Collection Title: Abergavenny Chronicle

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is the copyright of the Tindle Newspapers

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
29 articles on this page
THE BRITISH FRONT

THE BRITISH FRONT. THREE-QUARTERS OF A MILE OF FRENCHES TAKEN NEAR SERRE. — Cr .— SIR D. HAIG'S REPORTS. ) The following official dispatches from Sir I Douglas Haig Lave been issued by the Press Bureau:— Saturday, 8.35 p.m. Last night the enemy attacked our new positions east of Saiily-Saillisel after a heavy preliminary bombardment. His attacks were everywhere unsuccessful, and our line lias been eItirely maintained. » The enemy attempted raids during the night south-east of Neuville St. Vaast, east of Yermelles, and south of Neuve Chapelle. He was repulsed in each case with consider- able loss, leaving a few prisoners in out hands. A party of our troops entered the enemy's lines east of Neuville St. Yaast. destroyed a aoncrete machine-gun emplacement, and re- turned without casualties. This afternoon we carried out a very suc- cessful raid opposite Givenchy, and cap- tured twenty-five prisoners, including one officer. During the past twenty-four hours we have taken thirty-eight prisoners, includ- ing two officers. Artillery has been active on both sides north of the Somme, in the neighbourhood of Serre, and in the Ypres sector. Four ex- plosions were caused in the enemy's lines by our fire. Yesterday bombs were dropped by us on a number of places of military importance, and considerable damage ivai done to an enemy aerodrome. One German airplane was de- stroyed in an air fight, and another hostile machine was brought down by our anti-air- craft guns. HOSTILE TRENCHES TAKEN, I Sunday, 8.32 p.m. Another highly successful local operation was earned out by our troops last Eight north of the An ere. A strong system of hostile trenches lying at the souOthern foot of the Serre Hill was attacked and captured on a front of more than three quarters of a mile. Two hundred aid fifteen prisoners have been taken by us, a total considerably ex- ceeding the number of our casualties. A party of the enemy that endeavoured to approach our lines this morning south of Sailly-Sailliscl was driven back by our fire. We entered the enemy's tvouches during the night in the neighbourhood of 11 f3, eouth-west of La Bassee, north-east of NCllve Chapelle, and south cf Fauonissart. Many casualties were inflicted on the enemy and his dug-outs were destroyed. We secured a munl^er cf prisoners. We effectively bombarded the enemy's positions during the day at a number of places along our front. Bombing operations were carried out by our jrplanN3 with good resets on the ni?ht if the 9-10 mst. and a?niu yesterday One German machine was driven down in ur fighting. SIX HUNDRED YARDS OF ENEMY I TRENCHES OCCUPIED. Monday, 8.32 p.m. We made further progress last night north of the Aliere in the neighbourhood of the Beaucourt-Puisieux road, where, as the result of a small enterprise undertaken on a limited front, we occupied some 600 yards of hostile trench without difficulty. We took a few prisoners. Early in the night the enemy attacked our new positions south of the Serre Hill, but were caught by our artillery barrage and machine-gun lire, and easily repulsed. The enemy's linc-s were entered by our patrols at a number of places during the night. Scutht of Annentieres one of our raiding parties blew up a hostile ammuni- tion dump, and captured a few prisoners. This morning an enemy raiding party, which was observed to be collecting in the enemy's positions north-east of Neuville St. Vaast, was dispensed by our artillery. Successful bombardments were carried out by us during the day north of the Somme and in the neighbourhood of Armontieres and Ypree. Tn the course of air fighting yesterday one German aeroplane was driven down in a damaged condition. One of our machines ia missing. ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL RAID. I Tuesday, 8.40 p.m. I Early last night a strong hostile raiding b?-tY were driven off bv our fire aauth of PJ. 3 or»_rl Irwff Tivi- lhe enemy euniiw iucw, 1' goners in our hands. To-day the enemy again made repeated attacks, all of which were unsuccessful, upon our new positions south of Serre. Early this moraiag we oarried out a very successful raid, east .r Souchea. Our troops penetrated sevdral hundred yards into the enemy's positions, and did great damage to his defences. A trenck railhead and feur mine r,haft.6 A%,ere des-,r,) Y e d m?,; I koa d and feur mine shafts were destroyed by us, and many dug- outs were blown ill. Tim enemy resisted stub- bornlv, and a ooasiderable number of Ger- mans were killed. Wa captured forty-seven prisoners, including officer. Our casualties are rc-ported to be light. x We also entered tlgo trenches this morning and during the night north-east of Neuville St. Vaast, aortli of LooB. and cast of Ypre«. We destroyed several occupied dug-outa ) and took a few prisoners. A small party of th* enemy that succeeded in reaching our trenches south of Armentieres was at once ejected. < There has boon considerable artillery activity on both ftidos in the neighbourhood of the Somme and in the Ypres sector.

