Collection Title: Barry Dock news

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 5 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
8 articles on this page
4i TIRADE AGAINST NONCONFORMITY

4i TIRADE AGAINST NONCON- FORMITY." MR. LEWIS DAVIES CHAL- LENGED. POSITION OF THE CHURCH AT MERTHYR VALE. To the Editor of the "Barry Dock News." Sir,—The tirade of Mr. Lewis Davies, Merthyr Vale, against Nonconformity in your last issue is more amusing than serious. Let us briefly analyse it. He brings for- ward the testimony of three anonymous per- SOUR. The first, and I am ready to prove it, either speaks in great ignorance, or he wil- fully misrepresents the truth. The second is evidently jealous and bitter because of the great success of Whitefield s Tabernacle. The third simply manifests spleen against ministers of the gospel—Nonconformity ministers primarily, since they are so pro- minent in exercising discipline in their xdiurches, and the crooked member does not like that. I challenge these three courageous and anonymous men to prove their wild and reckless assertions by specific instances. But even having few specific instances, Mr. Lewis Davies' mental make up must be of a strange order before he will be able to conclude that Nonconformity is dying. Yet he has already conio to that conclusion on the basis of a few general and venomous assertions. He says, "Take the evidence of the Dow- lais Free Church Council, who, at their an- nual meeting, used these words: I am afraid, the speaker stated,' etc." Mr. Davies knows, I dare say, that one swallow cannot make a summery neither can one speaker make up a Free Church Council. No, sir; it is not the evidence of the Dowlais Free Church Council he gives, but the declarations ( of one of its members. Again, surely a Merthyr Vale Churchman ?ught to be the last to speak of the paralysis and decay of Nonconformity. Let Mr. Davies give the position of the English Church and Nonconformity respectively in his own home— Mertliyr Vale—instead of indulging in false- hoods concerning Nonconformists elsewhere. Merthyr Vale is what I might term a township of anything between 9,000 and 15,000 inhabitants. It has 11 Nonconformist I places of worship (three Baptist Churches, three Calvinistic Methodist, two Congrega- tionalist, one Wesleyan, one Primitive Metho- dist. and one Church of Christ"), with seating accommodation for ),()00 people at the very lowest. Some of these chapels are quite full \on Sundays, and uncomfortably full some- times. But for how many of the inhabitants of Merthyr Vale have the Church of England provided seating accommodation for worship? The answer is both alarming and significant. For none. There is no Church of England building in Merthyr Vale, unless steps have recently been taken to build one. Here is a Church that boasts of being national, and yet has allowed men, women, and children in a whole town to become heathen, as far as site is concerned. And Mr. Lewis Davies. who denounces Nonconformity with such vehemence, is partly responsible for this. In fcpite of the religious situation at Merthyr v ale, lie has the effrontery and hardihood to say that the Church of England is "the most vital religious body." True, the Merthyr Vale Churchmen had a building many years ago, but failed to keep things going, and they vacated it, and ever since it has been in the possession of a rather prosperous Baptist Church, whereas the Church of England had to take to the room above the old coffee tavern for religious wor- ship on Sunday. They did not require it during the week-, since "the most vital of "Religious bodies" can generally do without prayer meetings, etc., between Sunday and Sunday. On week-days, before the A berfan Hall was erected by the Calvinistic Method- sts, the workmen used to hold their meet- ings in the very room where the Church of England has been holding services on Sunday or nearly twenty years. 0 The sum of it all, as far as Merthyr Vale )s concerned, is that Nonconformists have been fully alive to the religious requirements the people, and have worked most assidu-  to mee^ those requirements, whilst "lnrchnwn have, to say the least, done Nothing. In face of these facts, Mr. Davies Tvill kindlv tell us which is the decayed Church.—I am, vours, etc.. :Barry J. LEWIS EVANS. I ?arry Island.

BARRY DOCK WESLEYAN ORGAN RECITAL AND CONCERT

BARRY DOCK WESLEYAN 'ORGAN RECITAL AND CONCERT. At the Wesleyan Church, Holton-road. Barry Docks, on Wednesday evening next an Organ Recital and Concert will be held. -and a rich musical treat is assured. Doors open at seven o'clock, to commence at 7.30. Admission Is. and 6d.

