Collection Title: Abergavenny Chronicle

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is the copyright of the Tindle Newspapers

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
25 articles on this page
OUR LONDON LETTER I

OUR LONDON LETTER. I (From Our Special Correspondent.] These are exciting times for men who art not clad in the fashionable khaki, and who are somewhere on the margin of the mili- tary age. Some indeed who are well over the age, but have preserved something of their youthful slimness and freedom from grey hairs, have had the startling experi- ence of being taken into custody by the police and required to give reasons why they are not in uniform. The police are conduct- ing a big "round-up" in order to discover missing absentees, of whom there are said to be some thousands. They have raided boxing rings, theatres, music halls, and other places of entertainment, and have made small captures here and there, but as yet no great haul anywhere. However, they are pretty confident that by the time they have finished their campaign there will not be many men in London wearing civilian clothes who are not able to give a satis- factory account of themselves. The police have not confined their opera- tions to places of entertainment. Evidently they intend to make raids in every place where men do congregate. A friend of mine was on his way home the other night, after having put in a good day at the office. He was thinking chiefly of dinner when he got out of the train at his Tube station to find the place in the hands of the police. He informed them that he was over age, and i produced his registration card. "No good," was the reply, "where's your birth certifi- w Of course he had not got it, not having been accustomed to carry such a document about with him. After a time he and a number of other unfortunates, two hundred altogether, were marched through the streets to the police-station, where they were questioned. After having been de- tained four hours my friend was allowed to go home, but he had to appear next day with his birth certificate. I don't think he is likely to go far without it in future. Somerset House, I imagine, must be driving a roaring trade. There is a fine impartiality, as was only to be expected from a Coalition Government, about the decision to take over the National Liberal and the Constitutional Clubs for work connected with the war. Each has a membership of five thousand, and, as the commandeering of both was announced at the same time, neither can complain that the Government's favours are unequally distri- buted. Not that the members of either are inclined to complain at all. They recognise that the loss of their clubs for the time being is the fortune of war, and they are quite ready to make the best of it. Large numbers of ■■ members of both these great political clubs are serving in the Forces, but thousands will be rendered clubless, unless, as probably will be the case, they are offered house-room by other clubs. The finding of accommodation will not be such a difficult matter as it would have been in normal times, as all the London clubs have been hard hit by the war and have room for more members. The National Liberal Club is to be taken over by the War Office and the Constitutional by the Ministry of Munitions. Patrons of picture theatres, though they have been robbed of the thrilling spectacle of the Cabinet actually ensrasred in doing whatever a Cabinet does do, are not to be thrown over entirely. They will not see the Cabinet, but they are to be gratified with visions of certain individual Cabinet Minis- ters in their habit as they live. Some of them, we are informed, are taken at their desks, busy with affairs of State, others are seen making speeches or delivering messages to the nation. Mr. Asquith is shown hard at work on papers, Mr. Lloyd George "radi- ates energy and enthusiasm," and therefore ought to be a useful "film just now. The photographer would seem to have achieved a triumph with Mr. McKenna, having photographed not only himself but also his buoyant optimism. Mr. Balfour's film shows a "detached calm," Lord Crewe is "courtly," and Mr. Herbert Samuel is "businesslike." Viscount Grey has a serious smfle, and some people are sure to have doubts as to whether at such a time as this he ought to smile at all. It has been stated that the proposal to film the Cabinet at work fell through because of the distaste of one of its members for such pub- licity. There were nine guesses at the identity of the Minister in question, and it is interesting to see that the two who were most frequently mentioned have been filmed after all! Bishops are not as a rule over-popular with the man in the street, bat the Bishop of London is an exception. His popularity began when he was Bishop of Stepney, now a good many years ago, and he is now pro- bably more popular than at any time in his career. It is not only with the man in the street that he is in high favour; the man at the Front likes him, and &o does the man at sea, for he has visited the troops in France and the ships of the Grand Fleet. At present, however, it is the man in the street who is getting his turn, for the Bishop is giving a series of open air luncheon-hour addresses in his diocese, and crowds gather to listen to the popular ecclesiastic. He has announced his inten- tion of talking to his people from one end of London to the other. His addresses are delivered in connection with the National Call to Repentance and Hope. There are people, no doubt, who think the Bishop of London a wealthy man with his ten thousand a year. They will be sur- prised to learn from his own statement that the State takes half of his salary in rates and taxes, and that the upkeep of two large houses and other expenses incidental to his position, have left him after fifteen years X2,000 poorer than when he was appointed Bishop of London. Some years ago the Bishop published a balance-sheet which ehowed that the balance was on the wrong side. An observant critic immediately wrote to know how it was, if the Bishop was so poor, that he could afford to wear a fur coat which must have cost at least fifty guineas. It looked rather a poser for the Bishop, but it came out later that the fur coat was a present, and that it had not cost fifty guineas, but only fifteen. That is the worst of being a Bishop. An Army con- tractor may wear a fur coat if he pleases, and people will think it only natural for him to do so, but let a Bishop appear thus splendidly arrayed and somebody at once wants to know where the money came from A. E. M.

