Collection Title: Abergavenny Chronicle

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is the copyright of the Tindle Newspapers

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
29 articles on this page
OUR LONDON LETTER I

 OUR LONDON LETTER. I [Ymn Omr Special Oorrupondftll.) I Probably the difficulty which at the time of writing stands -in the way of Mr. Lloyd George's appointment to the "W ar Office in succession to Lord Kitchener will be got over. It is simply that by the Government of India Act of 1858 it is provided that not more than four Secretaries of State shall 6it in the House of Commons. The four are alreadv there-Sir Edward Grey, Mr. Bonar Law, Mr. Herbert Samuel, and Mr. Chamberlain. Therefore, unless one of these goes to the House of Lords or resigns office in favour of a peer, or Mr. Lioyd George himself accepts a peerage, which is not in tie least likely, he cannot be War Secre- tary until the law has been altered. The proviso was fnwrted in the Act in order to make sure that the House of Lords should have at least one representative of the great executive departments. Advocates of single- Chamber government may see in the proviso an argument in their favour, as it might conceivably in certain circumstances prevent the appointment of the best man for any of the five Secretaryships which happened to be vacant. It might also send to the House of Lords men who would rather 6tay in the House of Commons. It was one of the effects of the proviso that for thirty-seven years, before Sir Edward Grey became Foreign Secretary in 1905, there -was always a peer at the head of the Foreign Office. Rumour is busy with the name of Mr. John Burns, who has passed almost com- pletely' from the public view since his retire- ment from the Government on the eve of war. Some Ministers who have thought it their duty to resign from the Cabinet have told the country all about it at considerable length; but Mr. Burns has said nothing at alL To keep silence for nearly two years -would be a severe trial for some ex- Ministers I could mention, but Mr. Burns was clwavs able., during his Ministerial career, not to make speeches. Soon after war broke out the German papers gave lengthy reports of a speech which they s<"d Mr. John Burns had made at the Albert Hall. It was one of the earliest of the enemy's attempts to use the Press to their advantage. Of course there was no such meeting at the Albert Hall, and no such speech by Mr. Burns, who, at the very moment when he was reported to have been addressing the multitude, was probably sit- ting quietly among his books at home. It is now rumoured that his views with regard to the war have undergone some modifica- tion, and that he would be willing to accept office again. The Central Recruiting Depot in Great Scotland Yard was not greatly put about by the coming into operation of the Military Service Act on the "appointed day." During the first two hours or so there was a brisk business in dealing with the married men who arrived to report themselves in accord- ance with the Proclamation, but afterward^ there was very little outiv-,rd sign of differ- ence between the "appointed day" and any other day. Most of those affected by the Act have received notice to -present- them- selves for service early next month, but thoge who have not received such personal notice are required to report themselves not later than July 24 at the local recruiting offices. A daily paper a few days ago informed its married men readers of military age that they might go on with their business and not worry until they got the notice. This, however, is not the case, Thev must report themselves not later than Julv 24, whether they receive personal notice or net. It is all very well to tell people to econo- mise; what they want to know is how they are to do it. The Treasury War Savings Committee, having for a long time been impressing upon us the urgent necessity for spending less and saymg more, has now pro- moted an exhibition to teach us a few wrinkles The National Economy Exhibi- tion is now open at Prince's Skating Club, and all who will may receive instructions in the art of preparing the cheapest meals for the greatest number, and m that of making new clothes from old. Experts are prepared to give information also on eoul- try-keeping and the care of other profitable live-stock, on intensive gardening, home laundry work. and many other things, and there are oonferenoos three times a day de- | signed to help those who wish to Teduce their personal and household expenditure. Mp, Hughes is going back to Australia. Dominion Premiers have visited us before, havo, made public speeches and been honowted with public receptions. None of them, however, made such a sensation as Mr. Hughes has made. He has made count- less speeches, and has received goodness knows how many university degrees and free- doms of boroughs. He was a school teacher before he went to Australia and became a Labour leader, and he has hobnobbed with dukes and takon the shine out of Cabinet Ministers. No function has been complete without Mr. Hughes, and he has even been invited occasionally to the meetings of the War Council. Nearly every morning the papers have reported a new speech by him, and sometimes two or three. He has never ceased to urge greater vigour in the proeecu- tion of the war, and in the preparations for the trade war which will begin when peace is proclaimed. "Never agaiu" is his motto with regard to trading with Germany, and it is pretty certain that he had a good deal to do with the decisions come to at the Paris Conference of the Allies. Mr. Hughes will mctst likely hare a place at the Peace Con- ferenoe, whenever that may be. The protest against sixpcnce-a-quart milk is meeting with considerable success in diffe- rent parts of London. Apparently, in spite of all the reepons for the increase which have been urged, it is still pos6ible for milk to be aold at a. profit at fivepence a quart, as a list of dairymen selling it at the lower t prioe has b-ees published in an evening paper. Naturally, people argue that if some dairy- mem arc able to sell at flvepence, all of them caa do so, and it is possible that all of them may before long. And if people find that in this wa y they can bring about a re- duction in the price of milk, they may try to bring about a similar reBult with other things. These are indeed anxious times for the buteher, the baker, and the candlestick- maker. A. E. M.