I uHE UNIONIST LABOUR PARTY AT BARRY

I 'u.'HE UNIONIST LABOUR PARTY AT BARRY. lit. On Wednesday evening next, at eight o'clock, j^ldertnan 6. K. Naylor, of the London Connty Council, will address a meeting at the King's Ilall, Barry Docks, on the objects of the Unionist Labour Patty. Mr E. H. Jenkina will preside.

No title

As St. D&vid'* Day this year hi:" on Sunday next the ministers of all denominations in Wales are asked by the Union of Welsh Societies to make references to the National Festival during the service. At Barry the annual special Services of Gwyl Dewi will be held on Sunday, at St. John's Welsh Church, Barry Don-ts.

THE BISHOP OF ST DAVIDS AT BARRY

THE BISHOP OF ST. DAVID'S AT BARRY. I GREAT SPEECH AGAINST THE CHURCH BILL I I TO AN AUDIENCE OF FULLY TV 0 THOUSAND. I THE BILL A CRUEL INJUSTICE TO TILE CHURCH AND NATION. I THE CASE FROM NONCONFORMIST STANDPOINTS. I I THE DUTY OF NONCONFORMISTS IN THE CRISIS. I SHALL TRUTH AND JUSTICE PREVAIL? The Theatre Royal, Barry, was filled to overflowing on the occasion of a great public meeting held on Friday evening last, to hear an address by the Lord Bishop of St'. David's in opposition to the Welsh Church Bill, and in defence of the Establishment in the Prin- cipality. For fully an hour before the meeting com- menced, Churchpeople and Nonconformists poured into the building from all parts of the district, and the greatest enthusiasm pre- vailed, amongst an audience of fully two thousand people, throughout the proceedings, which were preceded by an organ recital given by Mr. W. T. Llewellyn, F.G.C.M. On the walls around the platform were ranged a number of appropriately worded banners, one of prominent design, which at- tracted appreciative attention, being of his- toric significance. reminding the audience that the ancient Welsh Church was the Church of Saints Cattwg, Illtyd, Dyfan, and I' Caradog. four notablo patron saints to whom the parishes forming the Barry district, and in the immediate neighbourhood, arc dedi- cated. "Are these alien?" asked the in- scription, and at the foot the audience were enjoined to remember the rock from which they had been hewn. (" Cofiwch y Graig or lion I'cli naddwyd.") The chair was occupied by Mr. Oliver 14. Jones, J.P., D.L., Fonmon Castle, and amongst those present, in addition to the Bishop of St. David's were Mr. O. H. Jones, Mr. C. D. Thompson, J.P., Mr. D. T. Alexander, J.P., Rev. H. H. Stewart, M.A.. R.D. (rector of Barry and Porthkerry), Rev. J. S. Longdon, M.A. (rector of Cadoxton). Rev. D. Weatherill (rector of Merthyr Dyfan and St. Paul's, Barry), Rev. John Williams (rector of Sully), Revs. Ifor Davies, C. A. Clarke, and G. Isaac (Cadoxton), Rev. J. 0. Roberts (St. Catherine's, Cardiff), Rev. T. W. Welch (Barry), Rev. T. Vaughan Roes (Dinas Powis), Councillors D. Lloyd, J. Felix Williams, J. Marshall, J. R. Llewellyn, E. Ashton, and T. P. Prichard, Mr. F. P. Jones- Uoyd. Mr. R. A. Sprent, Mr. Harold M. Lloyd. Mr. E. Lowder Downing, Mr. T. Smith (Dinas Powis), Mr. W. Godfrey (Car- diff), Mr. T. Evans. Mr. W. Townsend. Mr. N I C. C. H. Kempthorne. Mr. D. H. Rees, Mr. C. T. Kirby, Mr. G. Notley, Mr. Eynon, Mr. Withers, Mr. T. An sell, Mr. A. Bond, Mr. Gibbs, Mr. D. M. Humphreys, Mr. T. Thomas, Mr. R. Treharne Rees, Mr. W. Bowen, Mr. Moore. Mr. C. Christian. Mr. T. L. Morris, Mr. J. T. John, Mr. W. J. Cocks, Mr. W. P. Gale, Mr. F. B. Wilkins, Mr. D. Rees, etc. The meeting was opened with the singing of a hymn, anil prayer ottered by the Rev. D. Weatherill. The Chairman, in introducing the Lord Bishop, said they had assembled that evening to protest against, and to do what they could to defeat, the Bill for the Disestablishment and Disendowment of the Church in Wales, and he was pleased that they had with them that evening their champion, the Bishop of St. Da-fid's—(cheers)—to address them, to help them in their protest, and to put clearly before them the case against the Bill. (Cheers.) No one deserved better of the Church than his Lordship, for notwithstand- ing all the heavy duties that devolved upon him as Bishop, he had found time to go about the country, to all parts of England as well as Wales, to point out and to explain the iniquities of the Bill, and putting before the people the true bearings of the measure. and to try, as far as in his power lay, to prevent this great wrong being done. (Cheers.) STRONG PROTEST BY THE BISHOP OF LLANDAFF. The Chairman then read a letter which he. had received that day from the Lord Bishop of Llandaff, from the Upper House j of Convocation, apologising for his inability to be present that evening, to join with the peoplo of Barrv in their protest against the Bill. "I think we must continue to protest," the Bishop stated. to the very last against the tyranny and injustice of the Government Bill for the Disestablishment and Disendowment of the Church in Wales, and to make clear to those who have not yet realised it. that the Bill, if ever it becomes law, will inflict serious and lasting injury, not only upon the Church to which we belong, but also upon the Nation, its welfare, and character. The great meet- ings recently held at Cardiff and Penarth, and the probably greater meetings to be held in the near future at Cardiff, New- port, Aberdare. and