GIRL SUFFOCATED IN PRAM I 1

GIRL SUFFOCATED IN PRAM. I 1 Auti Allder, aged four, of Gravesend, reached over the end of a perambulator to look at a baby inside it. The hood of the perambulator, which worked on a swivel in the centre, fell forward on to the back of her neck and the girl was suffocated. At the inquest a verdict of "Accidental death" was returned. The coroner said it was' the most extraordinary fatality he had known.

TRAINING SHIP BREAKS AWAYI

TRAINING SHIP BREAKS AWAY. I The training filip Clio, whioh has been moored off Bangor, in the Menai Straits, for close on forty years, broke from her moor- ings on Sundry, and drifted down the straits. There were 250 boys on board. The tide wae, fortunately, slow and the weather calm. The vessel" grounded on the soft mud on the Anglesey shore, and divers and t-uge went, to her assistance. The Clio is commanded by Captain Langdon, R.N.

FLYING OFFICER KILLED I

FLYING OFFICER KILLED. I A flying fatality occurred at Chesterfield on Monday. Lieutenant W. H. Seagrave, Royal Flying Corps, was journeying to a Midland town m a biplane when, owing to engine trouble, his machine came in contact with a tree-top. He received terrible in- juries, the skuU bcmg fractured.

TRIED TO RESIST I

TRIED TO RESIST. I "I stood in the room three-quarters of an hour trying to recast the temptation," said William Lucas, a. painter, who was sen- tenced at Maxylobone Police-court on Mon- day to six monUm hard, labour for stealing a kitbag from a first-class waiting-room at Paddington Station. I

No title

To each of 350 wounaed soldiers in Wil- lesden Green hospitals, local tradesmen have presented a safety razor. Seven acres of land and a cottaoe at Ged- ney, Lincolnshire, bought a few years ago for £ 400, have been sold for £ 1,000. Mr. lain Arthur Murray, eon of Sir Mal. colm and Lady Hilda Murray, has been ap- pointed Page of Honour to the King in the place of Mr. F. E. Stonor, resigned,

I FINE KUT SUCCESSES I I

FINE KUT SUCCESSES. | —.— I I MANY TRENCHES AND LIQUORICE ] FACTORY TAKEN. I The following announcements by the Wat < OSice relate to our operations near Kut: — < Saturday.—The e-nemy positions gained in the advance of February 5 have now been consolidated. During the process of con- solidation several nxinof bombing operations have been cariied out, and the artillery have on several occasions bombarded the liquorice factory, which ia strongly held by the enemy. On February 7 there was a successful cavalry raid, which resulted in the capture of a large quantity of grain. The offensive was resumed on the 9th inst., and, under cover of a heavy bombardment, a portion of the enemy's new front line west of the Hai WaB securcd and consolidated in face of two counter-attacks and several bombing" attacks. Further westwards the enemy trenches were penetrated, and by means of successful bombing work were se- cured and consolidated on a frontage of 1,200 yards. During these- operations the cavalry cperatin? on the western flank drove in enemy advanced troops south and west oJ the Shumran bend. LIQUORICE FACTORY CAPTURED. Sunday.-During the night of February 9-10 the Turks delivered tour separate at- tacks on our right. These attacks were all repulsed. On our left we improved our position still further early on the morning of February 10. Bombing attacks were commenced, and our hold on the enemy trenches was rapidly extended. Later, .after a heavy bombardment, assault was launched against enemy trenches west of the liquorice factory. This assault was successful, and possession was obtained of the enemy trenches on a front of 500 yards and of the liquorice factory. | This building was held by General Townsliend throughout the siege of Kut. Steady progress was made on the right during the day, and, as a result of the operations of February 9-10, a new line hae been occupied on a front of over 6,000 yards, and the enemy has been pushed back to a depth varying from 800 to 1,200 yards. All evidence points to the fact that the Turks again suffered heavy casualties, one of our brigades having collected more enemy dead than the brigade suffered in total casualties. The General Officer Commanding in Meeopo- tamia reports I- On February 10 the enemy's bridge at Shum- ran was shelled a direct hit was scored, and some enemy shipping sunk. On February 11 the advance on the right bank of the Tigris was resumed, and the enemy was driven back to his last line of trenches in the Da bra bend west of Kut. By evening our line was established across the bend from bank to bank on a frontage of 5,500 yards, and the enemy completely hemmed in. The distance covered in the advance varied from 800 yards on our right to 2,000 yards on our left.