DAMAGE TO CROPS BYOAIRCRAFT

DAMAGE TO CROPS BYOAIRCRAFT. The Board of Agriculture and Fisheries call the attention of farmers to the poasi- bility of tho loss of, or damage to, growing crops by hostile aircraft. No liability can be accepted by the Government, and no claim can be entertained in respect of damage to property by aircraft or bombard- ment unless the property has been insured under the Government scheme, particulars of which can be obtained at any Post Office or from any Fire Insurance Company.

LORD DOUNE WOUNDED

LORD DOUNE WOUNDED. SecoBd Lieutenant Lord Driune, eldest son and heir of the Earl of Moray, is officially Mportfd to havo !x?n woundM. Lord DO'm, who is in tho Royal Flying Corps, rceeivcd the Military Cross last month for bringing down a Fokkcr. Ho will be twenty four years old in August.

MR HARCOURT AGAINST MAXIMUMI PRICES

MR. HARCOURT AGAINST MAXIMUM I PRICES. The official report has been issued of Mr. Harcourt's reply to the Labour delegation which waited on him at the Board of Trade to raise the question of a State control of food prices in connection with the control of wages. 'the Acting President of the Board said that the minute of last November issued to the Committee of Production advising that auy further advance of wages (other than those advances following automatically from existing agreements) should be strictly con- fined to tne adjustment of local conditions, was not intended to apply to the lowest- paid men, whose wages it was agreed should be levelled up. It must, however, be recog- nised that all have to make sacrifices in consequence of the war, and that the vicious circle of, first, an increase of wages, then an increase in cost, of production, and thence an increase of prices, again leading to demands for further increases of wages, must be avoided. In war time we could not be allowed to exploit our individual advantages. Owners have been strictly limited by the Defence of the Realm Act and by the Excess of Profit Tax and the limitation of profits under the Munitions of War Act. If there was an embargo on wages, there certainly was also an embargo cn wealth.' The general advance of rates of wages, amounting to about ten per oent., was no fair indication of the advance in earnings. In an actual case just before the Committee of Production, covering something like 5.000 men. it was shown that while the rate of wages had increased only 3s. a week, the average earnings of the men had increased by 19s. 6d. a week. Earnings rather than rates of wages must be looked at. and the increase of earnings could not be reckoned at ten per cent., but would probably work out at nearer forty. He was prepared to continue to watch the relation of wages to the cost of living. He could sav no more than that, and could make no definite promise of any immediate change. As regards the cost of living, while food prices had increased, according to the Board of Trade calculations by fifty-nine per cent., the cast of living as a whole (including rent and other matters) could not be held to have increased by more than forty per cent., even assuming no modification in the stan- dard 'IssuilliTig Some modification must be da-. d of l i v i n g demanded of all except the very poorest. The committee appointed to inquire into the increase of pri ces of the principal com- | modifies was not a commission intended to pit for years. It was intended not to shelve the question, but to solve it, and to report immediately. Without wishing to prejudge the finding of the committee, he felt bound to put before the deputation, his opinions in regard to the proposal to fix maximum prices. The failure of the fixing of maximum prices in GNmany was perfectly well known. Fixing prices could not increase the amount of the commodity available, and seemed almost in- evitably to tend to reduce the amount or divert foreign supplies to other markets. It mi?ht be a hard saying, but it was better to have plenty dear than a scarcity still dearer by the internal competition of consumers for purchase of insufficient domestic supplies. If. for instance, we were to attempt to control the price of home-grown meat we must control the price of imported feeding fluffs for the cattle. If these were fixed beyond the world price the feeding stuffs would not come here, and the meat could not be produced. As regards some articles. such as sugar, high prices were actually desirable in order to limit consumption. If the new committee discovered that there were market operations or exploitation of the public to inflate prices artificially, then whoever was at the Board of Trade would be prepared at once to deal with it. Tie proposed to keep in very, close touch with the committee, and was most anxious to act speedily and immediately.

