Collection Title: Abergavenny Chronicle

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is the copyright of the Tindle Newspapers

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
40 articles on this page
ATLANTIC NONSTOP FLIGHTI

ATLANTIC NON-STOP FLIGHT. I MARVELLOUS ACHIEVEMENT BY BRITISH AVIATORS. —————————"—— SIXTEEN HOURS ON JOURNEY. It —————— The Atlantic has been conquered. To British enterprise and pluck has first fallen the honour of crossing the Atlantic by air in a non-stop journey. Starting from Newfoundland at 4.28 p.m. (Greenwich time) on Saturday last, Capt. John Alcock, D.S.C. (pilot), and Lieut. A. W. Brown (navigator) crossed the Atlantic in a Viekers-Vimy-Rolls Royce twin engine aeroplane, and landed on Sunday morning at 8.40 (Greenwich time) at Clifden, Ireland. Thus in t, r, years has the science of aviation so, progressed that the flight of M. Bleriot across the Channel is eclipsed to-day by one of ninety times the magnitude. Unfortunately, on landing the machine was slightly damaged, for, alighting on soft boggy ground, the fl lines of the c-entre section, as well as the main scar of the lower plane, were broken, and Lieut. Brown was slightly injured on the noso and mouth wl-I e ii the machine jolted. Through the accomplishment of this fine performance the prize offered by the Daily Mail," London, cf ,£lO,COO bs );e-m won; and the following is the account written by Capt. Alcock and issued by thb newspaper in qu-esticn We have had a terrible journey. The wonder is we are here at all. We scarcely saw the sun or tLc moon or the stars. For hours we saw none cf them. The fog was very dense, and at times we had to d e-soevid to within 200 feet of the sea. ha.4i to v,,? t L?7ii For four hours the machine was covered 1n a sheet of ice carried by frozen sleet; at another time the fog wss so dense that my speed indicator did net work, and for a few seconds it W,,3 very alarming. We lo-cp-ed the loop, I do believe, and did a very steep spiral. We did some very ha o had no sense of I hoi isoii. ■in. ii i. ■ ■ i biii ■ ii ii i i mhcwhm mra The winds were favourable all the v.,ar- forth-west, and at times south-west. e said in Newfoundland we wuLlld do the trip in sixteen hours, but we never thought we should. An hour and a half before we saw land we had no certain idea where we were, but we believed we were at Galway or there- abouts. Our delight in seeing Wastul Island and Turbot Island (five miles west of Clifden) was great. People did not know who we were when we landed, and thought we were scouts looking for Alcock. We encountered no unforeseen conditions. We did not suffer from cold' or exhaustion except when looking over the side; then the chewed bits out of our faces. We drank coffee and ale and ate sandwiches and chocolate. The flight has shown that the Atlantic flight is practicable, but I think it should be done not with an aeroplane or seaplane, but with a flying be-at. We had plenty of reserve fuel left, using only two-third; of our supply. The only thing that upset me was to se? the machine at the end get damaged. From above the bog looked like a lovely field, but the ma-chine sank into it up to the axle and fell ever on her nose. AVIATION BREVITIES. I .l .'u-' l.l' J. C,2 I i d i:i ii ?'he i-ii?e œ,llii!l, ie i:, j: n,-r' r Ll I j,:),tl, nardi, bcth were killed, sars « Lisbon w[re- let-. At Portsmouth, Them-, Pa-ttei, SS, a n ival veteran, ho served ui the Crimea and China, enjr yed a flight at Southsea Common in r.n .VVJO biplane. Mr. Latter entered tIi?X.y ?.tth??jc of ti,,] en and I .;(t:)i the .?;y when she was a hg'ut- iag ship. 

BiG FIRE AT CANADIAN CAMP I

BiG #FIRE AT CANADIAN CAMP. I More trouble, is reported among the Cana- dian troops remaining in England, and on Saturday last at -itley (Surrey) serious trouble occurred. A number of the men collected to protest against the delay which they say has taken place in returning them to Canada, and during the demonstration a, fire, which soon assumed large proportions, broke out at U Till Town," on the Portsmouth road. A range of at least a dozen shops war, des- troyed, along with the garrison theatre and a Salvation Army hut. Three shops in Little Tin Town,'1 about half a mile awav, were also set on fire. How C" fire actually originated is not known, but any suggestion of incendiarism is resented by the bulk of the men, many of whom a to quell the outbreak. On Sunday the camp was quiet, and there was no incident beyond a scuffle between two men for the possession of a revolver, in the course of which one of the men was shot in the neck. General Sir F. Turner (Chief of the Cana- dian General Staff) visited the camp during the day and addressed the men.

FAMOUS ACTOR DEAD I

FAMOUS ACTOR DEAD. I The stage has lost one of its most popular -1 and able comedians by the death of Mr. We-edon Grossmith, which occurred on Saturday morning last. Mr. Grossmith wao a member of the cclc- brated Grossmith family, being a brother of the late George Grossmith, and uncle of Mr. George Grossmith who is now appearing in I London. The deceased was born in South- ampton-row, and originally an artit-he frequently exhibited at the Academy-he went on the stage in 1885, and after a short and not over-successful time in England went in Rosin a Yokes's company to America for two years. Returning, he attracted little notice until. he wag called by telegram to play the part of Jacques Strop m Sir Henry Irving's pro- ductidn of "Hoben Macaire." His popu- larity grew from that time, and he was par- t i cu l ar l v suce"fu l in ticularly successful in "The Pantomime Rehearsal," "The New Boy," and "The Night of the Party "—the last of which he wrote himself. His last big part in London was in "Baby Mine."