elsewhere, as well as the meeting at Barry to-morrow, over which you are going to preside, will be evidence that we, as Churchpeople. and as citizens, are not less but more strongly opposed than ever to the Bil!. And the fact that more than 15,000 adult Noii(,oii-l, formists in North Wales have, within the last few weeks, petitioned against it. and that their example i.s now being followed by Nonconformists in South Wales, shows that the conscience and sense of fairplay of many of those hitherto opposed to us. are at last being thoroughly aroused." The reading of the letter was the signal for great rounds of applause and enthusiasm. "It is a very stirring epistle," the Chairman said. "It is the duty of every Churchman to continue to fight," he added. The Chairman then called upon the Bishop of St. David's to address the meeting. GREAT SPEECH BY THE BISHOP OF ST. DAVID'S. The- Lord Bishop, who rising was greeted with the greatest enthusiasm, the vast audience rising and cheering lustily over and over again. His Lordship said when it was suggested to him that he should come to Barry he had some hesitation at nrst in accepting the kind invitation, but he felt that he ought to do what he could in this populous diocese, where lie had always re- ceived such great kindness. (Applause.) The Bishop of Llnndaff's letter reminded him of the great faithfulness with which the opposi- tion to this Bill had been carried on in this diocose. (Hear. hear.) For two years sound hard work had been going on throughout this diocese, under the able and unassuming guidance of his friend, Mr. Godfrev. That was one of the reasons why he. had decided to accept the invitation to speak in the busy industrial centre of Barry. Ho was glad to I see that there was a considerable number of ladies and gentlemen in the building, who had done him the honour of coming to hear what he had to say against the Bill. He valued that very greatly, whatever conclu- sion they might come to upon this subject, for lie thought it was a right thing to con- sider both sides of a great, grave public question like this. Ho thanked those especially who had como to hear him, though r they did not agree with him, and he would show his gratitude by speaking with as much frankness as he possibly could. (Cheers.) By way of preface, the Bishop had some obser- vations to make upon his subject, which was the alienation of Churchyards and the secularisation of Church endowments." THE KING'S MOST EARNEST WISH. The events of the last fortnight showed that, notwithstanding the Parliament Act, public opinion was still a great power. (Cheers.) The Prime Minister's speech last week had created a new situation," because it recognised public opinion was behind the memorable passage in the King's Speech most earnest which declared his Majesty's "most earnest wish that the goodwill and co-operation of men of all parties and creeds may heal dis- sension." (Cheers.) Though the new situa- tion had direct reference to another measure, it could not but have great influence like- wise upon the future of the Welsh Bill, for tlIa t "mean little Bill" was not a Bill which could survive in an atmosphere of goodwill. It was not surprising, therefore, that the majority of the Government last Monday on the Welsh Bill fell to 62, the lowest figure on any amendment to the Address. The Bill had once more to be saved by Irish votes. (Applause.) THE PROTEST OF FIFTEEN THOU- SAND NONCONFORMISTS. The debate last Monday was dominated by j the announcement made in the Press that morning of tltp protest to the Prime Minister against "tho proposals to deprive the Church in Wales of her unclosed ancient church- yards, and to take away for secular purposes £ 157,000 a year of her ancient endowments," which had been signed by 15,321 Noncon- formists over 21 years of age resident in the Diocese of St. Asaph. (Cheers.) He must frankly admit that disendowment would be a greater evil in the long run, and that the dismemberment of the Church would also be a very serious injury to the religious life and work of the Church in Wales in the first place, and further to the whole cause of religion in the Principality. Those who signed this protest were drawn from all grades and denominations of Nonconformity, j and represented both political parties. It was a noteworthy fact that among the sig- natories were 29 ministers or preachers. 158 deacons, 56 holding various offices, and 18 justices of the peace." It was likewise a noteworthy fact that the highest percentage of signatures came from the purely Welsh country parishes. The genuineness of this pro- test was guaranteed by the request made to the Prime Minister by the Nonconformist committee which got up the protest that lie should allow a deputation to present the protest to him. FAILURE OF THE PRIME MINISTER. The failure of the Prime Minister to re- spond to this straightforward request could not help Welsh disendowment, and this failure was emphasised by Mr. McKenna's futile attempt to discredit the protest during last Monday's debate. Sir. John Williams, the chairman of the Nonconformist commit- tee, in his letter to the Press last Wednes* day. made clear the pettiness, as well as the futility, of Mr. McKenna's unworthy insinua- tions against the honour of this