IMP CHURCHILL ON CORONELI

MP. CHURCHILL ON CORONEL REPLY TO STATEMENT BY LORD I ZETLAND. Lord Zetland was reported to have said at the unveiling of the memorial in York Minster to Sir Christopher Cradock, that when the Admiral was offered his last com- mand he felt very considerable doubt as to the fitness and qualifications of the vessels under his care, and that he represented to the highest authorities his feelings of dis- trust. Mr. Churchill has now written to Lord Zetland stating that Admiral Cradock went to America a year before the war to command, not the South Pacific, but the North Atlantic station, and that on this station he had nothing whatever to do with Admiral von Spee, whost; squadron was in China. "The ships which composed Admiral Cradock's command bore no relation to Admiral von Spee's squadron at the other side of the world, and were never intended to be matched against it. Not one of the ships which Ad niral Cradock went to America to command fought in the action off Coronel; but on the contrary, he had been given an entirely different set of ships. The adequacy or quality of the original squadron which he went to America to com- mand, and any distrust you say he expressed about them, could therefore have no rele- vance to the adequacy or quality of the totally different force he commanded at Coronel." Mr. Churchill adds: "There are no doubt many things yet to be said about the cruiser dispositions of the Admiralty before and after the declaration of war, and about the circumstances in which the action off Coronel was fought. That is a subject I do not attempt to refer to now and. pending a full publication of the Admiralty minutes and telegrams, for which I asked in the House of Commons in November Inst, it is impossible to do so with any advantage."

IGERMANS SHOP RAIDED I

GERMAN'S SHOP RAIDED. I A. crowd of 2,000 persons raided on Satur- day night the shop in Portobello-road, Not-, ting Hill, London, W., of a German baker who was sentenced to six months' hard labour at the West London Police-court on Frida" y for failing to reduce the intensity of lights at another shop in Elgin-crescent. Tho crowd, which included many wives of soldiers, smashed tho windows, ransacked the premie, throw loaves and bags of flour into the street, and carried off the till. The police were powerless. »

I HUSBAND BEFORE CREDITORI

I HUSBAND BEFORE CREDITOR. A married woma*. aaked why a debt had not been paid, replied at Clerkenwell County-court that her husband was a sol- dier. Out of her separation allowance she sent him parcels. The Plaintiff: I saw the husband last week and he said his wife was not to send him parcels but was to pay this debt. The Wife (with determination) I am going to send him parcels, so there! He is fighting for his country.

I SEPARATION ALLOWANCES

I SEPARATION ALLOWANCES. An Armv order issued on Sunday states that the wife of a soldier receiving separa- tion allowance in respect of her husband may in future receive allowance also in re- spect of a soldier son who also contributed to tho household if this includes brothers and sisters who benefited by his contribu- tion. Increased payments will take effect from 26th inst., or from the date at which the son makes an allotment, provided appli- cation is made before July 31.

I WAR SERVICE MEDALS

I WAR SERVICE MEDALS. In response to a request for information concerning the medals issued for war ser- vice, the War Office announces that up to the present 86 Victoria Crosse-s, 130 Military Crosses, 6,150 Distinguished Conduct Medals, and 1,700 Military Medals have been con- ftrred. The issue" of tho general war medal, tho statement, dd", is not decided until peace has been concluded.