LINER IN COLLISION i

LINER IN COLLISION. The passengers and crew of the Hamburg- Amerika liner Graf Waldersee have been taken off bv the ss. Leviathan and Patricia. The old Him ship was rammed 100 miles off Sandy Hook by the American ss. Re- dondo. The Graf Waldersee had 6ft. of water in the engine-room, but the ss. Patricia took her in tow and she was beached on Long Island. Several of the crew were injured when the liner was rammed.

SUICIDE AFTER RESCUE

SUICIDE AFTER RESCUE. After being rescued from drowning at Brighton, Walter Lyons, a Bethnal Green costumier, jumped from the hospital balcony. At the inquest a verdict of "Suicide whilst insane" was returned.

DUMB BOY SPEAKSI

DUMB BOY SPEAKS. I An extraordinary story of the manner in which a dumb child regained his speech comes from the East-End of London. It ia reported that because his mother .pinched his arm rather hard, B. E. Pear- eon, of 64, Lett-road, Stratford, E., who had been dumb for fourteen months, called out "Oh don't," and can now speak quite I clearly.

No title

Permission given for the use of grey flannel trousers by naval officers in uniform landing for recreation does not apply to officers in London. The owner of the prize-winner in Class 1 for shorthorn bulls at an exhibition of breeding stock at Dublin refused an offer of 1-7,500 for his prize exhibit. It was said by the Crown solicitor i-:i Belfast that a demobilised woman muni- tion worker in that city drove up in a car to the labour exchange and drew her out- of-work dole. Influenza broke out on the steamer fn- goma, which arrived at Plymouth, and caused eleven deaths among German repatriated people from South Africa. A proposal is now before the Guernsey States to grant workmen a half-crown weekly for their fourth and subsequent chil- dren, the cost to be defrayed by a 5 per cent. tax on bachelors. Seaside trips for children and a brasa plate in the cfcnrch are to be the memorials to the Rev. B. P. Plumptre, M.C., a curate of Bermond-ey Old Parish Church, who was killed in France. Unless the disabled soldiers on strike at Leeds for more pension allowances while undergoing technical training resume work, their places will be filled by others waiting for training. Two islands in the Tonga group in the South Seas disappeared during a tidal wave. After being in abeyance during the war. the popular Coronation Hohday at the end of June is being revived throughout the Isle of Wight. Manchester Unity of Oddfellows have de. cided to establish an Orphan Gift Fund as a memorial of the members of the Order who |<*t their lives in the war.,

RACE RIOTS AT CARDIFFI

RACE RIOTS AT CARDIFF. I Trouble between whites anu blacks is oc. curring far too frequently all over tho coun- trv. News now comes from Cardiff, where the race feua is very severe, that tierce riot- ing has taken place in Bute-street and the neighbourhood, where the black boarding. houses are situated. A number of negroes were chased to the shelter of a small Q restaurant and boarding- house kept by cne Mohammed Ali, in Bute- street, by an infuriated mob. end the place was wrecked. The police on duty had to draw their batons before they could break up the threatening crowd and rescue the black boarders. In and around the by the docks broken and boarded windows remain as a token of the wild midnight scenes which occurred in the guerilla warfare between the blacks and whites. In Hcmfrey-street stands the charred wreck of all Arab lodg- ing-house which the mcb fired, after drag- ging two negroes out ef it and thrusting the white landlady into the street, BLAZING HOUSES. J All the furniture had been smashed to pieces, the fitting's wrecked, and the straw torn from the mat treses and } iie-I in heaps in the bedrooms. The house was blazing fiercely when the fire brigade arrived, but they quickly got the flames under. During the riots the circumstances in which one victim met his dc«th are mys- terious. His throat had been slashed across with a razor, which s::gge>ts thr,t tho wound migllt have beau inflicted from -h oehind. Whether he met his deth in one cf the melees in the district ur in a solitary cu- counter with negroes is not clearly known. A dock labourer named Frederick Lon g- man, 30. was stabbed in the street and died in a few minutes. AT LIVERIfOOL. I The Lord Mayor of Liverpool has con- I ferred with an official from the Mbi"trv of. Lahour regarding the recent colour riots in Liverpool. He has appealed to the Colonial Office for the repatriation of the negroes, and meanwhile they are to be placed in an Internment camp pending the same.

RAFFLES UPTODATE I

RAFFLES UP-TO-DATE. I Reminiscent of the popular fictional hero Rallies is the career or Theodore Fraser Dugdale, 23, described as an actor, who pleaded guilty at Marylebone to stealing jewellery to the value c-f 0 from a number of private hotels and boarding- houses. Dugdale's etory was that he had been led istrav by a well-dressed man known to him as "Red," who first proposed stealing motor- iii, of dl-i ,,? and the cars, then the procuring of drags, and the robbing of hotels. Finally, the thefts of jewellery from the bedrooms of guests in boarding-houses was suggested and adopted. The arrangement was that he should take a room, describe the interior to lic-d," and, on returning, leave the dcor aiar so that "Red" could slip in and go upstairs. It was stated that prisoner's father oseu- pies a very high military position.

