Collection Title: Abergavenny Chronicle

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is the copyright of the Tindle Newspapers

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
19 articles on this page
r I001 LONDON LETTER

r 001 LONDON LETTER. ] -—- -W  (From Our Special Corre"pondmt.] I It is not considered likely that the Government will decide the great question of voluntary against compulsory recruiting for some time yet. It is generally under- stood that the facts disclosed by the National Register will have a weighty influ- ence upon Ministers, and they may prove to be the deciding factor. What those facts may be is not known to anybody outside official circles, but the work of tabulating the results is being pushed on with all speed. The returns are to be first of all con- sidered by Lord Lansdowne's Committee, I who will report to the Cabinet. Special attention will, of course, be devoted to the pink form," which, as everybody now knows, is being used for every man of mili- tary age who has not enlisted. These pink forms will have to be subjected to very care- ful and thorough analysis, as an enormous number of them will relate to munition workers and others who are doing indispens- able work at home. When the necessary sifting has taken place it will be seen how many possible recruits are left, and it will be for the Cabinet to decide how the infor- mation is to be turned to most profitable account. There is to be no "treating," whisky is to be weaker, and the question of a further restriction of hours during which the sale of liquor may be permitted ia under con- sideration. This is how matters stand in London and Greater London now that an Order in Council has been made on the representation of the Central Control Board for Liquor Traffic. The position is cheer- fully accepted by the public and "the trade" alike, and there is quite a remark- able unanimity in condemnation of the "treating" habit, which was always absurd, and was a fruitful cause of excessive drink- ing. To ask a friend to drink with you was all very well—he might be as thirsty as you and as much in need of refreshment—but why on earth should you expect him, after finishing his drink, to ask you to "finish that and have another with him," whe neither of you could possibly want it? It was a senseless custom, and it will not matter if it is never revived. The only exception to the "treating" order permitted is that a man who stands another a meal may pay for the drinks consumed with it. And now people are asking what will be officially held to constitute a meal. Bread and cheese? A biscuit? Or must it be an affair of courses? Are we being as severely economical as we might, or ought to be? That is the question. Are we really, as a member of the House of Commons remarked, saving money in great chunks? According to this observer, we are saving in sport, enter- tainments, and holidays. Members of the House of Commons, he declares, are cutting ..down their tailors' bills; and women's ex- penditure on dress is appreciably less. If they are wearing dresses quite in the mode, their hats, we are told, are of all dates and fashions of the last three years. I am not an expert in these matters; but I ask my readers if among their lady friends there are many who, with a new dress or costume will consent to wear a hat which is three years old? And what about motorists. Are they economising as much as they might. The War Savings Committee some time ago recommended the cessation of motoring merely for pleasure, but on Satur- days and Sundays on any of the great main roads cut of London, there seem to be as many cars and motor-cycles as ever. In France joy-riding is almost unknown. Per- haps the additional tax on petrol will do something to stop it here. It is rather astonishing that ;'1 the twenty-one years' history of the Promenade Concerts, the experiment of afternoon per- fcrmances has never been tried until now. Apparently it has been assumed that Pro- menade audiences were composed of those whose only leisure is in the evening. No doubt this is very largely the case, and the promoters of the "Promenades discovered a large public whose musical needs and tastes had not hitherto been much con- sidered. But that th^-e is also a public for afternoon performances has been proved by the experiment at Queen's Hall. The first Wednesday afternoon concert was so suc- cessful that it was decided to give another, and possibly matinee concerts may become a feature of Promenade Concert seasons in future. The death of Mr. Keir Hardie has re- called the story of his famous .cap, which made one of the biggest sensations of the Parliament of 1892. That was the period when all members of the House of Commons wore frock-coats and silk hats. For a mem- ber to appear in a lounge suit and a bowler would have been to incur suspicion and to be labelled as a dangerous person of revolu- tionary tendencies. So, when Mr. Keir Hardie, the Scottish Socialist who had been elected for South-West Ham, actually came _to tho House of Commons wearing a cloth cap, men felt that the British constitution had been dealt a staggering blow. Mr. Keir Hardie's entrance upon the Parliamentary .stage was no doubt arranged in order to show his contempt for the established order ,of things, and when he drove into Palace Yard in a wagonette with a crowd of his 'supporters, with his cap, his short coat, his remarkable waistcoat, and a red muffler instead of a collar, he probably saw himself as the advanca guard of democracy march- ing to power over silk hats and frock-coats and all the things for which they stood. In time, Mr. Keir Hardie gave up these little eccentricities of dress, though he never took to a frock-coat. During his twenty-three years' membership of the House of Commons he has made several sensations, but never one so great as that which accompanied his first appearance. Visitors who come up to London from cer- tain places in the provinces are surprised to find that we are permitted so much light in -the streets and houses. To show even the faintest gleam from a window in some coast towns is to invite a visit from the police, and may perhaps mean an appear- ance before the magistrate and a fine. But London householders, so far as one can see, do not seem to take any particular trouble to hide their lights. The police are to be given increased power to enforce the regu- lations as to lights in private houses. There is a great need for uniformity in this matter, exceptional darkness, as Sir John Simon says, being as likely to prove a dis- tinctive mark as exceptional brightness. The commander of the Zeppelin which raided London is said to have informed an interviewer that he was "after the dark spots"; but one would, like to know why, if this was so, he should make us a present of the information, and so put us on oui guard. L A. E. M. I