large body of Welsh Nonconformists. (Cheers.) He was glad to see in the "Western Mail" the pre- vious Wednesday that steps had been promptly taken by Dr. Thomas, of Cardiff, to of C,-Ii, d i ff, to give an opportunity to the Nonconformists of South Wales to follow the timely example of moral courage and patriotism set by Non- conformists in the Diocese of St. Asaph. (Cheers.) He had not the honour of knowing Dr. Thomas, nor had he anything to do with the initiation of this protest, but he took that opportunity of saying that he was glad this step had been taken by a public-spirited Nonconformist. (Hear, hear.) AN IMMORAL PROPOSITION. He had maintained all along that it was essentially immoral to make the security of religious endowments a question of majori- ties. Since, however, the main argument for alienating endowments given for religion in Wales to secular objects was the assertion that Welsh Nonconformists desired this wrong to be done, it was time that those Nonconformists who disapproved of these iniquitous proposals should make their posi- tion clear. It was a great mistake to sup- pose that this protest came too late. The Prime Minister was deeply pledged to Parlia- ment not to use the Parliament Act to over- ride public opinion. Since the Parliament j Act was a new thing which took the country time to understand, the real crisis in th(i) i fate of Bills under the provisions of that Act came this year. He had shown before that the rumour circulated that the Welsh Bill could be hurried into law in front of the Irish Bill was an idle rumour. ) THE BISHOP'S EXPLANATION. He was surprised to see that the local daily organ of Welsh Disestablishers chal- lenged this week the correctness of his view. which had been endorsed by the Westmin- ster Gazette." He observed, however, that the challenge was based on a misapprehen- sion of what he had said. He had not said that the House of Lords had power under the Parliament Act to prevent the Bill from pass- j iiig at the end of the present session. What he had said was that the House of Lords had power to prevent the manoeuvre suggested in the rumour from being carried out, and had power, if it thought fit, to secure up to the end of the session time for public opinion to declare itself upon the Bill. (Cheers.) He believed that it was at present in the power of Welsh Nonconformists who thought the Bill to be wrong to stop it. It was that power that made it a very serious question for every reasonable Nonconformist in South Wales to decide for himself what action he would take, in view of the opportunity now given by tho step taken by Dr. Thomas, of I Cardiff. (Applause.) I OUT-OF-DATE METHOD IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. He was sorry to learn from the letter of the chairman of the St. Asaph Nonconformist Committee that an official warning had been given to Nonconformists in chapel on the first Stizidai- of this month against signing the protest. He did not think that such an official warning was consistent with the right and the duty of private judgment in moral and religious questions, which was a prin- ciple upon which Nonconformists in the past had laid great stress. The authorities of any religious body were taking far too much upon them when they presumed to dictate to the consciences of individuals. It would have been a right and reasonable thing, how- ever, for those who believed it to be morally right to take its churchyards from the Church, and to alienate to secular objects money given for the cause of religion, to give their reasons for their opinions. It was notorious that the supporters of these two proposals of the Bill had for many months failed to meet the arguments advanced against it. To use omcial authority to over- ride reason, to apply official warning instead of argument, was a method of procedure which was out of date in the twentieth cen- tury. and was based upon a disastrous mis- apprehension of the real question at issue. (Loud applause.) PARTY TRIUMPH OR THE GOOD t OF RELIGION. The question was not a question of the triumph of a party or sect, but the serious question whether the proposals of the Bill would or would not do good to the whole cause of religion in Wales, especially in future generations. The speakers in support of the Bill in the House of Commons the I previous Monday evidently looked upon it as a question of party triumph. Mr. McKenna boasted of the majorities obtained at political elections, and did not try to show that the [ secularisation of religious endowments would do any good to the cause of religion in Chapel or in Church. Sir David Bi-viiiiior j Jones, M.P.. to whose courteous tone he wished to refer with respect, actually based j an argument in favour of the Bill upon the fact that the numerous demonstrations j against the Bill were demonstrations not of a political, but of a religious character, while the meetings few and far between in its favour had been held on a purely secular J basis." The right hon. gentleman had thought fit to quote a remark which he (the Bishop) had made at Penarth last week about the value of Welsh nation- alitv. "because it formed a com- mon ground of patriotism on which Nonconformists and Churchmen could stand together as AVelslimen for the promo- tion