DEATH FROM DESTITUTION

DEATH FROM DESTITUTION. At Shoreditch, on Tuesday, an inquest was held on the body of IV, illiam Cook, sixty-nine, bootmaker, of Haggerston-road, London, N.E. The only source of income for deceased and his wife was a 5s. old-age pension and 7s. 6d., re- presenting Us small earnings for three weeks, and what few coppers he could pick up by selling' programmes at a local club. When the wife became ill and was removed to the in- firmary the old man had practically nothing to exist on, and the doctor who visited him found him emaciated and lying on a pile of rags suffering from pneumonia. There was evidence of extreme poverty, which, with the disease, led to death. A verdict in accord. ance with the medical evidence was returned.

I WOMEN VOLUNTEERSI

I WOMEN VOLUNTEERS. The following official statement has been issued Applications are bérJg received at employ- ment exchanges from women who are desiroul1 of enrolling as national service volunteers. "A scheme for the utilisation of the services j of women for natioual purposes is under the consideration of the department formerly under the Director-General of National Service. It will be promulgated as soon as possible. "In the meanwhile, women should register their names at the women's department of the employment exchangee throughout the country. There are many vacancies of various kinds for work of national importance, and especially for work in munition-filling factories/'

HERO IN ESSEX AIR RAIDI

HERO IN ESSEX AIR RAID. Mr. John Wright, fa-ther of Mr. Alfred Wright, a young Essex farmer who lost his life in a brave attempt to give warning of the descent of a German airship in September, 191C, has be-in made a grant of C150 by the War Office. The young man, who was a cripple and the mainstay of his aged father's home, rode a motcr-c^cle along a dark country lane to give information regarding the Zeppelin when he was run down 'by a meter-car and fatally in- jured.

PRISON FOR MUHmCN WORKERS i I

PRISON FOR MUHmCN WORKERS.: At a Yorkshire police-court on Tuesday several munition workers were charged with having matches in their possession while work- ing in a shell-filling factory. One man who was employed in the dangerous work of filling pans was sent to gaol for twenty-one (jays, hard labour. Another man, who was *entenced to fourteen days' hard labour, said that the matches had passed through a hole in lha lining of his pockets. 04>

YORKSHIRE MUNITIONS EXPLOSION

YORKSHIRE MUNITIONS EXPLOSION. The Mmititer cf Munitions regrets to announce that an explosion took place in a munitions factory in Yorkshire on Tuesday morning. The explosion was preceded by a fire, and as far as information is at present to hand all employees were- able to escape in good time and no lives have been lost. Some damage haa been done in the neighbourhood, and it is possible that there be some casualties at present un- known. .0

GASOMETER EXPLOSION

GASOMETER EXPLOSION. A gasometer belonging to the Caledonian Jlailway Company, and situated near Coo k- etre?t, Glasgow, exploded on Tueeday night. A largo number of windows were blown in, and tho concussion shook buildings over a wide area. A few fires broke out, but the firemen prevented them from spreading far. There were no casualties. The tank contained gas gene- rated from oil for heating railway carriages. ————— —————-

ILONELY DOCTORS DEATH

LONELY DOCTOR'S DEATH. At a Hackney inquest on Saturday on the hotly of Dr. George Henry Baker, aged eighty, a verdict of "Natural death" was re- turned. Deceased's body had laid undis- covered for three weeks in the house in Marc-street, Hackney, in which he was born. The police said that the room was covered with wires, clocks, and instruments. Dr. Baker had never married, and the coroner's officer said he had not been able to find any blood reations. He owned considerable pro- perty in Dalston and Hackney and had left no will.

No title

Mr. Robert I'Anson, formerly a jockey and afterwards clerk of the Sandown Park racecourse, died at Epsom last week. Mr. Cook, the Australian Liberal leader, declares that Mr. Hughes, the Premier, must represent Australia at the Imperial War Conference. Seven men were sentenced to two months and two to three months' imprisonment in Bristol, for stealing seventy-one bottles of .whisky from a ship.