No title

Sergeant George Edward Nurse, who won the V.C. in South Africa, has been gazetted a temporary second lieutenant in the Artil- lery. Portmadoc Town Council, in the interests of economy has decided to abandon public of economenyt, irely during the war, and to in- Ughting vite shopkeepers to clo6e at six, and the churches to start their Sunday evening ser- vices at an earlier hour. The new sewerage scheme is dropped. Some fifteen officers were decorated by the King at a small investiture at Buckingham Palace

i THINGS THOUGHTFUL I

i THINGS THOUGHTFUL I I SHARE WITH OTHERS. I There is no man that imparteth his joye to his friend, but he joyeth the more; and no' man that imparteth his griefs to his triend, but he grieveth the less.-Bacon, I MY SYMPHONY. I To live content with small means; to seek elegance rather than luxury, and refinement rather than fashion; to be worthy, not respectable; and wealthy, not rich; to study hard, think quietly, talk gently, act frankly; to listen to stars and birds, to babes and sages, with open heart; to bear all cheerfully, do all bravely, await occa- sions, hurry never-in a word, to let the spiritual, unbidden and unconscious, grow up through the common—this is to be my symphony.—William Henry Channing. I NEVER FORGOTTEN. I There is nothing, no, nothing, innocent or good, that dies and is forgotten; let us hold that faith or none. Oh, if the good deeds of human creatures could be traced to their source, how beautiful would even death appear; for how much charity, mercy, and I purified affection would be seen to have grown in dusty graves.—Charles Dickens. I GIFTS THREE. I Three men took joy in finding fault, And thus it came to pass, That Fate upon each one of them Bestowed a piece of glass. The fool contrived of his a lers Wherein, to gloating eyes, The smallest blot that could be found Was magnified in size. The just man made of hia a pane. All clear without a flaw, Nor summer sun nor winter rain Affected what he saw. The wise man pondered long and well How best the search to aid. Then, taking up the crystal gift, Of it a mirror made. I THE RICH PEOPLE. I We measure success by accumulation. The I measure is false; the true measure is appre- ciation; there are more rich persons in the world than one imagines. Perhaps you are one of them. Perhaps you may become one of them, when you know the way. Riches, strangely enough. do not make rich. It is one's attitude toward possessions that makes one rich. Some of the rich are the poorest of the poor. Some of the poor are the richest of the rich. If we appreciate what we have we are rich, even if our possessions might be tied up in a napkin. If we own liouses and broad, lands and do not appreciate them, we are poor indeed. Get the habit of appreciation. Do not think about ownership. The open sky, the open road, the broad fields, the forests and the flowers and the songs of happy birds, all be- long to the person that has sense enough left in this mad world to enjoy them.—Rev. B. P. Anderson. I A VISION OF REST. I We may live so happy there, That the Spirits of the Air, Envying us, may even entice To our healing Paradise The polluting multitude; But their rage would be subdued By that clime divine and calm, And the winds whose wings rain balm On the uplifted soul, and leaves Under which the bright sea heaves, While each breathless interval In their whisperings musical The inspired soul supplies With its own deep melodies, And the love which heals all strife Circling, like the breath of life, All things in that sweet abode With its own mild brotherhood; They, not it, would change; and soon Everv sprite beneath the moon Would repent its envy vain, And the earth grow young- again. —P. B. Shelley. I LOOKING FOR THE BEST. I Do not think of your faults, etill less of others' faults; in every person who comes near you look for what is good and strong; honour that, rejoice in it, and, as you can. try to imitate it. For the rest you will find it less easy to uproot faults than to choke them by gaining virtues. If, on looking back, your whole life- should seem rugged as a palm-tree stem, still, never mind, so long as it has been growing, and has its grind green shade of leaves and weight of honeyed fruit at top.—J. Ruskin. I MAKING LIFE COUNT. I The opportunities in that direction art surely as great to-day as they ever were in any day of the world's history. There are splendid things that need doing, as many of them as the world ever saw before, at one time, and there is the same old danger that they be left undone unless we under- take to do them. There are lofty ideals that need lifting up and glorifying and ex- emplifying in the face of a world that tends to get unsympathetic and selfish and sordid. There are gospels of righteousness and justice and kindliness that need preaching with word of mouth, but most of all with the stronger and more effective word of example. There are entrenched wrongs that need overthrowing, great causes that are crying out for fearless champions. The opportunities for making life count splen- didly are indeed simply unnumbered. And what a pitv it would be if, in the face of all that, we should dawdle it away and do nothing. I PATHWAY OF DUTY. And, as the path of duty is made plain, May grace be given that I may walk therein. Not like the hireling for his selfish gain, But, cheerful in the light around me thrown, Walking as one to pleasant service led, Doing God's will as if it were my own, Yet trusting not in mine, but in His strength alone. -J. G. Whittier. I QUIET JOYS. The joys that are bought with money are worth nothing compared with the joys that, though sweet and gentle and unassuming, are yet deep, enduring, and quieting; the joys that enlarge the heart instead of diminishing it, and which we too often pass by-somewhat in the manner of those peasants whom one sees in an ecstasy over the fireworks at some fete, and who pay not the smallest attention to the splendour of a summer night.—Sabatier. WOMAN MAKES HOME. I With the physical programme carried out to the last detail, the ethical drama opened. An early result, partly of her sex, and partly of her passive strain, is the founding through the instrumentality of the first savage mother of a not and beautiful social state—domesticity. While man, restless, eager, hungry, is a wanderer on the earth, woman makes a home. And though thia home be but a platform of sticks and leaves, such as the gorilla builds on a tree, it becomes the first great schoolroom of the human race. For one &ty there appears in this roofless room that which is to teach the teachers of the world-a little child.—Drum- mond.

