,000 subscribers in the second edition for 1914 of tho London Tele- phone Directory, an increase of 6,000 since January. More distinctive type has been used for the numbers to prevent misreading. John William Holting, fifty-five, manager of the Market Weighton (Yorkshire) branch of Messrs. Barclay's bank, was at Beverley sen- tenced to six months' imprisonment in the second division for fraud on the bank, which lost £ 5,600. Among the "drunks" int,roduced to the Wil- lesden magistrate was a navvy who wore a bead necklace.

DRESS OF THE DAY

DRESS OF THE DAY. A PRETTY BATHING GOWN. What an incredible gulf separateis the bathing gown of to-day from its proto- type of our mother's young days. Then it was a shapeless and clumsy garment more closely resembling a sack tied round the waist than anything else, while to-day it is carefully designed and as beautifully cut and fitted as the smartest of afternoon frocks. Moreover, the smart bathing gown of the day embodies in itself most of the characteristic features of the fashions of the hour, and thus dates as easily and quickly as a gown or a costume. The bathing gowns of this present season are particularly attractive and becoming. They are carried out in various materials, the more expensive models in taffetas (which is the fashionable material of the year for the purpose), satin, etc., whilst the less costly models are made of alpaca, soft serge, etc. Alpaca is particularly good for this purpose, for it is light in weight, does not hold the water, and does not cling A NEAT BATHING COSTUME. I [Refer to X 507.] to the figure when wet. Our sketch shows a very charming bathing gown made of alpaca, which in this case is a pretty shade of blue—something like a Saxe blue but just a trifle less bright. The suit consists of two -armeAt-s-plain and rather wide knickers, which clear the knee and which are set on to a little sleeveless and very low cut bodice of thin white cotton stuff, and a tunic which. reaches almost to the knee. The tunic fastens down the front with black buttons, and is held in at the waist by a sash of broad black silk braid which is tied in a rmart bow in front. It is cut in V shape at the neck, where it is finished by a smart turaed down collar of black satin. The sleeves are short and rather loose, and are set into the bathing gown in Raglan style. They are trimmed with bands of black silk braid, the outer of which is broad, whilst the inner is narrow. Bands of similar brai

No title

"Anyone who has seen wounded wild Animals must have noticed how, when unalarmed, they Appear indifferent to their wounds," said Lord laminjton. at the meeting of the Research De- fence Society in London.