of the welfare of Wales as a whole." Had the chairman of the Welsh Parliamen- tary Party done him the honour of reading the five speeches on Welsh nationality and the Bill which he had delivered last month. ho could never have made the mistake which he made of quoting his remark at Penarth as any excuse for confounding the national wclfaro of Wales with the triumph of a poli- tical party. (Cheers.) INJURIOUS TO THE COUNTRY. UNJUST TO THE CHURCH. Proceeding, the Bishop said he had given i his reasons last month for holding that the disestablishment clauses of the Bill were in- jurious to the country and unjust to the Church. They were injurious to the country because they were based upon the un-scrip- tural principle that the State as a State had nothing to do with religion. They were' unjust to the Church because they overthrew at a stroke the whole of its existing legal organisation, without redressing a single Nonconformist grievance. He had shown at Penarth last week that the dismembernwnt of the Church, which was, according to Mr. McKenna. the essence of the Bill, was a pro- posal without any precedent, which had not been mentioned bv any Liberal candidate at the last General Election, and which was contrary to three fundamental principles of Liberal policy professed by the Government. AN INTERRUPTION PROMPTLY ANSWERED. Here there was a slight interruption, some members of the audience interjecting the re- mark, "That is not correct." The Bishop (searchingly): What is that? A Voice: That is not correct. The Bishop Who said that?" (Cheers.) What is not correct? I did not say that the Bill had never been mentioned. What I did say was that this particular proposal. which Mr. McKenna calls" the essence of the Bill." namely, the alienation of the churchyards, and the dismemberment of the Church, that that had never been mentioned. (Loud applause.) Let me assure the friends at the back that I am sincerely grateful to them for this opportunity of making myself clear. (Cheers.) I do not wish to put my case too high. or make any statement which is open to challenge. If I do so. please chal- lenge me at once. (Cheers.) A HAHSH AND GLARING INJUSTICE. Continuing, the Bishop said the two pro- posals. to alienate from the Church its an- cient churchyards and to confiscate all its ancient endowments, were proposals so harsh and glaring in their injustice as to make it impossible for any reasonable being to ex- pect them to promote goodwill. (Hear, hear.) The supporters of the Bill seemed to have no idea about the feelings of Churchpeople in regard to their churchyards. The church- yards were the sacred precincts of our churches, and to alienate them from the j Church without just cause would be a per- ]' manent affront of which Churchpeople would be reminded each time they went to Church, The most. tender feelings of the living were associated with the hallowed resting-places of the dead. To alienate these hallowed spots from the Church without just cause was 1m outrage upon the feelings of Church- people which was most repugnant to Liberal principles, as well as to the kindly considera- tions for the feelings of neighbours which was a fine feature of Welsh character. Was there any just cause for this outrageous proposal? A FINE NAME TO A FOUL THING. In the Diocese of St. David's there were 421 churchyards which the Bill took away from the Church, and 480 Nonconformist burial-grounds which the Bill did not touch. To call a Bill which did this a measure of religious equality was to give a fine name to a foul thing. (Cheers.) It was a painful proposal. Was there reason in it? Noncon- formats had not only more burial-grounds of their own than there were ancient church- yards, but had also the right of burial in the parish churchyard by a Nonconformist minis- ter with a Nonconformist service under the Burials Amendment Act of 1880. If this Act needed amendment, let it be amended, but in view of the facts the proposal of the Bill to alienate its churchyards from the Church to a secular authority was not a redress of Non- conformist grievances, but a wrong wantonly inflicted on the Church. (Loud cheers.) t NO BENEFIT TO NONCONFORMISTS. The endowment clauses of the Bill in the wantonness of their injustice matched its churchyard clause. No benefit of any kind would accrue to Nonconformists out of the money taken from the Church under the Bill. No tithepayer was to be relieved from 1 the payment of tithe, nor. according to Mr. McKenna. was any ratepayer to be relieved from the payment of rates. Neither oduca- tion nor public health in Wales would gain from the Bill. The only conclusion to be drawn from the waste of Church money under the Bill was that it was taken away from J the Church, not for the good of anybody or anything, but merely for the sake of taking it away from the Church. (Hear, hear.) No- body had ever tried to show what ground there was for thinking that a proposal so essentially mean could possibly promote good- will. Unless some reason could be given for maintaining a view obviously contrary to human nature, the repetition of idle plati- tudes about the goodwill that would come from disendowment was nothing better than II DELIBERATELY ADDING INSULT TO INJURY. Since continuous possession for 2.5 years