No title

Henry Fife, manager of the White Hart I public-house, West Smithfield, London, was I fined X5 at the Guildhall for unlawfully sup- plying a g lass of whisky to a City police con- stable while on duty on the night of Septem- ber 7. Mr. Peter Smith, who has died at Iiket- shall, Suffolk, aged ninety-six, belonged to a family of twenty-five brothers and sisters: He is survived by two sisters, aged ninety- four and eighty-two, and one brother eighty- four. He had nine children, fifty-one grand- children, fifty great-grandchildren, and two great-great-grandchildren.

FRENCH UNITY

FRENCH UNITY. GROWING DISCONTENT TN GERMANY. The following French official communica- tion has been received for publication, and has been issued by the Press Burt^u 1. Once more the sacred unity of France has been manifested in the Chamber of Deputies. The necessary credits for the national defence have been voted unani- mously. This is the official consecration, after fourteen months of war, of the prudent and strong policy of the French Minister of Finance. 2. The news of the Bulgarian mobilisation has been received in France with calm; the papers are unanimous in approving the firm and resolute attitude of the Greek Govern- ment, which recently promulgated the decree of general mobilisation. 3. The discontent in Germany on the sub- ject of the rise in prices of foodstuffs is in- creasing. The "Reichsbote," the organ of the Protestant clergy, insists that the Government shall intervene before it is too late; otherwise, it adds, the burden on the population will become insupportable when winter comes. 4. The report of Lord Bryce, President of the English Commission of Inquiry, as to the infractions of the rules of war committed by the German Army absolutely confirms the reports of the French and Belgian Com- missions on the same subject; it reports in particular numerous cases of the abuse of the white flag, massacres of prisoners, and qrimes against women and children.

CHARABANC SMASH AT EPPING

CHAR-A-BANC SMASH AT EPPING. An accident to a motor char-a-banc oc- curred in the Epping Forest on Sunday morning, and as a result one man was killed and a number injured. The char-i- banc, which had been hired, was on the way to Cambridge with a party of thirty workmen employed at the Royal Small Arms Factory, Enfield Lock. Within half an hour of leaving the Vihe public-house at Waltham Cross, where the journey began, the char-A-banc started to run backwards just as it reached the top of the long declivity known as Woodredon Hill. The driver, Thomas Haswell, ap- plied his brakes without success. Realising that disaster was imminent, he shouted to the party to hold tight and keep their seats. Two of them, however, jumped into the road, One of the two, Harman Bigby, a polisher, of High-street, Waltham Cross, was killed outright. The other, Harry Brooks, of Lawson-road, Enfield Lock, broke his leg badly, and, in a critical con- dition on account of this and other injuries, was taken to Tottenham Hospital. None of those who kept their places until the crash came was very seriously injured. The driver, finding himself unable to stop the char-a-banc, turned it across the roay and as it dashed into a bank most of the occupants were thrown out. Medical at- tention was quickly available, and they were all able to be sent home. Woodredon Hill has been the scene of a number of accidents. The Wake Arms, near its top end, is the terminus of the Sunday omnibuses from London.