IN LIGHTER VEINI

IN LIGHTER VEIN I BY THOMAS JAY. ILLUSTRATF D BY J. H. LUNN. I I have had a visitor, and he came in without knocking. It wasn't the rate-col- lector, because he generally has me for a shilling or so. No, my visitor was Claude, my Influenza Germ. I hadn't seen him for AN UNWELCOME VISITOR. a long time, and I thought he was looking thin. As a matter of fact, I couldn't see him at all, but the doctor spotted him for me. This just shows you the pull those medical men have over the ordinary earth crawling person. It hap- pened this way. This is how we met. I went out the other night, all dressed u p 1 i k e a Spitzbergen policeman on night work. I slipped on my heavy coat and muffler, and slipped on the mat as I went out. Out-side, I found that the wind was doing its best to exceed the ^peed-limit. It was trying to drill a hole in my anatomy. It was the nastiest and most unfriendly wind that ever wafted across the tannery. It was intoxicated, went from one side to the other, and sneaked up side streets. It was the coldest wind I ever struck. It was so cold that my teeth chattered. They played a tune. They played "Rule, Britannia" and "Dixie Land" right through seven times. Well, I was hurrying along, when a nasty, heavy lump of hefty, slippery, sleeting wind hurled itself right into my lace. When it got to the ninth hole I got badly bunkered, and made my way home. At least the way home had been made for me years before by the Corporation. I went into a chemist shop to see the time, or to get a dog licence or something. There was a crowd of people with colds and bits of influenza tucked under their arms trying to get served. There was a woman with a baby. There was another with two babies. There was a butcher's boy, replete with red nose and blue apron, a telegraph boy, hurrying with a telegram and reading the "Exploits of Texas Sam, the Dixie Sharpshooter," there was a dog with the distemper, and a man with the toothache which kept on calling for an encore. I told the girl that "I whatted some dinxture of abbomnia for a cold id de ned." She said, "You've got a old." I seconded the resolution, and it was unanimously carried by the man with the toothache and the dog with the distemper, The young lady said the ammonia t would cure it in a night. I promised to give her my future toothache orders, and departed singing "Loves Young Dream" in ragtime. I have always had a very great respect for a Judge. In fact I am prepared to admit that it pays one to respect all gentlemen con nee bed with the law, for sooner or later- you never know-you may learn to find the value of such respect. Therefore I say at once that I have a very great respect for I Mr. Justico Darling. I delight to find that he is humane, that he declines to torture ids fellow-men. I appreciate the words he used in Court: "I have a Bechstein .in my house, but cannot play it." Perhaps his lordship ma.v have been bound over to keep the peace at some time or another, but I rather think he refuses to play it because he does not wish to be cruel to the people who may live within hearing. Pianos, I agree, are all very well if people will only leave them a-lone and not torment them. The weather has been almost as cold lately as it was two summers ago, and people have been getting quite excited about the fine skating. Now, when I hear a man raving about skating on real ice, about the sheen of the moonlight over the ice-bound lake-wen, I invariably give him a. cold, etonv stare, and pass on to more ploas i n g themes. Such a man may try to entice me on the ioe, and I would retaliate by braining him with a slab of war bread. I care not for the ring of steel over the ice- bound lake. Give me a good fire nnd my smoke. Why do people want to spend money buying skates with which to break their CUTTING A FIGURE. I nccka w hen they can got the same experi- ence by slipping on their coats and going out into the Strand and slipping on a piece of banana skin? Ice may be all very well in its proper placoC-lmch as on the oake or a lump or two in champagne, but ice on tho lake while the blizzard is blizzmg-well. it inspires mo net to daring deeds. A desperate story follows. According to long-establi.shed custom and the Shop Acts, the dull February afternoon was closing early. The eleet was falling with a dull, sickening thud on the study window of William Ken peck, known as the greatest spot-monger in the world. Indeed, he held the largest stock of spots for dominpes in this country. Outeide the sleet continued, to fall, the tcrnado was in the zephyr, the tem- pest was in the glassy deep, the sheen was on the ice-bound lake, but there was nc sugar in the cupboard. Outside the blizzard was blizzing enough to blizz everything. Blizzness as usual. Mr. Henpeck realised that he was ruined. Ruin not only stared him in the face, but was making ugly grimaces at him. Tony, his young son, had gone to bed without sugar in his supper milk. It was a few minutes later, and it was J still sleeting. Mr. Henpeck walked over to his desk. What was that? It was a eound as of a woman walking up the gravel path The asterisks are mine, or rather the printers, who has lent them to me for this occasion. Mrs. Henpeck walked slowly up the gravel path, stopping every now and then, and sometimes more frequently, to dodge one of the four winds which happened to be passing, and incidentally to nick a piece of sleet from her ear. Mr. Henpeck heard the dull crack of the sleet on the gravel path. He was rivetted to the spot. He then tottered over to the sideboard. That's funny. He was rivetted to the spot at first, but he must have filed away the rivet or taken the fipot with him. It was only a tiny spot. William Henpeck dashed out of the house and tore down the street. A policeman stuck it up again with a bit of stamp-edg- ing. Mrs. Heupeck sat before the fire and waxed doleful in the manner of the magazine frontispiece. "He will be back any minute now," she muttered. There were sounds aa of somebody walking tip the gravel path. It was Mr. Henpeck, who had returned at any minute- almost in answer to his wife's mutter. "Dearest," he said cheerfully, "I have done it. I have bought -a beautiful I Rolls-Royce at £ 500, three hundredweight of butter, a suite of Chippendale furniture, three overcoats, a set of furs, a Stilton cheese, eighty tins of sardines, thirty tins of boot-polish, a dog, and two eggs." "Wil- liam!" his wife screamed. "Whatever has overcome you? Are you mad? "No," he remarked," but there was .no sugar in the house, and they wouldn't let me have anv unless I bought these things." And that is how next morning Mrs. Miranda Henpeck, upon awakening, found her break- fast cup of tea full of sugar. Nor was Wil- liam unrewarded, for, upon awakening, he found his hat full of head. In the excite- ment he had gone to bed with his hat on. His hat, not his head.

