Collection Title: Abergavenny Chronicle

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is the copyright of the Tindle Newspapers

View full details

First Previous Image 4 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
6 articles on this page
Advertising

 aurtton _? ) ?"a;f:\ by au(ttal 1 -===- LL^ NVETIIERINE. MRS. HILL has fixed MONDAY, FEB. 26th, for her Sale of FURNITURE AND BUILDERS PLANT. STRAKER, SON & CHADWICK, Auctioneers. LLANFOIST HOUSE. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20th. GRASS LETTING SALE of 21 Acres, -with G permiS6Îou to Mow i? Acres. See Sale Posters. STRAKER, SON & CHADWICK, Auctioneers. I -\KEPr.A\TL; "l'' L ■\ BEF-GAVEN N Y r5I! ANNUAL BULL SHOW & SALE. TUESDAY, MARCH 0T11. JUDGE: H. TAYLOR, ESQ., Showle Court, Ledbury. Auctioneers J STRAKER, SON & CHADWICK. PEDIGREE HEREFORD STOCK BULLS. ABERGAVENNY 1 srn ANNUAL PRIZE SHOW & SALE, TUESDAY, MARCH oil,, 1')17. lUDGR H. W. TAYLOR, Esq., Shrowle Court, .4ing at ii Ledbury. at i-, o'c l (-,c k Judging at n o'clock. Sale at u o'clock. Entries close for catalogue Tuesday, Feb. 27th. J. STRAKER, SON & CHADWICK, Auctioneers Abergavenny. PRINCES STREET, ABERGAVENNY -IAI,F, OF WHEELWRIGHTS & COACH- } BUILDERS STOCK-IN-TRADE AND LANT, by instructions from Mr. Richard ickle (who is giving up the business), on TUESDAY, Oth MARCH, 1917. Details next week. MONTAGUE HARRIS. Auctioneer. EWYAS HAROLD, HEREFORDSHIRE- MR. MONTAGUE HARRIS, F. A. I., has ,)I "eceived mstmctÏt 12 Cross Street. JKtscellatieous. I THE EVENT OF THE YEAR. J sets forth in detail the great and tangible advantages THe offered to buyers during GANE'S GREAT STOCK- TAKING SALE OF FURNITURE which com- BIJOU mences on Saturday, Feb. 3rd and ends on Saturday, Feb. 24th BARGAIN This book also contains particulars of a COM- BARG"A'*I'N PETITION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE with handsome BOOK prizes for the successful. A copy of this book will "BO"O*K be sent FREE to any address. I I The has been tully established during the thirty years in BONA FIDE which we have been trading in Newport. THE ll/A ACTUAL REDUCTIONS are easily calculated be- CHARACTER cause the original and plainly marked prices remain PTIAT? APT* TAPTC? v on each article and an additional GREEN label bears f th8 the REDUCED SALE PRICES. As to selection, it 01 this is not too much to say that no other establishment in SALE the county can show anything like the stock we hold. Its As this Sale begins on Feb. 3rd and ends on the 24.th, Its ONLY NINETEEN DAYS are available in which buyers may secure the BARGAINS on offer, and BRIEF such an opportunity will not again occur for a whole year. GANE'S sales are only held for a few days previous to the yearly stocktaking and balancing and DURATION are intended to greatly reduce the stocks for this purpose. I ■M is an area in oar showrooms devoted to the display of Hie items ENORMOUSLY REDUCED in price, includ- ing a quantity of Second-hand Goods sent us for dis- BARGAIN posal by customers refurnishing. Every article will be marked, where possible, with its usual value so that buyers can see the saving effected. In many BAY cases good serviceable Furnishings will be available at ONE HALF the regular price. I 1 Our usual arrangements for Free Delivery remain during sale. Every opportunity is afforded for in- spection and compai ison, the public being cordially FINALE invited to walk round and inspect the stock without the slightest importunity to purchase. Goods not immediately required will be stored free, but must be paid for before end of sale. I 1 po E. GANE, Ltd. GREAT STOCKTAKING SALE of FURNITURE, 161 & 162 Commercial St., NEWPORT. I Cost or traptb. TOST, Thursday evening, between 5 and 6 P.M., j Lady's Bilver Wrist Wateh and Strap. Here- ford Road and Maindiif Court.-IPinder rewarded o* returning to V., Ckromelc Otioe, LOST, in Abergavenny, on 20th Jan., Black and Lj Tan Sheep Puppy, Toppy." Finder re- warded. Detainer prosecuted.-Apply, Sevenoskii Mount Pleasant, Llanwenarth, Abergavenny. STRAYED to Upper Hoelgerrig, Llanellen, about the middle Nov., a Welsh Ewe. If not claimed in seven days will be Bold to defray expenses.—T. Tipton. LOST in Abergavenny, light brown Hound JLj ("Tiger"). Finder rewarded.— White, Forge Hammer Gilwern. STRAYED from Hendre Farm, Llangattock Lingoed, Jan 26th, Radnor Ewe, pitch marked '.0.0 in wheel.