No title

A children's window, placed in St. An- selm's, Pinner, contains a piece of ruby giass from Ypres Cathedral, brought home by Lieutenant Michael Hill, formerly a chorister at the church. A large marquee at the Red Croes Active Service Exhibition at Liverpool, containing munitions, a eollection of war relics, and Raemaeker's cartoons, was severely damaged by storm. Through a motor-car swerving into a bank on the Maybolc-road, near Ayr, on I Sunday night, Charles Rattray McKechnin and David Smith Hamilton, of Pollok- shields., Glasgow, were killed. Two seamen from a Norwegian ship who pleaded that they had been having "a nice ti-e" were fined -65 each at Thames Police- court for disobeying the Aliens Officer's order to retcru to their vessel by 8 p.m.

I ENGLAND AND SWEDE I

I ENGLAND AND SWEDE#. FURTHER CORRESPONDENCE OVER DELAYING MAILS. The Press Bureau on Sunday night issued farther correspondence which has parsed be- tween the Swedish Minister and Viscount Grey. On August 17 the Swedish Minister wrote to Lord Grey as follows: My Lord,—In reply to the Note which your lordship was good enough to address to me, dated August 2, respecting arbitration, etc., mv Government directs me to make the following communication to you: His Majesty's Government share6 the hope that this correspondence may end in a defi- nite solution of the question at issue, and would warmly congratulate itself to see the application of the fertile principle of inter- natienal arbitration. His Majesty's Govern- ment is glad to note that his Britannic Majesty's Government appears to recognise the impossibility for his Majesty's Govern- ment to renounce in acfvance the right of taking measures which regrettable cir- cumstances might render nccessary. His Majesty's Government need not say that they perfectly recognise, as they have always done, the validity and binding force of the agreement of 1904, while at the same time maintaining their right to suspend the ap- plication of this agreement in the conditions in question. I hasten to take advantage of this oppor tunity to renew the assurance of the high consideration with which I have the honour to be, my Lord, your Lordship's most humble and obedient servant, (Signed) WRANGEL. To this Viscount Grey, on August 25, despatched the following reply: Sir,—I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Note of August 17 on the question of the parcel mails. The meaning of this communication does not seem to his Majesty's Government to be clear, and I have instructed his Majesty's Minister at Stockholm to point out to the Swedish Government that his Majesty's Government must, as a condition pre- cedent to any arrangement involving re- course to arbitration, have an assurance that the Swedish Government will definitely cease to interfere with the transit of parcels to and from the United Kingdom across Sweden. I have the honour to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant, I (Signed) GREY OF FALLODENj

HOISTING THE UNION JACK OVER DARESSALAAM

HOISTING THE UNION JACK OVER DAR-ES-SALAAM. The War Office announces the following de. tails, which have been received regarding the surrender of Dar-es-Salaam on the moruing of September 4:— On September 3 at daylight a close attack was commenced by our naval forces in whalers, in conjunction with a heavy bombardment of the enemy's position north of the town, and the advance of our troops from the direction of Ragamojo. Landings were effected at Konduchi and U.sassani were effected at Konduchi and Msassani Bay. The enemy troops evacuated the town, which was occupied by our combined naval and mili- tary forces, the British colours being hoisted with full honours. The obstructioni placed in the channel of the harbour are being removed. I TWO OTHER PORTS SURRENDER. I The town, with the exception of those por- tions which were occupied by the German troops, is virtually undamaged. On September 7 our naval forces and marines, with military landing parties, occu- pied the ports of Kilwa Kiwindische and Kilwa I i Kissiwani, which were surrendered under threat of a naval bombardment.

INO EMPLOYMENT OF ALIENSI

I NO EMPLOYMENT OF ALIENS. I An Order in Council published in the "London Gazette" makes the following ad- dition to the Aliens Restriction (Consolida- tion) Order, 1916: "As from and after the first day of October. 1916, a person shall not take steps to obtain the services for work other than munitions work in the United Kingdom of aliens er any alien not in the United Kingdom, except with the permission in writing of the Board of Trade, and subject to such special or general con- ditions as the Board of Trade may impose."