No title

 Mr. E. H. W. Cooke, auditor of the Bir- Irninpham Gas Department, has joined the National Service Staff in London, at the re.1 quest of Mr. Neville Chamberlain.

HONOURS LISTI

HONOURS LIST. I I ONLY ONE PEER: MANY KNIGHTHOODS I The New Year honours, which have been delayed, were issued on Monday. The list contains many rewards for war services. Only one peerage has been conferred, and that is upon Sir Hugh Graham, owner of the "Montreal Star." Colonel Owen-Thomas, who was mentioned in the Cornwallis- West report as having a genuine grievance, now receives a knight- hood as a reward for his great services to recruiting in Wales. A Privy Councillorship for Mr. W. P. Schreiner, the distinguished South African politician, is another interest- in- honour. Lieutenant-General Sir Bryan Mahon, who commands the Forces in Ireland, is .made an Irish Privy Councillor. Among the Baronet- cies are t ?ll following names:— Sir Frank Forbes Adam, acting chairman of the Territorial Association; authority on textiles and dyes. Sir R. Southern Holland, Director-General of the Inspection of Munitions. Mr. James Stevenson, of the Ministry of Munitions, now assisting the Director of National Service. Sir Charles Wakefield, Lord Mayor of Lon- don last year. Sir Charles Mathews, Public Prosecutor. KNIGHTS. I A large number of Knighthoods are con- ferred. The following are some of the names to bo found in the list:— Mr. W. A. Tritton, of Tritton, Foster, and Co., Lincoln had a big shaxe in the build- ing of the tanks. Mr. W. Weir, Scottish Director of Muni- tions, and on the new Air Board. Mr. E. T. Buckham, chief gun designer to Yickers, Ltd. Mr. V. L. Raven, of the N.E.R., now Super- intendent of Woolwich Arsenal. Mr. E. Pearson, in charge of the construc- tion of the new explosives factory at Gretna, the biggest in the world. Mr. H. Ross Skinner, Deputy Director- General of the Inspection of Munitions. Mr. Keith W. Price, Deputy Director- General, Explosives Supply. Mr. H. Holloway, Director of Housing Con- struction to the Ministry of Munitions. Mr. George Vanston, legal adviser to the L.G.B. in Ireland. Mr. James Gallagher, Lord Mayor of Dublin. Mr. R. Armstrong-Jones, late of the L.C.C. Asylum, Clnybnrv, an authority on lunacy. Mr. J. L. Otter, retiring Mayor of Brigh- ton; had much to do with the Indian hos- pital. Mr. E. M. Clarke, head of the motor ambu- lance department, British Red Cross. Lieut.-Colonel J. Nofton Griffiths, D.S.O., M.P., for WM' ecrvices. Mr. Arthur NewHbolme, chief --n?ical officer of the Local Government Board. Mr. O. A. R. Murray, Assistant Secretary, Admiralty. Mr. Stephenson Kent, director of the De- partment of Labour Supply, Ministry of I Munitions. Mr. McDougsl Dnckham, chairman of the Advisory Committee, Ministry of Muni- tions. Mr. Charles Ellis, director-general of Ord- nance Supply, Ministry of Munitions. Mr. E. H. Tennyson d'Evncourt, director of Naval Construction, Admiralty.

