Collection Title: Abergavenny Chronicle

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is the copyright of the Tindle Newspapers

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
21 articles on this page
OUR LONDON LETTER

OUR LONDON LETTER [from Our Special Corrupondtnl."] There is a growing- feeling among sup- porters of the Government that it would be a good thing if more Ministers would, follow the example of Earl Curzon and Mr. Lloyd George in making public speeches. It is not a good thing that hostile critics of the Government and of individual Ministers should have mutters all their own way. People are only too prone to tliink that if no defence is made to attacks upon public men it is because no defence is possible. Xo doubt men of deeds are needed in these days, but men of words also have their part to play, and those Minist-crs most skilled in platform oratory might do very useful ser- vice to the Coalition Government at this juncture; besides which they would infuse fresh spirit into the nation and encourage it to greater efforts. Earl C'irzon's defence of the Cabinet- even of the Twenty-Three—was very timely. People have heard so much about "the Twenty-Three" that many of them have a mental vision of twenty-three men of twentv-threo separate minds and opinions, all squabbling over questions connected with the war, unable to come to any decision, and hampering all the efforts of the naval and military men. Lord Curzon set himself to dispel that illusion, and we get a very different picture of the Cabinet. Its mem- bers do not spend their time in viewing or reviewing, modifying or amending, endor- sing or rejecting, the decisions of the V> ar Committee of six members. The War Com- mittee. as a matter of fact. has an abso- lutely free hand. Its decisions are circulated to the Cabinet; not one has ever been over- ruled. and in ninety-nine cases out cf a hundred they are not even delmted. But even a War Committee of Six is considered too large by some critics, who would reduce it to three, two, or even one. if the heaven- sent Man could be found. "And. say. Lord Curzon, "if there was only one, in two months' time there would be a public appeal to cut off his head." In face of the assurance that the War Committee has a free hand there doss not seem to be much in the agita- tion for a smaller Cabinet: for, as Lord Curzon says, it is not strange if the business of a great Empire in a war like this re- quires a score or more men to carry it on. The sensation of the moment is the quarrel between Mr. Lloyd George and the News," whose hero he has been for years. It waa "A. G. G." who began it. He startled hie readers one Saturday morning with an "Open Letter to Mr. Lloyd George, in which he pictured the Minister of Munitions as the man who made the crisis in the Cabi- net and not only one crisis, but criifts after crisis. "A. G. G. who is Mr. A. (5. Gardi- ner, the editor of the "Daily News," accused Mr. Lloyd GeoTge of being hand and glove with those who are directing the newspaper campaign against Mr. Asquith and the Government, and of being the moving spirit in the whole business. Other men appeared on the stage, but really, according to A. G. G. they only danced whale Mr. Lloyd George pulled the wi-res. "A. G. G." declared that the Minister of Munitions was scheming for supreme power, rather fancy- ing himself in the role of Dictator. It is true that others besides A. G. G." have been saying th ese things, or something like them but they have only whispered them, whereas A. G. G." has shouted them to the world. Mr. Lloyd George has called Mr. Gardiner an assassin, and described his arousations as "pon gas," whereupon "A. G. G." says again what he said before, only more so. It is a nice state of things between two old friends There is great joy among the noble army of bowls players, who have just begun opera- tion in the parks ¥1 the London suburbs. The Daylight Saving scheme will give them an hour's extra play. Tennis players, too, welcome the Bill, and, indeed, open-air people of all sorts. I understand that the joy is somewhat mitigated in the case of those who hold gas shares, for the putting on of the clock will certainly effect a large saving in artificial light. The more one thinks of the beneficial results which should follow the addition of another hour of day- light to the day, the more one wonders why on earth some such scheme was not adopted as soon as it was suggested nine years ago. The second report of the Central Liquor Control Board affords very remarkable evi- dence of the effectiveness of the Board's operations in reducing drunkenness. In all the scheduled areas the police reports record greater sobriety and a general improve- ment in conditions, better order in the streets, more comfortable homes, better cared-for children, and better timekeeping at works. Figures given for London show that while in the three months following the outbreak of war convictions for drunken- ness in the metropolitan district numbered 17,053, in three months following the im position of the no-treating order the totai was 8,343. "The figures given," comments Sir E. Henry, "are remarkable. They eon firm police observation that many fewet drunken persons are to be seen in the streets, and they indicate that the measures taken by the Board have had a very marked effect." It looks as though it might be pos- sible after all to make a nation sober by Act of Parliament, in spite of the oft-quoted dictum to the contrary. One of the finest things in this war is the cool courage with which the officers and men of the mercantile marine have gone about their business on the great waters, though Germany was doing her worst with her submarines. Many of them have stirring talcs to tell of encounters with the undersea boats. There is the Wandle, for instance. The bluff-nosed old collier which thousands of Londoners have seen pushing her way up the Thames to Wandsworth. She has had a fight with a submarine and come off winner, and delighted Londoners the other day showed their appreciation of the pluck of her captain and crew. Their pluck is typical of the entire merchant service, and it must be gall and wormwood to the Germans to learn that in spite of the submarine "blockade." which was to have starved ua out and reduced us to submission a year rr more, ago, our overseas trade is still prosper- ing, and ships continue to enter and leave our ports much as though no German sub- marines existed. A feature of the Board of Trade returns for April is the increase in British exports, the value of which v.:s Y,4,648,106 more than in the corresponding month of last year. The total value (f British exports was only £ 3,129,000 be-low the April of 1914, be fore the war. During the four months ended April imports ex- ceeded exports by £ 156,307,003. A. E. M. I