—Apply, W. Daviee. IRtgcellatteoue. Miss GLADYS MORGAN, A.T.CA., Teacher of Pianoforte, Harmony and Theory of Music. MATHAY METHOD TAUGHT. Pnpils prepared for Trinity College, Associated Board of R.A.M. and R.C.M., and all other reliable Examinations. For terms, &c., apply- LABURNUM HOUSE, WORCESTER ST., BRYMMAWR. ABERGAVENNY VISITED WEEKLY. P.O. 30 Abergavenny. Telegrams Stanley, Abergavenny. CHAS. P. STANLEY, Black Lion Yard, Abergavenny. Always a Buyer of Iron, Brass, Copper, Lead, Zinc, Pewter, Spelter, Gun Metal, Rags, Bones, Rubber Bottles, Rabbit Skins, etc., etc. BEST PRICE GIVEN. Upon receipt of Post Card will wait upon you immediately. ALWAYS NUMEROUS ARTICLES FOR SALE. New Grates soon pay for themselves apart from increased increased Warmth and Comfort, "are astonlsll- ingly cheap at qOBEQr PRICE & SOUS, LION STREET & PARK ROAD. District Agents for the Celebrated Oakeley Slates, and the firm for all Building Materials, Timber, &c. SHORTAGE of foreign eggs means more profit for British poultry-keepers. Get your share by using Karswood Spice, containing ground insects, 2d., 6d., 1/ Wibberley, Corn Merchant, Lion St., Abergavenny. COLISEUM ABERGAVENNY. Telephone, 33. MANAGING DmicOT OB RICHARD DOONER. RESIDENT MANAGES W. H. WALLER. MONDAY, TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY:— A Triangle Drama, THE BUGLE CALL. This fine picture is characterised by the excep- tionally fine work of a boy, who It as sworn to hate his new step-mother, but fails. An L.KO COMEDY DOUBLES TROUBLES. Funny is not the word. An old Keystone, featuring CHARLIE CHAPLIN in THE FATAL LANTERN. No. 9 Series of the Popular PARAMOUNT TRAVELS. THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY William Fox presents a picturisation of Keenan Bual's immortal Novel, BLAZING LOVE. Featuring the great emotional Actress, Virginia Pearson. A Triangle Keystone Comedy, THE JUDGE. Presenting CHARLES MURRAY A Good Judge—of Girls." ADDITIONAL PARAMOUNT TRAVEL. COMING NEXT WEEX-ULTUS AND THE SECRETS OF THE NIGHT. Doors open at 6.45. Commencing at 7.15. ADULTS I ADULTS, I ADULTS, ?t. j (Tip np Chairu) I (Tip-up ChMra) CHILDREN, 1 "7d. lid* B? .¡' -???.????? {) -;? \1' ;'> > \m BOROUGH OF ABERGAVENNY. NOTICE TO ALLOTMENT HOLDERS AND OTHERS. THE TOWN COUNCIL beg to draw the ) attention ox Residents of the Borough, who hold, or intend hdding Allotments, to the high value attached to Sulphate or Ammonia as an artificial manure. Supplies may be obtained from the Gas Works, packed in Bags, at the following rate :— 1 ewt., I Sli- i cwt., 9/6 cwt., í/ I4 lbs., 3/- Under 14 lbs., at 2id. per lb. WM. H. HOPWOOD, Town Clerk. Town Hall, Abergavenny, Feb. 15, 1917. Fishing Rights To Let. I rpiIE Monmomlishire Small Holdings Com- mittee invite TENDERS for the FlSH- ING RIGHTS on about 700 yards on the right bank only of the Usk, situated on the Cadfor Farm, about two miles from Abergavenny, which are to be let for this Season. Further particulars and cards to view the stream can be obtained from the undersigned, whom tenders must reach by the first post on Saturday, the 24th instant. J. ERNEST JONES, ct iii g County Land Agent. County Council Offices, Newport. SEEDS! SEEDS!! SEEDS! FRASER'S SEEDS ARE STILL THE BEST. SEED POTATOES direct from Scotland. !?) Sharpe's Express. Epicure, British Queen, Arran Chief, 14lbs. for 3/ Golden Wonder, King Edward, Up-to-Date, 14IIDS. for 2/6. BROAD BEANS—Seville Long Pod, Green Windsor, Johnson's Long Pod, Bunyard's Exhibition, 8d. per Pint. PEAS Pilot, Gradus, Essex Star, Quite Content, Little Marvel, 1!- per Pint. New Garden Seeds Direct from the Growers. PERCY FRASER, Florist and Seedsman, Queen Street, Abergavenny. BOROUGH OF ABERGAVENNY. SOUP KITCHEN. FUNDS ARE URGENTLY NEEDED for t carrying on the Distribution of Soup at the Castle. During the past week 400 to 500 children have been supplied each day, and the Committee hope that the response to the Appeal, for Funds will be such that they will be able to continue the Distribution until the present severe weather has passed. The estimated cost per week is /20. SUBSCRIPTIONS, OR GIFTS IN KIND, will be gratefully accepted by the Mayor, or the Town Clerk, Town Hall, Abergavenny. The Committee thank the Donors of the following Subscriptions received to date — Subscriptions already announced £ 16 19 6 The Rev. H. H. Matthew I 1 o Edgar C. Morgan, Esq. i 1 o Col. J. H. G. Harris 100 Mrs. E. Crawsbav 100 J. B. Walford, Fsq. 1 0 0 Wm. Davis, Esq. 100 F. J. Mills, Esq. 100 J. Harrison, Esq., Moreton Villa o 10 6 Mrs. Emily Foster 0 10 0 J. E. H. Martin, Esq. 0 10 0 Mrs. Cadle 0 10 0 Mrs. A. J. Wibberley o 10 o Mrs. Morrall o 10 o Mrs. Jones, Bank House o 10 o Mrs. Watkins, Park Villa 050 Mrs. Merton Jones 050 Mr. Chas. Oakey 026 Mrs. Cotton 020 Mrs. Jesse Pritchard 0 2 6 Mr. Samuel Cross (2nd donation) 026 W. & F. Lewis, Springwells 026 Mr. Wm. Pritchard 020 Mr. R. 11) a11 0 2 0 /28 18 6 -==-