VOTE OF CREDIT I

VOTE OF CREDIT. I MR. BONAR LAW 8N COST OF THE WAR I In the House of Commons on Monday, five hundred and fifty millions were voted for the carrying en of the war. This sum comprised i;200,000,000 for the period from February 23 to the end of the f?l=al year on March 31, making the full total for the year £ 1,950,000,000, X350,000,000 above the Budget estimate— and £ 350,000 ,€00 to cover the expenditure during April and May. Parliament, since August, 1914, has voted 082,000,000. Mr. Bonar Law explained the exceeding of the Budget estimate as being due to in- creased munitions and further loans to Allies and the Dominions. The daily ex- penditure on the Army, Navy, and muni- tions has risen from £ 2,980,000 for the first fifty days of the financial year to £ 4,020,000 for the last sixty-three days. Munitions ac- counted for the bulk of the increase. GIGANTIC FIGURES. The Leader of the House gave the follow- ing striking figures:— Country's expenditure from August, 1914, to March 31 next, < £ 4,200,000,000. National Debt at the end of next month, about JE3,900,000,000. Advances to Allies and the Dominions, .2890,000,000. Mr. Bonar Law. recalling his observation some time ag'o that we could not go on in- definitely at the present rate of expenditure, said he was confident we could bear the financial strain hmger than our enemies. "How long the war will last I don't know; Mobody knows." But if we maintained tax- ation after the war on the same scale as now we should have the means to meet in- terest and sinking fund and wipe off the whole debt in a comparatively short time. "We have a very difficult road before us itS a nation. We may have greater sacri- fices still to bear, but neither on the ground of finance nor of the courage of determina- tion of the people, will there be any going back until the end which we have &et our- selves to achieve is attained."

GOODS PORTER GUILLOTINED

GOODS PORTER GUILLOTINED. The City of London coroner. Dr. Waldo, held an inquiry on Monday concerning the death of William Palgrave Trivett, aged forty-sin, a goods porter, employed by the London and North-Western Railway Com- pany, at Broad-street Station. The evidence showed that Trivett was on the second floor of a building, and was leaning over the gate leading to a hydraulic lift for the purpose of speaking to somebody below, when the cage came down and guillotined him. The jury returned a verdict of "Accidental death."

RECEIVED STOLEN CHEESES

RECEIVED STOLEN CHEESES. Christopher Couldrey, thirty eight, 1 grocer, was sentenced to twelve months' hard labour at the Central Criminal Court on Monday for receiving four cheeses, the goods of the London and South-Western Railway Company. A detective said he found the good. in the cellar at prisoner's place m St. Peter's-lane, Clerkenwell. He also discovered sides of bacon, fowls, blouses, and other articles.

CLOTH CUTTERS SOVEREIGNS

CLOTH CUTTER'S SOVEREIGNS. John O'Neill, an Islington cloth cutter, was fined 4s. at Old-street Police-court on Monday. Asked if he could pay, he pro- duced twenty-four sovereigns, besides some loose silver. The magistrate suggested that the gold should be changed into paper money, and, O'Neill agreeing, this was im- mediately done.

IBOYANDGIRL MARRfAGE

I BOY-AND-GIRL MARRfAGE. A woman asked the advioe of the magis- trate at Old-street Police-court on Monday concerning her son, aged fifteen, who re- cently married a girl of seventeen. He had a milk found and earned 8.< a week. Mr. Wilberforce: Apply to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children and see what they can do about it.

No title

There were only 258 street accidents in London last quarter as compared with 350 for the same quarter a year ago, according to the report of the Commissioner of City Police. "These hire purchase agreements are awful," said the West London magistrate to a woman who told him that her furniture was taken away while she was in the infir- mary.