No title

Second Lieutenant Godfrey Phillimore, son of Lord Justice Phillimore, is a prisoner in Germany. W ounded in the head, he found himself within the German lines on regaining consciousness. A resolution expressing abhorrence and condemnation of the barbarity and cowardice of Dr. A.chenbach in his attitude towards the tvphus-stricken prisoners at Wittenberg has been passed by the council of the British Medical Association. Radlev College has up to the present a roll of honour of one C.M.G., ten D.S.O. s, sixteen Military Crosses, three Legion d'Honneur, and over fifty "mentioned in despatches."

TWO ZEPPELINS DES I TROYED

| TWO ZEPPELINS DES- I TROYED. I j BROUGHT DOWN BY THE GUNS OF WARSHIPS. ¡ Following on the complete wreckage of Zeppelin LO near S?vanger, in Norway, | after its futile raid on the Scottish coast, two more units of the German air fleet have I been destroyed. It is a matter for gratin- j cation that these new disasters were caused not by the weather, but by the gune of the Allies. I On Friday afternoon the Secretary of the Admiralty issued the following announce- I ment: "A Zeppelin was destroyed yesterday by one of cur light cruiser squadrons off the Schleswig coast." Subsequently the following further infor- mation was issued by the Secretary of the Admiralty: "The Commander-in-Chief, Grand Fleet, has reported that the ships which destroyed the Zeppelin yesterday were his Majesty's ship Galatea (Commodore E. S. Alexander- I Sinclair, M.Y.O.. A.D.C.) and his Majesty's ship Phaeton (Captain J. E. Cameron, R.N., M.V.O.). "The Zepp-elin was apparently employed on scouting duty when she was destroyed by the gunfire of these two vessels." I SUCCESS AT SALONIKA. It 1 On Friday night the Secretary of the Admiralty also issued the following: "Vice-Admiral de Robeck reports that at about 2.30 this niorniug a Zeppelin ap- proached Salonika. When pa sing over the harbour she was heavily fired on ¡u:d hit by the fleet, and came down in a blaze near, the mouth of the Vardar River. "There were no survivors." The story of the Salonika Zeppelin is told by the special correspondent of the "Daily Chronicle." Shortly after one o'clock (he says) the city was plunged into darkness, a warning having been received from the front that a hav i .i g Zeppelin had crossed the lines and was fly- ing towards the city. About 2.15 the hum of the airship's engines was clearly heard by those whom the turniag out of the lights had put on the qui vive. The night was very clear and quite cloudless, and, flying at a great lti- tude, the Zeppelin steered a course straight across the city. While over the Gulf, searchlights caught the airship in their brilliant glare, and the silvery form of the raider remained clearly visible for fully a quarter of an hour. Then the anti-aircraft guns opened fire, and soon a hurricane of shells burst round the airship. The fire was excellent from the very start, and manv of the shells burst very close to the Zeppelin, which remained practically stationary for some time. Precisely at 2.30 a shell appeared to the onlookers to strike the vessel and pass right through it, while, at the same moment, another seemed to burst right in the centre of the craft. Then a remarkable thing happened. Two blazing shells fell from near the tail of the airship, and it is stated this morning that those were two incendiary shells which were dropped on it by an aeroplane which, having gone up immediately the first alarm was given, was waiting for the raider. Viiiether this is correct or not, the Zeppe- lin, immediately afterwards, seemed to be out of control. First it turned round to the left, as though to return in the direction from which it had come. Then it veered round to the, right, with a decided dip in front. Another shower of shells burst round it, and a minute after- wards the searchlights lost it. For nearly half an hour people waited for its reappear- ance. The fire stopped, and the searchlights were put. out. At exactly 3 o'clock a gigantic burst of flame, accompanied by a dull roar, lit up the horizon out to sea. It was the end of the raider. Apparently, when the searchlights lost it, the aircraft, badly hit, fell rapidly to