SNATCHED FROM DEATH I

SNATCHED FROM DEATH. I Two babies, Robert Elliott, aged three, and Albert Newman, aged five, both of Chester-street, Rugby, had a remarkable escape from death at the mouth of a short tunnel on the Great Central line near Rugby. The children had crawled through a fence, and, unconscious of peril, were play- ing on the track. The mother of one of the children saw their danger, out was pre- vented by the fence from reaching them. Her frenzied cries attracted the attention of Corporal J. Walters, of the 6th Royal Warwicks, who was on bridge-guarding duty. At that moment a troop train pro- ceeding along the up line entered the tunnel. Corporal Walters dashed down the embankment, but was unable to reach the children in time. Fortunately Harold Meanwell, of Church Lanford, had observed the children's peril from the other side of the track. Running down the line, he snatched the babies up, one in each hand, almost from beneath the wheels of the oncoming train, and Reaping clear saved both himself and the. chi«dre.

DEATH OF MR KEIR HARDIE I

DEATH OF MR. KEIR HARDIE. I The death took place on Sunday, in a Glasgow nursing home, of Mr. Keir Hardie. The cause of death was pneumonia. Mr. Hardie was born in Scotland in 1856. At the age of seven he was working in the coal pits, and continued to do so until he was twenty-four, when he became secretary of the Lanarkshire Miners' Mission. He was a very active member of the Labour Party, and during his career in the political arena experiene ey many stormy times. He first contested Mid-Lanark unsuccesfully in the Labour interest in 1888. He was elected for South-West Ham at the General Election of 1892, but lost the seat three years later. Since 1900 he had represented Kerthyr Tydvil. He took an active part Í1 the early efforts to secure Independent Labour representation in Parliament, and was chairman of the Independent Labour Party, and for a time chairman of the Parliamen- tary Labour Party.

IA BOGUS LIEUTENANT I

I, A BOGUS LIEUTENANT. I A Kentish village has been hoaxed by a bogus lieutenant. How it was done was re- lated at Canterbury Police-court on Satur- day when Joseph Henry Baker was clarged with unlawfully "wearing a naval uriform. Baker, it was stated, arrived at Little- bourne representing that he was fron one of the Admiralty aerodromes and was arranging for the landing of two lydro- planes. The people of the village felt highly honoured at the mark of ftvour, lodgings were procured for the "lieu- tenant," a meadow was placed at hi-s dis- posal, and a landing place was chalkec out, carefully guarded by prominent >eople from the surrounding districts. Pracically every inhabitant waited for the hydrolases to arrive, but when evening came Suierin- tendent Herd arrived and arrested laker. The accused, who had previous convirtions against him, was sentenced to six m

I INTERNED GERMANS DEATH I

I INTERNED GERMAN'S DEATH I At an inquest in the Hackney Corner's Court, on Saturday, by Mr. Hickes, onEno Wiemenn, aged 31, a German prisons- of war, who died in Hackney Infirmary on September 20, Dr. Brandier, medical super- intendent at the innrmary, said that Wie- menn was admitted in June as a luntic, He became totally blind. Death was due to a tumour on the brain and paralysit A verdict in accordance with the evidence was given. The coroner said that some )iry- men had wondered why an inquest was necessary in this case. It was done so ;hat when the present terrible conflict was )ver and peace again reigned, the relatives 6uld obtain full information. j

DUTCH LINER SUNK II

DUTCH LINER SUNK. I I i The Holland-Amerika liner Eemdijk (6180 tons), of Rotterdam, has been sunk. he crew have been landed. The P. and O. steamer Mooltan las arrived at Plymouth with the crew of he British steamer Cornubia, belonging to Messrs. Chellew, which was sunk in he Mediterranean on September 9. They wre twenty-eight hours in their boats befire they succeeded in reaching a Spanish prt in safety. The eighteen men of the Lrtr- pool liner Hesione, reported sunk on Satr- day, who were missing, have been landa.