I AVIATORS PLUCK I

I AVIATOR'S PLUCK. I A coroner's jury commended the famous aviator Mr. Michael Geoffrey Smiles for plucky efforts to save the life of Sydney Harry Howlett, a boy of ten, who had be- come exhausted while bathing in the Silk Stream, Hendon, and had sunk. Mr. Smiles dived five or six times, but when, at the last attempt, he found the boy there was no sign of life. Witnesses agreed that the spot was a dangerous one, and that Mr. Smiles ran grave danger of losing his life by being en- tangled in the weeds.

I QUIET ON THE TIGRIS t

I QUIET ON THE TIGRIS. t The War Office announces J During the current month there have been no develop- ments on the Tigris Front. A reconnaissance by friendly Arabs discovered that hostile irregulars were between September 2 and 4 still in the vicinity of Ain (on the Euphrates, forty-six miles west of Nasiriyeh). Our friendlies returned under the observa- tioin of two British gunboats without en- gaging the enemy.

I GASSED BY GEYSERS I

I GASSED BY GEYSERS. I At inquests held at Shorncliffo on two soldiers. Corporal George Edward Phillips, Canadian Ordnance Corps, and Private Wil- liam Everett, Canadian Army Medical Corps, the evidence showed that they met their deaths under precisely similar circum- stances on the same night. Both were patients in a military hospital, and were found in separate bath-rooms fitted with geysers, having died from asphyxiation. The gas was turned on and the windows closed. Major Clifford Reason, 1D charge of the hospital, said he had recommended central heating for baths. The jury returned a verdict of "Death by misad\ ent.ure," and added that they con- sidered the geysers as now fitted were dan- gerous.

ITHREE STEAMERS SUNK

I THREE STEAMERS SUNK. News has been received that the following vessels have been sunk by enemy sub- marines Strathtay (British), steamer, 4,428 tona, Tagus (British), steamer, 937 tons. Hiso (Norwegian), steamer, 112 tons. Thirty-two men of the crew of the Bri- tish steamer Swift Wings have reached Mar- seilles. Two of the crew were killed and two wounded. The steamer Gallia, bound from the East, came into collision with the trawler Provi- dence, which sank. all the crew being drowned except the captain and a sailor. The Gallia, which suffered severe damage, has arrived at Marseilles.

No title

Coalville Tribunal passed a resolution protesting against Volunteer Training Corps being jeered at by young colliers, and urging that the authorities should in- sist on colliers also joining these corps, as in the case of exempted men. I "Even Cl men (garrison service at home) are now regarded as valuable," said Mr. Nield, M.P., at Middlesex Appeal Tribunal. A music-hall artist who said he had cariiod X30 a week for the last three years informed Lambeth Tribunal that he had never paid the income-tax.