OTHER MENS MINDS 0

OTHER MEN'S MINDS. 0 I should be ashamed to be a peesimist to dav".—AKCHDEACOS G? WESTMINSTER. GERMANY'S DOOi*. As sure as night follows day, the knell oi the doom of Germany hr.s sounded.—MAJOR GENERAL S^H ALFEED TURNER. PATRIOT MOTHERS. I The healthy x^cther who brings into thE world healthy children is performing s patriotic act for which 6h e deserves honour and respcct.—MAJOR LISONAKD DARWIN. TO PAY THE WAR DEBT. The burden of debt after the war will need something more than taxation, even at its present level. We may be able by taxation to pay the interest on the debt, but can ha-rdly hope to reduce it, and even to keep taxation at its present level would hamper the- country. Democratic finance has got to develop some new idea.—SIB STARR JAME- SON. 1 THE ALLIES' WATCHWORD. The watchword of the Allies in France could, believed Sir Frank, be put in the sentence, "Carry on boys, thorough to the ■ end."—SIB FBANK BENSON, SUBMARINE FOOD-SHIPS. One way of getting food into the country in future will be to carry it in submarines built as big as liners.-SIR J. COMPTON RICKETT. WHY? I Why do ladies, instead of having a pocket which is more or less safe, CITY a bag about with them R—MB. JUSTICE BEAT. VALUE FOR VALUE. 1 The settlement with Germany for the sinking of merchant ships will have to be on the basis of value for value, and not ton for ton. Ten thousand tons in a tramp steamer cannot be set against 10,000 tons in a liner like the Lu.-i,I,ania.-M-R. W. F. MASSET. POINTS AGAINST PIGS. I There is a great deal of nonsense being written as to cottagers having pi get yes, and it would cost a great deal to build them. Secondly, the waste from ninety-nine cot- tages out of a hundred would not keey a terrier, let alone a pig, and the priee of foodstuffs is, of course, prohibitive.—DUKE OF SoMERSET. A RARE EPOCH. I There are rare epochs in the history of the world when in a few raging years the character, the destiny of the whole race is determined for unknown ages. This is one. —MR. LLOYD GEORGE, TRADE DISPUTES. I It has been my lot during the last ten or eleven years to deal with an average of G50 trade disputes a yeor, jjnd I am perfectly safe in saying that at least 500 .f the dis- putes would never hare arisen hod there been in existence proper machinery fm' con- b ference between the parties.—MR. W. 1.1 1 AFPLETON. STAUNCH TO THE FLAG. I It was always my belief that the unity of the Empire would be tested only in a great war, and the way in which the Dominions have stood staunch to the British flag is a most wonderful certificate to t-he benirrnity of British rule.—SIB GEORGE RIGD. M.P. THE BEAST. I We are in the presence of a mox,(,iia wild beas-t, which must first be disabled — Sia I FREDERICK POLLOCK. TEACHERS OF MOTHERCRAFT. I I would like to f?e &t ieast ax women on 1 every be?th committee to propagate tbe Ht I .c,f mothercraft.—MR. A. H. D. ACLAND, I M.P. 1 A BRITISH HABIT. i A study of the pest shows that there is no characteristic more deeply ingrained in the "British mind than the ohrcnic habit of self-depreciation. It is combined, I admit, with a tolerably good conceit of ourselves.- MR. BALFOUB. THE MISSING DOCTOR. I The clergyman and the lawyer play their pnrt in the marriage contract, while the doctor, perhops the most important of all, is left out.-DR. C. J. MACALISTEB. A FAIR THING. I We are profiting by what our forefathers have done. Let us take care that our chil- dren shall profit by what we are doing to- day.—ME. WALTER LONG. BY THEIR FRUITS. I The soldiers who have come from indus- trial life to take their places in the ranks are the product of our educational system during the past forty years, and they have shown themselves a very fine body of men and better soldiers than have been sent out by this country in any previous campaign. Their good, sou-nd, manly intelligence and character affords proof that our elementary schools have fully justified themselves, and I am convinced that our educational system as a whole does not deserve the contempt and condemnation which have been poured on it.-Sin EDWAHD CLARKE, K.C. EARLY DAYS. I Many men town councillors do not like I being reminded that they were babies them- selves and in the bands of women.—MR. A. H. D. AOLAND. M.P. CONFIDENCE IN VICTORY. At the present time there is a feeling of confidence in the country in regard to the ultimate issue of the war. Those who know the military situation never had such confi- dence as they have to-day. This confidence is well grounded.—MR. AKTHUB HENDEBSON.

1 J CABBAGE AS MEDICINEj

 CABBAGE AS MEDICINE. The common cabbage is an excellent food. So thought the people of Ancient Egypt. who always ate it l'or breakfast, and even raised alters to the vegetable. It was intro- du-ced into England by the Romans. The ancients believed the cabbage to be a cure for all sorts of illnesses, and it certainly ha* high nutritive qualities. It contains mineral salt. calcium and iron, and if served in the right way it not only nourishes the body but destroys injurious acids in the blood tissues. If prepared in salad form, the cab- bage will lose none of its nourishment; but it retains a large amount even if plain boiled.

No title

National Council of Y.M.C.A.'e proposes to form "The Order of the Red Triangle" for those who have rendered auspicious ser- vice to the Y.M.C.A. during the period of the war. In order to increase the production of food the farmers of Westmoreland intend to plough about 2,000 extra acres of land this year, and devote it to the cultivation of corn and potatoes, British bootmakers have just received another order for 2,000,000 pairs eI boots for the Ruaeiaa armj.