the surface of the sea,.and then blew up. A few minutes later a warship was sending a flashlight message, and watchers could guess that it was announcing the destruction of the Zeppelin to the rest of the fleet and to all the stations of the Allied Army. Following that, we could hear cheering from the warships in the harbour. The smashed Zeppelin lies in the shallow waters of the marshes, near where the Var- dar empties itself into the sea. It is not known yet whether it can be salved. The crew is said to have consisted of thirty-six men. No reports have been received of the raider having dropped bombs at any point of its journey, and the impression I gathered when I saw the Zeppelin hovering practically motionless over the Gulf was that the ship had lost its bearings. News of the destruction of the airship, which probably is the same craft which visited Salonica on February 1, has been re- ceived with great rejoicings by the people of Salonica, who had been passing somewhat uneasy nights under the menace of a return visit of this vehicle of barbarism. The latest information regarding the de- struction of the Zeppelin is to the effect that the fatal shots were fired by anti-aircraft guns. After lying in the shallow water of the Vardar Delta for twenty minutes the Zeppe- lin either exploded or was set on fire by its crew. Five unexploded bombs were found in the wreckage. I FINISHED BY A SUBMARINE. On Saturday the Secretary of the Admiralty made the following announce- ment "A more detailed report has now been re- ceived of the destruction of Zeppelin L7. It now appears that though severely damaged by H.M. ships Galatea and Phaeton her de- struction was completed by a British sub- marine commanded by Lieut.-Commander F. Feilman. R.N., which rescued seven of the Zeppelin's crew, and has returned with them. "She was attacked and slightly injured by a German cruiser on her return journey." The Secretary of the Admiralty also issued the following on Saturday:— "In a further report from Vice-Admiral de Robeck, concerning the Zeppelin brought down at Salonika, it is now stated that sur- vivors of the crew have been found, and four I officers and eight men have been made pri- soners.

IZEPPELINS OVER TRAWLERS I

I ZEPPELINS OVER TRAWLERS. I I  I I HULL FISHERMEN'S EXPERIENCES. Crews of Hull trawlers fishing in the North Sea last week report that nine Zeppe- lins were engaged in the raid on the English and Scottish" coasts on Tuesday night. They sighted the squadron of enemy airships about mid-day on Tuesday. Two of the five Zeppelins which came within view circled over the fishing fleet and later two other Zeppelins appeared, and long before dusk the niiinl)er had been increased to nine. While several of the airships were scouting, others kept immediately over the fishing vessels, which headed for the coast. The Zeppelins were flying at a low altitude, one, according to a skipper. being at a height of not more than 100ft. The Zeppelins hovered around for eight or nine hours and did not disappear until darkness set in. No bombs were dropped on the fleet. One of the trawlers fired a rocket for assistance. I BRITISH AEROPLANES MISSING. I An official report issued by the German Admiralty on Saturday states that a Ger- man torpedo-boat captured a British aero- plane off the coast of Flanders, undamaged, with the two occupants, both officers. The report also states that the British submarine E31 was sunk on Friday morning by gunfire. The Secretary of the Admiralty makes the following announcement:— "With reference to the Official German Report published to-day, it is the fact that two of our naval aeroplanes are missing. "The body of Flight Sub-Lieutenant H. R. Simms, R.N., has been picked up at sea, and the observer, Sub-Lieutenant C. J. Mul- lens, R.N .V .R., is missing, his lifebelt having been picked up in the same vicinity. "As regards the aeroplane reported cap- tured by tho Germans, the names of the officers concerned in this case are: "Flight Sub-Lieutenant Arthur T. N. Cowley, R.N. Sub-Lieutenant Ronald M. Inge, R.N.V.R. "The German claim that British sub- marine E31 was sunk by gunfire is untrue, that vessel having returned safely to her base.