IOTHER MENS MINDS I

I OTHER MEN'S MINDS. I Drastic action "must be taken, and thfl people put on rations, if necessary, to pro- tect them against exorbitant profits.UP., F. W. JOWETT, M.P. I RED TAPE. I A Minister of Labour could have as much red tape round his body would reach from Birmingham to Lohdon.—MR. J. HAVELOCK WILSON. I CONDITIONS OF COMRADESHIP. I When German Socialists have got rid of their mad Kaiser and have hanged his ghouls as high as Haraan, when German democracy has dissociated itself from the crime of the Lusitania, when Germany's democracy has honestly tried to bring to justice those who killed the women and children of Scarborough, then, and not till then, will British Labour men call them comrades.-Mit. T. MCKERRELL. I A MATTER OF BUSINESS. But the Dutch are a commercial people, and when very large prices were offered by Germans and smaller prices by ourselves the Dutch took the former.—LORD ROBERT CECIL. I A PALTRY SAVING. I At a time when it might have been I thought desirable to keep open every avenue., of popular instruction and of intelligent diversion, the galleries of our National Museum at Bloomsburv were closed for the sake of the paltriest saving—three minutes, it was calculated, of the cost of the war to the British Treasury.-SIR ARTIIUR EVANS, I STARTING FROM SCRATCH. I It will take some time for the cinema to force its way to its place alongside literature and art, but it will do it, and in a much shorter time than people think. 'fhe print- ing press in Eng-land has a 400 years start of it: the handicap is not too much.—MR. C. M. HEPWORTH. I THE LAST WAR. I believe that the heart of the nation to- day means that this is really to be the last of the wars. But peace cannot be made by old methods which have failed in the past, and we cannot finish the war until the peoples of Europe are willing to look each other in the face and shako hands.—MR. J. RAMSAY MAODONALD, M.P. I THE FUNDAMENTAL NECESSITY. A war like the present requires many things for its successful conduct. Men are necessary, shells and gunfi are necessary; but the fundamental necessity underlying all thes#, and without which the meet ample supply of all the other necessaries would be absolutely empty and useless, is the neces- F;ity to r-a i nt. sity to maintain that practical command of the seas in which the British fighting "hip" and the British mercantile marine acts in coll abo rat ion and co-operation, and for so many glorious generations of our history have been able to maintain.—MR. BALFOUR. I DECLINE OF RELIGION. Religion has slipped back to something like our Christmas decorations, a very beautiful thing in its way, but rather unim. portant.—REV. LORD WILLIAM CECIL. I DRINK AND PATRIOTISM. We have seen British citizenship at its very best. On the other side, have we not seen the few of our fellow-citizena who are unprepared in such an unprecedented crisis to tolerate the slightest interference with their vested interests, if their vested in- terests are in the liquor traffic? Have we not also seen an even greater number unpre- pared to allow the slightest interference with their social habits, even if the interfer- ence meant the saving of an Empire and. civilisation?—MR. ARTHUR HENDERSON. S I THE WRONG WAY. A party attitude—any party attitude— will be fatal to the hopes and goodwill now current towards national education.-Siu JAMES YOXALL, M.P. OUR DREAD OF IDEAS. We do not use our men of learning, our national brains, our star-finders; rather we call them "swots," prigs, fogies, bookworms, and what not; so that what we most dread in England are ideas.—MR. AUSTIN HARKJ. SON. I A PERTINENT QUESTION. If only an intelligent German pieced to- gether all the claims as to the damage in- tiicted on this country which have been put forward since the raiding policy was initi- ated, he would be led to turn on the authori- ties in Berlin and ask them how it hap- pened that a nation which had suffered such losses—camps, docks, ships, forts, ammuni- tion factories, and other places of military importance bombed out of existence-was able not only still to fight, but to consti- tute herself the main support of the Allied cause.-Ma. ARCHIBALD HURD. THE BRITISH. ,j- J Everything they do, even in sport and games, is done with the exclusive object of getting on top by every manner of trick. Pure pleasure in the game is unknown to them; they are only acquainted with sheer selfishness and brutal egoism. The only thing that will bring them to reason is brute force.—PRINCE HENRY OF PRUSSIA. STATE CONTROL OF LAND. I We shall not get our landlords and farmers to plough up their worst four mil- lion acres of grass without definite control —either by peremptory legal obligation to cultivate, or by State farms.—Ms. SIDKET WEBB. OUR WORST ECONOMY. I Perhaps the worst economy to which we I are to-day reduced by our former lack of preparedness is the economy of Truth.Sip ARTHUR EVANS. 'I THE IDEAL PEACE. I Peace shall be neither premature nor be- lated; it will be a peace consistent with the great objects with which we went to war, consistent with the great ideals that have dominated us" from the beginning, to estab- lish the issue of right against might.-Mu. ARTHUR HENDERSON. SLUMS AND THE STATE. I It is not wise, or humane, or patriotic that the State should passively sanction the perpetuation of slums. Mil. H. M. RICHARDSON. THE BRITISH METHOD. I Nothing is more striking in the conduct of this war than the way in which the British method of "slow and sure" has justified itself.-M.R. ALFRED NOYES.

No title

The State, city, and private profits in the State of Delaware, U.S.A., owing to war orders, are already responsible for gifts amounting to £ 40,000 to the Y.W.C.A. of Wilmington, X50,000 for a hospital addition, X50,000 for a free library, and < £ 200,000 for a college. Sweden is now aa armed camp with 300,000 men ready to take the field at a moment's notice, says Mr. Nels Krogen Wattson, on his return to Butte, Montana, after a visit to his old home at Gothenburg Notwithstanding the action of tho Germr Government, about 150 children, "]O(K-J very weak and ill," arrived at Flushing li -i.. Belgium the other day. Some of them had not eaten potatoes for six months. The British public to maintain accurate perspective, should regard the present Allied operations on the Western Front lOt as the Battle of the Somme, but as the Somme sec- tion cf the Battle of Europe, says an Ameri- 1 can military expert.