No title

For absenting himself from work wlle engaged on Government work, a lace wotter, named Barradell was fined X5 at Ilkestn, Derbyshire. Up to August 31, 92,658 railwaymen ad twisted a percentage of 14.90 out of a ttal ef 621,588 employed. » I

SA A I 46

SA???? A I .-4 6  Nigella Miss Jekyll.—The cornflower-blu4 blossoms in a feathery green setting of MiSíi Jekyll's love-in-a-mist are distinct and pleas- ing. Growing some 18in. high, sow th< seeds in ordinary border soil whfre thE plants are to flower, choosing a sunny posi- tion. For buttonholes and sprays this is onq of the most distinct and useful annuals. Trees and Shrubs.-Seeds or fruits are maturing freely on numerous trees and shrubs in the garden at the present time. It is worth while sowing a number of these aE soon as gathered, otherwise they are stored until spring, become hard, and then germi- nate more irregularly,, and take longer than if sown now. Notable instances are roses and pyrus (which includes the fruiting crabs, cotoneasters, cytisus, genistas, Crataegus, and honeysuckles). Another group which require sowing as soon as ripe are those which lose their vitality if allowed to dry and shrivel. These include the oak, walnut, horse and Spanish chestnut, and castanopsis. For small quantities of these sow in pots. and plunge to the rim in ashes in a colJ frame. < Storing Fruit.—Late varieties of pears and apples will soon be ready for storing, but leave the latest varieties a little longer. If thoroughly sound fruit is placed in boxes it will keep well, but some of the finest samples may be placed in single layers. I Apples are best stored so that the stalks are downwards, but pears the reverse way, as shown in the accompanying illustration. The Hardy Leadworts. — Ceratcstigma plumbaginoides, or plumbago larpentae, as it is frequently named, is a very desirable plant for the rock garden and front of the mixed flower border at this season. The plants grow some six inches to nine inches high and are now freely clothed with cobalt- blue flowers. A recent introduction from China, ceratostigma willmottiae, appears likely to equal or even surpass in value for the garden the older kind. Growing up to two feet in height, the plants are free and bushy in growth, much more so than c. plumbaginoides, and the leaves are smaller. The shade of blue in the flowers varies little if any. The plants thrive best in rather light soil. Increase is by division in spring, or by cuttings inserted in a close frame during early summer. A Serviceable Mower Carriage. The accompanying sketch of a carriage for a lawn mower has proved useful where the machine has to be taken over gravel paths or long distances. It may be made entirely of wood. The wheels are cut out circular from wood liin. thick, which may be sawn out with a narrow pruning saw. The sup- porting boards are lin. thick, bolted through a triangular shaped axle. The length and depth of the boards accord with the size of the machine. « The Week's Work.—The rooted layers of carnations and picotees may be detached from the parent plants, lifting carefully so that plenty of soil adheres to the roots, and planted at once in beds and borders one foot apart. Choice varieties may be potted in 3-inch pots and wintered in frames freely ventilated. Large clumps of michaelmas daisies must be carefully staked and tied to the best advantage, also the tall chrysanthe- mum uliginosum. Dahlias need close atten. tion now; secure all strong growths and cut off exhausted blooms. If sufficient cuttings of pelargoniums have not been obtained, more may be inserted, preferably round the edges of pots, which should be sufficiently drained, and a sandy compost used. Water, and place the pots in a light position in greenhouse. Restricted trees making too luxuriant growth, causing them to bear no fruit, require root pruning. Dig a trench half way round three feet from hole and cut cleanly all the strong roots. Fill in soil and make firm. Treat the other half next year. When quite ripe, the husks and nuts being brown, gather the filberts and cob- nuts and spread them out in the sun for several days to dry, after which pack in earthenware receptacles, sprinkling a little salt between the nuts to prevent mouldiness. An excessive growth of laterals on the vines prevents access of light and air to ripen the principal growths, therefore shorten and thin out so as to give the large main leaves plenty of space. It will assist the ripening processes if a temperature of 60 deg. is maintained. Give a copious watering of liquid manure to leeks and draw earth to the stems to assist the blanching. Continue to earth plants in trenches the same as for celery. Full-grown beetroots are ready for lifting. Do this carefully, thus avoiding damage to the tap-root. Twist off the leaves two inches above the crowns. Store between layers of sand in a cool place. Tomatoes outdoors showing signs of colouring should be taken indoors to ripen and finish, also any from plants under glass in an unheated hcuse may be ripened in, a warmer struc- ture. If possible, assist crops backward in ripening under glass with gentle fire heat. Green fruits not possible to ripen may be used for jam making. < » » Eupatorium Weinmannianum.—This is a South American shrub that is almost hardy. In the south and west, extending along the west of Scotland, it is fairly colpmon, flower- ing freely in late autumn and -early winter. At the foot of sunny south walls, plants in the London district have passed through recent mild winters unharmed. This eupa- torium, also known as e. fragrans, is, how- ever, best known as a valuable autumn- flowering greenhouse plant. It thrives in ordinary soil, and increase is by cuttings in- serted in spring. Grow the plants in pots outside during the summer, and bring into the cool or cold greenhouse in early Septem- ber. An evergreen bush, flowering from eighteen inches high upwards.