IN MEMORY OF CAPT SCOTTI

I [N MEMORY OF CAPT. SCOTT, I MR. ASQUITH UNVEILS TABLET IN ST. PAUL'S. A memorial tablet to Captain Scott and his companions who died when returning from the South Pole in 1912, has been un- veiled by the Prime Minister in the south transept of St. Paul's Cathedral. Lady Scott was not present, but Mrs. Scott, the mother of the explorer, and her two daughters attended. "Had Scott not died as and when he did," said Mr. Asquith, "W e should be thinking of him not only as a great explorer, but as one of the most skil- ful and devoted of the sailors who are guard- ing all we hold dear against formidable perils. Providence willed otherwise. "Of Scott's companions, Lawrence Oates has become, from the circumstances of his fieath, the most striking personality." The Premier quoted Scott's memorable account of Oates' sacrifice, and asked, "What finer or more worthy epitaph has ever been written T "We are proud, and justly proud, of our heroic warriors on sea and land, who, during these last two years, have added new pages to the glorious annals of our race. Do not let us forget the imperishable deed of stimulus and example which we and the wholo Empire owe to Scott and his com- rades. The tablet bears an inscription by Earl Curzon, in the following words: IN MEMORY OF I Captain Robert Falcon Scott, C.V.O., R.N., Dr. Edward Adrian Wilson, Captain Lawrence Edward Grace Oates, Lieut. Henry Robertson Bowers, and Petty Officer Bdgar Evans, who died on their return journey from the South Pole in February and March, 1912. "Inflexible of purpose steadfast in courage—resolute in endurance in the face of unparalleled misfortune—their bodies are lost in the Antarctic ice—but the memory of their deeds is an everlasting monument." ♦

I LINERS FIGHT WITH U BOAT I

I LINER'S FIGHT WITH U BOAT. I The crew of the Clan Macfadyen, when that vessel arrived off Gravesend, told how she encountered two enemy submarines in the Bay of Biscay. There was a sharp fight with the first one. The Clan Macfadyen is much smaller than the Cayzer Irvine liner Clan Mactavish, which fought such an heroic action with the raider Moewe, being of only 2,816 tons gross. She is engaged in the Indian trade. Members of the crew state that the sub- marine opened fire at a range of only about fifty yards and fired about sixty shots. For- tunately the Clan Macfadyen is armed with a big gun, and this was immediately brought into action. The submarine appeared to be hit several times. The liner, which bears the marks of having been hit several times, escaped with- out serious injury to her crew. The ship ha.d been damaged on the port side amid- ships above the water line, and has also sustained damage to her funnel and boats. Three hours later the steamer encountered another submarine which fired a torpedo but missed her by a few feet. Both escapes must have been due to courage and good seamanship, as the Clan Hacfadyen steams about only ten or eleven knots.

IlORD CLANRICARBES FORTUNEI

I lORD CLANRICARBE'S FORTUNE. The late Marquis of Clanricarde has left an estate of the gross value of £ 2,500,000. By his will, dated February 2, 1916, a short document containing a bout 200 words, he gives an annuity of Xl,000 to Miss Burga Weyland, daughter of his sister, Lady Catherine Weyland; £ 20,000 to his nephew, Mark Weyland; and the residue of his estate to his grand-nephew, "Harry Las- celles, by courtesy called Viscount Lascelles, son of my nephew Henry, Earl of Hare- wood." Probate is granted to the Earl of Hare- wood, K.C.V.O.. of 13, Upper Belgrave- street, London, W., nephew, the sole ex- ecutor.

I LORD DANGAN ENLISTS

I LORD DANGAN ENLISTS. At Walton-on-Thames, the case of Vis- count Dangan, heir to Lord Cowley, was again before the Tribunal. Viscount Dan- gan had previously obtained three months' extension with leave to appeal. The mili- tary representative now took exception to this lengthy exemption, and asked for with- drawal of the certificate. The Viscount, who is an actor, had stated that his wife, child, and mother-in-law were entirely dependent on his earnings. An order in bankruptcy was recently made against him. He did not appear, it being stated that he had enlisted for immediate service. The certificate was accordingly cancelled.