No title

When eookiv.g by gas, cev-?r light the g&i until everything is prepared. Beilcd beans vith tomatoes 11:301: a tasty, nourishing dinner and 6avc meat. To cure a biiici'-s headach«, take a cup of black, unsweetened coffee te which the juiee of half a lemon has been addecL Oranges and lemons which z.re to be kept for any length of time fchculd be hung in a wire net in a cool, airy plaM. To clean japanned trays, rsb with a rag dipped in olive oil, then polish with a soft flannel. Never allow water te touch the enamel. Don't forget, that to put very dirty; clothes soaking in very hot sude ia likely t. "set" the dirt. The sudii should be just hot enough to comfortably bear your hand in. If you wear a silver thiinve into holes on the top, get a local plumber t. drop just a little solder inside, and the tlimbla will be as good as new again at a oofit of about a penny. If you wash table-napkina at heme, don't starch them. Iron them with a very hot flatiron when etill quite wet, and they will be plenty stiS enough. Never throw away the water in which rice, macaroni, and potatoes have been boiled. It is most nourishing when added to soup. When a fire is required 1at.. hI. the eVeD- ing-, damp some email coal and put on all re f i-ise r-uch as potato-peelings and tea- leaves. The fire will keep ia for keure, and you need not use good coal. Before putting a bright paJl on the fire, rub it over with a little dripping. Wirea washing up, use nice soapy vrAter, and when dry rub with a soft duster. By this simple method your pans will koep bright for weeks, thus saving time aai4 polish. A LEAKY PAIL. If the bottom of your I;ai! hat worn into Fmall holes cr cracks, turn it "P and 2'8 it a coat cf enamel. )"'Lil* titill wet spread a piece of linen smoothly over, rct it t. dry, then give another co^t of paiat. When this second coat is dry it will fGrlia a strong bottom to the p. ii. DUSTING ASPIDISTRAS. If you possess an aspidistra, «oa t wasb. the leaves. Instead, rub wry gently with a clean dwter every two cr three days. It if a much letter plan washing and fat less mtssy. If the planM hatV? been ?piy neglected and are grimed wttk d??t, wipe )n?l -,re 1--?imed wli?k d-aA;t,, wipe before you begin the dusting plan, but UD- less they really are vc:-y dirty the washing is quite unnecessary. CLEANING RED TILES. Red tiles should never vritbl soda-water, since, when dry, agly white marks appear. Perfectly pi&ia lake warm water is be&t for ordinary ••easions, But when much soiled they can be *asilv cleaned by rubbing then; 1:1(4e well, and r. out aa aighth of an inch thick. Cut into l'n:ade witit a tuir.bleT, and bake on a cTaaecd tia ia a moderate oreu for about fifteen miactes, or till a palo brown. SAVOUHT BATTER any •old minced meat (or sausage), a quarter of a pound of flour, half a pint of milk, salt and pepper, and one egg. Prepare a batter by smoothing the flour quite froo from lump; with a little milk. Add the egg-. and be1 thoroughly. Add the remainder of the milk and salt and pepper. Place tLe aaiace in in a well-greased tin, and pour the batter over this. Bake for half an heur in a hot oven. Serve with good gravy. Chil- dren arc very fend of this dieh. MEAT PATTIES.—Make some i'hert paetry, roll it out thin, and cut covers for a dozen- deep pattv-pans. Roll out the triatmings and line the tins with it. With half a pound of chopped (cooked or raw) meat mix two tabiespoonfuLs of browned breadcrumbs soaked in gravy, half a teaspoc-nful of pow- dered mixed heibs, and season well. Adit a little more gravy or water if not fairly moist. Fill the patty-pans, put en the covers, wetting the edges to the m together. Round a bole in the tep curl tb. tiny leaves of paste. Bake in a fairly hot even. EXETER STEW.—Take a pint of kt&ck, two good-sized onions, a tablespoonful of flour, r. pinch of pepper and BáJt, a tablespoonful of vinegar, a pound of beef trimming, a few baked and boiled haricot beans, and some c 1, c, i-, i- <1 capers, or minced pickled gherkins in their place. Slice the onions thin, and fry them a. rich brown colour in fat. Dredge in the flour and brown that also; add vinegar- pepper, and salt- cut the meat into nice pieces, add it to the onions, pour the stock over, and when not quite boiling, draw the pot aside, and simmer it very gently for two hours and a half. Put the meat on a hot dish. Boil the gravy for three minutes, add the chopped onions and capers. Border with haricot beans soaked all night and boiled in salted water till tender.

No title

A Norwegian seaman, who thrice escaped, death at the hands of the Germans, has been drowned in Bristol Docks under mysterious circumstances. Maryport fishermen are selling their catcbee themselves owing to a dispute with, the ioeal fishmongers, who used to buy the fibh on the quayside and soil it ia largo centres