IAbergavenny and the War Loan

I Abergavenny and the War Loan. Though, of course, no figures are available, indications point to the fact that Abergavenny has subscribed a very satisfactory total to the new War Loan. The Town Council have taken up £ 1,000 worth of stock with money from the waterworks account and the mains renewal fund. This is a good stroke of business, and will mean a gain of £ 25 in interest compared with what would be received if the money were left on deposit. The Gwenynen Gerddi Gwent Lodge of Oddfellows have also taken up the matter in a very business-like manner and have con- tributed /i,2oo, all new money. Of this sum 1200 has been taken from current account and the remainder has been borrowed from the bankers on the security of a loan which falls due for repayment next year. The local officers are to be congratulated on their financial acumen. The committee of the Workmen's Hospital Saturday Fund have also done their bit by investing £100 in the Loan, and as they had previously invested £ 100 this makes their total contribution ^200. I Victory Scholarships." Another local investment in the War Loan is of educational interest. From the sale of the old British School to the School Board, some years ago, there remains a balance of over L100, which the trustees propose to invest in the War Loan and at the same time to belp local educa- tional facilities. The money is to be invested in the name of the Corporation and the Mayor has been entrusted with the task of drawing up a scheme for providing four local scholarships with the interest on the money invested. These will be called Victory Scholarships," and two will be tenable at the Grammar School and two at the Girls' County Intermediate School.