DARING PRISON BREAKER I

DARING PRISON BREAKER. I A daring esca pe from prison is reported I from County Kerry, where John Brady. t'ged 21, at Tralee, after being remanded on a charge of breaking into two houses and stealing, among other things, two sets of artificial teeth, a cycle, and a suit of clothes, broke the fastening of the slide to the "peephole" of his cell, and in some extraordinary way unscrewed the outside kick. Frnrn somewhere in the prison he got two sheets and a chair. With these he climhed to the roof. Knot- ting the two sheetd together, and tying one end to the chair, he threw the chair over a wall 6ft. away. The other end he fastened to the roof. He then must have passed hand over hand to the wall and to freedom.

JUMPING A JUMPER I

JUMPING A JUMPER. I On a charge of attempting to steal a jumper value J64 4s., Mrs. Margaret Cromp- ton, 22, Park-street, Greenwich, was com- mitted for trial at Marlborough-street Police-court. Mrs. Annie Betts said that when in the dress department she saw Mrs. Crompton pick up the jumper, hide it under her coat, and go out. On being stopped Mrs. Cromp- ton gave up the jumper, saying, "Oh, I am sorr:" and in the manager's office ehe said, "I "wanted a new dress, but hadn't the money. I am very sorry. Don't charge me." ■

HIST I I

HIST I I Thomas J. Hogan, a casual labourer at the docks, charged at Thames Police-court with stealing a bottle of port, said that in I the' docks thousands of gallons of port wine leaked away day aijd night and ran into the river. thTheV Sagistrate: Does the general public know that? Hogan: No, sir. Th? Magistrate: You should not t give publicity to the statement; there won't be anybody iu this cour within ten mmutea.

No title

M' iior Sir John Lister Kaye, Command- in officer, of the City of London Motor Transport Volunteers, appeals to owners of motor vehicles to loan them to provide trips for wounded soldiers still receiving treat- ment in London. The U.S. Senate has passed a Bill autho- I rising American shipyards to construct ships on foreign account without Govern- ment permits. "->'

I WOODEN STOCKINGS I

WOODEN STOCKINGS. A word of warning is necessary to those addicted to the use- of fancy stockings, for it i, regrettable to say that in this par- ticular article of feminine attire things are not always what they seem. Wearers are to be cautioned against some of the ersatz articles now on the market. An extraordinary spectacle was lately witnesf-ed at a French society meeting. There was a sudd-en very heavy shower and a group of brilliantly attired mannequins got a soak- ing. They were forced to retire in great embarrassment because their stockings dis- solved in the rain, sinking about their ankles in a mess of pasty colour. It seems that much of the so-called silk," of which even expensive stockings are made, is pro- duced from wood-pulp and is not proof against a. serious wetting.

GAUGING COLOURS

GAUGING COLOURS. Colour-blindness proves to be less eimplu than has been supposed, the defect being one of colouring instead of vision i:i some cases. Eyes quite perfect in ordinary colour perception may become iveak or fatigued for red, and then re-pond to green rays combined with red from certain red glass. A Veteran engine-driver property identified red light near at hand, while at considerable distance the signal appeared green. The disc of the lamp was found to be copper ruby gl:1s, and this and some other kinds of red glass permit rays towards the bine end of the spectrum to opass in mixture with the red. The use of selenium ruby glass is, therefore, advised, its trans- misison of only red rays ensuring that the normal eye will see no green.

TUBE STATION ROBBERYI

TUBE STATION ROBBERY. I A daring safe robbery is reported to been undertaken by two men, undoubtedly expert cracksmen, at the Regent's Pa-rK Station of the Bak-loo Tube. Railway. The safe was kept on the floor in the booking office, where, nfter the station had been closed, the thieves entered, and, nsin.r two charges of gelignite, blew open the and stole £ 150. It is thought that the thieves concealed themselves near the station, watched the foreman lock the gates and leave, and then I vaulted the railings, smashed the padlock cn the sliding gate cf the approach, and so I gained entrance, to the station. I

No title

Admiral Troubrielge, who is Acting Bri- tish Representative to the European Com- mission on the Danube, has been appointed temporary president of the Inter-Allied commission on that river. In connection with Hurst Park races, lhj Kingston Polic.n netted < £ f50 in fines for illegal gaining.

j FOURYOLKED EGGS I

j FOUR-YOLKED EGGS ? I A Pennsylvanian negro has established himself as a chicken fancier extraordinary. For three years he has conducted experi- ments ill feeding fowls that are said to compare with Luther Burbank's efforts on behalf of fruit. The negro's feed formula are a carefully cherished secret, and are designed to produce., multiple-yolk eggs. Last summer his hens began to lay double yolkers fairly regularly, but recently he found a triple-yolked egg in the nest of his favourite hen. The egg weighs 7Joz. and ia pure white in, colour. He claims that by 1920 he will have four-yolkcd eggs regularlJr.