gave a full title to Nonconformist property, it was a sufficient warrant to common-sense of the just title of the Church to its property that it had been beyond any question in the con- tinuous possession of the Church for, at any rate, 250 years. (Cheers.) The attempt to overthrow the solid right of this long prescrip- tive title by wild assertions about ancient history, which were unsupported by any his- ?toi-iaii of recognised authority, was simph- to undermine the foundation of all property, private and corporate, in civilised communi- ties. THOSE MISERABLE SOPHISTRIES. The attempt to blind the eyes of the Welsh people to the injustice of the Bill by miserable sophistries could not but have a very bad effect upon the morality of everyday life and business in Wales for years to come. (Cheers.) Let them briefly look at specimens of these miserable sophistries. It was said that be- cause the Bill disestablished the Church it was, therefore, just to disendow it. Since the spokesman of the Welsh Parliamentary party had discovered that disestablishment without disendowment was merelv an aca- demical and infinitesimal refohn which was not worth asking for." the plea that dis-| establishment justified disendowment. was a' disgraceful excuse for injustice. He had shown last month that the disestablish- ment clanscs of this Bill were in themselves unjust because they wantonly overthrew all the existing legal organisation of the Church. and brokt. up its unity without redressing a single Nonconformist grievance. It was a new kind of morality altogether to claim that one act of injustice made a second act of inius- tiee right. (Laughter.) FAITHFULNESS OF PAROCHIAL CLERGY. A second sophistry often used was the plea that because some people for reasons entitled to respect, did not care to avail themselves of the religious benefits of Church property no one else was to be allowed to do so. Under the parochial system of Church work the parocnial clergy were in duty bound to give their pastoral ministrations to all parish- j joners in their homes who cared to have them irrespective of their particular religious opinions, whereas Nonconformist ministers. j under the trusts attached to Nonconformist property, were only under obligation to minister to members of their congregation. I from the point of view of national welfare this breadth of the trust attached to Church property was no reason for singling it out for confiscation, but a strong reason for not doing Emphatic testimony was borne bv the report of the Royal Commission to the faith- fulness of the parochial clergy in Wales to the breadth of the trust laid upon them bv virtue of their office. DANGEROUS TO WELSH NONCON- FORMIST ENDOWMENTS. "1 lien a section happened to withdraw from a Nonconformist chapel, nobody had ever urged that the fact of such a withdrawal was any reason for confiscating the trust property of the chapel to secular objects. There had been cases of large withdrawals from Noncon- formist denominations, but those who thus withdrew had never disgraced themselves bv claiming that on account of their withdrawal the property of the denomination from which they withdrew should be confiscated to secular objects. The new morality that the existence of Nonconformists in Wales justified the con- fiscation of Church property to secular ob- jects was. therefore, at a time of great un- settlement of religious thought, as dan* gerous to Welsh Nonconformist endowments as it was contrary to the principles of equity. It could not be said that Church property in H ales was too large for the religious object tor which it was given. It was a fact bevond any question that the number of those who at the present lime availed themselves of the religious benefits of Church property in Wales was at least three times as large as the whole population of Wales at the time when its property was originally given to the Church. THE RIGHTS OF FUTURE GENERATIONS. The supporters of the Bill in their disendow- ment proposals had forgotten far too much the rights of the future generations in Wales. (" Shame.") He had shown at Llandilo that all the signs of the times went to show that the menacing advance of materialism and in- difference would compel Christian people in NI-ales at no distant date to realise their urgent duty to overcome temptations to sec- tai ianism, and to seek to put into practice the central and supreme Christian idea of a cordial understanding and goodwill among all Christian people. To alienate religious en- dowments. therefore, to secular objects, for which the State could and ought to make: pi o\ lsion out of its own large resources, would be to deprive future generations in ales of the religious inheritance left to them by their forefathers, merely for the sake of relieving the pockets of the present generation of wealthy Imperial taxpayers, i This was absolutely wrong from the point of view- .both of equity and of national welfare, This generation was only a tenant for life in regard to the religious endowments of Wales and had no moral right of anv kind to cut off the entail of C'ymru Fydd. (Cheers.) "A SHODDY BILL." "It is a shoddy Bil1." his Lordship went on. It is a shameful Bill." (Applause.) APPEAL TO WELSH NONCONFORMISTS. He did not appeal