Family Notices

+ BIRTHS, MARRIAGES & DEATHS DEATHS. AUTY.-ON Febri-,arv 3rd, at 55 Southern-road, Huddersfield, Fred, the dearly-beloved husband of Annie Auty, aged 52 years. (Late Railway Hotel, Abergavenny). OWEN.—On Tuesday, Feb. 6th, at the Hygienic Bakery, Abergavenny, Margaret Jane Owen, formerly of Llanidloes, Mont., in her 58th year. KILLED IN ACTION. BOUGHTON.—In Loving Memory of Private Robert H. Boughton, 7th Batt. S. Lanes. Regt., who was killed in action Jan. 31st. 1917 (late of Lloyds Bank and The Manse, Mount- street, Abergavenny), in his 19th year. In Loving Memory of Pte. Alfred Victor Williams (2nd Monmouthshire Regt.), who was killed in action on January 30th, 1917, in his 21st year fifth son of Mr. Wm. Williams (engineer) and Mrs. Williams, late of 70 Park-street, Abergavenny. He gave his life for King and Country. IN MEMORIAM. In Loving Memory of Donald Griffiths (twin) who died at 20 Castle-street, Feb. 12th, 1916. One year has passed and still we miss him. We loved him, yes, no tongue can tell How deep, how dearly, and how well I Christ loved him too, and thought it best To take him home with him to rest. Thy purpose, Lord, we cannot see, I But all is well that's done by Thee. Missed by Mother, Sisters and Brother.

No title

THANKS. I Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Redwood desire to return their sincere thanks for all kind expressions of sympathy with them in their recent sad bereave- ment. AL

Advertising

You Should Note the Fact that your fowls will be healthier and lay more Eggs if you give them a sprinkling of Ovum, Thorley's Poultry Spice, in their soft food.-Sold by Jeffreys & Son, Frogmore Corn Stores, Abergavenny.