ITRAITOR TO HIS COUNTRY I

I "TRAITOR TO HIS COUNTRY." I Charged under the Defence of the Realm Act with collecting and attempting to elicit information with respect to description of war materials from workmen employed by Messrs. Vickers, Albert Bright, forty-nine, iron merchant, of Sheffield, was at Leeds Assizes sentenced to penal servitude for life. Mr. Justice Avory said that prisoner was a traitor to his country, and if he had not pleaded guilty and the jury had consideic-d the question as to whether he intended to help the enemy, and had found him guilty of that, he would have been sentenced to death.

IA SOLDIERS HORSEI

I A SOLDIERS HORSE. I Lady Tree remarked, at a meetin g of Our Dumb Friends' League, that many cavalry soldiers back from the Front had spoken to her with adoration of the horses they had to leave when they went into the trenches. She said to one of them, "Don't you long t) see your horses again?" He replied, "Yes, I do, more than anything—more than I want to see my home." EMe said, "If a thousand horses were to come along, would you recognise yours?" He answered. "Yes, of course, and I think hfc would recognise me."

POLICE SUED FOR DAMAGES I

POLICE SUED FOR DAMAGES. I Arthur Percival Haigh, of Blackpool, has ben awarded £ 40 damages at the Liverpool Assizes against the Chief Constables of Blackpool and Maidstone for false imprison- ment. His case was that, after being discharged as being medically unfit from the King's (Liverpool) Regiment at Maidstone, he was arrested after his arrival at Blackpool and locked up for twenty-six hours on an allega- tion of felony which subsequently was not proceeded with.

ADULTERATED CREAM I

ADULTERATED CREAM. I PiTies varying from X10 to £ 2 were im- posed by Mr. Mead at the Marlborough- streot Police-court on a number of trades- people in the West-End of London for sell- ing cream which was mixed with boric acid to%uch an extent as to render it injurious to health. The magistrate dismissed a similar case last August, but the decision had since been reversed in the High Court.

DRESS OF THE DAY I

DRESS OF THE DAY. I A PAINTY COTTON FROCK. ) There has not been for many years & season when so many charming washing frocks have been shown, both for grown-ups and for children. Now that silk and woollen materials have grown so very dear people are beginning to recognise what & great economy may be effected by wearing wash- ing fabrics. Chosen judiciously, washing stuff may be made to do duty for every pos- sible occasion, except, of course, for cold or very wet weather. They are cheap, remark- ably durable, considering their price, and they return from each visit to the washtub looking as nice and fresh as if new-three very strong points in their favour. And there is such a delightful variety of cotton materials this year that the woman must be difficult indeed who cannot find something to please her. For morning wear there are plenty of nice plain fabrics, such as ging- ham, zephyr, cotton gaberdine, pique, cotton crepe, and cotton poplin whilst for after- noon use there are all sorts of lovely printed voiles, organdies, muslins, and lawns. Our sketch shows a specially pretty little tub fiock for a girl of from eix to twelve, suit- able for serviceable everyday wear, The original frock was carried out in a charming I [Refer to X 699.] cotton crepe, with a background of pale pink patterned with pnwdcred roses in two tones of deep pink and grev-green foliage, but the design might be worked out most effectively in zephyr, linen, gingham, or gaberdine, either plain or patterned. The dress is a one-piece model, and fastens straight down the front with a close row of small pearl buttons. It is a-bsolutely plain over the shoulders, but is c-it with plenty of flare, 60 that it is amply wide at the bottom, falling in the most graceful fashion. The dress is cut into a number of pointed tabs at tie waist-line; these are arranged in pairs, one buttoning upwards and the other down- wards, and cress a belt of patent leather or stitched silk. Tins belt should either be black or should match in colour the prevafl- ing tone in the printed design on the material. The neck is' finished by a wide turn-down collar of fine white lawn or mus- rin. This collar is quite plain, save for a double row of hcm-stitching near the edge and a border of quaint pointed lace, which is set on without any fullness whatever. A knot of ribbon, which should match the belt in colour, catches the ends of the collar in front. The sleeves aie quite plain, and are set into deep bands at the wrist, which are nearly hidden by little turn-back cuffs that match the collar. A deep hem finishes the bottom of the frock. I A NEAT MORNING FROCK. In these stirring days, when the average housewife finds it neccssary to do a good part of her own domestio work, the wash- able morning frock has become a quite im- portant feature of the everyday wardrobe. The materials usually chosen for this useful garment are cotton crepe, French print, [Refer to X 700.] I gingham, or, most popular and perhaps most serviceable of all, the plain, twilled/ or red casement cloth, woven in very wide widths, and obtainable in a large variety of soft and pretty colourings. The work-frock shown in our sketch is both smart and simole. It is cut all in one piece, and fastens down the front with but- tons and buttonholes. If made in a fairly light-coloured fabric- it can be worn witmut any covering overall or pinafore; but if realised in dark grey or navy blue, its wearer will probably consider herself much more attractively dressed for work if she slips over it a big cover-up apron. The white collar of the work-frock is detachable, and should be as pretty as pos- ;ible, and the little bow-tie should invariably be smart and neat, as those are the only relieving features of the severely plain garment. Paper patterns can be supplied, price 6;d. When ordering, please, quote number, en- close remittance, and address to Miss Lisle, 1, La Belle Sauvage, London, E.C.