THE LIGHTEST METAL I

THE LIGHTEST METAL. I It is said that aluminium, with a specific I gravity of 2.56, is not the lightest i-tietal. It is the most abundant of all metals, hut recently attention has been called to the possibilities of the much rarer glucinum, cr beryllium, tho specific gravity of which is only 1.64. It is white, malleable, does not oxidise in the air, and, with a very high melting point, is stated to be twice as strong as aluminium. Its chief source is the beryl, of which—including the emerald and aquamarine—the basis is a, glucirum- aluminium silicate.

TO KEEP FLOWERS FRESif I

TO KEEP FLOWERS FRESif. I A little saltpetre or carbonate of eoda added to the water in which flowers are left standing will keep them comparatively fresh for more than two weeks. Flowers that have wilted can be revived for a time if the stems be insert;" in a solution of weak camphcrr water.

WHEN PRESERVING I

WHEN PRESERVING. I When preserving fruit melt a little paraf. fin, and when cool enough dip the finger- tipa the depth of the nails into it. It will at once form a coating which protects the nails from fruit-juice.

No title

The Rev, Sidney Valentine, against whom 17 charges of theft from shops were made at Newport, was stated by the police to he un- fit to plead, and was remanded. In Camberwell-grove, Denmark Hill, S.E., which is only about three miles from the Royal Exchange, there is a house the roof of which is being re-thatched with straw. Eighteen lunatics who escaped from Clou- mel Asylum during the attendants' strike are still at large. The occupants of an Italian military air- plane which came down near Lai bach were made prisoners of war by the Jugoslavs.

BRITAIN RULES THE SEAS

BRITAIN RULES THE SEAS. SIR DAVID BEATTY AND SIR DOUGLAS HAIG HONOURED. I- NEED FOR A CITIZEN ARMY. ————— N Britain's ?ir chiefs h1YC been honoured I both by the King and the citizens of London. On Thursday h-t Admiral of the Fleet Sir David Bcatty mid Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig were invested by his Majesty at Buckingham Palace with the Order of Merit, anel later at the Guiidhail the Free- dom of the City of London was conferred upon them and gold and jewelled swords of honour presented. The drive of the two great commanders from the West-End to the City was one great triumphant progress. In acknowledging the presentations the two guests of honour made interesting speeches, Sir Douglas Haig outlining, in the course of his remarks, our total unpre- paredness for war in 1912, and pointing the moral, by our victory, for the need for a citizen army. THE NAVY. Sir David Beatty first paid a tribute to the officers and men of' the Navy, to whom the honour was due. He was glad to learn that the citizens of London might have an opportunity of welcoming some of these officers and men in the City. Continuing, the Admiral said: "As the Royal Navy contracts to its peace establishment, so the mercantile navy must expand as rapidly as possible to link up the Empire and the countries of the world. "By the defeat of Germany the principles of freedom at sea, for which we have fought for 300 years, are established thrciu-'iov.t the world. c I "'Nothing can alter the fact that the British Empire is entirely dependent upon the sea. "The Royal Navy is essentially all Im- perial Service, and is ,one of the strongest and most real connecting links between the Mother Country and her children. "One of the greatest traditions- of the servica i3 lovaity, loyalty to King loyalty to country, and loyaltv withm itself. I that this great tradition will never be lest sight of, and that it will always be remem- bered that cur Empire lives by the sc-a and that the Royal Navy is loyal, steadfast, and true." THE ARMY. I Sir Douglas Haig siid: "Only by adequate preparation for wai can peace in any way be guaranteed. Iti the duty of every man to prepare himse.i beforehand for his country's defence. "Let us not forget the lessons of the war. My message, as a man who has seen enough of war to make me determined to spend my lutmost efforts to prevent its recurrence, i to urge that we should set up forthwith the organisation of a strong citizen army on Territorial lines—an organisation that will ensure that every able-bodied citizen shall come forward when the next crisis cenies, not as a willing, patriotic, but militarily ignorant volunteer, but as a trained man. To meet whatever danger might threaten 1lJ we need to organise at once our democratic citizen army." -I mmwmmmrwnnmrmvmmnKnwHmrwmrm^mn aim i im w.didi imiiiii

LIBERAL M P DEAD I

LIBERAL M P. DEAD. I Mr Thomas Jeremiah Williams, Coali- tion Liberal M.P. for East Swansea, died at Morriston, Glamorgan, after a long ill- ness. Born in 1872 at Mc-rriston, the son of a ■Swansea M.P., who beg-an as a boy in a tinplate works and became chief proprietor, Mr. Williams was called to the Bar in 1902 and practised in South Wales. and the Ches- ter Circuit. He became M.P. for Swansea District in 1915. His death involves a by-election in East Swansea. At the general election last December Mr. T. J. Williams polled 11,071 votes and defeated his opponent, Mr. 1). Williams (Labour) by 4,730 votes.