No title

Syrian Mallow.—The varieties of hibiscus synacus are amongst the best shrubs for autumn flowering. The shelter afforded in most suburban gardens suits them, and in a deep, well-manured soil they grow and flower freely. The Syrian mallow may also be planted in the background of the mixed flower border, where it will grow to a height of six to eight feet or more. Increase is oy cuttings, which may be inserted now in a frame in the greenhouse, or in a cold frame. There are numerous single and double sorts, and s:x of the best are: Celeste, single light blue; totus albus, single white; alba plena, double white; caerula plena, double blue; lilacina plena, double lilac.; and rosea pleno, double rose. Violet.—Cut all runners off the plants, give the bed a thorough watering, and pre- pare the frame to receive the plants. Make them up with fairly rich and moderately light soil to within eight inches of the top before planting. 0, Lifting Zonal Geraniums Which Have Been Plunged.—It is a good plan to plunge plants of zonals in the beds throughout the summer. The specimens referred to are grown in 5in. pots. They blossom freely. throughout the summer, and make satisfac- tory growth. Cuttings may be taken in tho oidinary way, as shown at B in the sketch. Then, before frost occurs, lift the plants, cut away the surplus roots at A., which have grown through the pot, and clear away smaller ones on the surface, at C, C. Planting Daffodils.—The various kinds of daffodils like golden spur, horsfieldii, emperor, empress, Sir Watkin and maxinius are most suitable for floral effect in the garden and the bulbs are cheap. They should be planted now, placing the bulbs 4in. deep. Cucumbers in Winter.—It is much more difficult to successfully grow a good crop of cucumbers in winter than in summer. In the summer we may have the plants some- what close together, but in winter they should not be nearer than 30in., as shown in tho sketch. Moreover, it is not advisable to stop the shoots severely in winter. In summer the stopping may be done at every joint beyond the young fruits, but in the colder season at least two joints should be left intact on side branches. The sketch shows the section of a bed lengthwise. Alter making up the bed, form small mounds of nice, loamy, porous soil, whereon to put out the young plants. Procure sturdy plants and get them well established in their winter quarters before the end of Septem- ber. A gentle hot-bed, made of fresh litter and oak and beech leaves is advisable. ♦ ;and SpanL,?h The Week's Work.—English and Spanish irises are useful to cut from in the early summer, and should be planted now on an open border. Cover the roots with 3in. of soil and place the rows lOin. apart. There are numerous colours, including good blue bhadcs. Aconites ind snowdrops should be planted now to flower next February, and now is a good time to take up and divide old clumps of these bulbs. Plant them 3in. deep. They do very well under the shade of trees, and spread quickly in light soil. Get the vioiets up with good balls of soil to the roots, and water them in well after plants ing. Keep the frame close until the plants take root, then give more air. Shade lightly on bright days and syringe them over every afternoon. If the weather continues dry, give trees bearing full crops thorough waterings, or many of the fruit will fall prematurely. Liquid manure can still be used with benefit for late apples and pears. If the second fig crop is gathered, give the trees a thorough syringeing with insecticide, and follow this regularly with clear water every day. A good watering at the roots will also be essential. MoreUo cherries are fully ripe and the blackest of them are fit for dessert. If the weather keeps fine and open they will hang until the second week in October, but in the event of much wet, it will be better to gather them. When the fruit has been gathered from pot trees, plunge them in ashes in an open position, and keep them moist at the roots, also give them copious syringeings with clear water to keep the foliage clear and healthy. To get £ TKH1 results from a late sowing of turnips, pay great attention to early thinning. When i,ho plants aro 2in. high, thin out to 9in. apart, and use the hoo regular^ once a week betweei the rows. Get a good batch of lettuce, intended for autumn use, trans- plants! into a shallow spot as early as •possible. Give abundance of water, both at the time of removal and during the next few weeks, or the leaves will be of poor quality and of little use. Transplanting Peach Trees.—When it is necessary to remove trees in the house, the present is an ideal time to do the work. Get them up with care to avoid injury to the roots, and plant firmly. Give the trees a copious watering and syringe twice daily, also keep them shaded from the sun. Little air should be given at first, but more after about ten days. Sprouting Broccoli.—Those who know the value of this in providing a long succession of useful sprouts from February onwards will already have planted & good breadth of it. but others unfamiliar with its cultivation and wonderfully productive nature may pos- sibly have failed to include this among the winter greens already planted. Providing sturdy plants can be obtained, with plenty of root adhering, there is still ample time to plant. 341d get good results about next April. There are two distinct varieties of purple, one coming to maturity several Weeks in advance of what is known as ordi- nary sprouting. The white variety finds much favour with many, being equally pro- lific, and usually gives good shoots in March, leaving plenty of time to clear the ground for the main crop of potatoes. A very rich groand is best, and although when planted earlier in the summer a square yard is none too much to allow each plant, half that distance will do now. Celery for Ea-rly Use.—Continue to ndd soil to the earliest row of this, and where sticks are required in the first week in October, the rows should have a good soak- ing with manure water. When the leaves and stems are thoroughly dry, add finely broke. soil or ashes in sufficient quantity to ensure a good length of well-blanchod stem. Autumn Cauliflower. -Where this is de- sired early next month, give a portion of the bed a light sprinkling of nitrate of soda and hoe it well into the wil, or, if preferred, give a thorough watering with Hqoid manum, to which the above Btimulant has been added at the rate of loz. to each gallon.