DRESS OF THE DAY I

DRESS OF THE DAY. I A SMART WASHING SKIRT. I A well-cut washing skirt of a fairly simple type is a most useful addition to the summer wardrobe. Indeed, for the woman who boats, golfs, or plays tennis to any extent it is almost a necessity, for with the addition of a simple, smart blouse of the same colour it forms a. charming summer toilette which is practical in the extreme, and which is quickly and easily laundered. Tf> be really successful a washing skirt sh^; Id be carried out in fairly heavy material, as pique, linen, linen hopsack, cotton pteplii,' etc., for light materials never hang nicely for such a purpose, and are very soon tumbled and soiled. As regards colour, that is. of course, a matter for individual choice, but I am quite sure that the most practical skirt is [Refer to X 713.] either the all-white model, or the heavy white hopsack skirt with just a hair-line 8tripe of black or navy blue. White washes so admirably and always looks so fresh. Our sketch shows one of the newest of the season's washing skirts, a perfectly simple model that is both smart and practical. This skirt fastens down tho front. The seam which forms the epening has a hem edge, and is machined from top to bottom, the fastenings consisting of buttons covered with the skirt material. It is made with a deep hip yoke at each side, which is, cut away in a charming curve on either side of the front, leaving a very short yoke across the middle of the front. This yoko ends on each fide of the back, which consists of a plain panel of tho material machined along cither edge. The skirt is very slightly gathered round the waist, and is finished by a little stitched belt of the material. The original skirt from which the sketch was made was carried out in very heavy and rather coarse white linen, but any of the materials mentioned above would be equally suitable. I CHILD'S SUMMER FROCK. There is no pleasanter task for a mother than the planning and making of her small daughter's summer frocks. The material with which she has to deal are so pretty and dainty, and the work is so simple and easy, that even the most inexperienced mother may venture upon it with a light heart con- fident that she will be entirely successful in her efforts to produce really dainty and ser. I [Refer to X 714.] viceable little garmente at much less than half the price she would pay for the same quality of frock if it were bought ready- made. This year the wise mother will fashion her little daughter's best dress of cotton material as wei as her everyday school dreases, for wool and silk fabrics have risen greatly in price, whilst cotton stuffs are not much more expensive than they were befoic the war. Here, for instance, in our sketch is as pretty a best frock as any mother could de- sire, and yet it can be made for a ridicu- lously small sum if air inexpensive cotton fabric be used. Suitable materials for such a frock are muslin, cotton voile, organdy, cotton crepe, or cotton marquisette, all of which fabrics may be plain or patterned, ac- cording to individual fancy. I call imagine the little gown looking perfectly charming made of white cotton voile patterned with a small design of pale pink roses and green leaves, and completed by a wide sash of wedgwoqd blue ribbon. The frock fastens down the front with small buttons covered with the sash silk. The bodice is gathered on the shoulders and is pouched, a little at the waist. The particularly attractive cellar i v ich finishes the neck is made of fine white organdy muslin, neatly hemmed round the edge and trimmed with pointed lace set on without any fullness. Tiny pearl buttons are set on the front of this collar, and a smart, long-ended bow of black Velvet Tibbon finishes it at the throat. The sleeves are gauged several time sat the elbow, and are finished by wee frills of the material. The small skirt is a two-tier model set in a plain foundation which reaches to the full length. Paper patterns can be supplied, pcice 6Jd, When ordering, please quote number, eft. close remittance, and address to Miss Lisle, 8. La Belle Sauvage, London, E.C.

No title

Second-Lieutenant N. L. Ames. London I Regiment, who 'a" officially reported min- I ing &n May oO, hn? written hom that he is a prisoner of war in hospital.