No title

Captain B. M. Hughes, of the l-4th Nor- folks, who has been killed in the Darda- nelles, gave up a lucrative practice at Wymondham to serve his country, refusing also a medical post, as he considered it his duty to serve with the men of the regiment whom he had assisted to train, and with some of whom he served in the South African War. The war has had an extraordinary effect on the shipping industry, old vessels for which only breaking-up prices could have been realised eighteen months ago finding ready purchasers at Cardiff and other ports at J210 and J611 per dead-weight ton—con- siderably more than they were worth when newly built. A ten-year-old steamer of 6,500 tons, which sold for £ 25,000 in 1911, cHanged hands recently at £ 60,000.

I MOTHER AND HOME I

I MOTHER AND HOME. I The following "don'ts" should be observed by many: Don't marry a man who is reck- less and who spends every penny he earnj upon enjoyment. He may be a pleasant enough companion, but he will never prospei or save toward a rainy day. Don't marry a woman who looks down with contempt on all matters connected with housekeeping, condemning them as dull and uninteresting. Remember that a home is never comfortable or well.managed without a good mistress. Don't marry a man whose only idea in lift is having a good time himself, and wh< never troubles to think of sharing his plea, sures with his mother and sisters. I WITHOUT SUNSHINE. I Those who do not appreciate sunshinte, and there are such persons, should try the fol. lowing experiment. It would probably cause them to alter their opinion: Make a room quite dark, and then burn some car- bonate of soda in the flame of a Bunsen gas burner. It will give an orange yellow light sufficiently strong to illuminate everything in the room, but bright though the light is, all distinctions of colour have vanished. Only light and shade remain. A crimson carnation, a blue violet, a red tablecloth, a yellow blind-all look grev or black or white. The faces of those present look positively repulsive, for all natural hues have disappeared. No other experiment so amply demonstrates how great a, loss would be that of our sense of colour, or of the sun- light which enables us to use this sense. I GERMAN MEASLES. I This is a mild, infectious disease, bearing such a close resemblance to measles that many mothers mistake it for the latter com- plaint. Its name and origin have been much discussed since we have been at war with Germany. As a rule the symptoms are mild. The eyes are a little red and there may be a slight running from the nose, whilst the child loses its appetite and com- plains of pain in the back. Sore throat is another symptom. The eruption very closely resembles that of measles, but is usually more copious and the skin is more uniformly red. The rash may be said to begin like measles and end like scarlet fever; but the eruption itself lasts a longer time than measles, its duration being from five to ten days. An attack of German measles is I normally not very serious. I TREATMENT. u I The treatment is very simple The child should be put to bed and the room kept at a temperature of 64deg. There should be a constant supply of fresh air in the room, and the window should be kept open for a couple of inches, both top and bottom. Aconite is the only medicine that will be re- quired, and for a child of one year, three 1-minim tabloids of tincture of aconite should be dissolved in a wineglassful of water and a small teaspoonful should be given every hour. For a child of four years of age, six tabloids should be used to make the solution. As the malady is in. fectious the child should be kept away from the others until the skin has ceased to peel, and afterwards the room should be disin. fected. I SUNSHINE V. FIBS. I I H A. fireplace or stove shoul4a never De built where the sun will strike it," says a well-known architect; "sunlight puts a fire out. I had often been told that fires would not burn well if the sun shone on them, but regarded it merely as a fable. I thought the fires only seemed to burn less well be- cause the bright light of the sun made their flames look pale and weak. Experi- enoe soon showed me that I was wrong. It is a fact that sunlight will weaken and eventually extinguish a fire. The reason is I that the sun's raye hinder combustion, rare- fying the air and reducing the