No title

Managers of the Metropolitan Asylums Board have approved the estimates provid-. ing for an expenditure of X659,500 for the half-year ending March 31, 1917, and fixed the rate at 3 7-16d. While working in Rotherhithe railway tunnel a man who was engaged in attending to the hydraulic pumps on the Underground was struck by a train and killed..

I OFFICIAL LISTS OF 3376134 I CASUALTIES I

I OFFICIAL LISTS OF 3,376,134 I CASUALTIES. The German casualties reported in the German official lists during the month of August last are as follows: Killed and died of wounds 40,684 Died of sickness 2,043 Prisoners 1,7S5 Missing. 42,SS9 Severely wounded 32,825 Wounded 8,230 Slightly wounded 97,338 Wounded remaining with units 15,158 240,957 The above casualties, added to those re- ported in previous months, and including the corrections reported in August, 1316, bring the totals reported in the German official lists since the beginning of the war th: Killed and died of wounds. 781,517 Died of Sickness 50,615 Prisoners 165.497 Missing 234,272 Severely wounded 455.710 Wounded 275,453 Slightly wounded ,1,24!J,294 Wounded remaining with units 163,746 3,376,134 The above figures 'include all German national ities—Prussians, Bavarians, Saxons, and Wiirttembergers. They do not include naval casualties or casualties of colonial troops. It should be noted that the above figures do not constitute an estimate by the British authorities, but merely represent the casual- ties announced in German official lists.

ENEMY AERODROMES BOMBED

ENEMY AERODROMES BOMBED. BRITISH NAVAL RAIDS IN BELGIUM. The Admiralty has issued the following: September 9. An attack was carried out this morning by naval aeroplanes on the enemy's aerodromes at Gliistelles and Handzaeme. A large number of bombs were dropped with satisfactory results. All machines returned safely. September 10. An attack was carried out by naval aero- planes during the afternoon of the 9th in- stant on the railway siding -and ammunition dump at Lichtervelde. Machines returned safely. I BOMBS ON TURKISH CAMP. The War Office on Saturday issued the following The General Officer Commanding-in-Ciiief in Egypt reports: On September 8 three of our aeroplanes ag-ain raided El Mazar. Of the twenty bombs dropped eleven were seen to take effect in enemy camp6.

SHELL CONFERENCES IN PARIS

SHELL CONFERENCES IN PARIS. The Press Bureau states that at the series of conferences held last week in Paris be- tween the French and British Ministers for War and the Ministers for Munitions, Mr. Lloyd George and Mr. Montagu were ac-, companied by representatives of the War Office and the Ministry of Munitions and by officers from the staff of Sir Douglas Haig. An interchange of views took place as to the conclusions to be drawn from recent military operations. Measures were discussed for the most effective employment of the joint military resources of France and Britain, and satis- factory conclusions were arrived at. The Minister of Munitions has returned to Eng- land.

IMK CHURCHILLS MOrTo

I MK. CHURCHILL'S MOrTo. l Speaking at Chelmsford on Saturday afternoon, Mr. Churchill said the true motto was "Look after the war and after the war will look after itself." Now, he said, was the moment for tightening the blockade all the more and for stopping by every possible means the launching of supplies into Germany through neutral countries. Referring to the air he remarked that we were getting a greater mastery of the pro- blem of dealing with the German airships, and we could not but be struck by the fact that the hornets were learning to fight by night as well as by day.