BRITISH ARTILLERYS VIGOROUS ACTIVITY

.—— ——. BRITISH ARTILLERY'S "VIGOROUS ACTIVITY:' The communique received from the British General Headquarters in France on Sunday night was as follows: "Last night after a short bombardment the enemy attempted a raid on our trenches north-east of Loos, but was .driven off, leav- ing three dead on our parapet. "North of River Douve a party tried to cut our wire, but was driven off, leaving two dead. "To-day our artillery has continued to be very active along the whole Front, and mutual artillery actions have taken place at many points, the heaviest shelling being about Neuville St. Vaast, south of Vailly, and to the north of the Ypres-Menin Road. "About Theipval Wood and Hamel the enemy did a considerable amount of shell- ing with trench mortars as well as artil- lery. "Near Hulloch, a hostile trench mortar was destroyed by our artillery. "Since yesterday evening the enemy has blown four mines, two of which were oppo- site Hulloch, one south of Bethune-la-Basse Road, and one north of Neuve Chapelle. No casualties were caused by these mines. "We destroyed five hostile kite balloons thie afternoon." The German official reports "vigorous activity" of the British along a front of sixty miles, Lens and its suburbs being heavily bombarded. ENEMY AIRMEN DRIVEN BACK. Saturday night's British official was as follows:— "Yesterday hostile aircraft were again active. A reconnaissance of six machines, which attempted to cross our lines, was attacked by our scouts and driven back. One of our aeroplanes, descending to a height of 900 feet, attacked with machine- gun fire some horsed transport and caused it to stampede. "During the night our trenches about Givenchy and west of Messines were bom- barded intermittently. North-east of Arras our patrols brought in two prisoners. To-day our artillery has been more active than usual along the whole front. Hostile batteries have retaliated by bombarding our positions about Authuille Wood, Ransart, a-nd Y pres. "North of the Ilohenzollern Redoubt, the enemy sprang a mine a short distance in front of our trenches. No damage was donQ. "Later reports show that the hostile gas attack south-west of Messines reported in yesterday's communique, was a bombard- ment with gas shells." ENEMY LINES PENETRATED. On Monday night the following report was issued: "We carried out a number of successful enterprises last night at different points of the Front. "The hostile lines were penetrated at ten different places. Our parties inflicted con- siderable casualties on the enemy and took several prisoners. Our casualties were everywhere very slight. "The Munster Fusiliers and Anzac troops were particularly successful. "In connection with these raids there was a good dealijbf artillery work on both sides. "Yesterday evening and during the night our artillery fired with great effect, the hostile trenches being considerably damaged in many places. Four large explosions were caused by our heavy artillery in the enemv's rearward lines between Pozieres and Montauban. "To-day our artillery has again been active at numerous points, and considerable damage has been caused to hostile defensive works, notably near Longueval, Gomme- court, Givenchy-en-Gohelle, north of the Loos salient, oppoite Wytschaete, and to the east of Wieltje. "One hostile kite balloon, in addition to those already reported, was destroyed by our aircraft yesterday, making a total of six out of fifteen balloons attacked. The whole six were seen to fall in flames." X —————

MAID KILLS MISTRESS

MAID KILLS MISTRESS. A fifteen-year-old domestic servant named Jeannie Carson, otherwise Matilda Bryant, was sentenced at Edinburgh on Monday to ten vears' detention for killing her mistress, I Mrs. Elizabeth Anderson, of Peebles. It was stated that when the son arrived home to lunch the girl told him his mother had gone to Glosgow, and after he had left she dressed up in Mrs. Anderson's clothes and went to Glasgow herself. The charge, which was originally one of murder, was reduced to one of culpable homicide. It was pleaded the girl lacked mental balance. Lord Justice Clark in passing sentence said the girl at an early age had abandoned herself to minor criminal offe neeg.

ISOLDIERS PLUCKY RESCUE

I SOLDIER'S PLUCKY RESCUE. Private Starp, of the Middlesex Regiment, who recently returned from France, plunged into the Thames at Staines in full uniform to rescue Mrs. Walker, wife of Lieutenant Walker, of the Manchester Regiment. Lieutenant Walker and his wife were thrown into the river owing to a canoe overturning. Lieutenant Walker could swim well enough to keep himself afloat, but his wife was soon in difficulties. Private Starp swam to Mrs. Walker, who. losing consciousness, clutched at her rescuer, endangering both. He managed to pull her to a shallower part of the stream, where she was dragged ashore insensible. U<»

TRAMCAR OVERTURNS

TRAMCAR OVERTURNS. Forty persons were injured in a tramcar accident at Handsworth, Birmingham, on Mcndav morning. The brake blocks on the front wheels of the car fell off and fouled the lines. The car, which was travelling at a moderate speed, swerved to the side of the road and overturned. The driver of the car had l-is vnst broken and the woman conductor spTained her ankle. Forty of the sixty passengers were bruised and received cuts from bioken glass.

U FE SENTENCE REDUCED

U- FE SENTENCE REDUCED. In the Criminal Appeal Court, Albert Bright, of Rotherham, appealed against sen- tence of penal servitude for life passed on him on a charge under the Defence of the Realm Act of illicitlv obtaining information from employees of Vickers, Limited. His counsel contended that his motives were misjuda-ed. Mr. Justice Darling, giving judgment, re- duced the sentence to ten years' penal servi- tude, and said the court thought that the judge who passed sentence had acted on the assumption that prisoner intended to com- municate with the enemy. ♦

rFREQUENT VISITORS

r FREQUENT VISITORS. The wife of a bootmaker who answered a moneylender's summons at Bloomebury County-court told the registrar that they were without means, as their home had been visited by burglars a few days ago. When the registrar expressed regret, the wife added that there had been a previous burglary. "You must be used to it," observed the registrar. "We have had fourteen in five years, the wtnan replied—a record that so impressed the registrar that he made an order for the payment of only 2s. & month.