ROYAL COACHMAN DEAD I

ROYAL COACHMAN DEAD. I The death is announced of Mr. William Blvth, who was Stite coachmcAl to the late King Edward. He entered the service of the late King when he was Prince of Wales in 1878, and for 30 years drove his Majesty on all important occasions. lie had occupied a coachman's box for 56 years, having served under the late Earl of Derby before his Royal appointment. In 1908 he retired from the service of nis Maj- est", and went to spend the autumn of his life at Burtcn-oii-Trent. I I

l GREAT FIRE AT TRAFFORD PARK I

l GREAT FIRE AT TRAFFORD PARK. I A serious fire, at which enormous damage was done, has occurred at Trafford Park, Manchester. Starting in a warehouse, the flames, fanned by a strong wind and fed by such inflammable materials as oil, sulphur, and timber, spread so rapidly that in a very short time 45,000 square yards was covered with roaring flames. The buildings either totally destroyed or very badly damagéd in- clude oil warehouses, sulphur warehouse, two timber ylttds, Government store yard, engineering works, park estate offices. The Government store contained ampng other things thousands of aerial bombs, for- "i The fumes from tunately without charges. The fumes from the burning sulphur increased the difficul- ties of the firemen's work, several being temporarily overcome, ahd one taken to hospital. All the firemen had to wear war gas masks, which were obtained from a neighbouring munitions factory.

No title

Many German prisoners of war in Britain ire to be sent to France for reparation work, says the Berlin wireless. Believed to have been drowned while at play, the body of. a boy named Ilobbs, aged ), has been recovered from the Thames at Teddington. It was stated at a meeting of the Liver. pool Health Committee that a large amount of fish had gone bad, and had been sent tc the destructor.

HEROES OF THE SEA I

HEROES OF THE SEA. I The King and Queen, attended by high officers of the Fleet, including Admiral Beatty, were present at the service held at St. Paul's in memory of the officers and men of the Royal Navy who have given their lives during the war. The royal party also included Queen Alexandra, Prince Albert, Princess Victoria, the Duke of Ccnnaught, and the Dowager Empress of Russia. Under the dome the band of the R.M.L.I., from Chatham,, made a vivid splash of scarlet, and their fine music reflected the pathos of the occasion. The Archbishop of Canterbury -aid that never had the well-being of Engirmd de- pended more on her sons afloat then in the last five incomparable years. Some 57,000 lives belonging to our sea forces, said the Archbishop, had made the great sacrifice. As the last strains oT Chopin's "Funeral March" died awav the opening notes of the "Last Post," muffled and strangely distant, came echoing through t-/e Cathedral. In its turn the "Last Post" way before the triumphant opening of the "Naval Reveille

BRITISH ENGINES FOR SOUTH I AMERICA

BRITISH ENGINES FOR SOUTH I AMERICA. Orders have been received by Mesc-ra. Armstrong, Whitwortli, and Company foi ten heavy shunting locomotives from the Buenos Aires and Western Railway, and the some company have received an order from the Dutch Colonial Government for five pas- senger locomotives.

NO BEER NO GLASSES I

NO BEER, NO GLASSES. I Because they were told that no beer was to be had, a man named Foreman climbed over a bar counter, at Leicester, and tried to help himself. Another named Fox smashed seventeen beer glasses and a jug. Foreman was fined £ 3 and Fox 20s.

No title

David Evans, a pump man, who with two others, was entombeot in the Glynea Collier*, Llanclly, for six hours after an explosion on Sunday, has died. St. Albans contemplates spending £ 100.OOP on housing, and also the erection of a score of bungalows for permanently disabled sol- di eis 'as a war memorial. At the meeting of the Church Governing Body held at Llandrindoel Wells, cn the motion of the Bishop of Llandaff the Con- etitutional Committee was directed to con- sider and report upon the position of women in the government of the Church in Wales when a Province of Wales is formed. At the Vintners' Company's first dinnei Einee the war began, the Master, Mr. Charles Breach, announced that < £ 10,000 fo! the Red Cross had be-en raised in the hall. # "¡;