I SOLDIERS WHO LIVED ON BEER

I SOLDIERS WHO LIVED ON BEER. "It is something like thirty years ago nnce the founders t, of the Y.M.C.A. began their work, and the change that has come yver the personnel of the Army during that time is little short of miraculous." This statement was made by Lord French when he opened extensions of the Y.M.C.A. Shakespeare Memorial Hut in Gower-street, London, W.C. "When I first joined the Army," said Lord French, "practically the only refuge that the soldier had was the canteen. In those days we had soldiers who practically lived on beer. It used to be quite a common. thing for an old soldier to sell his dinner to a recruit and buy beer with the proceeds. "In the few years before the war the change manifested itself in a most remark- able manner, especially with regard to the diminution of crime. Drunkenne.s.s used to be a most prevalent crime in the Army, and we used to have strings of defaulters outside the orderly room waiting to be punished. You hardly ever see a drunken soldier now."

ACTRESSS 8000 NECKLACEI

ACTRESS'S £8.000 NECKLACE. Michael Cunningham, thirty-eight, an electrician's assistant, was charged at Marl- borough-street Police-oourt with stealing from the Lyric Theatre, London, W., a pearl necklaoe value < £ 8,000, the property of Mi.s Doris Keane. It was stated that on the occasion of a matinee at the Lyric Theatre Miss Keane handed to the dresser her jewellery, among which was the necklace. The dresser put it with other articles in a small satchel she wore. This had a hole in it, through which the necklace appeared to have fallen. The prisoner picked it up and took it away. A week later a reward was offered, whereupon he went to Miss Keane's dressing-room and produced the necklace in a handful of dust, and said he had found it under the stairs. Miss Keane pleaded for leniency far the prisoner, and he .was sentenced to throe months' imprisonment in the second divi- sion.

LEATHERN MONEY I

LEATHERN MONEY. I Paper currency in England is a recent in- novation, and we were forced to that extremity in order to increase our reserves of gold out of which to pay the enormous cost of the war. In the year 1360 King John of France agreed to pay our Edward the Third three million golden crowns for his ransom, and in order to get that number of golden coins into the ooffers of the State he introduced a coinage of leather!

BY SPINNING TOPSI

BY SPINNING TOPS. Many interesting astronomical discoveries have been. made ity the help of spinning tops, and the facts obtained by their study have been applied to the rotation of heavenly bodies, the earth included, and the "wobble" of its axis has been calcu- lated by this means. In many ways, there- fore, the spinning top is a valuable scien- tific instrument.

No title

Three munition workers were fined at a Midland court sums of S15, £ 10, and .£5 respectively for being in possession of matches at a Government shell-filling fac- tory. Mr. W. E. Cain, of Wargrave, Berks, has given £ 1,000 to enable Liverpool wives and relatives to visit British prisoners in Swit- zerland.,