to Welsh Nonconformists; to defend the interests of the Church as such. The ground on which he appealed to all reasonable Welshmen against the Bill was the broad patriotic ground of the welfare of W ales as a whole and the still broader ground of justice. His appeal to reasonable Noncon- formists was a simple and straight appeal to each one to judge for himself whether the proposals of this Bill in regard to ancient churchyards and ancient Church property were just or unjust, and whether thev would do good or harm to the whole cause of reli- gion in Wales for generations to come. He appealed to each one to judge these two questions for himself, and not to let anv politician or minister or deacon do his think- ing for him. He was entitled to appeal to all those who. after serious thought, believed those proposals to be either unjust or in- jurious to the cause of religion to have the courage of their convictions to come out in the open like men. and not be frightened by the warnings of anybody from signing a pro- test to the Prime Minister against these un- just and injurious proposals. (Loud applause.") Concluding, the Bishop appealed to his hearers to 01 think for themselves." and if. after serious thought, they would come to the conclusion that it was right to take the churchyards and to secularise religious en- dowments. then "don't sign the petition and say that the Bishop of St. David's told -011 not to sign it." (Cheers.) "If. how- ever, you think these proposals arc wrong. after serious thought, you ought to sign the j j petition. (Applause.) Have the courage of your own convictions. Como out into the open like men, and don't be frightened by any official warning. (Cheers.) APPEAL TO PERSONAL CONVICTION AND CONSCIENCE. i speak not now as a iJishop to Nonconform- ists. but as a Christian man to Christian men and Christian women—as a Welshman to Welsh men. (Cheers.) Don't think this is a question of which side will win. It is a ques- tion of whether truth and justice shall pre- vail or not. (Hear, hear.) That is the ques- tion. and I ask you to use your own common- sense and judgment—a great gift of God. Use your consciences—another great gift of God-and sign the petitions, or not, accord- ing to your consciences." (Great cheering.) BARRY NONCONFORMISTS AND THK BILL. The Rev. H. H. Stewart, rector of Barry, and rural dean of the district, moved the hearty thanks of the meeting to the Bishop of St. David's for his eloquent address, and to Mr. Oliver Jones for his kindness in pre- siding. "We are all deeply grateful to the Bishop," the rev. geiitlei-niii said, for com- ing to Barry to deliver ono of his greatest I speeches." (Cheers.) The Rector was always lost in wonder and admiration that his Lord- ship could continue to make such great speeches under such depressing circumstances, for no one attempts to answer him or ques- tion his statements. We are very grateful to him for being here to-night, and he has encouraged us to realise that public opinion still counts. (Applause.) Referring to the D;establishment question, the Hector of Barry said he was most sanguine that there were a large number of Nonconformists in this town who were against the measure. He would never forget the great kindnesses he had received at the hands of Nonconformists, a very large number of whom he counted amongst his personal friends, and whose friendship he valued. (Hear, hear.) Many Nonconformists would be pleased if this Bill were dropped. No one seemed to want the monpy of the Church. The Government had been trying to find one. and then another, who wanted the money. The Welsh National iiid the Welsh National Library would be very glad to have nothing to do with it. (Cheers.) He moved the cord■ o] thanks of the meeting to the Bishop and Chairman. (Applause.) BETTER TO SUFFER WRONG THAN TO DO WRONG. I It is better to suffer wrong than to do wrong." >aid Mr. H. A. Sprent. in seconding thevoteofLhanks. Therefore, as citizens, 110 thought they had more reason even than as Churchpeopic in thanking the Bishop for coming to address them as he had that even- ing, because as members of a nation which did wrong, they would suffer, and they would have more sadness at heart than ever as members of a Church which was persecuted and robbed. (Cheers.) He thanked his Lord- ship, not only for his address, but for show- ing them such a great example of high sense of duty, and the spirit in which he Lad in all his campaign put the question forward. leav- mg bitterness and personality on one side. If this Bill was passed. Mr. Sprent added, it would inflict a great wrong upon the nation. (Applause.) TRUTH JS TRUTH. AND JUSTICE IS JUSTICE. Acknowledging the vote of thanks which was passed with great enthusiasm, the Bishop of St. David s smcereh- thanked 111 ?rpsent toother -n-ith tho.? who had created a little interlude ju his speech, which had enabled h)m to make his meaning quite clear (Cheers.) "Truth is truth." his Lordship adckd. and justice is justice, and so Joll. as we know that truth and justice are at our back, we need not be afraid. That is mv last word to yon." (Cheers.) Mr. O. H. Jones also acknowledged the vo yc. and ag:un expressed hfs pleasure at be ng present, and at hearing the magnificent ad(!:v.s of the Lord Bishop.