EPITOME OF NEWSI

EPITOME OF NEWS. I Haymaking has begun in Essex. Dr. Pessoa, the President of Brazil, haa eft Lisbon on a French cruiser for New York. A Glasgow family of eight is down with small-pox. Canon J. T. Inskip will bo consecrated as Blhop Suffrgan of Barking at St. Paul's Cathedral on June 24th. A fifth death has occurred from the Hawick motor smash. A large consignment of sugar has arrived at Queenstown in the steamer Trafalgar, from orders amounting to over 10,000 tons. London Jews propose to raise £1,000,000 for a war memorial. Birmingham trams carried 900,000 pas- sengers on Whit-Monday. The Hon. Mrs. 11. W. Forster is about to convert Peak Hill Lodge, Sydenham, into a convalescent home for aged mothers. Larger supplies of British cheese are pro- mised for the near future. Mexican Government, forces have re-en- tered the town of Chihuahua, which was re- cently captured by General Villa. American Red Cross depot in Paris was de- stroyed by fire. Clonmel Asviuni attendants have struck on a- wages cjuestion. The inmates, including soin 3 bad cases, arc said to have taken the opportunity to escape. President Wilson is considering the ap- pointment of Mr. Brand Whitlock, a well- known American journalist, as United States Ambassador at Rome in place of Mr. Thomas Nelson Page. Owing to coal prices, seaside roundabouts are self-propelled by joy-riders. Persons going away for their holidays must take their ration-books with them. Escaping from an asylum near Edinburgh, a man wandered on the railway, and was killed. A British army motor depot at Tournai was burnt out; 150 lorries were destroyed, and two British soldiers were injured. By the mediation of the Mayor of Dudley, the Black Country strike of enginemen, which laid 12,000 men idle, has been settled. Lord Derby, the British Ambassador, has undergone a slight operation in Paris. Hi" condition is very saitsfactory. Southwark children are to have a day nursery in a Government hut on a plot of I laud secured for the purpose by the Duchess of Marlborough. At a special meeting of shareholders of Norwich Waterworks Company it was agreed to sell the undertaking to the corpo- ration on the letter's terms. Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. T. Garratt, 77, of Exeter, who had not missed a Derby race for 44 years, and was staying in London daring Derby week, died suddenly from heart failure in London. A general strike has been declared in the port of Valencia. The Crown Princess of Sweden is expected to visit this country shortly. Mr. Robert Murray, of West Kirby, an expert in forestry and a famous park de- signer, has died. During an inspection of the work of arm- less men at Charterhouse military hospital recently, the Queen expressed a wish to pos- sass an inlaid tray being made by Private Pre,ton, and it was later sent to Bucking- ham Palace. Bethnal Green Museum, which has been closed since 1916, has been re-opened. Sir Charles Hanson, M.P., who was knocked down by a motor-lorry in London, is recovering. Marriages in. Hungary this spring were four times as numerous as during the corre- I sponding months of last year. While nying at Castle Brornwich, a D.H. 10 aeroplane fell, hit a tree, turned turtle, and was smashed. Lieutenant Inglcby, n.A.F., of Reading, was killed, and Lieut. Daves, R.A.F., was picked up unconscious, but was not seriously injured. Yarmouth Corporation have approved a eclicme, to which they are seeking the approval of the Local Government- Board, to erect 427 working-class dwellings. Lady Muriel Paget has left London for Pressberg to snperintend the work of the Angrlo-Czech Relief Fund, of which she is I organising secretarv. At a conference of butchers at the offices of the Early Closing Association, petitions in favour of seven o'clock closing, signed by 459 butchers in Battersea, Camberweli, Lambeth, Southwark, and Wandsworth were handed in. "The streets of Riga arc strewn with the corpses of murdered inhabitants," says a Swede who has just returned home from a visit to the city. A new process which, it is claimed, re- duces the cost of producing nitrate by 50 per cent., was demonstrated by Dr. Charine at Santiago de Chile in the presence of a distinguished gathering. A wireless message from Moscow reports that, by order of the Revolutionary Soviet, special trains have been despatched to the front laden with propaganda leaflets and placards, cinematographs, and portable theatres. Efforts are again being made to settle the Dublin hotel strike, which has been in progre-ss since Good Friday. Out of 208 applicants, an officer wounded in the war, Capt. Jas. Mylan Gittings, R.F.A., M.C., formerly Educational Officer with the Thames and Medway Garrison, has been appointed headmaster of the new Boys' Secondary School at Egham, Surrey. Thirty Government stacks of flax have been destroyed by fire at Holbeach. Enormous crowds assembled at Belfast to welcome the 1st Royal Irish Rifles from Belgium, but at the last moment a telegram was received stating that the battalion had been ordered to Rugeley (Staffs). With fifteen entries in the sheep section at Northampton Agricultural Show at King- thorpe, Mr. John T. Smith, of Greensnor- ton, won seven firsts, &ix seconds and one third, and his last pen was "reserved." The late Rajah of Sarawak has been buried in Sheepstor Churchyard, Devon- shire. The embalmed body has been resting in a vault for two years pending the arri- val in England of the present Rajah and Itanee. Two men who escaped from a prison van on the way to gaol were at Liverpool given twelve month", hard labour. A companion was sent to Borstal for three years. The annual Convention of the American Federation of Labour, the world's biggest industrial organisation, demands stronger beer. They are going to tell President Wil- son what they think about it. During the temporary absence of his parents, a Southsea child, George Henry Field, aged four, rolled through an open window and was killed. Stated to have been refused leave, Violet Morris, of St. Paul's-road, Middlesbrough, a W.A.A.C., attended her sister's wedding and was eventually arrested and charged with being an absentee from her unit, but on promising' to return immediately she was fined los. A Dutch skipper was at Gravesend Jrdercù to pay £16 13s. lOd. (double duty) and costs for having on his ship tobacco on which he had not paid duty. Officers of the American Seventh Division, which is on the point of returning home, were received at the Hotel de Ville, Brest. Admiral Salaun, the Maritime Prefect, be- stowed several decorations. After a strike lasting four weeks, the workers on- the Suez Canal, accepting the advantages offered to them before the strike, have resumed work. A pair of tits which have built their nest in the standard of a gas lamp in a main street at Ashford (Kent) and now have a little brood, are not disturbed by the visits of tho man who lights ancl extingrughes the lamp every day, .C..„ — —