supply of oxygen so necessary to a good, bright blaze." CYCLING IN BAD WEATHER. I When the roads are bad, all muddy and wet, it is well not to take to the lanes and by-ways until traffic has rolled flat the ridges of mud. When, at the beginning of bad weather, rough roads have to be ridden, do not pump tyres too hard. A light covert coat, carried on the machine, is useful in wintry weather for wheelmen and women. Many cyclists suffer from cold feet when riding in cold weather; they should be care- ful to have foot wear that is easy fitting. Two pairs of stockings are warmer than one of thicker material; stockings should be of sufficiently large size, not fitting tightly. Cloth gaiters, strapped under the footwear. should be adopted. For cold hands, wear kid gloves with a woollen pair pulled on over them. When riding over roads that are bumnv. see that the spring" attachment of your lamp is in good condition and that all nuts on the machine are screwed tight. The best place to carry a lamp for winter riding is on the front offside fork. This shows the road clearly, and in a winter's haze or fog the light is seen from the rear by motorists or cyclists who may be overhauling you. If caught in a dense fog, place a piece of tissue-paper over your lamp-glass, and the light will then better penetrate the fog. In fog, an oil lamp is better than an acetylene gas one. I MEASUEE Youia NOSE. I The following are, according to tne ruies of art, the conditions requisite to a really perfect nose: The nose should have the same length as the forehead, and have a slight depression at its root. From its root to its extremity it should follow a perfectly straight line, and come exactly over the centre of the upper lip. The bridge of the nose, parallel on both sides, should be a little wider in the centre. The tip should be neither too thin nor too flesky, and its lower outline neither narrow nor too wide. The lobes must be gracefully defined by a slight depression. Seen sideways, the lower part of the nose will have but a third of its total length. How TO USE PERFUMES. It is now usually understood that very strong perfumes are to be left severely alone by the woman who desires the designation of "lady," and the Indian perfumes of a few years ago are now considered vulgar. To use perfume of any kind rightly there should be just a suggestion of its presence rather than an overpowering reality. Sachets filled with wadding and sprinkled over with a favourite scent may be worn in the cloth- ,ing and laid amongst the lingerie, but a handkerchief saturated with perfume should never be used. Orris root is at the founda- tion of many violet-scented preparations, and the smell of this is never overpowering. A DRY SHAMPOO. I Scalp specialists differ as to the fre- quency with which the hair should be washed, but those with fair hair who are afraid to wash it too often should have a dry shampoo, which can be quite eatoily ob- dry s h ampoo, which (. tained at home. This is made by sifting equal parts of fine white oatmeal with powdered orris root, and then dusting this into every part of the hair, using a little lamb's-wool powder-puff for the purpose. After the hair is filled with the powder wrap the head up in a towel, pinning it tightly round the neck to prevent the irritation of grains of the meal working down the neck and back. At the end of an hour or two unpin the towel, and with a clean brush go outside and shake and brush the hair until every bit of the powder is out of it. Work- ing the meal out of the scalp gives the very best kind of massage to the roots. Do not stop brushing until the hair is entirely freed from the powder. It makes the hair delightfully fluffy, and one never catches cold by this method as is often the case when the hair is washed. The oil and grease are removed, and the hair left deli- cately perfumed, clean and light without the aid of soap. If the hair can be brushed out in the sunlight so much the better.

No title

George Savage, seventy-three, of King's- place, High-street, Southwark, was killed by a motor-car while crossing Blackfriars-rcad, London, S.E. The father of ten children, all under twelve years of age, who appeared at Felt- ham Court as a rate defaulter, was allowed a month in which to pay. For failing to join a vessel Hugh Feeney, ship's fireman, was sentenced at Biyth to a month's imprisonment.