THE X0TE AY AS Ui RISTIAX EQUALITY

THE X0TE AY AS Ui! RISTIAX EQUALITY." To the Editor of thp Barry Dock Xcws." Sir,-Xo one 1?'??'? at the Theatre Hoyal on ??r'?:dt ay evening last can refuse to recognise ill Bishop. Owen's various references to Non- conformists a most refreshing spirit of broad- mindedness. They were "Christian people doing God's work." they and Churchmen had a common Master." and in his appeal he made it clear that lie spoke" not as Bishop to Nonconformists, but as a Christian to Christians." The note was Christian equality, and this is just what lies at the root of the demand for Disestablishment, Yet his Lordship opined that "Disestab- lishment would be a greater evil than Disen- dowment in the long run." and asserted that by Disestablishment not a single Noncon- not a sin 'le -N- oiicoii- formist grievance would be redressed Surely lie is cognisant of the claim repea- tedly made that so long as one Church retains the position of State Church (the "represen- tative of religion." as some put it), so long is the very spirit of Christian equality vio lated. How real this grievance is a Church- man can readily appreciate if lie imagines a reversal of present-day conditions, with the Anglican Church in the position of the Non- conformist Churches, and Presbyterianism say (as happened in the middle of the seven- teenth century) recognised by the State as the National Church. He would no more submit than did the Anglicans of Cromwell's time. "The lenders and members of the Church of England." writes the Rev. Fovarguo Bradley, who accompanied the Bishon some months ago on a Church Defence" totir ought not to expect a silent submissiveness oil the part of any ro]io:ious community, suf- rering under a sense of injustice and wrong, while they in demanding a unique Oil to the State are contending for a position that implies that they are religiouslv superior. Disestablishment will do awav with the injustice and wrong, and the unique relation of one Church to the State will cease —ours faithfully. Feb. :24tb. lÇjU. E. PHYCE ROBERTS. -Fp eb, 24th. 1914.

INTERESTING WEDDING AT BARRY

INTERESTING WEDDING AT BARRY. At Bethesda "Welsh Congregational ( hurch A BaITY. on Wednesday last. Mr. John Morris! of lMiewyad-road. Barrv Docks, was married to Miss Madge Evans, of Hatville, Holton- road. Barry Docks. The officiating ministers were the Revs. D. H. Williams, M.A.. and TIpn Evans. At tho close of the interesting ceremony a reception was held nt the resi- Of D lestvn Jones. High-street, and Mr. and Mrs Morris later in tho day left for London, where the j uoneymoon will be spent.

No title

Three new c'anfg have bp?n completed this wetk a'; Egs.de So. 2 Dock, at Barry, to extend j ■ tbe orange available for 'Ye discharge of pitwood | and other cargo. ?ever? new tips are &I?o about ,bping c-n?ructcd, :;c? wi:i be ready by the au uun. i