THE WAR LOAN

THE WAR LOAN. PUBLIC RSEET3?4G AT ASEKGAVENMY. in turtlierance or the War Loan campaign a public meeting was held at the Town Hall, Abergavenny, on Tuesday evening. The attend- ance was disappointingly small considering the importance of the matter. Xo doubt most people had made up their minds as to the amount they would subscribe to the War Loan, and it is questionable whether the holding of public meetings during the closing days for application could have much more effect than the appeal already made. It is gratifying to know, how- ever, that the attendance at the meeting was by no means a criterion of the interest of the local public in the Loan. Mr. Hugh Edwards. M.P., was announced to speak, but both he and a substitute were unable to come, and their place was taken by Mr. Mervyn Howell, of Cardiff, at the last moment. The Mayor presided, and supporting him on the platform were the principal speaker, the Rev. H. H. Matthew, the Rev. S. H. Bosward (Mayor's chaplain), Dr. Glendinning, Mr. D. Howell James, Councillors 1'. Telford and J. R. Beckwith, and the Town Clerk (Mr. W. II. Hopwood). The Mayor said that a short time ago lie attended a great conference of Lord Mayors Mayors, and chairmen of local authorities, at the Central Hall, Westminster, and comprising quite 3,000 representatives who passed a resolu- tion pledging themselves to do all that lay in their power to further the War Loan and to make it such a success that it would bring victory to our arms and spread terror in the hearts of the enemy. As their representative, lie voted for that resolution, and he felt that he could with confidence ask them not only to support the War Loan themselves but to urge others to do-so, in order that they could truly make it a Victory War Loan. They had sent their men to the front, and Abergavenny had responded very well in that direction, and it was the very least that they, as citizens of the town and of our vast Empire, could do to show that they would stand by the men who had gone forth, to the last penny that lay within their power. He had appealed to them from that platform for numerous objects and he had been gratified with the result. He now asked them to give every penny they could to the War Loan, and if they did that they could look forward to the day of peace and say that they had done their share in the great work that had lain before them. If they had no money to invest, he believed that there were various insurance companies who were prepared to negotiate in- surances on their lives and to invest the money in the War Loan, so that there was therefore 110 reason why anyone should neglect the oppor- tunity to help to male the War Loan a great success. Some people were afraid that if they invested their money they would not be able to withdraw it before the expiration of the period. They would be able to realise the full value at any time, so that there was no fear of their money being tied up. The Importance of Finance. Mr. Mervyn Howell said that the success or the War Loan was not dependent on the big men because the big men were few, and they were expected to subscribe. It was the small in- dividual subscriber who could make the War Loan a success. It was not always the general who won the war, and it was not the individual private, but it was the combination of all the privates, n.c.o's and generals that won the war. That was the position to-day with regard to the War Loan. The indemnity after the Franco- Prussian War was enormous, but France paid it off in five years. Who was it in France who paid this money off ? It was the peasant pro- prietors or farmers. For once in their history farmers in this country admitted that they had not done so badly. (Laughter). As a purchaser of eggs, he should consider that they had done extremely well. He was told that Abergavenny had done very well so far, but Friday was the last day, and any money subscribed before Friday would have a value which could not be compared with any value that could be sub- scribed afterwards. This must be the Victory Loan. If it was not it was quite useless for anyone to hope for anything after this war. They could not expect the German people to put on one side their fetish of militarism at a moment's notice. They said that this wonderful military machine must be kept up with their last penny, and that was why the small man in Germany had subscribed an enormous propor- tion to their war loans. The number of sub- scribers in Germany was between five and six millions. The Germans were watching us very closely. They knew very well that this war had reached a phase where finance would make all the difference between victory and defeat. We could not keep men in the field and supply them with food and munitions without what the Americans called the almighty dollar," and if ever there was a time when finance occupied an important position that time was to-day. The Government were not asking them for charity, and they did not want charity. They were offering a 5} per cent. interest for a loan upon the best possible security. The loan was negotiable and it was on the security of the British Empire. They were not only getting a splendid return for their money, but by taking up the loan they were increasing the stability of their investment. The moral of the German nation would go down in almost exact proportion to that in which this Loan went up. It was not only a question of patriotism or of a good business proposition, but it was a question as to whether Germany should be on top or not. Anyone who had the money, or could borrow it, and did not subscribe was distinctly helping the enemy. He wanted every small place to realise that every little bit they could give was helping in a much greater degree than they could imagine. The Mayor called on the Rev. H. H. Matthew and expressed his pleasure at welcoming him back to the town. He had shown an example to religious men in undertaking the duty of a chaplain at the front. An Example of Sacrifice. The Rev. H. H. Matthew, who had a cordial reception, proposed That this meeting hereby pledges itself to do all in its power to make the War Loan a success by subscribing and by urging others to subscribe thereto." He said it had been a great pleasure to do anything he could for the men at the front, and the ex- perience he had gained during the last 12 months had amply repaid him for any sacrifice he might have made in serving as a chaplain. He keenly appreciated the kind way in which the people of the parish and other friends in the town took his decision to go, the loyal way in which they had acted while he was away, and the kind welcome they had given him on his return. He realised the importance of the War Loan, and the first couple of days after his return he borrowed some money from a kind banker to invest in the Loan. He borrowed to the limit to which he could go. He did not claim any credit for that, because if one could do a good thing for oneself in a proper manner monetarily one naturally did it. He did not know what to say of the man who had got money to sopare and did not put it into the War Loan. There were many people who had the greatest will in the world to serve their country, but they did not see the necessity of doing it in this particular way. They were not locking the morey up, and it was very unlikely that there would not be a perfectly good market for this stock. They would be able to sell it at any time they wanted to and get good money for it. Some people said that they would buy War Loan afterwards, but they would be only buying from somebody else, and would not be lending money to the Government. If they had no money, let them borrow some from their bank or their insurance society. If they had seen what he had seen during the past 12 months they would not hesitate to do anything they could at what- ever cpst to their convenience or at whatever economy during the next few years. They would not hesitate if they could see how cheer- fully the men at the front were facing danger, and, what was worse, the discomforts, the monotony, the rude conditions of life, as many of them had to do day after day, week after week, not only the men at the front, but the men at the base, too. They were doing it very courageously and very cheerfully. When lie first went up to the front trenches the weather was as bad as it could possibly be. He re- membered being up to his thighs in mnd. He found it miserable enough, but he was not living in it. He had a dry place to stay and dry clothes to change into, but the men in the trenches had no dry clothes, and for five or six days they had to put up with these conditions, day and night. For hours at a time they were standing in mud well above their knees, but he did not hear a single grouse. There was plenty of it when they were out cf the trenches, but when they were in them there was not a grumble at all. (Applause). That experience of his was repeated every time he went to the trendies. What the men were going through for them lie did. not believe the people at home realised. But he did not want the parents to think their boys were miserable'all the time. It was not all like that, and they had some awfully jolly times