No title

It was announced in the "London Gazette that "the temporary commission of Lieut. Herbert Asquith (in the Royal Marines) is terminated in erder that he may accept a commission in the Army." Colonel H. B. II. Wriglit is gazetted tem- porary major-general, and Colonel H. M. Grcnfell and Colonel 2nd Commandant G. E. Matthews temporary brigadier-generals.

MORE SENTENCES BY GENERAL COURTMARTIAL

MORE SENTENCES BY GENERAL COURT- MARTIAL The following further insults of trials by General Court-martial have been announced in Dublin: Private Henry Joseph Wyatt, Royal Irish Lancers, who was tried on the 13th and 14th inst., was found guilty of manslaughter and sentenced to penal servitude for five years, which sentence has been confirmed by the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief. David Kent, tried on the 11th and 15th inst., was found guilty of murder and of aid- ing and abetting in the recent rebellion. He was sentenced to death, but with a strong recommendation to mercy on account of his previous good character. The General Officer Commanding-in-Chief confirmed the Court-martial finding, but commuted the sentence to five years' penal servitude. I The following prisoners from TullamoTe were tried by General Court-martial, and the General Officer not having confirmed the proceedings has ordered their release: James O'Brannan, Peter Bracken, Frank Brennan, Thomas Byrne, John Delaney, James Clarke, Joseph Morris, Henry McNally, Thomas Duggan, Thomas Hogan, Joseph Graham, and Joseph Rafter. On the 15th and 16th inst. Austin Stack and Cornelius Collins were tried. They were found guilty of conspiring to bring about the rebellion in Ireland and were sentenced to penal servitude for life, which sentence has been confirmed. Mr. Tennant (Under Secretary for War) has stated, in answer to a question in the House of Commons that, roughly, 3,000 pri- soners arrested in connection with the Irish rebellion have passed through the hands of the military authorities, and of these about 1,200 have been released.

SOLDIERS UNDER THE NEW ACTI

SOLDIERS UNDER THE NEW ACT. Under the Military Service Act, which re- ceived the Royal Assent on May 25 last, every man in Great Britain between eigh- teen and forty-one years of age is deemed to be a soldier from Saturday, June 24, that being the appointed day on which the mea- sure came into operation. The first section of the Act lays down that from the appointed day "every male British subject who has at any time since August 14, 1915, been, or for the time being is, ordinarily resident in Great Britain, and who has attained the age of eighteen years, and has not attained the age of forty-one years, shall be deemed as from the appointed date to have been duly enlisted in tia Majesty's Regular Forces for general service with the colours or in the Reserve for the period of the war, and to have been forthwith transferred to the Reserve." Application for exemption can now only be made by the special permission of the local tribunal on special grounds, and only within thirty days. By July 24 next every eligible man must have reported himself at the re- ctuiting office, whether he hws received notioe to do so or not.

NOVEL COURTS FOR MINERS I

NOVEL COURTS FOR MINERS. I The question of absenteeism in coal pits, which has caused serious loss in output, is to be dealt with in a novel way under a scheme in which both masters and men are co-operating. Courts are to be net up at each colliery on the lines of the existing muni- tions tribunals, for the purpose of dealing with serious or habitual cases of absention from work. Upon these courts representatives of both the management and the men will sit, and they will have power to impose fines varying from 2s. 6d. to a sovereign. The finea realised in this way will be devoted to some charitable institution or object preferably associated with colliery life. It is calculated that the removal of avoid- able absenteeism will increase production of coal in Great Britain by ten million tons per annum.

CURATE WINS MILITARY CROSS I

CURATE WINS MILITARY CROSS. News has been received that the Rev. B. P. Plumptre, of Bcrmondsey Old Parish Church, has won the Military Cross. When the Rev. F. H. "Gillingham—the Rector of Bermondsey and the Essex cricketer—returned from the Front at the end of last year after serving twelve months mentione d in dis- as chaplain and being mentioned in dis- patches, the Rev. B. P. Plumptre, one of his curates, asked that he might take the rector's place and represent Bermondsey at the Front with the local battalion, the 22nd London Regiment. The rector agreed, and now Bermondsey is justly proud of its gallant curate. —————.

BRITISH ARMY AND VERDUN I

BRITISH ARMY AND VERDUN. Sir Francis Younghusband, speaking at Egham on Saturday, sata the French Army was showing the most perfect command in repelling the Verdun attack, and the French na,tior was keeping its head so cool that it was not making that demand on the British Army which this country would almost like it to mako. "That shows wonderful self-restraint," he added, "but it also means victory in the end, for the reason that the Germans are gradually wasting away the flower of their army.