No title

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hearn, 37, Popp'o- well-row, Gainsborough, Lines, have nine sons serving in the Army. Two of the German steamers recently seized by Portugal have brought cargoes of sugar and oxen from Madeira to Lisbon.

COMFDLSIGN BILLI I

COMFDLSIGN BILL. I MR. LLOYD GEORGE ON THE MILITARY NECESSITY. The second reading of the Military Service Bill, which makes service compulsory for all men between the ag-e-s of eighteen and forty- one, was carried in the House of Commons on Thursday. A motion for its rejection was defeated by a majority of 292, only thirty- six members voting in favour of the motion. Mr. Lloyd George made a strong speech in support of tho measure. lie said those whe opposed the Bill were advising the House to reject the advice of the military authorities, who were responsible for the conduct of the war, who had declared that the finding of the men at once would make all the differ- ence between defeat and victory, and that 1 the men could not be found in any other way. The Cabinet had examined the. demands of and they had come the military authorities, and they had come to the conclusion that it was an irresistible one. It was a maxim of military practice that if they were to drive out an entrenched foe equally well organised, equally well led, equally well equipped, they must have a superiority in men. If the opponents of the Bill examined the facte of the military situation the demand of the military authorities would surely be intelligible to them. The vast majority of the members of r tho House and an infinite majority of the people outside believed in this Bill. There had never been a country yet faced with a great military peril that has ever saved it- self without resource to compulsion. Military advice was for this Bill. The Cabinet having examined that advice was for it, and mili- tary necessity demanded compulsion. The opponents of the Bill asked Parliament to reject it on the ground of some sacred principle—to sacred to make it public. The opponents of tho Bill said that the results of the Bill would be insignificant. He could tell the Hoi; that at the battle of Ypres one division of fresh troops to relieve the ex- hausted men on either side would have con- clusively decided the issues of tho battle. He thought the estimate of 200,000 men from the Bin was a moderate one, and he regarded it as important that when they talked of 200,000 men our Allies and our fees should know that we were not yet at tho end of our resources in men. I THE NEW BILL. The Mi'.ilarv Service Bill is described as a measure "to make further provision with respect to military scrvieo during the pre- sent war." It consists of fourteen clauses. Its main provisicns may be summarised as follow:—■ Under Clause 1 every male British sub- ject in Great Britain between the ages of eighteen and forty-one is made liable for service unkss lie comes within the pre- scri bed exceptions or attains the age of fortv-one before the appointed date. For these who arc eighteen or over when the Bill passes, the appointed day will be the thirtieth after tho measure becomes law. For those under eighteen when the Bill passes, the appointed day will be the thirtieth after their eighteenth birthday. Thus evervone affected will have a clear month in" which they may enlist volun- tarily. By Clause 3 two important modifications are mado in regard to the exceptions allowed under the original Act: (1) Time-expired men under forty-one are to be recalled to the Colours, and (2) Men rejected as medically unfit since August 14, 1915, will, as from August 1 next, be liable to reexamina- tion. This reduces the exceptions to (1) clergy- men (2) men actually serving in the naval or military forces; and (3) men resident in this country only for educational or other special purposes. Other provisions of the Bill include the following: Men whose term of service would other- wise expire are to continue to serve for the duration of the war. Territorials may be transferred to other units. The formation of a special reserve to which men in the Army or Territorial Force with mechanical training may be transferred. The reduction of the period between the htp. nf a certificate of exemption and the calling up of the holder from two months to two weeks. An important new provision (Clause 7) re- quires the holder of an exemption certifi- cate, at. the request of a constable or other authorised person, to produce his certificate or give particulars as to when and why he obtained it. Failure to comply, or the giving of false information, will entail a fine of .£20 or three months' imprisonment. I GROUP SYSTEM RE-OPENED. The Secretary of the War Office makes the ,tnniiiiic,e.ment:- "The Group System of enlistment, which was temporarily closed on April 26, 1916, has now been re-opened. "Unattested married men and single men excepted from the Military Service Act, 1916, can again therefore join their respec- tive Groups. "A new Group, to be called Group A," f is being formed for all men born in 1898."