No title

OUR CHILDRENS CORNER t

OUR CHILDREN'S CORNER. t, I UNCLE RALPH. I My DEAB CHILDREN,— I really feel quite proud of you all-the splendid way in which so many have executed their paintings for the Com- petition, and I am delighted to see the entries streaming in. You have set me wondering which of you will secure the special Prizes, as so far the results are so extremely good that I am afraid there is going to be a great big tie, and I imagine "Unc. Ralph" will have the busiest time of his life when the Competition closes on October 1. There is still another week left for those who have not yet taken part in which to see what they can do. This week I am more pleased than I can say to open so many letters from my little nieces and nephews telling me how glad they are to have this "Corner" in the paper week by week, all to themselves, and there is nothing like showing your appre- ciation by putting such good work into the tasks which I set you in the way you do. At least you prove to me your belief in the motto, "Work while you work and I guess I know just how well you can "Play while you play." I have yet another splendid Competition in mind, so keep your eye on the "Corner." Once again good-bye. Much love to each and all, Ever your affectionate. UNCLE RALPH. TRR j CHILDREN'S CORNER UNION. FOUNDED BY UNCLE RALPH. (Open t. Boy. and Girl. under 15 yeiuraf Please enrol me at a Member of the C. C. U." My age is years. JVante Å c1dre. late Vihtn signed potttto UNCLE RALPH,9, 14 BIILL8 BAUTAOB, LONDON, B.C. Members dctlrlnt am Illuminated membershio card. toitabU for framing. should eocloit ptanr itioi with this form. ANSWERS TO LETTERS. ROBIN GEUKGE JAMES: Thank you so much for the pretty story, which I have en- joyed reading. I am glad to welcome you to the "C.C.U." MOLLY DAVEY: I am delighted to hear you were pleased with your prize. DOROTHY ELY: Glad to wel- come you as a member. No, I do not think you are too young, and I should like you to try the competitions. A member- ship card will be posted to you shortly. KATE ELY: Well, Kate, I am glad to note that you are always in the "pink" when you write to me. Your letters always in- terest me, and I am glad that your little sister has now joined. DOROTHY MATTHEWS: So glad to hear you were pleased with your prize. You must try again. DOROTHY SMALLWOOD: Thank you for your nice letter. I hope you enjoyed your holidays. 1', Watch the "Corner" for the result of the Painting Competition, which I hope to aa- nounce next week. 4 CHILDREN'S CORNER UNION. 1 Founded by UNCLE RALPH. Open to all Bora and Girt. under 15 year* of age. RULES OF MEMBERSHIP. 1. To do a good turn to someone every day. 2. To be bright and sunny from morning i tiU night.. 3. To be kind and considerate to others. 4. To be truthful, honest and/diligent. 5. To be unselfish in thought and action. 6. To be kind to all animals. LETTERS FROM MEMBERS OF THE I "CHILDREN'S CORNER UNION." 1 DEAR UNCLE RALPH,— I thank you very much for the prize which you sent me. I got a great sur- prise, as I was at school when it came, and motner received the parcel from the post- man. I will now try again in the Painting Competition. From your loving niece, MARGARET REYNOLDS. DEAR UNCLE RALPH,— I am sorry I have not gone in for all the J nice Competitions, but I have been busy. I I felt I must go in for this one, and here I is the result. We have come to a close of M the holidays, and I have a lot of home n work, and it means few competitions. j I wonder which Indian will take his master or mistress a prize? I Your little niece, EDITH LANGMAN. DEAR UNCLE RALPH,—• I am now writing to thank you very, very much for the chocolates. They were j very nice indeed. I expect you were < wondering why I did not write, but we 1 started school last week, and I have been j away from home. I did not think I should come first in merit, for it was rather tricky. I think it very kind of you to have a Painting Competition. Now I will say good-bye, thanking you once again for the chocolates. With love. From your niece, MARY LINE. I MOLLY'S RIDE. I "You catch me up," said Molly to her brother Dick as she jumped on to her pony Rob. "All right," said Dick; "I won't be a minute." "Just then Rob saw a piece of paper on the road, and, taking fright, started gallop- ing off as fajt as he could go. Molly clung on to the reins and pulled and pulled, but Rob went faster than ever. "Help, help!" cried Dick, as he saw his two soldier cousins riding along. So they turned their horses round and went off after Molly. They galloped and they shouted, and they waved their swords, but Rob only went faster and faster. Everyone they passed who had a horse joined in the chase. But Rob went on and on until he came to the cross roads, when he turned to the right and went in at the Squire's gate; then he < stopped, and Molly got down and went in to jj see the $quire. ¡ But all the others, when they came to the cross roads, could see no sign of Rob and i his rider. They began to think that Rob 1 must have been a fairy horse and carricd Molly away altogether. So Dick and his cousins went to ask the Squire what they | should do, and there they found Molly tell. | ing the Squire all about her exciting ride. t

GERMAN GENTLEMEN I

GERMAN GENTLEMEN! I The Germans behaved much better-"or, 1 rather, less badly-in 1870 than now, and 1 men of the two armies fratemiaed on several 1 occasions. Once during the Siege of Paris the German outposts came upon large jj well-stocked wine cellars, and finding that the supply was more than sufficient for their own wants, signalled to the opposing pickets to approach under a flag of truce. The latter piled their arms and went over. with the re- sult that they were soon busy carrying awsty bottles brought up from the cellars by the. obliging Germans. i