EIO000 FOR RUSSIAN STUDIES a

EIO,000 FOR RUSSIAN STUDIES. a Sir James Roberts, Bart., of Saltaire, Yorks, has offered j810,000 to the University of reds for the foundation and maintenance of a professorship of the Russian language and literature. The gift has been gratefully accepted. In a letter announcing his gift, Sir James Roberts says:—"It would be an illusion to expect that adequate advantage could be taken of Russia as as outlet for our manu- factures unless we can be represented out there bv our own countrymen, equipped with a knowledge of the Russian language."

WOOLWICH WORKERS BEATD

WOOLWICH WORKER'S BEATD. At an inquest at Woolwich on the body of Gwendoline Darrell, twenty-four, em- ployed in the Royal Arsenal, it was shown that death was due to aoute jaundice caused by poisoning by trinitro-toluol (T.N.T.), with which the girl had been working. The Coroner said that the workers in explosives wore masks, and he hoped it might be pos- sible in future to treat the masks with chemicals to counteract the effect of the fumes. A verdict of "Accidental death" was letumed.

All OFHCEtrs SACRIFICEI

All OFHCEtrs SACRIFICE. I Lieutenant George Cyril Paton, of the Royal Scota Fusiliers, stationed on the east of Scotland, has lost his Life in tragic circumstances while engagod in bombing practice. A hand grenade fell within a few yards of a trench in which there were a lumber of his men. T. save them he picked up the grenade in order to carry it out ef the danger zone, when it exploded and he was instantly killed.

No title

Councillor J. 8. Rowntree, an ex-mayor of Harrogate, and a meifiber of the famous cocoo, firm, was granted total exemption on conscientious grounds by the Harrogate Tribunal. The Tsar has eonferred the Order and Medal of St. Ann upon some of the officers and man of the British unit in Russia for "meritorious ymrk." The town council of Strasburg has decidea to change the name of the "Rue de Lau- sanne" in that city to Rheinfelcjener- strasee" in order to "strafe" Lausanne for the- sympathy ehown far the cause of the Allies. An Ormskirk motor garage proprietor in- formed the Local Tribunal that. while he had no objection to lady drivers, the public would not have them, people who ordered a taxi invariably saying, "Please don't eend a lady driver." I I