I PREMIER AND BELGIUM

I PREMIER AND BELGIUM. Mr. Asquith attended the first annual meeting of the National Committee for Relief in Belgium, held at the Mansion House, London. He said he could not refrain from referring to the attitude of the Ger- man Government towards the seven million civilian population in Belgium. The Ger- mans, after occnpying Belgium, said in effect: Great Britain is blockading Belgian ports. We cannot feed you. If you starve it will lX) the fault of the British blockade." The Prime Minister continued, "I have only to say, in reference to that: All the moral obligations which up to now have been recognised by every civilised Power to pro- vide for the population in occupied territory seem to IX) disregarded. Thanks to the action of the Allied Governments and to the actio,?i of t l l(, Alli?e, benevolence of the British and American public, and above all through the humane interposition of the Committee for Relief, the civil population in Belgium have been kept alive. They maintain a loyal, if of necessity a passive, resistance, and they spurn with unconquerable spirit the in- sidious and insincere approaches of the enemy. "There will come a day—soon, I hope, but sooner or later that day will come—when King Albert's brave Belgian troops and our brothers-in-arms in France will succeed in relieving the whole of the Belgian people from the tyranny which at present over- shadows them, and in restoring to them the prosperity which they gladly sacrificed rather than sacrifice their honour and their inde pende nee.

LORD KITCHENER ON KUT I

LORD KITCHENER ON KUT. I Replying to Lord Beresford, in the House of Lords, Lord Kitchener said that the sur- render of Kilt reflected no discredit on the British or Indian armies. General Town- shend had done everything that was humanly possible to resist to the last, and everv effort waR made to relieve the beleaguered forces. It was mainly due to the adverse weather conditions that General Townshend was not rel ieved. The last message sent out from Rut by Genera l Townshend said:— "We are pleased to know we have done 

No title

"Accountants have opportunities in their intercourse with men of various callings to assist in keeping the German out of the :"orld's markets, and I hope they will avail themselves of them," said Sir Wocdburn Kirby, president of the Institute cf Char- tered Accountants.