GREAT VICTORY LOAN

GREAT VICTORY LOAN. OUTLINE OF OUR BIG PUSH FOR PROSPERITY. A SPORTING' ISSUE. Details of the new Victory Loan are now issued, and it is "up in" everyone who not oiily vaiitz,, a sound investment with a particle of "spice" in it, but who ío, anxious and willing to place the country oil a sound and victorious financial basis to ,ie s-?re k immediately acquire some of the s'ock. The sporting instinct in the new loan is to be found in annual drawings or "lucky lips." The winning numbers of these will • be determined by lot, and holders win be; paid off on September 1 of each year. Win- uers will be made aware of their numbers s by advertisement not less than two months previous to the date ot redemption. As the amount of dividends will eiepend to some extent on the date of application, to obtain benefits of the full dividends early application should be made; to any it is inadvisable to delay the acquisition of a. holding till the last* day, July 12. To popularise the great victory loan stiU further it is proposed that Cabinet Minis- j ters shall tour the country and extol the j campaign in various towns. Aeroplanes f and airships will float o'er head and drop leaflets, and in many towns golden ladders ivill be erected to show at a glance the position the subscriptions have reached. Briefly stated, the new Loan may be out- lined as follows: It is offered to the public in two form" (1) The 4 per ccmt. Victory Bonds and (2) I the 4 per cent. Funding L,(,,aii and these can be summarised as THE VICTORY BONDS. I Issue price .£85. Yield slightly over SA I 14s. per cent. The bonds are to be redeemed ?.t par (XIO,O) by annual drawings by lot, or, in other words, by a soH of ",Iicl;y dip." First drawing is September 1, 1920. Purchasers at issue price rcceire back on repayment the whole of their capital with a bonus of £ ib on each £85 in- vested. Those whose numbers are drawn on the first occasion will secure a yield of "cJJ over 20 per cent. on their money. The numbers of bonds drawn will be pub- lished two months before repayment, thus giving ample time for arranging for reinvestment of capital and bonus. THE FUNDING LOAN. Issue price £80. Yield 5 per cent. The loan is to be paid off within seventy- one years at latest by purchases on the market at or below par (o £ 100). These purchases will help to raise price over that of issue. Government re- tains option to repay the whole loan in forty-one years or after. The Funding Loan may be obtained either, in the form of registered stock, transferable by deed, or in bearer bonds,, at subscriber's option. The Victory Bonds may be registered in the books of the Bank of-England, which, is awis.e pr-icaution. POST OFFICE ISSUES. Application for either the loan or bonus through the Bank of England must be for the sum of £50 or multiples of < £ 50. There are, however, Post Office issues of both the loan and the bonds. Application for these will be received for fully-paid allotments of X5 or any multiple of -.£5. No application will be accepted for instalment allotments of the Post Office issues. War Savings. Certificates or Savings Bank deposits can be used in payment of applications for the Post Office issues. DEATH DUTIES. Stocks and bonds of this issue will be ac- cepted as the equivalent of cash for the payment of death duties. Each < £ 100- nominal value of stock or bonds surren- dered will be counted as representing £80 cash. The stock of bonds sUlTcndered mm:t have formed part of the estate iiassing en death of the deceased continuously u.p to the date of death for a period of not le-s than six months immediately preceding the date of death, or from the date of the original subscription.

iI A II UP Ii HANDS UPj

i-I A ¡\II)' UP' Ii HANDS UP! j I DAR.'WJ ATTEMPT TO ROB KENTiSH BANK. The exciting times of the "Wild West" in j the good old clay. (?) are recalled by an attempted Lu>.uk robbery reported from Bel- ) vedere (Kent). It appears that a man, who is aged about 2(5, presented himself at the bank, and was seen by the manager, Mr. Robert Le-lie, of Woolwich, at whom he i pointed a revolver and called "Hands up." Mr. Leslie piuckily closed with the man. A woman passing the bank at the time noticed what was happening and screamed. The man, startled, wrenched himself free from Mr. Lc.-dic, rushed out of the bank, and ran at top speed towards the woods in the direc- tion of Erith, a mile and a half away. The chase was taken up by several persons in the street, but the man managed to reach the cover of the woods. Tho p-clice were quickly on his track, and advanced into the undergrowth after him. Soon Police-constable Derk caught sight of him, a i,cl called upon him to surrender. He •replied by pointing his revolver at the policeman, and shouted to the officer to keep nv:ay. Then he fired. The bullet passed through Dark's helmet without injuring him. and the man rushed further into the wo-ed-i towavds a spot locally known as the "Trenches"- which suggests that he has a knowledge of the district. Other police officers followed, eays the "Daily News," and soon after Police-con- st d/.e Moore caught sight of him behind soioe hrubs. You are surrounded, and better give up," shouted the police officer. The man, who is left-handed, again pointed the revolver at the policeman with the barrel resting upon- his right' wrist, aiain warning the officer not to approach him. But a sudden inspiration seized the police- man. siiatchiii- his helmet from his head he hurled it into the man's face, and sprang forward, seizing the man's hands. In the struggle that followed the officer had to use his truncheon, and the revolver went off, wounding the man in the arm. He was then overpowered by the police. The plucky policeman was not injured.

I FLYING OFFICERS LATEST II I STUNT

I FLYING OFFICERS LATEST II I- STUNT." Performing "stunts" is the privilege cf flying officers 4otli at home and abroad, and one cf the most interesting yet reported is that as told at a court martial which has (ell held at Upton as the result of the sen- sational flying over the Dee at Chester on Good Friday of Lieut. Edwin Arnold Clear, R.A.F. The accused pleaded not guilty to a charge of low flying and guilty to a charge of escaping whilst under arrest at Chotwick. said he saw all aero- A police "witness said he saw an aero- plane fly under a bridge twice, but he could not identify the machine. The banks of the river were crowded, and there were a lot of boats in the stream. The accused, in defence, admitted that he flew low that afternoon, but not at the place in question. The story of the escape of the accused told by Sec.-Lieut. Hough, who was on duty as escort with Lieut. Clear when the latter was under arrest, shows that whilst out for exer- cise, add when passsing the aerodrome, they saw some machines about to depart fcr Ireland. The accused got into one whidh the mechanic said was a "dud." Witness told the mechanic that Clear was under arrest, but owing to the noise of the engine the mechanic did not apparently under- stand. The chocks were removed, and accused was off the ground before witness could prevent him. Clear landed at Castle Town, in the Isle of Man, wher. the machine ".rashed into a Avail.