I MOTORS MOTORING

I MOTORS & MOTORING BY J. T. WARD. THE £15 MOTOR-BICYCLE: IS IT POSSIBLE ? For the past two or three years a rumour has gained currency that some firm of motor manufacturers were going to place on the market a reliable and efficient motor- cycle at the low price of gl5. Usually, the firm credited with such an intention was the famous Ford Company of Detroit (U.S.A.), and possessing a British works at Trafford Park, Manchester, probably on ac- count of the fact that they have specialised in the production of a cheap light car in huge quantities. And certainly, if any motor manufacturing firm could by any means produce a motor-cycle and sell it at such a low price, none would be better able, with their plant and organisation, than the Ford Company. But the canard has at last been laid to rest and settled once for all, for the British Ford Company has issued an official notification that at present it has no intention whatever of producing a motor- cycle, neither at tl5 or any other priee, and that there is not the slightest truth in the rumour so persistently circulated. In this connection, the Ford Company are too busy in developing and improving their car busi- ness, and it has just been announced that. they intend to extend their large works at Detroit—doubling its size, in fact—at a total cost of approximately Jfc 1,000,000, and which will enable them to employ a labour force of something like 400,000 employees. MOTOR-CYCLE COST. It may, of course, some day be possible to- produce a motor-cycle to sell at X15 retail, but that day is not yet, and may be ma.nv years ahead. Let us just consider what it means. The manufacturer would need a profit of at least £ 1 per machine, while the retailer would require another £2 profit. This reduces the figure to X12. Factory cost, advertising, and dead charges of pro- duction would absorb at least another .£2: 10s. per machine, even if produced in enor- mous quantity. This brings the nett cost for material and labour put into the machine down to the low figure of < £ 9 10s. So we need go no further in considering the absurdity of the proposition, for the cheapest engine alone, made at present, would cost £3 to E4. The magnets cost £ 2, petrol and oil tank .£1, carburetter Xi 10s, say for tubes, pipes, wiring, pulley, and transmission another tl, or about Y.9 in all, and we have not yet considered the making of the bicycle, or its tyres and all other parts, not to mention plating, enamel- ling, lining, etc., etc. As matters stand at present, no firm of makers specialising in motor-cycles would dream of the bicycle portion alone costing them less than ES to £ 10, which would be good enough to use vith engine drive. PRESENT CHEAP MOTOR-CYCLES AND THE OTHERS. So far, the cheapest motor-cycle known to be on the market is offered at .£21, and noteworthy points about this machine are that the engine is of small dimensions and power (about one h.-p. or so), and it is so ill-finished generally that the maker offers a better finished one at E23, and one of slightly higher power at £ 24, and better ones altogether at < £ 30. Another maker who made a speciality of motor-cycles at £23 has been forced to go into bankruptcy, so the profits were evidently inadequate. There are several machines on the market at t26 5s. of good design and make, but in these cases the engines fitted are of the "two- stroke" variety, notably cheaper to pro- duce than the ordinary four-stroke tvpes, as. they have fewer parts. It is remarkable the existing unanimity in price asked for really well-made 3} h.-p. standard types, for all are t48 to < £ 50 each, and it would be obviously an advantage to any maker could he produce and sell such machines at £ 40 or £ 42, and so secure an increased trade. Those £48 or £ 50 machines are for plain standard fixed engine mounts. To fit them with a free engine clutch device adds another £ 5 or £ 6 to cost, and change speed gears another X6 or £8, and so we get to the .£60 and P-65 machines now so popular quite easily. An electric lighting and self- starting engine set or device brings them up to £70 and £75. Twin cylinder machines, too, are always more expensive than the single-cylinder variety. Ten and twelve years ago plain three h.-p. machines were about £ 50, as they are to-day, although present-day machines have many refine- ments and details added. In every case where reductions have been made, it has been at the expense of engine power. I THE IMPORTANCE OF THE SPARKING PLUG. Every car owner knows how important it is in a four or six cylinder car to not only ase the best quality sparking plugs, but to see they are kept clean and free of soot or oil. Nothing can be more annoying to the owner-driver of a car with a four- cylinder engine if one cylinder is "missing" through a defective sparking plug or some sther cause. The car bumps and jumps along instead of running evenly, and is very unresponsive to the throttle and spark levers and also the clutch. The difference in smoothness of running and the power developed can be detected instantly one plug ceases to fire. As a general rule the use of too much engine oil is a prolific cause of misfitmg at the plugs. The supply of oil should be well regulated, just enough and no more. It is better to give an engine l little and often than to rely on putting in a quart or more at once, occasionally. An oiled up" plug will not spark, no more will one "sooted up," the latter cause being the use of too much petrol and too little air, or- "too rich a mixture" as it is put. It is a good plan to take all four plugs out occa- sionally and clean them thoroughly, or better still keep two sets, and be able to change the ones in use for a clean set at any time. Good sparking plugs must necessarily possess three important qualifications. They must be thoroughly insulated for the high: tension wire to get into the engine, com- pression proof in all parts, and heat proof. THE MINIATURE LIGHT CAR. Nothing has tended towards popular and economical motoring during the past year more than the efforts made by manufac- turers to produce a reliable and efficient miniature car. In price they range from £ 125 to E200 and slightly over, the best examples selling at from JJ185 to- X210, the latter price including an electric lamp lighting set. They are light on tyres.. and these being of small size are cheaply re- placed. They will run forty to sixty miles on a single gallon of petrol, and a pint of engine oil or less. More wonderful still, they are capable of speeds up to fifty and sixty miles an hour on the level, and can actually leave on the road bigger and more expensive cars. In every respect except one, they will do all the bigger powered and more expensive cars can do, and the excep- tion is in the hill-climbing, in which thev do not shine on top gear, but will climb anything in reason on second speed, which is easily changeable owing to the "gate" change lever arrangement fitted. ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. Holiday-maker (Shrewsbury). Shrews- bury Windermere: Go by Battlefield, Shaw- bury, Market Drayton, Andlem, Nantwich, Tarporlev, Warrington, Wigan, Preston, Garstang Lancaster, Bolton-le-Sands, and Kendal. It is a splendid road all the way, except through and a few miles out of Wigan. Preston to Kendal, and on to the- Lake, is in fine condition. Novice (Chester).—To see North Walls,. Conway is a good centre. You are only a few miles from Llandudno or Colwyn Bay ind Rhyl, while such places as Bangor, Beaumaris, Carnarvon, Betys-y-coed, Bala, Barmouth, etc., are within easy driving dis- tances. A. T. (Evesham).—You should be able to :ret a good motor shed built for zCl4 or £ 15. k number of firms are advertising them at crom £8 upwards, but arre mostly too small. ^urragated iron sheeting for outsides and ;hin-tongued and grooved boarding for in- jides will form a good shed, or you might ase the new slab materials such as Etermit, which are heat and cold proof and very- lurablc. All communications relating to motors ind motoring should be addressed to J. T. 5VARI>, 8, La Belle Sauvage, London, E.C.