No title

OUR CHILDRENS CORNER

OUR CHILDREN'S CORNER. BY UNCLE RALPH. CHOOSING. If we hsd heaps and heaps of pounds. Or even one or two, They wouldn't take us long to spend, I know just what we'd do. For there's a shop down in our town That's full of lovely things- Brown butterballs and acid-drops, And suga,r mice on strings. But what we'd buy—Babette and I— Are ginger queens and kings. THE FAIRY'S WHISPER. It was the dearest little pond in th. world, and Elsie found it down the glen in the shadow of the birch wood. The stream showed her the way. There were lovely, yellow water-lilies on the top of the water, aiid there was warm yellow sand at the edge, and spotty and spteckly fishes darted hither and thither among the stones and rushes. Who would not have wanted to paddle in such a place? It was the very first thought, that came int-o Elsie's hefcd when she saw it. And the second was that she would take. off her shoes and socks at once and wade in the clear water. Then a third thought slipped into her head and stopped her all of a sudden. "Perhaps the pond is deep," whispered thought number three. "And mother would not like you to paddle without asking leave." "I don't think it is very deep," replied Elsie impatiently. "I can see the bottom." "That is because the water is so clear, said the thought. It whispered the words so very plainly that Elsie looked round quickly to see if anybody WtS behind her. But she saw no- one—no one but a big dragon-fly, who flew: off a branch and darted, like a blue Bash. into the wood. Mother looked very grave when she heard about the pond, for she knew that the clean water was deep and the yellow sand shift- ing and dangerous. But she smiled when Elsie told of the whispering thought and the big blue dragon-fly. "I think it must have been the fairy Common Sense who tried to save you from harm," said she, hugging the little girl tightly in her arms. I THE STORK EXCURSION TRIP. "Oh come, my small friends, if you will, Said the Stork, "for a ride on my bill; Half a dozen or so Can perch in a row Without any fear of a spill. "If a trip to the sea you'd prefer, You need only sit tight and not stir; My legs are so long And my bill is so strong That not the least risk you'll incur." So a squirrel and other small game, With an owl and a rabbit, all came- 'Twas an excellent notion, This trip to the ocean, They one and all said the same. They may have been caught by the tide, For they never came back from their rid. Unless—the Stork still Wore a smile on his bill On returning-some travelled inside. f BILLY'S TUB. The greengrocer rang the bell just as his mother was going to bath little Billy. "Mind you don't fall in, darling!" she said as she hurried off. "Keep awav from the bath, like a good little rabbit.' But -Billy, alas, was not a good little- rabbit, and, as soon as his mother had left the room, he climbed carefully into the tub* of water. "I'm big," said Billy; "surely E can wash myself by this time. You only have to rub the soap on so, and scrub a little so, and it's soon done." But, try as he would, Billy could not get clean. The sponge and the brush were large and heavy, and his long ears so difficult to manage. They stood up when he wanted them to lie down, and laid down when he wanted them to stand up. He was getting tired and shivery. Just then his mother opened the door. "Why, Billy she cried. It's all right, mother dear," said Billy very quickly. "I'm only il Just then he trod on the soap, and down?, he sat with a fearful splash and bang. "Oh Oh howled Billy, "I wish I'd left- my bath alone!" "You're a silly little rabbit," said his mother, picking him up. "You've put soap in your eyes and ears, and you're not the tin.it tit clean." So slis- 'tZ-'c'ulbed ancl gerubbed aiid scrubbed, then she rubbed Billy dry. "Perhaps, next time," she said, when at last she had finished, "you will do as you're told, r I LEARNING TO BE A SOLDIER. I I cannot be a soldier, because I'm only four. But I am learning all I can, and when I've. grown more I'm going to join the Army, and if the war's, not done I'll go and fight the enemy, and shoot, them every one! And I pretend a castle that's very tall and; great, Is just outside our garden—I'm sentry at the gate: It's only make-believe, but still I'm learn- ing all I can, So I can be a soldier and fight, when I'jfy a man. I THE TAFFITY-MAN. One fine morning, as the Taffitv-Man was going over the Green Hillock, he happened to pass the house of the Silver Gnome. The Silver Gnome was in his front garden, sowing silver seeds. When he saw the Taffity-Man pass by, with his ribbons flying and his plumed hat set jauntily upon his head, he took a seect from his bag and blew it with all his force- into one of the Taffity-Man's shoes. The Taffity-Man kept on his way, and ho* did not know tkat anything had happened; toi him; and presently the silver seed turned. over in his shoe, and began to sing: "Wriggle, wriggle, in and out, Ring, ring, round about, Spread a??i round about, Spread and splutter, spring and sprout. When the silver seed sang this song, the, Taffity-Man began to feel so happy that hee. did not know what to do with himself. Presently he reached the Green Common and there were Dame Bluebell and Dame Nancibel walking along soberly, on their way to market. Goodness, graciouR me!" cried the Taffity-Man. "Imagine anybody walking" along like that on a day like and dance with me, both of vou." And he seized the good dames by the. hands, and round and round they all three- lanced. "It is an odd thing," said the Taffity-Man, "but I believe if we danced to the other end nf the Green Common, we should see silver iixpences growing in the ditch! So they danced on and on, as if the wind were blowing them; and they knocked over the pedlar woman who was travelling to the Goose Market, and the shoemaker's son who had been buying a gift to take to a friend. But the Taffity-Man did not notice what he had done, and they went dancing on and- ofa and on: and they passed the ditch with- out looking at it. And they would have kept on dancing for ever, had not the silver seed fallen out of the Taffity-Man's shoo. When that hapned, the Taffitv-Man stopped dancing and went on his way to the town, and Dame Bluebell and Dame Nanci- bel hurried off to market.

No title

'11e ¡8;lth 11:;5 tak