I AIRSHIP TO CROSS ATLANTIC I

I AIRSHIP TO CROSS ATLANTIC. I Starting from England and sailing west- Avard, it is the intention of the big British airship R34 to cross the Atlantic. A successful final trial flight was made during the week-end. The airship left East Fortune aerodrome, Haddingtonshire, on Saturday, and returned safely. She carried out her wireless trials-the chief object of the flight—establishing com- munication with the Azores, a distance if 1,200 miles. The American Navy Department an noun- ■ ees that when the R34 crosses the Atlantic she will land in Mineola. Field, Long Island, and arrangements have been made by the British Air Ministry whereby American. crews will prepare the airship for the return irllrnry.

No title

Alderman John Bunting, of Spalding, a native of Peterborough, has given a send-off to the Peterborough War Memorial Hospital by a gift of £ 5,000 for the purchase of the site. According to the Washington correspond- ent of the New York "Sun," Viscount Ishii has left for Tokio, thereby ending his diplo- matic mission in Washington, He has sent his resignation to Tokio.- President Poincare will visit Glaegotv University early in October to be installoti Lord Bee tor. —

DISMISS

DISMISS! KING BIDS "GOOD-BYE" TO SPECIAL CONSTABLES. It was naturally not in the province of all the members of the noble portion of our population to sec active service oversea.1; and to those who remained at home pride of place must be given to the special con- stables. This fine body of men, which did such valuable and self-sacrificing work through- out the trying years of the war, were re- cruited chiefly from the upper and middle classccs, and by their ever-ready and enthu- siastic performance of their duties removed a great responsibility from the authorities, who were thus enabled to release from the regular police force trained men for fighting purposes. In recognition of the splendid work per- formed by the "specials" a great review was. held in Hyde Park on Saturday, the men later marching- to Buckingham Palace, where each member of this voluntary force was handed a copy of a farewell message from the King. The men—including the City of London Police Reserve and Boy Scout buglers-numbered about 20,000. At the foot of the Victoria Memorial were drawn up the massed bands of the Brigade of Guards. Facing the entrance to b the Palace was a covered pavilion, in which were the King, Queen Mary, Queen Alexan- dra, Princess Mary, Princess Victoria, the Prince of Wales, and Prince Albert. The men marched past in divisions, each division being accompanied by parties of Boy Scout buglers-the" All Clear" boys. THE KIG'S MESSAGE. The message issued by his Majesty read as follows:— On the conclusion of your services as special constables, I desire to express my appreciation of the splendid public spirit which you have evinced in the performance of a high civic duty. Your conduct as a body has been exemplary. At the commencement of the great war you, who were unable to join the colours, loyally came forward in thousands. With steadfastness and courage you car- ried out the obligations you undertook; you faced the responsibilities of that police routine duty necessary for the maintenance of law and order, and also the perils of the air raids. It is in recognition of such efforts throughout the country that I have instituted with much pleasure a Long Ser- vice Modal. I am glad to personally assure you of my satisfaction at the way in which, to a man, you have served your Sovereign and helped your country ia her hour of need. At the close of the proceedings the band struck up the National Anthem, and the crowd present cheered heutily.

No title

A hat camiot be bought in Budapest with- out a permit from the Soviet. Sir D. Haig is to be presented with the honorary frcedom of N-e w e a s t le -o n-Ty n e. Lieut.-Colonel F. Jenkins, C.M.G., Cold- stream Guards and Nigeria- Regiment, WTest African Frontier Force, has been ap- poiutcd Colonial Secretary of Barbadoes.

Advertising

i I J ) Look YouDgI ) A youthful appearance is a valuable Ii' J asset to 'verybody and no one appre- i ciates this fact more keenly than d J woman. In business, social and 1 v private life it will always be to your 1 advantage to look young* to wear | ™ the rose of youth." To preserve a d genuinely fresh and youthful appear- J J ance, it is imperative that your I digestion should be active and r efficient. Nothing will make you 4 J look sickly and faded sooner than J v the liability to any form of lndigest- m ion, whether such arise from Oie ft I stomach, liver or bowels. | 13EECHAKS { PILLS { t jt "III satisfactorily ensure the harmon- J. t ious working of the digestive system. B ? They will bring to the tired and  d over-worked stomach tone and  ft vigour; they will prove to be a gI valuable stimulant to the liver; and ? ? their splendid aperient qualities will ? have a beneficial influence upon the J' g bowels. Owing to the blood-purifying proper;l es of Beecham's Pills the & complexion is soon wonderfully im proved and takes oji all the d J irresistible charm of health. If, j therefore, you desire to look young I and feel young you may rest assured I I that in this respect Beecham's Fills 1: vit nelp You. Sold everywhere g a in boxes, labelled ls-3d and 3-Od.