I MOTHER AND HOME I

MOTHER AND HOME. If you want to get to the top of the ladder of success, don't be afraid of start- ing at the bottom. Always keep the pro- noun "I" in the background, but put the person it represents well in the foregroundo: Keep the word "concentration" always before you. Stick it up in the study, the bedroom, the office, the workshop. Practise concentration in all things great or small- It is not what you make that counts; it is what you save. Prating about seizing opportunities and so on is worse than useless unless you are fitted to profit by them* Seize you may, but you cannot hold if not fit. You must have knowledge. Get it. Without system, unflagging industry ifit often robbed of the best part of the results of its activity. Don't say "I can do this," but—go and do it. THE FIRST RUNG. It may be hard to find the first rung of the ladder, but keep working away until you do find it. Keep your eyes and ears open, your mouth ?tut. Ignorance is no- thing to be ashamed of unless you have had the opportunitv to learn. Inquire about everything which concerns you, and what you are told remember. Realise that you. h?ve a weak spot. Find it, then remedy it. The strength of a chain is that of its weakest link; so the strength of a man must be gauged by the strength of his weak spot. It is better to go on until you're stopped than not to make any progress at alL SAVING ON BOOT REPAIRS. With every pair of boots or shoes I buy I purchase Is. 6d. worth of bend leather. This I cut into strips from 2in. to 2!in. wide, and nail a piece across the centre of the sole in each boot. When this wears down another piece goes on. By this system, and with the aid of rubber heels, I generally get from three to four years' wear out of my boots. To GAIN OBEDIENCE. The best mothers are the ones who strive to interest themselves in everything that concerns their girls—those who have the happy knack of bridging over with love ana sympathy the years that lie between thein,, Don't expect them to have the wisdom that. vears alone have taught you. You are far more likely to guide them if you are not always ready to find fault with follies which are so often due to inexperience. Above everything, strive to cultivate absolute conifdence. Remember, as girls grow up.. they want freedom of action and thought. If you gain obedience, make your rules easy to obey. BRAN REPLACES STARCH. When blouses require only a little stiffen- ing, bran water should be substituted for starch. Add two handfuls of bran to a quart of water, boil for half an hour. Then strain and add a quart of warm water., This mixture helps to preserve the colour of embroideries, etc. THE COMPLEXION. A. complexion which is hopelessly dull or greasy can be made beautiful in a moment bv a perfectly harmless home recipe. It vou have no cleminite in the house, get about an ounce from your chemist, and add onlv enough water to dissolve it. Apply a little to the face with the finger tips. Thw process defies detection, and the result is, a- immediate appearance of velvety, youthful "bloom" which every woman desires. The,, effect will last all day under the most try- ing conditions, indoors or out, and renders powdering quite unnecessary. This simple substance is also very good- for the skin, and no possible harm can come from its regular use. To make the eyelashes grow long, dark, and curling, apply a little men- naline with the finger tips occasionally. It is absolutely harmless and beautifies the eyebrows as well. Two HOLIDAY DON'TS. Don't make the mistake when packing for your holidays of forgetting to put in a couple of pairs of comfortable old boots and shoes in case you may want to undertake » long country walk. Don't ruin your new* clothes, before you have worn them. by packing them carelessly in too small a trunk so as to avoid much luggage. Far better leave them at home than find they are creased and damaged at the very out- set. CLEANING TIME. Some people have a curious fondness of retaining small parcels of things that are absolutely useless, such as pieces, of some gown that was worn out and done with years ago, odd pieces of fur or scraps of j lace too small to be of any use, rolls of old- fashioned trimming or morsels of satin and brocade not large enough for even a. "crazy" patchwork. The old proverb about, keeping a thing and its Me will come i. open to an enormous amount of abuse, in, common with all the old proverbs. Re- member what Charles Lamb said when h? and Mary were removing from somewhere- in Holborn to Tottenham. He complained, that women had always cartloads of rubbish that they must take with them wherever they go. And so we have. It is well to minimise it, if we can, to make periodical onslaughts upon the accumulations and to disperse them. Don't treasure cast-off things. SMELLING SALTS. Do not go to the expense of purchasing :t fresh bottle of smelling salts if yours has become exhausted. You can replenish your bottle quite easily yourself, and will find it far cheaper. Buy a pennyworth of rock ammonia, and break it into small pieces- Fill the bottle with these pieces, and then cover with either* lavender-water or eau-de- Cologne. You will find that this makes ex- cellent smelling salts at a trifling oost. A FLANKER BLOUSE. Nothing requires more care than a flannel blouse if it is to be washed properly. Wash it in three lots of tepid, soapy water. If coloured, soak it first for half an hour in salt water to fix the colour. Then squeeze it instead of wringing it dry. Hang it in a windy or draughty place, and when almost dry iron it on the wrong side with a warm, not hot, iron. CLEANING A SUEDE BAG. To clean a grey suede bag place a little flour on a piece of paper In the oven, and leave until it has got very hot, but remove it before it begins to turn brown. Take a clean piece of flannel, and dip it In the; flour, and rub it well into the leather, When every part of the handbag has re-, ceived attention, and meets ,with your satis- faction, take it out into the garden, andl beat it with the handa until no suggestiotti of dust arises. The bag will look quite clean and fresh again after this treatment*. To CLEAN A WRITE STRAW HAT. I Squeeze some lemon- juice into & saucer,. and add flowers of sulphur sufficient to form a thin paste. Brush the hat all over thoroughly with this mixture, using a stiff nail-brush for the purpose. Afterwards rinse in clean cold water, and lay aside to dry. The hat will be qnite white and fresh again when dry. If a gentleman's hat is being cleaned, :t shoukf be laid on some- thing quite flat to dry, crown upwards* Should the crown show signs of lifting or falling in, however, reverse the position, and place a flat-iron inside the crown, which will prevent the straw from warping.

No title

A solicitor's clerk, who at the conclusidn of a case applied for costs, was told by Judge Cluer 13t Clerkenwell County-couiit that by 90 doing he was acting as a solicitor and making himself liable to prosecution. When Wm. Edwin Chapman, of .Kentish Town, was summoned for the recovery of rates on (several of his properties, the col- lector stated that defendant spent about nine months out of the twelve in prison. He was a house farmer, and while he was in prison his son looked after the property. Leave was given to distrain.