No title

When peeling onions hold a cork between the teeth, and the eyes will not become affected. A little flavouring is a tremendous im- provement to a junket, and coffee makes a delicious flavouring. All scrape of cold fish, whether fresh or Baited, should be saved and made into rkrleles, mixed with mashed potato. To tint discoloured lace curtains, mix equal quantities of ordinary starch and corn starch, boil, and use in the same way as white starch. To prevent jam from burning or boiling over, smear the bottom of the preserving pan with butter or margarine before putting Si the fruit and sugar. If the children's white frocks or pinafores get stained with fruit-juice, rub the mark very thorougbly with a little paraffin. Don't put the garment into the wash-tub at once leave it for an hour or two, then wash out in the usual way. If you mix a mustard plaster with th6 white of an egg instead of hot water the result will be as good and it will not blister. Warm camphorated oil is better, than either. Keep a pail for ashes—mix damp tea leaves with them, and use to back up a good fire. A fire thus made up will last for hours, and give out splendid heat. When making toast for breakfast, if it has to be done quickly, cut the broad in .slices and lay them in the oven whilst preparing the other things. The toast then onlv re- quires to be "shown tho fire," and will be nicely brown and crisp. It is a good idea when cooking a chicken or game in the oven to roast it in the usual way until it is nicely browned, then turn the back upwards, and leave it until done. In this way the gravy will run into the breast* and make it soft and deliciously tenklev-, REPAIRING ORIENTAL RUGS. To repair Oriental rugs at home, reinforce the tender places by putting underneath them a piece of burlap. Match the colours in the rug as nearly as possible with worsted. The worsted will usually be too bright, so dip them in strong coffee and dry thoroughly before using. Take the worsted double and sew closely through and through both rug and burlap, following the pattern of the adjacent figures. Leave the-stitches on the upper side longer than tho surround- ing nap and shave evenly down to it. USE FOR OLD TEACUPS. Teacups with broken handles are very useful for poaching eggs. Butter the inside, break tho egg into the cup, and stand the cup in the frying-pan half filled with water. It keeps the egg a good shape when poached, easy to slip on to toast, and is. cleaner than poaching in a frying-park BLOW-FLIES. Blow-flies are one of the greatest pests, of the larder in warm weather, and can only be kept out by the most scrupulous cleanliness; even then one or two will occasionally get in and very speedily do a great deal of mis- chief if there are fresh joints or poultry, or even fresh fish. Creosote (obtainable from the chemist) is the thing most disliked by the blow-flv, and will do no harm in the pantry. Moisten a rag with it and hang it up. or spray the shelves with it, and the blow-fly will speedily take his departure. MOTHS. The simplest way of dealing with moths is to keep them out of the houee altogether, and this can be done at the expense of a few pints of turpentine. Sprinkle the rooms with this once a week, or thereabouts, when the moths begin to hatch out, and they will 1 all die or leave the building. Repeat it if they appear again. Sprinkle a little in drawers where woollen clothes are, and the moths will not come near them. CLEANING VARNISHED WOOD. Place a week's tea-leaves in a pail, and pour over them a quart of boiling water. Leave for one hour, then strain and bottle. This liquor is excellent for cleaning var- nished wood and linoleum, and when used for cleaning windows or mirrors makes them- shine like crystal. CLEANING PAINTWORK. Paintwork should not be cleaned too often, or the polish is removed. I have always found it a good plan to keep a brush for paint work, and to use it instead of a duster every day. By doing this, dust is not allowed to settle in crevices, and by a daily brush down much scrubbing and clean- ing is prevented, so that there is a saving of both time and labour. SOME USEFUL RECIPES. POTATO SCONES.—Boil six large potatoes in salted water for a quarter of an hour. Strain off the water and let them stand, well covered, by the side of the fire to steam. Mash them with a fork quite free from lumps, with a generous lump of either butter or dripping, a tablespoonful of flour, and two small whole eggs. Beat this well with a wooden spoon. Well butter a griddle; make it quite hot. Turn the potato mixture on to a well-floured board; put pieces on the hot griddle as large as a teacup; flatten them with a floured knife. When they begin to rise, keep turning them over with a knife to cook them well through; or bake them for twenty minutes in a hot oven, lightly greasing the baking-sheet. EVE'S PUDDING.-Take fib. of fine bread- crumbs, fib. of finely chopped suet, and the same quantity of minced apples and cur- rants, washed and dried. Mix the whole together with two beaten eggs and a little milk. Put all into a well-greased mould, and boil for two hours. Dish and serve with any sweet sauce. RICE LOAT.-This requires four eggs, jib. ground rioe, ilb. castor sugar, and flavour- ing. Beat the eggs and sugar until thick and creamy. Add the ground rice and con- tinue beating for ten minutes. Add the, flavouring. Place the mixture in a prepared tin, and bake slowly for three-quarters of an hour. BAKED JAM ROLL.-Take lIb. jam, lib. flour, 6oz. margarine, one teaspoonful baking powder, and a quarter of a teaspoon- ful of salt. Mix the flour, baking powder, and salt, rub in the margarine, and add sufficient cold water to make a stiff paste. Roll out and spread with jam to within half' an inch of the edge. I Moisten the edges, roll up lightly, and bake in a hot oven. COCOANUT BISCUITS.-For this you will need lb. each of oocoanut flour, ground rice, butter, and sugar, two eggs, and a tea- spoonful of baking powder. Cream the butter and sugar, and add the other ingre- dients. Place a spoonful of the mixture for each biscuit and bake in a hot oven. TRIPE FRITTERs.-For this you will re- qiiire ilb. cooked tripe, four tablespoonfuls of flour, half a teacupful of milk, and salt and pepper. Cut the tripe into finger lengths. Prepare the batter by mixing free from lumps the flour, milk, and seasonings. Dip each piece in this and fry in a deep fat until a golden brown. Drain free from fat and dish. Pieces of boiled hake or cod are equally good cooked in the same way.

No title

Temporary Colonel C. H. Foulkes, Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel H. O. Mance (both Royal Engineers), and Major Sir C. V. Gunning are gazetted temporary brigadier-generals. "Is a stall a business?" asked the military representative at St. Pancras when a stall- holder taking £ 40 a week said he employed no one and kept no books. Three months' exemption.